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Sustainability Communities Action PlanApril 2017 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) Consultants: Raimi + Associates Brendle Group Fehr & Peers Acknowledgments City Staff: John Gillison, City Manager Elisa Cox, Deputy City Manager Fabian Villenas, Principal Management Analyst Donna Finch, Management Analyst I Deborah Allen, Management Aide - Sustainability Interdepartmental Advisory Group: Deborah Allen Jeff Bloom Ingrid Bruce Candyce Burnett Ruth Cain Linda Ceballos Don Cloughesy Elisa Cox Linda Daniels Donna Finch Michael Frasure Tom Grahn Trang Huynh Erika Lewis-Huntley Fred Lyn Breanna Medina Christen Mitchell Jennifer Nakamura Nettie Nielsen Solomon Nimako Flavio Nunez Francie Palmer Ty Quaintance Dean Rodia Ernie Ruiz Lori Sassoon Brian Sternberg Fabian Villenas Jason Welday William Wittkopf Sustainable Community Action Plan Task Force: Alta Loma Unified School District Building Industry Association - Baldy View Chapter Burrtec Waste Industries, Inc. Central Unified School District Chaffey College Green Earth Movement (GEM) Chaffey Joint Union High School District Coca-Cola Cucamonga Unified School District Cucamonga Valley Water District Inland Empire Biking Alliance Etiwanda Unified School District Friends of the Pacific Electric (P.E.) Trail Grid Alternatives Lewis Group of Companies National CORE Omnitrans Rancho Cucamonga Chamber of Commerce Rancho Cucamonga Service Council San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG) Southern California Edison (SCE) Southern California Gas (SoCal Gas) South Wire U.S. Green Building Council - Inland Empire Chapter Victoria Gardens WLC Architects Executive Summary I Chapter 1. Introduction 1 Plan Overview + Purpose 3 Sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga 4 Plan Format 7 Plan Development 8 Community Engagement 10 Chapter 2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions 15 Background 15 California Greenhouse Gas Legislation 16 SBCOG Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan 18 GHG Inventory + Forecast 18 GHG Reduction Targets + Goals 22 Chapter 3. Goals + Policies 25 Transportation + Mobility 27 Land Use + Open Space 31 Energy Efficiency + Renewables 34 Green Building Performance 37 Water + Wastewater 40 Waste + Recycling 43 Chapter 4. Implementation 47 Administration 47 Triple Bottom Line Evaluation 49 Potential Funding Sources 50 Monitoring and Reporting 50 Definitions + Acronyms 59 Appendices A.Community Survey Summary B.Community Mapping Exercise Summary C.Community Forum & Sustainability Expo Summary D.San Bernardino County Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan SBCOG (formerly SANBAG)Regional GHG Plan and InventoryE. Triple Bottom Line Evaluation Methodology F.SBCOG (formerly SANBAG) CAP Implementation Tools Figures 1-1: City of Rancho Cucamonga Boundaries 2 1-2: Sustainable Community Action Plan Timeline 9 2-1: Greenhouse Gas Effect 15 2-2: Climate Change Regulatory Framework 17 2-3: Rancho Cucamonga GHG Emissions Sources (2008)20 2-4: Per Capita Emissions by San Bernardino County City 21 Tables 2-1: Rancho Cucamonga GHG Emissions Sources (2008)19 2-2: Rancho Cucamonga 2020 Emissions Forecast 22 4-1: Best Practices for Sustainability Planning Implementation 48 4-2: Alignment of Policies and Strategies 53 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) The Sustainable Community Action Plan summarizes the direction and future goals for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga and is the result of a collaborative effort between residents, local businesses, community organizations, students, City staff and elected officials, and regional agencies. In 2015, the City of Rancho Cucamonga began the process to develop the Sustainable Community Action Plan (Plan) through a conversation with the community regarding their priorities for environmental sustainability. These community conversations are a core component of the Plan. With the help of the community, a vision for a more sustainable Rancho Cucamonga was developed and serves as an overarching beacon that guides the goals and policies within this Plan. The vision for this Plan is: The City recognizes that a healthy and prosperous community strategically balances economics, environment and community health. To that end, the goals and policies identified in the Plan are geared towards improving sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga in a manner that provides environmental, economic and health benefits to the community. Each of the goals and policies in the Plan are evaluated based on their health, economic, and sustainability benefits through a set of Guiding Principles developed through a collaborative process. The Guiding Principles are: Environment •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption (water, energy, fuel) •Protect habitat & biological resources •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions •Improve air quality •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development Economy •Increase energy, water, and fuel cost savings •Support local small businesses •Offer incentives or funding opportunities •Expand green workforce training and recruitment •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce maintenance and operating costs Community Equity + Health •Improve overall community health •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Increase access to locally-grown food •Provide safe and convenient walking and bicycling options •Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals Rancho Cucamonga strives to be a model community for health and sustainability. We are committed to making innovative decisions that ensure a high quality of life and access to a safe, clean environment. Environment Economy Community Equity + Health I Land Use + Open Space Sustainable Community Action Plan Topic Areas The Sustainable Community Action Plan is organized around six key topic areas . Each topic area is supported with goals, policies, and action items. The co-benefits of each topic area are also identified, by linking them to the appropriate Guiding Principle, in order to further make the connection with the environment, economy, and community health. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction In light of overwhelming scientific consensus and to avoid the most severe effects of climate change , California has taken a global leadership role by enacting GHG reduction and climate change related legislation and has implemented programs to dramatically reduce emissions. Legislation like AB 32 in 2006 and SB 32 in 2016 have set statewide greenhouse gas reduction targets to reduce emissions to 1990 levels by 2020 (equivalent to a 15% reduction from 2005 levels) and 40% below 1990 levels by 2030 (equivalent to a 49% reduction from 2005 levels). Rancho Cucamonga participated in the San Bernardino Council of Governments’ (SBCOG, formerly SANBAG) regional efforts to inventory greenhouse gas emissions and identify strategies to reduce emissions. Through this effort, Rancho Cucamonga set a goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 15% below 2008 levels by 2020. In to tal, existing actions, state programs, and the goals and policies in this Plan will reduce GHG emissions in Rancho Cucamonga by an estimated 16.9% by 2020. As the City looks to future GHG reductions goals, Rancho Cucamonga will look to align greenhouse gas reduction goals with State targets for 2030 and beyond. The implementation of the Plan will provide a focused roadmap for advancing environmental sustainability and reducing greenhouse gas reductions. Energy Efficiency + Renewables Transportation + Mobility Green Building Performance Water + Wastewater Waste + Recycling II Chapter 1. Introduction Rancho Cucamonga is located in the Inland Empire, at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains in western San Bernardino County. It is bound by the cities of Upland, Ontario, and Fontana, the San Bernardino National Forest, and parts of unincorporated areas of San Bernardino County. Major transportation infrastructure supporting the City includes State Route-210, Interstate-15, Interstate-10, Foothill Boulevard, the Metrolink train station, and Ontario International Airport. Figure 1-1 identifies Rancho Cucamonga’s location and main corridors. Originally incorporated in 1977, Rancho Cucamonga’s spirit of heritage stems from its history as a collection of three small communities: Cucamonga, Alta Loma, and Etiwanda. This history is celebrated today through public art, unique architecture, and well-preserved historic places. Historic Route 66 (Foothill Boulevard) stretches across the City in an east to west direction, contributing to the nostalgia of the well-known and romanticized highway that still resonates with residents today. As the City continues to mature, there is a recognized need and desire to consider environmental sustainability issues, thus prompting the development of the Sustainable Community Action Plan. In 2016, Rancho Cucamonga had a population of approximately 175,000 residents and is projected to grow to 204,000 residents by the year 2040. The City of Rancho Cucamonga developed this Plan through support from a grant provided by the Southern California Association of Governments through the Sustainable Communities Planning Grant Program. A primary goal of this effort was to engage the community in a dialogue about the strategies and actions that contribute to a clean and healthy environment for all that live, work, learn and visit Rancho Cucamonga. Central Park demonstrates the use of renewable energy with solar carports. Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 1 Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga, 2017 2 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction The Sustainable Community Action Plan serves as a roadmap for advancing environmental sustainability and reducing greenhouse gas reductions, charting a course for the next several years, and identifying long- term actions beyond 2020. It is meant to serve as a vision for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga, but also to identify some initial steps the City can take to begin implementing sustainability initiatives. The Sustainable Community Action Plan: 1.Describes a vision for Rancho Cucamonga’s hopes for a sustainable future. 2.Articulates the community’s values and priorities as guiding principles for the Plan. 3.Confirms greenhouse gas reduction goals. 4.Highlights recent accomplishments and projects undertaken by the City and community. 5.Identifies new policy and program opportunities to achieve environmental sustainability goals. 6.Expresses the sustainability, economic, and health co-benefits through a triple-bottom line evaluation. By identifying recent accomplishments and possible future initiatives, the Sustainable Community Action Plan serves as an informational tool and analytical framework for the City and residents to consult when considering future projects, policies, and programs. It is anticipated that together residents and City government will use this Plan to guide future dialogue and planning for a more sustainable future. While summarizing potential opportunities for the future, this guidance neither authorizes nor mandates any given activity or initiative on the environment in Rancho Cucamonga and is therefore not a project under the California Environmental Quality Act. (Cal. Pub. Res. Code § 21065; 14 C.C.R § 15378.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) presents the common definition of sustainability, as “the ability to maintain or improve standards of living without damaging or depleting natural resources for present and future generations.” Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 3 The following vision statement for the Sustainable Community Action Plan is the result of a collaborative effort between city staff, the Sustainable Community Action Plan Task Force, the Interdepartmental Advisory Group, and the community. This statement was drafted and further refined based on community input to reflect the goals and identity of Rancho Cucamonga. In 2008, Healthy RC took form as a way to promote and encourage a healthy and environmentally sustainable lifestyle. Since its inception, Healthy RC has developed a wide range of programs, policies, infrastructure, and activities to help improve community health and sustainability. Healthy RC has received national and statewide recognition from the National League of Cities (NLC), including five Gold Medals, and three Beacon Awards from the Institute of Local Government. Rancho Cucamonga adopted an updated General Plan in 2010 that further implements sustainable community design principles in a manner that simultaneously facilitates economic development and promotes community health and well-being. Rancho Cucamonga has also participated in regional studies and programs through San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG, formerly SANBAG) that are important to implementing sustainability programs related to transportation, land use, energy efficiency, water conservation, and waste reduction. The Sustainable Community Action Plan builds upon these existing plans and policies, best practices and programs. It organizes strategies based on feedback obtained during community engagement efforts including public workshops, interviews, and surveys. Implementation of the goals and actions outlined in this Plan are not the sole responsibility of any individual, department, agency, business, or neighborhood. The entire community has a role in and plays a part in creating a sustainable future. The Plan is a guide for the City to lead the way in those efforts. Rancho Cucamonga strives to be a model community for health and sustainability. We are committed to making innovative decisions that ensure a high quality of life and access to a safe, clean environment. 4 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga’s General Plan is a document that sets a long-term vision and guidelines for future development in the community. The goals, policies, and actions outlined guide development decisions and ensure that projects are consistent with the City vision. The Rancho Cucamonga General Plan was comprehensively updated in 2010 to address land use, community design, mobility, economic development, community services and resources, public health and safety, and public infrastructure. The General Plan includes numerous policies and implementation actions that either directly or indirectly enhance environmental sustainability. The Rancho Cucamonga Circulation Master Plan provides a long-term vision for improving the City’s bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. By focusing on Personal Health, Environmental Health, Access for All, and Economic Health, the Plan strives to create a safe, convenient, comfortable environment for bicycling and walking in Rancho Cucamonga. The Plan sets forth goals and objectives for both bicycling and pedestrians through clear objectives and plans towards achieving integrated walking and bicycling throughout the City. In 2015, the City updated its Economic Development Strategic Plan which guides the City’s economic development priorities and activities. An update was necessary due to changing conditions including a national recession and recovery, and the end of redevelopment. The Economic Development Strategic Plan covers the demographic, economic, business, and market conditions and identifies the advantages and disadvantages for economic development in the City. The strategies and actions are designed to strengthen the City's existing advantages, and take action to address disadvantages or gaps. 5 In 2014, the City of Rancho Cucamonga completed the Healthy RC Strategic Plan which “embraces the comprehensive, interrelated nature of health and works in partnership with all sectors to create a healthy and sustainable community.” It serves as a roadmap with emphasis on creating an environment that supports a healthy mind, body, and earth. The key community health priorities in the Healthy RC Strategic Plan include: Healthy Eating & Active Living, Community Connections & Safety, Education & Family Support, Mental Health, Economic Development, Clean Environment, Healthy Aging, and Disaster Resiliency. The Sustainable Community Action Plan provides the opportunity to support the Clean Environment priorities of the Healthy RC Strategic Plan. In 2014, the San Bernardino Council of Governments (formerly SANBAG, now SBCOG) completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory and a Regional GHG Reduction Plan. SBCOG collaborated with 21 jurisdictions, including the City of Rancho Cucamonga, to prepare an estimate of the GHG emissions generated by activities within each jurisdiction, establish numeric GHG reduction targets, and identify feasible strategies to reduce GHG emissions to reach those targets. The GHG inventory and forecast developed for Rancho Cucamonga are described in greater detail in Chapter 2 and is included as Appendix D to this document. Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) is required to adopt and update its long-range Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) every four years, in accordance with federal and state transportation planning laws. The RTP outlines the region's goals and policies for meeting current and future mobility needs. It provides a foundation for transportation decisions that are ultimately aimed at achieving a coordinated and balanced transportation system. The RTP identifies the region's transportation needs and issues, sets forth actions, programs, and a list of projects to address the needs consistent with adopted regional policies and goals, and documents financial resources. The SCS portion of the document provides a combination of transportation and land use strategies that help the region achieve state greenhouse gas emission reduction goals and federal Clean Air Act requirements, preserve open space areas, improve public health and roadway safety, support our vital goods movement industry and utilize resources more efficiently. 6 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Guiding Principles for the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan were developed through a collaborative process between the community, city staff, and the consultant team. These objectives guide the overall topics and goals for the Plan and are used to evaluate the goals and policies based on their sustainability, economic, and health co-benefits. The Guiding Principles are: Environment •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption (water, energy, fuel) •Protect habitat & biological resources •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions •Improve air quality •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development Economy •Increase energy, water, and fuel cost savings •Support local small businesses •Offer incentives or funding opportunities •Expand green workforce training and recruitment •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce maintenance and operating costs Community Equity/Health •Improve overall community health •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Increase access to locally-grown food •Provide safe and convenient walking and bicycling options •Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals To ensure a sustainable future, the City of Rancho Cucamonga aims to protect the assets that make our community a great place to live, work, learn, and visit. Each of the subsequent sections below are organized around focus areas and includes recent accomplishments and projects undertaken by the City or community, new policy and program opportunities to achieve environmental sustainability goals, and the co-benefits that contribute to improved environmental sustainability, economic development, and well-being. 7 Transportation + Mobility: Examines mobility options within the community, including walking, bicycling, driving, and taking public transit. Land Use + Open Space: Discusses land use decisions and how it affects the overall health and sustainability of Rancho Cucamonga. Energy Efficiency + Renewables: Covers opportunities to improve efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in and around the City. Green Building Performance: Looks at opportunities to develop, maintain, and operate buildings in a manner that utilizes resources efficiently and improves the health of building occupants. Water + Wastewater: Discusses use and conservation of water resources as well as reuse of treated wastewater in Rancho Cucamonga. Waste Reduction: Discusses opportunities for minimizing waste and organics by reducing non-recyclable materials and increasing the city’s waste diversion rates. The Sustainable Community Action Plan looks at policies and programs and evaluates each one based on the health, economic, and sustainability benefits using the Guiding Principles. This process has been coined the “triple bottom line” evaluation and helps prioritize programs and policies that achieve the greatest number of objectives and balances benefits to the environment, economy, and community. Each policy has been evaluated using the Guiding Principles. The results of the evaluation were used to revise and refine polices in the Plan. The development of the Sustainable Community Action Plan was split into four phases. This process helped to focus the topics of discussion and community engagement activities for collecting public input. A wide variety of engagement methods, summarized in the next section, were utilized throughout the process. Phase 1: Understand + Build Upon Efforts to Date Phase 2: Identify + Prioritize + Evaluate Policies Phase 3: Develop Plan Phase 4: Review + Adopt Plan Community + Stakeholder Engagement Environment EconomyCommunity Equity/Health 8 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction The first phase started with a kickoff meeting to review the schedule, objectives and desired outcomes of the Plan. City staff helped identify relevant regional and local planning documents that would help inform the Plan and serve as a baseline for the team. The team also held introductory meetings with the City Council, various City Departments, and community agencies/organizations as a way of introducing the project and the process for developing the Sustainable Community Action Plan. The team began to identify opportunities to align proposed sustainability actions with community values and assess how sustainability policies affect the triple-bottom line. The evaluation process looked at existing goals and policies by topic that could correlate to the Sustainable Community Action Plan. It included extensive community outreach, with participation at community events, administering a survey, and hosting a community forum. Additionally, meetings were held with City Departments and community agencies/organizations to review a draft vision statement and discuss guiding principles. An outline and format were developed for the Plan, with the aim to create a document that balances technical rigor with readability and user-friendly graphics. It integrates priorities and feedback shared by the community with best practices from around the region and across the state. This phase also included meetings with various City Departments, and community agencies/organizations. This final phase of the Plan included a review and final adoption of the Plan. The document was presented to the City Council and Planning Commission for consideration and adoption. The community had the opportunity to comment and provide feedback on the Public Draft Plan. 9 Community engagement efforts from the development of the 2010 General Plan and Healthy RC Strategic Plan helped to serve as models for the structure and format of community engagement for the Plan. Community engagement efforts conducted during the Plan’s development focused on seeking input on the goals and priorities for sustainability from the survey, community events and meetings, community forum, Plan Task Force, Interdepartmental Advisory Group and stakeholder interviews. The community survey generated feedback from community members, including residents, employees and visitors, to gauge what sustainable improvements or changes would be supported in Rancho Cucamonga. Surveys were administered at numerous community events in different areas of the City and local organization meetings, and were available electronically through the City’s website. The survey period was from March to May 2016 in an effort to reach a wide cross-section of community members. Surveys were conducted at the following events or meetings: Alta Loma High School Military March Event Chaffey College Associated Student Body Chaffey College Earth Day Chaffey Student Energy Club Chamber of Commerce Chaparral Mobile Home Park Cucamonga Valley Water District Earth Day Friends of the P.E. Trail Cucamonga Challenge Healthy RC Community Champions Meeting Healthy RC Steering Committee Healthy RC Youth Leaders Los Osos High School Environmental Club Northtown Healthy RC Event Rancho Cucamonga Earth Day Community Event Community Engagement Community Events + Survey Community Forum + Sustainability Expo "This would be a great place for..." Mapping Activity Stakeholder Interviews Plan Task Force Interdepartmental Advisory Group 10 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction RC High School Environmental Club Rancho Cucamonga Kiwanis Club Rancho Cucamonga Resource Fair Rancho Cucamonga Rotary Club Rancho Cucamonga Service Council Senior Advisory Committee Senior VIP Club Terra Vista Farmers Market West End Realtors Association In total, more than 1,000 people participated in the community survey either in person or through the online portal. The complete survey results are provided as Appendix A to this Plan. In an effort to identify the location for the community’s preferred sustainability enhancements around the City, a mapping exercise with stickers representing desired environmentally sustainable activities or changes was launched. This exercise was used as part of the City’s “pop-up outreach materials” that were available at various community events between March 2016 and June 2016. Participants placed stickers on aerial maps of the City to show support for improvements and activities at specific locations that would advance Rancho Cucamonga’s sustainability efforts. As part of the planning process these results were analyzed for economic, health and environmental feasibility. Some key feedback is included below and a complete summary can be found in Appendix B. •Add drought tolerant landscaping, farmer’s markets, bicycle lanes and bicycle parking around Chaffey College •Improve the areas around Cucamonga Elementary and Rancho Cucamonga Middle School including; add drought tolerant landscaping, bicycle lanes and bicycle parking, preserve open space, add sidewalks and walking trails, add trees and green scape, and EV charging stations. •Add higher density development in areas around Etiwanda High School, around the Civic Center, areas between Town Center and Church Street, north of Etiwanda Elementary Park, near former Empire Lakes Golf Course site, and near Victoria Gardens. Attendees participate in the mapping exercise on display at the CVWD Earth Day event. Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 11 On June 2nd, 2016, approximately 200 community members gathered at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center for the City’s Community Forum and Sustainability Expo to discuss opportunities for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga. The event included three components: Sustainability Expo with 20 local organizations and exhibitors, refreshments from local healthy restaurants, and a workshop that included a presentation and small group discussion. Below is a summary of key feedback from the Community Forum + Sustainability Expo. A full list of community feedback can be found in Appendix C. Outreach •Educate youth •Offer sustainability recommendations to residents/businesses Transportation •Improve access and convenience of public transportation •Synchronize traffic lights •Create trails going north to south •Provide interconnected bike trails •Improve trail lighting Energy •Increase use of solar energy •Offer incentives Water •Demonstrations on water saving techniques •Encourage replacing lawns with drought tolerant landscaping •Expand use of recycled water Waste + Recycling •Increase recycling bins throughout City •Promote recycling programs for businesses and schools The Plan Task Force included members from local agencies, community organizations, educational institutions, and businesses. The Task Force members served an important role in helping to develop the Plan and served as project advocates to the broader community. This group reviewed the evaluation results and helped prioritize policies, programs, and other strategies to include in the Sustainable Community Action Plan. The Task Force met several times throughout planning process, providing critical input during different key points in the Plan’s development. The Rancho Cucamonga Community Forum and Sustainability Expo. Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 12 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Introduction The Interdepartmental Advisory Group is made up of key representatives from various city departments. They will ultimately lead efforts to implement the Plan, and therefore the meetings with this group were designed to both educate and encourage ownership of the Plan. This group served as a technical resource to inform and provide guidance. The Interdepartmental Advisory Group held meetings during each pivotal stage of the planning process. Department representatives were able to share insight and make suggestions for the direction of the Plan and community engagement. Stakeholder interviews were conducted in two rounds. The first round was with select city staff, organizations involved in sustainability efforts, and local businesses. The second round was with City policy makers including Council Members and Planning Commissioners in order to provide an overview of the Public Draft Plan and the process in developing it. 13 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) There are various gases in the earth’s atmosphere, including greenhouse gases (GHGs), which play a critical role in determining the earth’s surface temperature. Known as the greenhouse effect, infrared radiation enters the earth’s atmosphere from space and a portion of the radiation is absorbed by the earth’s surface. The earth emits this radiation back toward space, but much of the radiation that otherwise would have escaped back into space is instead trapped, resulting in a warming of the atmosphere. Scientific evidence shows that human activities are increasing the concentration of GHGs in the atmosphere trapping more heat and changing global climate patterns. Among the prominent GHGs contributing to the greenhouse effect are carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Figure 2-1 illustrates the greenhouse gas effect. Source: wunderground.com/climate/co2.asp According to the California Association of Environmental Professionals, scientific studies have demonstrated a relationship between increasing man-made GHG emissions and a long-term trend in increasing global average temperatures. This conclusion is the consensus of the vast majority of climate scientists worldwide. The increases in temperature and its effects on the earth’s resources are well documented in the scientific literature, which is best summarized in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)’s periodic reports, the latest of which is the Fifth Assessment Report (2014). The IPCC’s work to model and evaluate future climatic conditions indicates that if GHG emissions continue to increase at current rates, there will be substantial adverse effects to both humans and the natural 15 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions environment. Scientific organizations around the world have concluded that avoiding the most severe outcomes of climate change will require keeping global average temperatures to rise no more than two degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) by the end of the century (IPCC 2014). In order to limit global temperature increases to two degrees Celsius the IPCC and organizations like the Union of Concerned Scientists have indicated that the U.S. and other developed countries would need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions anywhere from 78 percent to 95 percent below 1990 levels, with most organizations identifying an 80 percent reduction below 1990 levels by 2050 to provide stabilization at the two-degree Celsius threshold. While the anticipated effects of climate change will vary around the world, Rancho Cucamonga is looking to the future to anticipate and address the challenges that may threaten community health and quality of life. In Rancho Cucamonga, climate change and continued generation of greenhouse gas emissions is likely to result in average temperature increases of 3.8 to 6.6 degrees Fahrenheit, a nearly ten-fold increase in the number of days reaching extreme heat levels (days in which peak temperatures reach 95 degrees Fahrenheit or higher) and increased wildfire risk in areas that are already designated Very High Fire Hazard Severity Zones by Cal Fire (Source: Cal Adapt – California Energy Commission, 2016, http://cal- adapt.org/tools/factsheet/). In light of the scientific consensus and to avoid the most severe effects of climate change, the State of California has taken a global leadership role in the climate change field by enacting GHG and climate change related legislation and has implemented programs to dramatically reduce emissions. In California, there are a series of climate change laws that have been enacted over the last decade. The most pertinent GHG legislation in California includes: California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Assembly Bill [AB] 32 and Senate Bill [SB] 32): AB 32, signed in 2006, is the primary legislation that has driven GHG regulation and analysis in California, by instructing the California Air Resource Board (CARB) to develop and enforce regulations for the reporting and verifying of statewide GHG emissions. At the heart of the bill is the requirement that statewide GHG emissions be reduced to 1990 levels by 2020. Based on CARB’s calculations of emissions levels, California must reduce GHG emissions by approximately 15 percent below 2005 levels to achieve this goal. In September 2016, the Governor signed SB 32, which builds upon the statewide targets for 2020 by establishing a longer-term target so that “statewide greenhouse gas emissions are reduced to 40% below the 1990 levels by 2030. Executive Order S-3-05 (2005): This Executive Order highlights longer term GHG emissions reduction targets for the State, though such targets have not yet been adopted by the legislature and signed into law. Specifically, Executive Order S-3-05 seeks to achieve a reduction of GHG emissions of 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, consistent with the scientific consensus that developed regions will need to reduce emissions at least 80 percent below 1990 levels to limit global warming to two degrees Celsius. Sustainable Communities and Climate Protection Act of 2008 (Senate Bill 375): This law builds off of AB 32 by linking transportation funding to land use planning. The law also requires that metropolitan planning 16 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions organizations (MPOs) establish GHG reduction targets for 2020 and 2035 and achieve t he established targets through the development of a Sustainable Communities Strategy (SCS) within the Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). SCAG, the MPO covering southern California, has prepared an RTP and SCS for the period through 2040. CEQA and Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Senate Bill 97): Passed in 2007, SB 97 required the Natural Resources Agency to prepare amendments to the CEQA Guidelines, providing direction to lead agencies on how to analyze and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. According to the Governor’s Office of Planning and Research, the amendments adopted in 2009 to the CEQA Guidelines helped to clarify that lead agencies must analyze the greenhouse gas emissions of proposed projects, and must reach a conclusion regarding the significance of those emissions. (See CEQA Guidelines § 15064.4.) Additionally, there are several regulations that have been enacted at the State level that address sustainability and GHG emissions. The regulatory framework is depicted in Figure 2-2. Land Use + Transportation Fuel Efficiency Standards AB 1493 (2002) Low Carbon Fuel Standard E.0. S-1-07 (2007) Sustainable Communities Strategy SB 375 (2008) Energy + Renewables California Building Codes (2016 Updates) Renewable Portfolio Standard SB 1078, SB 107, SB 2 Electricity Emissions of GHG SB 1368 (2006) Property Assessed Clean Energy AB 811 (2008) Water Conservation Water Efficient Landscaping AB 1881 (2006) Water Conservation Act + Targets SB X7-7 (2009) Plumbing Fixtures Replacement SB 407 (2009) Waste + Recycling Integrated Waste Management Act AB 939 (1989) Per Capita Disposal Rates SB 1016 (2008) Solid Waste Diversion AB 341 (2011) Organic Waste Recycling AB 1826 (2014) 17 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions In order to support GHG related legislation, the San Bernardino Council of Governments1(formerly SANBAG, now SBCOG), partnered with 21 member cities and the County of San Bernardino to prepare GHG inventories, identify potential GHG reduction measures, conduct environmental review of the GHG Reduction Plan, and support each community’s efforts to reduce emissions by developing regional programs. The remainder of this chapter details the work completed by SBCOG that is relevant to the City of Rancho Cucamonga. While the SBCOG work identifies best practices for the region, Rancho Cucamonga’s Sustainable Community Action Plan has been developed to leverage regional efforts and incorporate local community input to identify strategies and actions that are reflective and appropriate for the community. Please refer to Appendix D for the complete document. The San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG), working in conjunction with the City of Rancho Cucamonga, prepared an inventory of GHG emissions for the calendar year of 2008. The inventory estimates emissions for on-road transportation, off-road equipment, residential and commercial energy use, solid waste generation, and water and wastewater emissions. With the exception of a few sectors, the 2008 inventory is based on actual activity data and emission factors provided by the various utilities and agencies that deliver and/or collect resources in Rancho Cucamonga.2 A GHG inventory provides an analysis of all sources of emissions within a given boundary and assessment of their magnitude. The inventory addresses both direct emissions (such as natural gas combustion for building heating) or indirect emissions (such as electricity generation that occur outside the inventory area). The inventories were prepared consistent with industry protocols including the U.S. Community Protocol for Accounting and Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions, the Local Government Operations Protocol, and the California Association of Environmental Professionals Whitepapers on inventorying, forecasting, and setting targets for GHG emissions. The unit of measure used in the GHG inventory is the metric ton of CO2 equivalent (MTCO2e), which combines the differing impacts 1 The San Bernardino Council of Governments, formerly SANBAG, was established to improve regional coordination in planning for issues of mutual interest to the jurisdictions of San Bernardino County. 2 The guidelines used to account for all significant contributing sectors to GHG emissions were based on two documents: the U.S. Community Protocol for Accounting and Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (ICLEI 2012) and the California Air Resources Board Local Governments Operations Protocol (LGOP 2010). 18 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions of all GHGs into a single unit.3 Each GHG differs in its ability to absorb heat in the atmosphere based on the lifetime, or persistence, of the gas molecule in the atmosphere. Methane traps over 21 times more heat per molecule than CO2, and N2O absorbs 310 times more heat per molecule than CO2. In 2008, Rancho Cucamonga generated approximately 1,559,136 MTCO2e from all emissions sources (see Table 2-1 and Figure 2-3). Like most communities in California, on-road transportation accounted for the largest share of emissions, representing 45.1% of emissions, while building energy was the second largest sector of emissions at 44.5%. Off-road equipment, water conveyance, and solid waste disposal represented smaller, but still notable, portions of the emissions profile, representing 5.2%, 3.0%, and 1.9% respectively. The smallest sectors, wastewater treatment and agriculture, each represented less than 1% of total emissions in Rancho Cucamonga in 2008. Sector Annual Emissions (MTCO2e/yr) Percent of Total Emissions On-Road Transportation 702,904 45.1% Building Energy 693,422 44.5% Off-Road Equipment 80,830 5.2% Water Conveyance 46,054 3.0% Solid Waste Management 29,042 1.9% Wastewater Treatment 6,584 0.4% Agriculture 300 < 0.1% Total Emissions 1,559,136 100% Source: Regional GHG Reduction Plan, 2014. 3 This unit is calculated by multiplying each emitted gas by its Global Warming Potential (contribution of a given mass of GHG to global warming). 19 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions Source: Regional GHG Reduction Plan, 2014. Transportation sector emissions are the result of gasoline and diesel combustion in vehicles traveling to, from, or within Rancho Cucamonga, but excludes emissions associated with vehicles that pass-through Rancho Cucamonga without stopping. Residential and commercial energy use calculates the emissions generated by electricity and natural gas consumed by residences and commercial businesses within Rancho Cucamonga. Off-road equipment includes construction and landscaping vehicles, and other equipment that relies upon gasoline or diesel fuel to operate, while solid waste emissions are based on the amount of waste disposed in landfills, where it decomposes and generates methane. Finally, water and wastewater emissions are calculated by determining the energy needed to extract, transport, treat, and dispose of the water resources consumed by the community. On a per capita basis, the City of Rancho Cucamonga had above average per capita emissions (10.6 MTCO2e) in the year 2008 when compared to other participating cities. As shown in Figure 2-4, this is slightly higher compared to other cities in San Bernardino County (9.8 MTCO2e), despite having approximately the same job/residents ratio as the region average. On-Road Transportation 45.1% Building Energy 44.5% Off-Road Equipment 5.2% Water Conveyance 3.0%Solid Waste Management 1.9% Wastewater Treatment 0.4%Agriculture <0.1% 20 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions Source Regional GHG Reduction Plan. 2014. Annual emissions generated vary from year to year based on a variety of factors. The Regional GHG Reduction Plan, prepared by SBCOG, forecasted emissions levels for Rancho Cucamonga in 2020 if population, housing, and employment forecasts reached the levels projected by the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) in the 2035 Regional Transportation Plan and no new programs to reduce emissions were implemented. This is referred to as a business-as-usual or BAU forecast. Table 2-2 identifies the baseline emissions in 2008 and compares the BAU forecasted emissions for Rancho Cucamonga in 2020. Between 2008 and 2020, average emissions in Rancho Cucamonga are expected to increase 2.2% as a result of economic and population growth if the BAU scenario is continued. 5 5.3 6 6.6 6.6 6.8 6.8 7.1 7.9 8 8.6 8.6 9.1 9.8 10.6 11.5 12.4 13.9 16.4 17.8 17.9 21.9 0 5 10 15 20 25 Twentynine Palms Highland Hesperia Adelanto Chino Hills Rialto Yucaipa Fontana Grand Terrace Yucca Valley Montclair Victorville San Bernardino San Bernardino County Average Rancho Cucamonga Redlands Loma Linda Colton Chino Needles Ontario Big Bear Lake Per Capita MTCO2e/yr 21 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions Sector 2008 Annual Emissions (MTCO2e/yr) 2020 Forecasted Business As Usual Emissions (MTCO2e/yr) Building Energy 693,422 722,126 On-Road Transportation 702,904 701,998 Off-Road Equipment 80,830 82,950 Solid Waste Management 29,042 29,475 Agriculture 300 153 Wastewater Treatment 6,584 6,801 Water Conveyance 46,054 50,598 Total Emissions 1,559,136 1,594,101 Emissions Change 2008-2020 + 2.2% Source: Regional GHG Reduction Plan, 2014 At the state level, the various standards and measures such as fuel efficiency standards, low carbon fuel standard, and energy renewal portfolio standard supports the goal of reducing GHG emissions in the City’s on-road and building energy sectors by 2020. At the County level, the GHG Plan’s landfill controls will further reduce emissions. Collectively these measures at the State and County levels will reduce emissions in Rancho Cucamonga beyond the levels recommended by AB 32 (15% below 2008 levels by 2020). However, Rancho Cucamonga recognizes that the efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions continues beyond 2020, particularly given the adoption of Senate Bill 32 in 2016 which sets GHG reduction targets for 2030. With that in mind, Rancho Cucamonga has committed to supporting implementation of local measures to reduce GHG emissions in addition to State measures. In order to align with or be on a trajectory to meet the State’s long-term greenhouse gas reduction goals and the scientific consensus of the emissions reductions needed to limit global warming to two degrees Celsius, the City of Rancho Cucamonga would need to reduce emissions equivalent to the following levels: •To 1990 levels by 2020 (equivalent to 15 percent below 2008 baseline levels), consistent with AB 32 •To 40 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 (equivalent to 49 percent below 2008 baseline levels), consistent with E.O. B-30-15 and SB 32 •To 80 percent below 1990 levels by 2050 (equivalent to 83 percent below 2008 baseline levels), consistent with E.O. S-3-05 This Plan identifies steps that Rancho Cucamonga can take to contribute towards a GHG reduction target that reduces emissions approximately 15 percent below 2008 levels by 2020. 22 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Greenhouse Gas Emissions Policies and actions to achieve long term GHG reduction targets beyond 2020 that are further out in the future will be considered as the City identifies updates or revisions to the Rancho Cucamonga General Plan. 23 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) To ensure a sustainable future, the City of Rancho Cucamonga must work to preserve the assets that make it a great place to live, work, learn, and visit. The Sustainable Community Action Plan is a road-map to preserve and enhance the natural environment, public health, the economy, the people who make the City vibrant, and the many other qualities that make Rancho Cucamonga a model community. The Sustainable Community Action Plan targets key areas for advancing sustainability. These areas include: Transportation + Mobility (TM) Examines mobility options within the community, including, walking, bicycling, driving, and taking public transit. Land Use + Open Space (LU) Discusses land use decisions and how it affects the overall health and sustainability of Rancho Cucamonga. Energy Efficiency + Renewables (EE) Covers opportunities to improve efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in and around the City. Green Building Performance (GB) Looks at opportunities to develop, maintain, and operate buildings in a manner that utilizes resources efficiently and improves the health of building occupants. Water + Wastewater (WW) Discusses the use and conservation of water resources as well as reuse of treated wastewater in Rancho Cucamonga. Waste + Recycling (WR) Discusses opportunities for minimizing waste and organics by reducing non-recyclable materials and increasing diversion rates. 25 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices Each of the topic areas in the Sustainable Community Action Plan includes a similar structure, as follows: •Introduction provides a brief overview of the topic, the activities covered under the topic, its relationship to a sustainable community, and why it is included in the Plan. •Recent Efforts + Support identifies the recent efforts undertaken by the City, partner agencies, and the community to implement programs related to the topic. This section also highlights plans or programs adopted by the City that are relevant to the topic. •Co-benefits incorporates the results of the triple-bottom line analysis to highlight how well the various policies achieve the goals and priorities of this plan related to the Environment, Economy, and Community Health + Equity. •Goals + Policies lists the various goals and policies associated with each topic. It also includes a series of Actions that could be implemented to achieve the goals. 26 Transportation and mobility decisions play a key role in how people interact and move around a city. Increasing transportation options is critical to improving accessibility, promoting health, and working towards improving local and regional air quality. Rancho Cucamonga has initiated several efforts towards improving mobility and enhancing access for a variety of different transportation modes. In 2015, the Rancho Cucamonga Circulation Master Plan for Bicyclists & Pedestrians was prepared, with the intent to make walking and bicycling a safe, convenient, comfortable, and viable transportation option. The Sustainable Community Action Plan builds off the Healthy RC model, integrating bicycling and walking into community planning efforts. It articulates goals to improve personal and environmental health- including air quality, access to all modes of transportation, and economic health. This plan highlights the health and environmental co-benefits from active transportation such as walking and bicycling, when compared to automobile use. The Healthy RC Strategic Plan lays out Rancho Cucamonga’s community health priorities which include a clean environment and active living. The City also promotes Safe Routes to School (SRTS), a program that brings members of the community together, including students, parents, school officials, public safety officers, and teachers, to address pedestrian safety issues and encourage students to walk or bicycle to school. In addition to these programs, Rancho Cucamonga has completed several other projects and programs that promote alternative transportation options, including: •Complete Streets Ordinance •Expansion of municipal “green” fleet with Alternative Fuel vehicles and fueling infrastructure •Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Stations throughout the City •Pacific Electric (PE) Trail Master Plan •Bicycle lockers at various locations (i.e. Metrolink) •Bicycling and Trail Guide •Streamlined EV Charger permitting process •Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Infrastructure Improvements •Encourage Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) service Circulation Master Plan for Bicyclists and Pedestrians 27 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies Improvements to the transportation network can provide a wide-range of co-benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment. The following co-benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Increase fuel cost savings •Offer incentives and funding opportunities •Improve overall community health •Provide safe and convenient walking and bicycling options •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Improve air quality •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development Policy 1: Promote active transportation choices. Actions TM 1.1 Develop public information campaigns highlighting the health, environmental, and economic benefits of active transportation. TM 1.2 Coordinate with stakeholders on the development of strategies to implement Sustainable Community Action Plan goals and related sustainability goals from the General Plan. TM 1.3 Partner with local agencies and community organizations to promote bicycling and walking. TM 1.4 Coordinate with elementary and middle schools to facilitate the expansion of the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program by identifying supporters and funding opportunities. Tesla Superchargers are located at Victoria Gardens The City has invested in clean fuel infrastructure and electric vehicles 28 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies TM 1.5 Develop programs to promote National Bike Month and provide access to gear and education classes for prospective bicycle riders. TM 1.6 Construct amenities such as bicycle maintenance and repair stations, along trails and in parks to facilitate and encourage bicycling. TM 1.7 Improve awareness of bicycling and walking by exploring Open Streets events, which are events that temporarily close streets to automobile traffic and make them available for bicycling, walking, and other public uses. TM 1.8 Develop campaigns to promote and enhance the Pacific Electric (PE) Trail. TM 1.9 Increase bicycle trails in the Southern portion of the City to ensure access to safe alternative transportation. TM 1.10 Explore the feasibility of implementing a bikeshare program for employees and the community. TM 1.11 Install green pavement markings at conflict zones along key transportation corridors. Policy 2: Utilize Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies citywide. Actions TM 2.1 Support the use of shared-parking strategies in multi-tenant retail, commercial, and office centers. TM 2.2 Develop programs to promote regional car sharing to reduce the overall per capita vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and improve air quality. Policy 3: Ensure safe and convenient transit options are available to all residents. Actions TM 3.1 Coordinate with transit providers to establish direct routes to popular destinations, such as the Ontario International Airport. TM 3.2 Coordinate with transit providers to provide improvements to local service, as well as needed amenities in close proximity to transit line stops. TM 3.3 Work with OmniTrans to offer Advanced Transportation Management Systems (ATMS), or Smart Bus Technology at all local stops. TM 3.4 Recommend shaded or covered stations/transit stops. TM 3.5 Work to improve first /last mile connections for Rancho Cucamonga public transit riders. TM 3.6 Require the incorporation of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) techniques, such as appropriate lighting and landscape maintenance, to improve the safety of public transit stops across Rancho Cucamonga. TM 3.7 Facilitate shared ride services such as Uber and Lyft by requiring amenities such as dedicated parking bays or pick-up locations for their use. Policy 4: Increase the use of alternative fuels and electric vehicles. Actions TM 4.1 Support development of electric vehicle infrastructure and charging stations at City-owned facilities and private property. TM 4.2 Support efforts to introduce and integrate alternative fuel vehicles and technologies (such as compressed natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell technology) into the transportation network. 29 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies Policy 5: Facilitate efficient movement of vehicles throughout the city. Actions TM 5.1 Support synchronization of traffic signals along major corridors for improved traffic flow. TM 5.2 Support expansion of High Occupancy Vehicles (HOV) lanes on freeways near Rancho Cucamonga. TM 5.3 Periodically review and update the Truck Route Map to facilitate efficient movement of freight within and through the community. TM 5.4 Continue to explore opportunities where Safe Routes to Schools and the Pacific Electric (PE) Trail can be integrated into existing evacuation routes throughout the City. 30 Land use and open space design decisions affect our ability to live a safe and healthy lifestyle. Rancho Cucamonga has demonstrated its support for smart land use planning and protection of its natural resources. The City strives to continue offering mountain views, multiple housing options, economic opportunities, along with numerous public parks and an extensive trail network. Rancho Cucamonga has made a commitment to sustainable land uses through its General Plan. The Managing Land Use, Community Design, and Historic Resources Element of the General Plan demonstrates the City of Rancho Cucamonga’s commitment to promote healthy and sustainable land use patterns through carefully managed development and policy initiatives. City Council’s mid- and long-range planning goals show commitment for more sustainable land use decisions and open space enhancement and revitalization through their directive to “Develop standards to address mixed use, high density, Transit Oriented Development and underperforming or underutilized areas and initiate a Development Code amendment to incorporate new development standards.” This goal directs law- makers and city staff to prioritize goals and policies that promote personal health, environmental health and economic health. A list of key land use and open space completed programs and projects include: •Participation in SBCOG (formerly SANBAG) Regional Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Inventory, Forecast and GHG Reduction Plan •Adoption of 2010 General Plan •SCAG Compass Blueprint Project - West Foothill Boulevard •Tree City USA Designation •Community Gardens and Farmers’ Markets Ordinance •Cucamonga Canyon Conservation Efforts •Empire Lakes Mixed-Use Development •Empire Yards Transit Oriented Development •Adoption of Mixed Use/Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Standards 31 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices Changes to land use patterns and improved access to open space can provide a wide-range of co-benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment of Rancho Cucamonga. The following co- benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Increase energy, water, and fuel cost savings •Improve overall community health •Provide safe and convenient walking and bicycling options •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Protect habitat and biological resources •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions Policy 1: Support development and redevelopment of land use patterns that promote clean, green, and healthy living. Actions LU 1.1 Support new, diverse housing opportunities within walking distance of businesses, employment, and mixed-use areas. LU 1.2 Support building multifamily and mixed-use development in areas identified by the General Plan. LU 1.3 Encourage the use of short, grid pattern streets and connected blocks through pedestrian and alternative transportation paths for development. LU 1.4 Promote bicycle parking and alternative transportation amenities in mixed-use, multifamily, and commercial development. LU 1.5 Facilitate the use of passive design to work with natural elements and landforms. City trails provide residents access to open space. 32 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices LU 1.6 Orient buildings for pedestrians, as opposed to vehicles, by having them face the street, providing large connected sidewalks, and offering a buffer between vehicles and pedestrians. LU 1.7 Support green tech and energy related businesses moving to Rancho Cucamonga. LU 1.8 Support projects that facilitate access for bicyclists and pedestrians. LU 1.9 Support and implement planting of additional low-maintenance, large canopy trees that provide shade for pedestrians and reduce the heat island effect. Policy 2: Provide for the preservation of parks, open space, and development. Actions LU 2.1 Maintain running tracks, playgrounds, and sports courts in public parks. LU 2.2 Strive to provide park and recreational facilities that offer a range of sizes and activities at a rate of at least 5 acres per 1,000 residents. LU 2.3 Build or redesign parkland space to best suit local neighborhoods with collected development impact fees. LU 2.4 Enhance crime prevention strategies through environmental design techniques for parks including adequate lighting, wayfinding signs, and clear lines of sight. LU 2.5 Expand the rate of tree plantings and landscaping along the Pacific Electric (PE) Trail. LU 2.6 Continue to emphasize water resource management and urban forestry in park and landscape maintenance districts, and expand practices to address other sustainable management practices such as Integrated Pest Management, soil health, and fertilizer usage. LU 2.7 Support limited local access to the San Bernardino National Forest and the Angeles National Forest that is sensitive to the natural environment. LU 2.8 Protect and showcase scenic mountain views as development occurs. LU 2.9 Ensure that new multi-family residential development provides adequate on-site recreational and open space amenities consistent with the values and standards of the community. LU 2.10 Encourage the production of local agriculture and food in front/backyard gardens, community gardens, parks/open space areas, and utility and flood control easements. LU 2.11 Promote low impact development, within the foothills, that works with existing natural landforms and minimizes the amount of site grading needed. LU 2.12 Continue to enforce the General Plan goals and Development Code requirements for compatible development that is sensitive to the existing built environment and preservation of the landforms in the hillside areas. 33 Energy resources play a key role in the daily life and business operations of residents and businesses. Increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy supports environmental sustainability and reduces operating costs of a household or business by reducing overall energy consumption. In recent years, Rancho Cucamonga has taken strides towards increasing sustainable activities and reducing inefficiencies in energy consumption. These programs demonstrate Rancho Cucamonga’s progress and future commitment to a cleaner and more efficient city. A list of the key energy efficiency and renewable energy programs and projects in Rancho Cucamonga include: •Renewable energy systems at three City facilities (370 kW) •Solar RC Expansion Project at additional five City facilities (1.8 MW) •Cool California City Designation •SolarRC streamlined solar permitting process and reduced fees •Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program •Home Energy Makeover contest •Replacement of incandescent traffic lights with efficient LED lighting •Energy Network partnership •RCMU Renewable Energy rebate program •RCMU/Library Play and Learn Island (PALTM) •RCMU Energy Efficiency rebate program •RCMU Ice Bear energy units •RCMU Direct Savings Program for commercial customers •Library Kill-a-Watt program •Partnership for a Greener Northtown •Property Accessed Clean Energy (PACE) Program •San Bernardino Regional Energy Partnership •RCMU’s purchase of 6 MW share of renewable energy from the Astoria 2 Solar Farm •RCMU is meeting the State's Renewable Portfolio Standards (RPS) of 33% renewables by 2020. The SolarRC program has greatly expanded the City’s and RCMU’s commitment to renewable energy. 34 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies Opportunities to increase energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy can provide a wide-range of co- benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment of Rancho Cucamonga. The following co-benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Increase energy and fuel cost savings •Support local small businesses •Expand green workforce opportunities •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce operating costs •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Generate public interest and support for sustainable goals •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions Policy 1: Reduce energy demand by improved efficiency and building design. Actions EE 1.1 Continue to promote programs that encourage users to reduce energy use and increase efficiency. EE 1.2 Increase participation in Southern California Edison’s Green Rate, Time-Of-Use (TOU) Rate and Electric Vehicle (EV) Rate Plans. EE 1.3 Increase educational and outreach efforts for residential, commercial, and institutional building owners to increase awareness of Southern California Edison (SCE), Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU), and the Gas Company programs, rebates, and incentives. EE 1.4 Promote City-approved third-party programs and financing sources, such as the Property Accessed Clean Energy (PACE) program, to improve energy efficiency of existing buildings and homes. EE 1.5 Promote the retrofit of existing buildings with energy efficiency techniques through contractor trainings and educational resources for building owners and tenants. EE 1.6 Continue leveraging federal, state, regional, and other funding sources to retrofit and commission existing municipal facilities. EE 1.7 Expand the Green Business Recognition Program by offering incentives for participating businesses in Rancho Cucamonga. EE 1.8 Support efforts regarding energy disclosure, audits, and/or upgrades at time of sale for residential and commercial properties. EE 1.9 Pursue retrofitting of existing and installing new streetlight, traffic signal, and safety lights with LED fixtures. 35 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies EE 1.10 Install automated controls and universal energy management systems in municipal buildings. EE 1.11 Establish an energy revolving fund for municipal and community projects. EE 1.12 Enroll appropriate City facilities in the SCE Demand Response Program. EE 1.13 Support RCMU efforts to expand energy conservation programs. EE 1.14 Promote programs and conservation efforts that encourage a reduction in energy and greenhouse gas emissions of homes and businesses. EE 1.15 Provide incentives and educational materials to encourage sustainable building design and site design that receive LEED, Sustainable Sites, Living Building Challenge, or similar certifications. EE 1.16 Continue to support, and regularly update RCMU's New Development Incentive program for new development that exceeds California Green Building Standards Code minimum requirements. Policy 2: Increase the amount of renewable energy use in Rancho Cucamonga. Actions EE 2.1 Offer a citywide resource that compiles with all state, local, and third-party incentives, programs, and information regarding renewable energy for residents and businesses to access. EE 2.2 Continue to support and expand the use of renewable energy. EE 2.3 Promote income-qualified solar housing programs that provide no- or low-cost solar for families living with limited or fixed incomes. EE 2.4 Leverage incentives and rebates to increase renewable energy generation on City-owned facilities and properties. EE 2.5 Install solar panels when feasible on new and existing municipal buildings. EE 2.6 Advocate for the continuance of the Net Energy Metering (NEM) program at the state level. 36 The development and operations of buildings provide opportunities to identify cost-effective ways to improve the environmental performance of buildings while enhancing occupant comfort and health. Rancho Cucamonga has already taken many steps toward improving building performance. The City has begun to implement a Green Building Ordinance that follows CalGreen’s voluntary two-tiered system, but requires new or remodeled municipal buildings over 7,500 square feet meet CalGreen’s Tier 1 standards. The City’s development code encourages use of energy conservation techniques, in addition to constructing new municipal buildings with green building features including solar panels, drought tolerant landscaping, and natural lighting. A detailed list of green building performance projects and programs are listed below: •Green Purchasing Ordinance •Adoption of 2012 Development Code •Green Building Ordinance •Corporate Yard green building features •Environmentally friendly cleaning products in janitorial services contracts •Home Improvement Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program •Ready RC program •City Hall HVAC Upgrade •Retrofit City Hall outdoor lights with LED •Institute for Local Government (ILG) Beacon Sustainability Recognition Award Program 37 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices Improved design and performance of buildings can provide a wide-range of co-benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment of Rancho Cucamonga. The following co-benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Increase energy, water, and fuel cost savings •Support local small businesses •Expand green workforce opportunities •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce operating costs •Improve overall community health •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Generate public interest for sustainable goals •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption •Improve indoor air quality •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions Policy 1: Facilitate the use of green building practices. Actions GB 1.1 Incorporate the design and technical standards of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and Well Building Standards or similar rating systems in the development or renovation of City-owned buildings. GB 1.2 Encourage developers to participate in the Green Building Program and achieve or exceed CalGreen Standards. GB 1.3 Conduct a systematic review of the Development Code and explore incorporating guidelines and standards that encourage green building practices. GB 1.4 Encourage green architectural historic preservation and remodeling practices. GB 1.5 Support an outreach and education plan for developers, realtors, contractors, and institutions focused on sustainable design principles and green building techniques. GB 1.6 Support the installation of solar panels on new and existing residential, commercial, industrial and warehouse space. Policy 2: Promote opportunities to improve environmental health, disaster resiliency, and workplace wellness. Actions GB 2.1 Encourage alternative transportation options such as telecommuting, carpooling, and commuting incentives. GB 2.2 Support community workplace wellness fairs to promote new ideas for workplace health and wellness. 38 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices GB 2.3 Promote integration of workplace wellness and environmental health into the Rancho Cucamonga Green Business Recognition Program. GB 2.4 Promote disaster resiliency efforts through the Ready RC program and business emergency response training (BERT) to local businesses and employers. 39 Water use and wastewater production in Rancho Cucamonga provides the City with opportunities to collaborate with the City’s water supplier Cucamonga Valley Water District (CVWD) to reduce the consumption of a precious natural resource and ensure a supply of quality water. California’s severe drought reached record highs in 2016. The State Water Resources Control Board reported in July 2016 that Californians reduced residential water use by 28 percent in May 2016 compared with the same month in 20131. While California has taken major steps towards reducing the amount of potable water used at home and at work, long-term conservation strategies are still necessary. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines wastewater as being water that contains organic matter, inorganic compounds and microorganisms. Essentially, any water that has been used in a home or business is considered wastewater and must be collected and treated before being disposed. The City of Rancho Cucamonga has taken strides towards reducing water consumption and increasing use of recycled wastewater. These efforts include: •Municipal water usage reduced by 27 percent •Water consumption reduction goal of 40% below the 2013/14 baseline •Recycled water for irrigation at various locations •305,000 square feet of turf removed from parks and City facilities •Street medians converted drought-tolerant landscaping at various locations •Computerized irrigation control system implemented •Adopting a Drought Emergency Proclamation to prioritize water conservation efforts 1 For more information on California residential water use please visit: (http://drought.ca.gov/topstory/top-story-62.html) The City currently irrigates parkways and median island landscape sites with recycled water. 40 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices Water conservation and wastewater efficiency efforts can provide a wide-range of co-benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment of Rancho Cucamonga. The following co-benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Increase water cost savings •Support local small businesses •Expand green workforce opportunities •Reduce operating costs •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption •Protect habitat and biological resources •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions Policy 1: Support efforts to reduce potable water usage per capita in Rancho Cucamonga. Actions WW 1.1 Support expansion of the recycled water program in Rancho Cucamonga to include new and existing residential and commercial development. WW 1.2 Support the Cucamonga Valley Water District in promoting smart metering and continuous monitoring of community water use. WW 1.3 Partner with Cucamonga Valley Water District to increase educational and outreach efforts to increase participation in the Green Business Recognition Program and increase water efficiency. WW 1.4 Support efforts to facilitate implementation and use of greywater systems. WW 1.5 Consult with the Cucamonga Valley Water District and the Inland Empire Utilities Agency to ensure water storage and treatment facilities have sufficient capacity and utilize efficient technology. Policy 2: Continue to expand water conservation efforts citywide. Actions WW 2.1 Continue to provide information regarding rebates for individual residences and homeowner associations for Lawn Buy Back Program and drought-tolerant landscaping. WW 2.2 Conduct community outreach and promote the City’s water conservation efforts. WW 2.3 Work with Cucamonga Valley Water District to identify high-water use consumers and provide focused outreach and engagement efforts to these properties. WW 2.4 Continue to implement retrofits to city street medians, parks, and other green space to use water efficient landscaping. 41 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices WW 2.5 Develop and implement a plan to reduce municipal water consumption significantly below 2013/2014 baseline level. WW 2.6 Establish a tree preservation ordinance to retain healthy shade trees and reduce watering needs (young trees typically require more frequent watering than older, well-established trees). WW 2.7 Regularly update the municipal code to address landscape and hardscape requirements and water efficiency strategies. 42 Solid waste is disposed of by residents and businesses, collected by heavy duty trucks, and disposed at landfills where methane is generated as waste decomposes. This provides opportunities for increasing waste diversion rates, recycling opportunities and reducing food waste. The amount of waste diverted from landfills through recycling programs has continued to increase, both locally and at the statewide level since the passage of AB 939 in 1989. The City has started local programs that encourage use of alternative products, reuse and recycling and the Engineering Services Department is dedicated to reducing waste through various programs. The Environmental Programs Section strives to protect and conserve our natural resources through education, planning, waste reduction, recycling and pollution prevention. The implementation, promotion, and management of the City’s waste reduction and recycling programs, the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Facility, storm water pollution prevention program, and numerous grant-funded programs are handled by the City. Some of the key programs and projects include: •Green Business Recognition Program •Food Waste Pilot Program •CTRL Tree paper waste reduction campaign •Accela paperless permitting program •Expanded Polystyrene ban •Construction and Demolition Diversion Program •Oil Recycling Program •Home-Generated Sharps program •Cucamonga Quakes Baseball “Recycle Tuesdays” Program •Healthy RC Green Living Guide •Rubberized Pavement Program •Commingled recycling and organics programs 43 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Polices Improvements to solid waste and recycling programs can provide a wide- range of co-benefits related to the economy, community health, and environment of Rancho Cucamonga. The following co-benefits have been identified based on the goals and policies included in this section: ECONOMY COMMUNITY HEALTH + EQUITY ENVIRONMENT •Offer incentives or funding opportunities •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce maintenance and operating costs •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Protect habitat & biological resources Policy 1: Expand programs to decrease waste sent to landfills. Actions WR 1.1 Educate the community about the lifecycle of consumer goods and food and promote recycling and waste reduction programs. WR 1.2 Work with Rancho Cucamonga schools to increase recycling programs. WR 1.3 Expand outreach and technical assistance to Homeowner Associations and multifamily residences to increase participation in the residential recycling and organics diversion programs. WR 1.4 Increase the minimum requirements for construction and demolition waste to divert 65% of materials. WR 1.5 Continue funding the Household Hazardous Waste and electronics recycling programs to provide the community opportunities to properly dispose of these waste products. WR 1.6 Explore the development of strategies that will support zero-waste goals at special events. WR 1.7 Expand recycling containers at City facilities and events. WR 1.8 Encourage the use of recycled and reusable bags. Policy 2: Expand opportunities to recycle organic materials. Actions WR 2.1 Expand commercial organics recycling for businesses in the City by encouraging participation in waste audits and providing technical assistance. Paper recycling at the Earth Day event. 44 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan – Goals and Policies WR 2.2 Explore options for food rescue programs. WR 2.3 Explore options for including non-animal based food waste as part of the green waste collection for residential uses. WR 2.4 Implement provisions of the California Commercial Organics legislation. WR 2.5 Explore implementation of organics recycling at City facilities. WR 2.6 Support programs to divert materials from landfills. WR 2.7 Explore the establishment of a zero waste farmers market. 45 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) Implementation of the Sustainable Community Action Plan, including achievement of greenhouse gas reduction targets, will require collaboration between the community, city government, and other agencies that serve the San Bernardino County region. This chapter identifies some of the basic steps that a jurisdiction might take to successfully implement similar plans. These are suggested, not required, and are intended to guide the City of Rancho Cucamonga in implementing the policies and goals identified in this Plan. Success in meeting the City’s environmental sustainability goals will depend on cooperation, innovation, and participation by the City and residents, businesses, and local government entities. Key steps are outlined that the City may take to implement this Plan and integrate sustainability principles into City policies and operations. The best practices for Plan implementation are grouped into six categories: •Integration: Integrating sustainability planning and emissions reduction efforts into City internal processes and into future updates of planning and policy documents. •Engagement: Empowering City staff and encouraging community participation in the planning process. •Strategic Planning: Prioritizing measures and ensuring all mechanisms are in place to implement the Plan. •Monitoring: Tracking and periodically reassessing progress in meeting Plan goals. •Reporting: Remaining accountable through ongoing reporting of sustainability achievements, emissions reductions, costs, benefits, and challenges. •Adaptive Management: Remaining flexible and taking corrective actions to improve processes and programs. A discussion with the Plan Task Force regarding future environmental sustainability efforts Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 47 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Implementation The following Table 4.1 identifies Best Practices for Sustainability Planning Implementation: Integration BP-1. Connect the Plan to Other Planning Documents (i.e. General Plan, Healthy RC Strategic Plan) BP-2. Infuse Environmental Sustainability Planning into the City’s Mission and Core Values BP-3. Formalize the Plan through General Plan Updates and Changes to the Development Code or Other Relevant Ordinances Engagement BP-4. Develop a Robust Community Engagement Strategy BP-5. Engage Decision Makers Early and Often BP-6. Continue to Meet with the Interdepartmental Advisory Group on a Regular Basis BP-7. Continue to Engage the Plan Task Force and consider transitioning to a larger Community Green Team Strategic Planning BP-8. Identify Resource, Funding and Data Needs BP-9. Establish performance indicators Processes to Facilitate Data Collection and Tracking BP-10. Dedicate Funds and Staff Time toward Plan Implementation Monitoring BP-11. Develop a Robust Monitoring Plan BP-12. Track Environmental, Economic, and Community Equity + Health Indicators BP-13. Perform GHG Inventory Updates Every Five Years Reporting BP-14. Prepare Reports to Communicate Successes and Progress BP-15. Use Multiple Platforms (i.e. City website, newsletters, social media) to Report Progress Adaptive Management BP-16. Complete After-Action Reviews BP-17. Perform Ongoing Research and Analyses BP-18. Refine Policies and Programs to Achieve Environmental Sustainability Goals Source: Adapted from SBCOG CAP Implementation Tools Final Reports on CAP Implementation Strategies 48 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Implementation As part of this Plan, a Triple Bottom Line evaluation tool and process was developed to enhance the Plan’s sustainability connections and potential outcomes. The purpose of the Triple Bottom Line evaluation was to provide a process and framework to objectively and consistently review the Plan against community priorities. The Triple Bottom Line evaluation tool uses the Sustainable Community Action Plan’s Guiding Principles as a framework against which to evaluate the Plan’s policy directions. The evaluation process was a qualitative exercise, completed by a multi-disciplinary team at various stages during the Plan development process. The Triple Bottom Line evaluation process details and outcomes are documented in Appendix E. Environment •Reduce greenhouse gas emissions •Reduce resource consumption (water, energy, fuel) •Protect habitat & biological resources •Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions •Improve air quality •Contribute to thoughtful planning and development Economy •Increase energy, water, and fuel cost savings •Support local small businesses •Offer incentives or funding opportunities •Expand green workforce training and recruitment •Attract environmentally friendly businesses •Reduce maintenance and operating costs Community Equity + Health •Improve overall community health •Engage and empower the community and local organizations •Increase access to locally-grown food •Provide safe and convenient walking and bicycling options •Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals The results of the Triple Bottom Line evaluation were used to revise and refine the policies in this Plan. Following this iterative revision process, it is anticipated that each policy supports the Guiding Principles, and provides benefits to the community across the Triple Bottom Line. Furthermore, the results help illuminate policies and actions where significant triple bottom line benefits are possible – ones that might be beneficial to prioritize for near-term implementation. Environment EconomyCommunity Equity/Health 49 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Implementation Moving forward, the Triple Bottom Line evaluation process is a resource that the City can periodically use to guide discussions about prioritization of implementation strategies, streamline future updates, and revisions to the Plan. Implementation of the local sustainability actions requires collaborative efforts by the City and other public agencies, local businesses, developers/builders, and commercial building owners and residential homeowners. In some cases operating costs are anticipated to decrease, resulting in a net savings. Funding and financing options may be available to support implementation efforts at the individual, local, and regional level. Some funding sources are not necessarily directed towards a City, but to a larger regional agency. Rancho Cucamonga will continually monitor private and public funding sources for new grant and rebate opportunities and collaborate with larger agencies that have access to funds to be used for environmental sustainability programs and GHG reduction projects. Leveraging financing sources is an important role a local government plays to implement environmental sustainability measures. The estimated emissions reduction potential from implementation of this Plan exceeds the 15% requirement of the State's greenhouse gas reduction goals and is currently projected to be 16.9% percent below 2008 levels by 2020. The City plans to monitor progress by utilizing the Implementation Tracker Tool developed by SBCOG, and encourage project applicants for new development to sufficiently address GHG reductions. The applicable reduction goals to be achieved to be consistent with long-term state-wide goals include: •2020: 15% below 2008 levels •2025: 31% below 2008 levels •2030: 49% below 2008 levels •2035: 57% below 2008 levels •2040: 66% below 2008 levels •2050: 83% below 2008 levels A combination of implementation actions and mitigation measures are aimed to regularly evaluate progress and trigger a mechanism to address it. When emissions reduction goals are not met, it will ensure the City is consistently making progress toward the long-term state-wide goals and local targets. The San Bernardino Council of Governments Climate Action Plan Implementation Tracking Tool (CAPITT) is a Microsoft Excel-based tool that helps cities track GHG reductions achieved through implementation of 50 Rancho Cucamonga Sustainable Community Action Plan - Implementation the GHG reduction measures within their Plans, monitor plan implementation progress, and share findings with stakeholders, partners, and the community. The CAPITT helps derive estimates for annual GHG reductions achieved by State, County, and local reduction measures based on user inputs. Cities may use the tool to track progress toward meeting their individual 2020 GHG reduction targets. It supports coordinated planning efforts to reduce regional GHG emissions within San Bernardino County. This is achieved by inventorying GHG emissions, estimating reductions, monitoring trends over time, sharing findings, and revising actions based on results in order to achieve the reduction targets. The San Bernardino Council of Governments CAP Implementation Tools Final Report can be found in Appendix F of this Plan. The Sustainable Community Action Plan’s policies support the General Plan and the SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan. Table 4-2 lists, by topic area, each policy contained in the Sustainable Community Action Plan, and its related policy in the General Plan and related strategy in the GHG Reduction Plan. It is anticipated that key policies in the Sustainable Community Action Plan will be integrated as part of the next General Plan Update in order to advance policy implementation. With the adoption of the Sustainable Community Action Plan, the City will strive to achieve the goals, policies, and actions identified in the Plan. This Plan provides a clear roadmap to advance the City’s sustainability efforts and conduct periodic reviews to evaluate progress. In addition, key policies from the Sustainable Community Action Plan will be incorporated in the next General Plan update. As the City looks to the future, Rancho Cucamonga will work to align our efforts with the State reduction targets and regional efforts through 2020 and beyond. Source: City of Rancho Cucamonga 51 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) PF: Public Facilities & Infrastructure PS: Public Health & Safety RC: Resource Conservation TM: Transportation & Mobility WR: Waste & Recycling WW: Water & Wastewater Legend CM: Community Mobility CS: Community Services ED: Economic Development EE: Energy Efficiency & Renewable GB: Green Building Performance LU: Land Use Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy TM Policy 1 Promote active transportation choices. CM 2.1 Facilitate bicycling and walking citywide. Transportation (On-Road) -1 Sustainable Community Strategy: Coordinates land use planning, regional transportation plans, and funding priorities in order to help California meet the GHG reduction goals. CM 2.2 Encourage all feasible measures to reduce total vehicle miles traveled by automobiles, including enhanced transit access and land use approaches that provide compact and focused development along major transit corridors. CM 3.8 Continue to encourage the provision of bicycle facilities such as bicycle lockers and secure bike parking, throughout the City. CM 3.9 Identify and implement a dedicated funding source for implementation and completion of the bicycle network as identified in the Bicycle Plan. CM 3.11 Continue to require pedestrian amenities on sidewalks on major streets that are key pedestrian routes, including the provision of benches, shade trees, and trash cans. Transportation CM 3.14 Enhance pedestrian and bicycle access to local and regional transit, including facilitating connections to transit. TM Policy 2 Utilize Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies citywide. CM 2.7 Require new developments of more than 100 employees (per building or per tenant/company) to develop Transportation Demand Management programs to minimize automobile trips and to encourage use of transit, ridesharing, bicycling, and walking. CM 4.3 Continue to implement Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) measures and advanced traffic management technologies where appropriate. CM 5.5 Allow shared parking between land uses where feasible and appropriate, and encourage “park-once” strategies to facilitate the efficient use of parking resources. PS 11.3 Support programs that increase ridesharing, reduce pollutants generated by vehicle use, and meet the transportation control measures recommended by SCAQMD in the most recent Clean Air Plan. TM Policy 3 Ensure safe and convenient transit options are available to all residents. CM 3.1 Consult with regional transit operators to maintain and improve the coverage and frequency of transit service in the City. Transportation (On-Road) -2 Smart Bus Technologies: Collaborate with OmniTrans to implement "Smart Bus" technology, global positioning system (GPS), and electronic displays at all transit stops by 2020 to provide customers with "real-time" arrival and departure information. CM 3.2 Support OmniTrans’ expansion of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) into Rancho Cucamonga, along Foothill Boulevard, with stops at all major north-south streets, and with direct routing via Victoria Gardens. CM 3.4 Consult with Omnitrans to establish and maintain transit hubs at Victoria Gardens, Chaffey College, the Metrolink Station, and other locations as appropriate to facilitate use of transit and transfers between transit services. CM 3.6 In addition to requiring private development to provide transit amenities, consult with regional transit operators to provide attractive and convenient bus stops, including shade/weather protection, seats, transit information, and bus shelters as appropriate. CM 8.1 Support regional transit options that improve access between Rancho Cucamonga and LA/Ontario International Airport. 53 Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy TM Policy 4 Increase the use of alternative fuels and electric vehicles. CM 2.3 Support the use of hybrid, electric, and low/zero emission vehicles. CM 2.4 Replace City vehicles with energy-efficient and alternative fuel source models when replacing vehicles or adding to the City’s fleet. CM 2.6 Accommodate charging and fueling stations for alternative fuel vehicles, and put forth strong efforts to have charging facilities provided at employment centers. RC 5.3 Explore and consider the costs and benefits of alternative fuel vehicles including hybrid, electric, natural gas, and hydrogen powered vehicles when purchasing new City vehicles. TM Policy 5 Facilitate efficient movement of vehicles throughout the city. CM 4.1 Continue to implement traffic management and traffic signal operation measures along the arterial roadway to minimize delay and congestion for all modes, without adversely impacting transit, bicycles, and pedestrians. Transportation CM 4.4 Maintain the City’s transportation infrastructure in good condition; develop and maintain adequate funding sources for its ongoing maintenance and upkeep. CM 6.2 Support appropriate regional plans for high-occupancy vehicle lanes, Bus Rapid Transit and express bus, rail transit, and high-speed rail, provided it does not negatively impact the City. CM 6.5 Consult with Caltrans, SCAG, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, SANBAG, OmniTrans, San Bernardino County, and the cities of Upland, Fontana, Ontario, and Montclair to coordinate regional transportation facilities, and to pursue Federal, State, and regional funds for local and regional traffic improvements. CM 7.1 Continue to maintain a truck circulation system that defines truck routes, directs the movement of trucks safely along major roadways, and minimizes truck travel on local and collector streets. ED 3.4 Improve internal circulation for all modes of transportation, consistent with the concept of “Complete Streets.” LU Policy 1 Support development and redevelopment of land use patterns that promote clean, green, and healthy living. LU 2.1 Plan for vibrant, pedestrian-friendly Mixed Use and high density residential areas at strategic infill locations along transit routes. LU 2.2 Require new infill development to be designed for pedestrians and automobiles equally, and to provide connections to transit and bicycle facilities. LU 2.3 Provide direct pedestrian connections between development projects where possible. LU 2.4 Promote complementary infill development, rehabilitation, and re-use that contribute positively to the surrounding residential neighborhood areas. Land Use LU 3.3 Locate regionally serving land uses with immediate access to the regional transportation network that is designed to provide maximum access capabilities and permit maximum dispersal of traffic. LU 3.4 Promote development that is sustainable in its use of land and that limits impacts to natural resources, energy, and air and water quality. LU 3.5 Work toward a sustainable jobs-housing balance by accommodating a range and balance of land uses within Rancho Cucamonga. LU 3.6 Create focused, pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods that are reminiscent of the qualities found in earlier days, particularly within the original communities of Cucamonga, Alta Loma, and Etiwanda, and along Historic Route 66 (Foothill Boulevard). LU 3.7 Encourage new development projects to build on vacant infill sites within a built-out area, and/or redevelop previously developed properties that are underutilized. LU 3.8 Implement land use patterns and policies that incorporate smart growth practices, including placement of higher densities near transit centers and along transit corridors, allowing Mixed Use development, and encouraging and accommodating pedestrian movement. LU 5.4 Promote a pedestrian-friendly corridor where employees can walk to restaurants, commercial services, and other amenities in the area. 54 Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy LU Policy 2 Provide for the preservation of parks, open space, and development. CS 1.1 Provide adequate park and recreational facilities that meet the City standard of 5.0 acres of parkland (including trails and special facilities) for every 1,000 persons. Land Use-1 Tree planting: Establish a citywide tree planting goal or tree preservation goal. CS 1.2 Develop parks that contribute to active and healthy lifestyles, and allow for a balanced commitment to both organized recreation activities and passive park environments. CS 1.5 Continue to require new development to provide needed park facilities through the various measures and tools available to the City (e.g., in-lieu fees and/or land dedication). CS 1.6 Pursue and expand joint use of public lands that are available and suitable for recreational purposes, including school district properties and flood control district, water district, and other utility properties. CS 1.8 Continue to build, renovate, and maintain parks in a manner that is environmentally sustainable. Land Use CS 6.2 Connect trails in Rancho Cucamonga to trails in the SanBernardino National Forest and other hillside open space areas. These trails shall include trailheads with vehicle parking and other amenities. RC 1.1 Preserve sensitive land resources that have significant native vegetation and/or habitat value. RC 1.2 Develop measures to preserve and enhance important views along north-south roadways, open space corridors, and at other key locations where there are significant views of scenic resources. RC 1.3 Protect visually prominent natural landforms and other sensitive land resources of citywide significance through measures such as design standards, hillside grading controls, and suitable land use designations as documented in the Managing Land Use, Community Design, and Historic Resources Chapter of this General Plan. Energy Efficiency EE Policy 1 Reduce energy demand by improved efficiency and building design. RC 4.1 Pursue efforts to reduce energy consumption through appropriate energy conservation and efficiency measures throughout all segments of the community. Energy-1 Energy efficiency of existing buildings: Promote energy efficiency in existing residential building and nonresidential buildings, and remove funding barriers to energy- efficiency improvements. RC 6.1 Add energy efficiency standards in the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code based on green building principles, to reduce energy consumption (particularly for heating, cooling, and lighting) in new construction. Energy-3 Green Building Ordinance: Adopt a green building ordinance that exceeds Title 24 standards (or any subsequent standards that replace the current Title 24 standards) by achieving at least Tier 1 voluntary standards within CALGreen2 for all new residential and nonresidential buildings. RC 6.3 Promote energy-efficient design features, including but not limited to, appropriate site orientation, use of light-colored roofing and building materials, and use of deciduous trees and wind-break trees to reduce fuel consumption for heating and cooling beyond the minimum requirements of Title 24 State Energy Codes. RC 6.4 Promote green practices and the use of energy saving designs and devices for new and existing buildings throughout the community. Consult with energy providers such as Southern California Edison, Southern California Gas, the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility, and others to establish and coordinate energy efficiency programs that promote energy efficient design in all projects and assist residential, commercial, and industrial users. PS 12.8 Develop green procurement plans and ensure energy savings in City operations and maintenance. EE Policy 2 Increase the amount of renewable energy use in Rancho Cucamonga. RC 4.2 Promote the use of renewable energy and alternative energy technology, and support efforts to develop small-scale, distributed energy generation (e.g., solar, wind, cogeneration, and biomass) to reduce the amount of electricity drawn from the regional power grid and reduce the use of natural gas, while providing Rancho Cucamonga with a greater degree of energy and economic self-sufficiency. Energy-4 Solar Installation for new housing: Establish a goal for solar installations on new homes to be achieved before 2020. 55 Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy RC 4.3 Encourage the use of solar energy systems in homes and commercial businesses. Energy-5 Solar installation for new commercial: Establish a goal for solar installations on new commercial and industrial developments to be achieved before 2020. RC 5.2 Investigate the feasibility of using solar (photovoltaic) lights for City operated parking lots instead of conventional street and pedestrian lights that are powered by electricity in an effort to conserve energy. Energy-6 Solar for warehouse space: Promote and incentivize solar installations on existing and new warehouse space through partnerships with SCE and other private sector funding sources. Energy Efficiency PS 12.2 Encourage renewable energy installation, and facilitate green technology and business and a reduction in community-wide energy consumption. Energy-7 Solar installation for existing housing: Establish a goal for solar installations on existing single family housing to be achieved before 2020. Energy-8 Solar installation for existing commercial/industrial: Establish a goal for solar installations on existing commercial/industrial buildings to be achieved before 2020. Energy-9 Co-generation facilities: Encourage co‐generation facilities to supply 15% of building energy in new commercial and industrial facilities greater than 100,000 square feet. Green Building Performance GB Policy 1 Facilitate the use of green building practices. ED 4.2 Make green building and green business a priority. PS-1 GHG Performance Standards for New development: Support implementation of the performance standard to reduce GHG emissions attributable to new discretionary development projects at least 20% to 29% by 2020. RC 4.4 Reduce operational energy requirements through sustainable and complementary land use and circulation planning. Support implementation of State mandates regarding energy consumption and greenhouse gas reduction, including AB32 and SB375. RC 6.1 Add energy efficiency standards in the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code based on green building principles, to reduce energy consumption (particularly for heating, cooling, and lighting) in new construction. RC 6.2 Encourage green practices for new and existing buildings throughout the community. RC 6.4 Promote green practices and the use of energy saving designs and devices for new and existing buildings throughout the community. Consult with energy providers such as Southern California Edison, Southern California Gas, the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility, and others to establish and coordinate energy efficiency programs that promote energy efficient design in all projects and assist residential, commercial, and industrial users. PF 1.5 Continue to incorporate low-maintenance features into public facilities consistent with the City’s sustainability plan. GB Policy 2 Promote opportunities to improve environmental health, disaster resiliency, and workplace wellness. CM 2.8 Support the installation of high-speed communications infrastructure to facilitate the ability of residents to work at home. 56 Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy PF 1.1 Continue to implement high-quality standards for new public facilities and improvements to existing buildings. PS 1.2 Strive to limit loss of life and property as a result of wildland fires through adequate wildland fire protection services, education and enforcement of defensible space and brush clearance requirements, and wildland fire evacuation and preparedness plans. PS 2.1 Support an appropriate level of individual and community preparedness. RC 5.1 The City should serve as a role model by adopting recognizable standards and incorporating the use of sustainable strategies for new and existing public buildings that maximize occupant health and productivity, minimize operating costs, and provide good environmental stewardship. WW Policy 1 Support efforts to reduce potable water usage per capita in Rancho Cucamonga. RC 2.2 Continue to consult with the Cucamonga Valley Water District (CVWD) and support programs that protect water quality, conserve water usage, and promote re-use of water in accordance with State guidelines. Water-1 Require Adoption of Voluntary CALGreen Water Efficiency Measures for new Construction: Require adoption of the voluntary CALGreen water efficiency measures (at least Tier 1) for new construction. Water & Wastewater RC 3.1 Require the use of cost-effective methods to conserve water in new developments, and promote appropriate water conservation and efficiency measures for existing businesses and residences. Water-2 Implement a Program to Renovate Existing Buildings to Achieve Higher Levels of Water Efficiency: Implement a program to renovate existing residential and nonresidential buildings to achieve higher levels of water efficiency. RC 3.3 Support efforts to expand the recycled water distribution system and actively promote the widespread use of recycled water in Rancho Cucamonga. Water-4 Implement SBX -7-7 The Water Conservation Act of 2009: Requires urban water agencies throughout California to increase conservation to achieve a statewide goal of a 20% reduction in urban per capita use (compared to nominal 2005 levels) by December 31, 2020. PF 5.1 Support programs of the Cucamonga Valley Water District (CVWD) that make every practical effort to minimize leaks in the water and recycled water distribution systems, through regular monitoring and maintenance. PF 6.2 Consult with the Inland Empire Utilities Agency and the Cucamonga Valley Water District (CVWD) to ensure that the treatment facility has sufficient capacity to meet future wastewater treatment needs. PS 12.5 Provide green building incentives, assess green building techniques as a formal stage of project review, and develop a green building ordinance or program that addresses both new and existing buildings. Adaptation strategies will also include increased water efficiency in buildings. WW Policy 2 Continue to expand water conservation efforts citywide. LU 10.1 Continue to require implementation of the City’s Water Efficiency Ordinance, which should be reviewed and updated periodically. Water-3 Water efficient Landscaping practices: Establish a goal that a certain percentage of all water used for non‐potable sources be recycled (and treated) wastewater. LU 10.3 Promote low water usage, and emphasize fire-safe defensible space. RC 3.2 Encourage the conversion of water-intensive turf/landscape areas to landscaping that uses climate-appropriate plants, efficient irrigation systems, and water efficient site maintenance. RC 3.4 Maximize water efficiency and the use of alternative sources of water in City operations, and develop water-related best practices and model programs. 57 Sustainable Community Action Plan Policy General Plan Policy SBCOG GHG Reduction Plan Strategy WR Policy 1 Expand programs to decrease waste sent to landfills. PF 7.1 Continue to adopt programs and practices that minimize the amount of materials entering the waste stream. Encourage recycling and composting in all sectors of the community, including recycling of construction and demolition materials, in order to divert items from entering landfills. Waste-2 Increased Waste Diversion: Exceed the waste diversion goal (50%) by adopting citywide waste goals of at least 75% of waste diversion. Waste & Recycling PF 7.3 Embrace the sustainability principle that recognizes and takes advantage of the life cycle of goods and materials. PF 7.5 Continue to educate the community regarding the benefits of solid waste diversion, recycling and composting, and maintain programs that make it easy for all people in Rancho Cucamonga to work toward and achieve City waste reduction objectives. PS 3.3 Educate residents and businesses about proper disposal methods of household hazardous waste, and the availability of less toxic materials that can be used in place of more toxic household materials. WR Policy 2 Expand opportunities to recycle organic materials. PF 7.1 Continue to adopt programs and practices that minimize the amount of materials entering the waste stream. Encourage recycling and composting in all sectors of the community, including recycling of construction and demolition materials, in order to divert items from entering landfills. PS 12.6 Encourage efforts to reduce waste generation and re-use and support increased recycling and composting opportunities with a focus on large commercial and industrial waste producers. 58 Active Transportation Any form of human-powered transportation such as walking, bicycling, etc. Bikesharing Short-term bicycle rentals that allow users to access bicycles on an “as-needed” basis. California Air Pollution Control Officers Association (CAPCOA) A non-profit association of the air pollution control officers from all 35 local air quality agencies throughout California that promotes clean air and provides a forum for sharing knowledge and information. California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Legislation and corresponding procedural components established in 1970 by the State of California to require environmental review for projects anticipated to result in adverse impacts to the environment. California Green Building Code (CALGreen) Statewide green building code designed to improve public health, safety and general welfare by enhancing the design and construction of buildings. Clean Air Vehicle A vehicle that meets specific emissions standards as defined by the California Department of Motor Vehicles. Clean Technology Products, processes or services that reduce waste and require as few non-renewable resources as possible. Climate Change The long-term shift in regional and global weather patterns, including temperature. Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) A multi-disciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior through environmental design. Conservation The management of natural resources to prevent waste, destruction or neglect. Cucamonga Valley Water District (CVWD) A local agency that serves Rancho Cucamonga with irrigation and domestic (drinking) water. Environmental Impact Report (EIR) A report identifying potential environmental impacts that could result from implementing a particular plan or program. Electric Vehicle (EV) Alternative fuel automobile that uses electric motors and motor controllers for propulsion, in place of more common propulsion methods such as the internal combustion. First Mile/Last Mile First mile/last mile refers to the beginning or ending portion of a trip, which often includes various modes of transportation to connect to transit. Greenwaste The vegetative portion of waste from various sources including waste from domestic and commercial operations. Greywater The less contaminated portion of domestic wastewater, including wash water from clothes, wasters, and laundry tubs. 59 Green Building Environmentally responsible and resource-efficient processes throughout a building’s life-cycle: from siting to design, construction, operation, maintenance, renovation, and demolition. Green Job Work in agricultural, manufacturing, research and development (R&D), administrative, and service activities that contribute(s) substantially to preserving or restoring environmental quality. Greenhouse Effect A term used to describe the warming of the Earth’s atmosphere due to accumulated carbon dioxide and other gases in the upper atmosphere. These gases absorb energy radiated from the Earth’s surface, “trapping” it in the same manner as glass in a greenhouse traps heat. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) Atmospheric gases that contribute to the greenhouse effect by absorbing infrared radiation produced by solar warming of the Earth’s surface. Groundwater Water that exists beneath the Earth’s surface typically found between saturated soils and rock, and is used to supply wells and springs. Home Energy Renovation Opportunity (HERO) Program An energy efficient financing program for homeowners that utilizes a property assessment (see PACE) to fund projects. High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) A traffic lane restricted to vehicles with at least two passengers, for the purpose of encouraging carpooling and reducing traffic congestion and air pollution. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) International body for assessing the science related to climate change. The IPCC provides policymakers with regular assessments of the scientific basis of climate change, its impacts and future risks, and options for adaptation and mitigation. Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) A green building certification program that recognizes best-in-class building strategies and practices. Low Impact Development A land planning and engineering design approach to manage stormwater runoff and protect water quality that emphasizes conservation and use of on-site natural features. Mixed-Use Any mixture of land uses on a single parcel, including mixtures of residences with commercial, offices and retail. As distinguished from a single use land use designation or zone, mixed use refers to an authorized variety of uses for buildings and structures in a particular area. Open Streets Open streets initiatives temporarily close streets to automobile traffic, so that people may use them for walking, bicycling, dancing, playing, and socializing. Organics Food Waste, greenwaste, landscape and pruning waste, nonhazardous wood waste and food-soiled paper waste that is mixed in with food waste. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) A financing option available to property owners to fund energy efficient, water-saving and renewable energy upgrade projects through an assessment on their property tax bills. Quimby Act California State Law requires provisions for the dedication of parkland, or the payment of fees in lieu of dedication of land, as a condition of approval of residential subdivisions. It further sets a target of three acres of parkland for each 1,000 residents. 60 Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) RCMU provides electricity to over 900 metered businesses and residents in the Southeastern area of the City of Rancho Cucamonga. Renewable Energy Any energy source that is naturally replenished like that derived from solar, wind, geothermal or hydroelectric action. San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG) San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG), formerly known as SANBAG, is the council of governments and transportation planning agency for San Bernardino County. San Bernardino County Transportation Authority (SBCTA) The council of governments and regional transportation planning agency for San Bernardino County. Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) The nation’s largest metropolitan planning organization, representing six counties, 191 cities and more than 18 million residents in Southern California. Shared Parking A land use/development strategy that optimizes parking capacity by allowing complementary land uses to share parking spaces, rather than producing separate parking for each use. Telecommuting A work arrangement in which employees do not commute to a central place of work. Transportation Demand Management (TDM) A general term for strategies that result in more efficient use of transportation resources. Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Describes a type of community development that includes a mixture of housing, office, retail and/or other amenities integrated into a walkable neighborhood and located within a half-mile of quality public transportation. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Name given to a substance that contains carbon and that evaporates (becomes a vapor) or “off-gases” at room temperature. Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT) A measurement of miles traveled by vehicles within a specified region for a specified time period. Wastewater Water that has already been used for washing, flushing, or in a manufacturing process, and therefore contains waste products such as sewage or chemical by-products. 61 (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) 1 General Description Community engagement is a key component of the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan. This survey was a way to generate feedback a wide cross-section of the community regarding their priorities for environmental sustainability. This survey, which was not designed as a statistically valid survey, was administered at numerous community events and meetings of local organizations and was available electronically through the City’s website. Surveys were administered and available to the public between March 2016 and May 2016. Purpose The purpose of conducting the community survey was to identify community values, determine where there is support for cleaner and greener changes throughout the City, and to determine what environmentally conscious activities residents already incorporate into their lifestyles. Questions Survey questions were developed with input from the Sustainability Action Plan Task Force—a groups of 25 stakeholders from the community. Surveys were available in both English and Spanish, and available electronically and in hardcopy format. Surveys included a brief introduction of the Sustainability Action Plan, eight questions regarding sustainability practices and priorities, and five demographics questions to help inform responses. The survey introduction and questions are as follows: 2 3 4 Participants Surveys were circulated at the following community and civic events/meetings with approximately 1,077 surveys were taken citywide: Community Events:  Chaffey College Earth Day Event  Cucamonga Challenge Event  CVWD Earth Day Event  Rancho Cucamonga Day Event  Alta Loma High School Military March Event  RC Resource Fair Event  Terra Vista Farmers Market Event Civic Groups:  Chaffey Student Energy Club  Chamber of Commerce  Rancho Cucamonga Chapparral Mobile Home Residents  City Civic Group  Community Champion Civic Group  HRC Steering Committee  Rancho Cucamonga SAP Interdepartmental Advisory Group  Kiwanis Club  Los Osos Environmental Club  RC Service Council  Rotary Club  Senior Advisory Committee  Senior VIP Meeting  West End Realtors  Healthy RC Youth Leaders Notable Responses There were several trends and consistent responses across a large pool of participants identifying these trends may help shape future policies for the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan by placing emphasis on what community members care most about. The highest recorded responses are as follows:  70% of respondents reported using energy efficient lighting and bulbs as what they currently do to help the environment. 5  77% of respondents cited access to parks, trails, and open space as the main aspect of Rancho Cucamonga that make it easy to lead an environmentally friendly lifestyle.  31% of respondents cited a lack of available local jobs as the leading factor that prevents leading an environmentally friendly lifestyle.  51% of respondents said lower utility bills would encourage implementing additional sustainability practices.  40% of respondents placed highest importance on health and wellbeing for inclusion on the Sustainability Action Plan.  79% of respondents place extreme importance on having a clean and healthy environment to live in.  54% of respondents are extremely concerned about global environmental issues. A full detailed list of survey results are provided in Attachment A. Conclusions The data collected from this survey was used to identify and draft additional outreach questions for the Community Forum. The responses will ultimately inform policies and actions for the Sustainability Action Plan by identifying areas of concern and support for sustainability advancements in Rancho Cucamonga. Based on survey responses, the Sustainability Action Plan should consider strategies that continue to support walking trails and access to open space, offer incentives for residents and business owners to reduce waste, energy and water consumption, and attract local businesses to increase the local workforce. The majority of respondents expressed strong support for living in a clean and healthy environment. 6 Survey Results: This section includes charts with responses from the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan Community Survey. 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 If you could do only one thing to make Rancho Cucamonga more environmentally sustainable, what would it be? (Write in your answer below) This question had over 500 responses, which are listed below.  Walking to school/work etc.  Less traffic  Plant trees and other plants  Artificial turf around shopping centers (conserve water)  Renew all energy with solar panels  I would recycle more!  Recycle  Recycle  Use less water  Water reclaimation  Recycle  Offer low cost program to help home owners plant drought tolerant/resilient plants  Save as much water and keep the community clean  Mandate more solar energy use  Re-use rain water to parks  Farmers markets in City  Clean healthy food. No meats that have been treated inhumanely nor w/ chemicals  Harness the wind in east Rancho close to Fontana for energy don't know if it's cost efficient?  Clean air and water  Recycle  Save water  Do not damage the mountains  Green building  Green building  Growing trees  Grow trees  Become more active in environmentally involved  Subsidize gray water systems  More trees on the trail, shade!!  Drive less-rideshare-public transportation  Community Cooperation  Requiring businesses to recycle papers, glass, aluminum  Recycle more  Recycle  Less housing, more nature  More safe walking/running/biking routes  More recycle bins  Be involved  Teach people how to gather and contain the rain when it comes! Swales, collect roof water runoff, cisterns etc.  More community gardens  Compost  Recycle locations  Clean city  More solar panel opportunities for homeowners (rebates), drought resistant plants (rebates)  keep it clean  Solar roads  Less building- more attention to nature preservation.  Light rail throughout town  community garden 14  More hard to grow food at home.  Make more trails for walking and biking safely  Nature preservation  Sobre medio ambiente  More recycling/housing (low income)  Build more wind turpine for energy.  Plan more trees  Effort into community garden.  To use the bike trails more.  City rain conservation/city compost/community garden  Access to recycle bins at almost any area possible we can put in  Solar and wind renewables  conservacion de energia/energy concervation  Nature preservation  More public transit  More public transit  Limit urban development.  More solar panels.  Un mejor parque en old tow park/ a better park at old tow park  Mas areas verdes y parques/ more green spaces and parks.  Poner banquetas sobre 9th st/ Add sidewalks on 9th St.  Ayudar a recycling/ help with recycling  Waste + recycling education  Water conservation & recharging  Awareness-education  More solar power  More bike paths  More recycle bind per house  Drought resistant plants  Safe  Make it safer  Windmills! Or better renewable energy  More support for drought tolerant gardens and common grounds.  Easier to recycle/shread/hhw  inform others  Remove my grass, but can't afford it  compost recycle  Programs to encourage green living at the neighborhood level!  More recycling centers  Less water usage  Info on growing own food.  being able to use zero scape in hofts  I would make sure on st. cleaning day that o vetts are park on that day. I would have a pkg control office to cite the ones that are pkd. Thats give revenue to tour city and our sts would be cleaner.  Renewable energy rebates/programs  recycling and resuse  Go solar at home  implement a better water saving system  More trees planted.  Public Awareness  save water, save energy, take care environment  Access to health care ( would lower greehouse gas)  recycling  Financial incentives to offset cost of low water landscaping  Reuse of water safety  Help in getting more drought tolerant yards.  Make our bus system more efficient. They are never on time. There's so few buses.  biodegradating  Addition of more public transit  limit overcrowding 15  More family event  More recycling  Local produce more available  Have more parks.  install solar panel  recycling cans everywhere!!!  help with buying alternate fuel vehicle  better public transport  sobre medio ambiente/ about the built environment  more trees?  water conservation  water run off  recycle  save water  doing great job so far  add more plants  less building  Water use conservation  Lower utility bills  Cut down showers to 5 minutes  remove large spans of grass to conserve water  Plant more trees / fruit trees  Limit the ownership of dogs (4 and 5 too many per family). Plus the waste from the dogs are not picked up.  conserve water  more handicap parking  Plant more succulants  Helping senior in daily activities  reduce emission of carbon  Public gardens  Make recycling cans more available to home owners.  male the politicians aware and vote for.  recycling  More recycling  Communicate more to all families get the word out.  more save on water  Change sand at parks to rubbermats  Public transportation  he growth of city in very fast. To (?) in horrible (?) of the day eventough roads are wide. If that can be taken care it would be of great help.  less traffic  H2O runoff reservoirs  Save water. Grow more trees.  Advocate next phase of Gold line to go north from Glenwood to North Rancho  i love RC- nothing  Plan a reusable water system city wide. Plan to reuse rainwater city wide (not just the wash concrete)!  more solar power use  recycle  More public transportation  Better public transportation  cleaner water  conserve water  Focus on classes which teach and provide access to information about gardening, saving water, potlucks, etc.  limit home building  recycle  Have more of this.  have more plants with less water  recycle  recycling  walk more  waste/rain water harvesting  less grass to water  cleaner water  trash soting  bikeiding 16  More reusable energy generador  cheaper housing  solar panels  water conservation  More recycle bins in apartment complex.  stop watering lawns  more recycle bins/places open longer  Eliminate polluting factories creating smog.  Pick up trash  solar panels  I would want to help make meeting and gather ups more information leading to environmental stable world.  Grow lots more and have farmer's markets all over.  Build more house in the open space.  Cut the amount of gas in the air.  To have more recycling containers around campus.  Provide assistance in converting green landscaping to desert scape.  stop people from litering  walk and clean trash  More open places  more gardens  Recycle energy and keep the safe  use renewable energy  Become more green, make solar panel for light  More public transportation routes.  solar energy  Rent a bike, better buses, more often.  Volunteer planting  compost  More recycling and waste cans in the city like public areas.  Yes I do this.  recycle  waste and recycling  more recycling plants  Easier biking / walking trails  More recycling centers.  solar and reusable water  more trash cans  Better food choices- local food-less processed, chemicals, etc.  less hours of construction workers with dust and using gasoline  i try to keep the city of clean as possible by not throwing trash anywhere  Put more solar for electricity to save city costs and money can go to other things.  water use conservation  more natural gasses  recycle and cleanup the environment  Maybe start a city clean up program to clean up trash and plant more plants.  more walking paths  more edible plants  convient and transportation  convert yard to drought tolerant plants  recycle  more trees  stop building homes so close together and open communities to all.  recycle clothes and toys  do my part  More places to dispose of garbage  effective public transportation  encourage train travel  more green space  give out free hybrid vehicles to everybody  I will have more community gardens and more green to see more trees on the trail (shade).  more public transport 17  more availability of recycling counters (time, places)  help the seniors better  plant  water use and concervation  Recycling  more places like bing  I recycle and conserve water  Financial incentives to offset cost of low water landscaping  convert business city to solar panels  get solar on business  Reuse of water safely  smoke free city  Help in getting more drought tolerant yards  public transportation that is easy to use  Make our bus system more efficient. They're never on time, and there's so few buses.  Biodegrading  educate people in school and people outside  try to employment Green Building or help with water usage  more community gardens/greenery  mandatory education class in the environment  more strict about water use  have local food markets  public transit  have more public transits and more energy conservation  Addition of more public transit  environmental education for all, thus can motivate community to take the right steps towards efficiency.  uncover cement to plant more trees (connection to appreciating nature)  Educate people how to be more environmentally sustainable.  more access to renewable energy sources  conserve water  Limit overcrowding  install a healthy learning (learning about the importance of environmental sustainability) program.  More family event  More recycling  It could be to give more people a better education on health.  Local produce more available  more education for the public on their affect on environmental sustainability  open more lanes/streets to have less traffic and more crosswalks  Have more parks  water concervation  Install solar panels  make our choices more known  to have everyone on my street save water  Recycling cans everywhere!  dd basketball courts to all playgrounds  Help with buying alternative fuel vehicle  Reuse rainwater  fewer plastics in landfills  Pick up any trash on the street  more drought tolerant plants and shade trees in parks  Better public transportation  limit the building going on  More support for drought tolerant gardening and common grounds  Easier to recycle/HHW  better road work  Inform others 18  retain rain water in reservoirs locally  Remove my grass, but can't afford it  compost, recycle  push for smog reduction- it seems as smog is greater lately.  Programs to encourage green living at the neighborhood level.  More recycling centers  improve transportation  Less water usage  have better water management and recycling education  Info on growing own food.  institute public awareness campaign to beautify R.C. to encourage individual responsibility to keep the environment clean.  Being able to use zero scape in HOAs  better public transportation/convinience  I would make sure on street cleaning day that no vehicles are park on that day. I would have a parking control officer to cite the ones that are parked. That gives revenue to our city and our streets would be cleaners.  Renewable energy rebates/programs  Recycling & reuse  help establish committee for solar energy assistance  Go solar at home  Implement a better water saving system  limit population growth. control immigration growth.  climate smog  climate control: lean more about + publicize "chemtrails" has been in our stairs every day. chemicals being discharge into our atmosphere every day for "climate control". this is real!  don't know  More trees planted  Public Awareness  here in 1979 everything is too expensive beyond my means  Save water, save energy, take care environment  Access to Health Care (would lower greenhouse gas)  having more renewable energy  every single street has a sidewalk and well lit. plus not wild life to attach someone.  add charging stations (cars)  conserving it's natural resources and environment  separation of road and bicycle trail/tracks; restrictions on plastics  increasing the use of renewable energy  put solar panes up at a choffey parking lot  improve population density  recycle more  green buildings  plant vegetable gardens  not sure  clean our community stop polluting  use more solar panels  water concervation  more affordable housing  inform the public of what is available  support any program that assist with this mirror and example env sustainability  implement what I learn  do not allow chem trail spraying and pesticide spraying find a greener way to address those issues.  jobs  bike to work 19  recycle  more education through open public events  fruit gardens  increase renewable energy  picking up the trash that is around here  more information about opportunity  more walking  pick up whenever possible  remove plants that need water frequently adapt to changing environmental conditions  recycle more!  don't know at this time  big super market  Give free solar  A raise in quality of life  Picking up trash  More cleanup of trash  Recycle  Recycle available and convenient everywhere-apartments have trash everywhere but few recycle areas, inconvenient.  Energy conservation  Less traffic  Conservation  Promote reduced use of fuel  Provide solar system on affordable rate to single family houses.  Plant more trees.  Get rid of all trash  Conserve water  Community Garden  Have free re-usable grocery bags.  Have the Mayor speak to the whole city.  To make an event to pick up trash  Cleaner streets, walkways  Connect my irrigation to recycled water system.  Recycle more products and use energy efficiency light bulbs.  Promote/encourage walking and biking instead of car use  synchronize the traffic lights, reduce stops, and eliminate carbon from idling vehicles. Eliminate all drive-through facilities  promote solar energy  Shop locally  Community (co-operation) buy in on programs.  City Citizens work together to help make all yards drought tolerant.  Stop ripping out the grass everywhere!  Public transit  More solar throughout the city  Create more opportunities to help the environment  Spread awareness  Reduce our CO2 Emissions  More churches for the Lord  Implement solar for every house  Open spaces for community gardens  Make caring about the environment acceptable.  Continue to walk to work  Walk places  Recycle  I ride my bike each day  Get a community green club  I could ride my bike  I would introduce new ideas to less knowledgeable groups.  Recycling  Use more solar panels and recycle more 20  Have information available about environmental updates  Grey water reclamation  Friendly neighborhoods  Recycle and save energy  Work on making parks and nature safe to explore and enjoy  Recycle  I would place more recycling cans  Put more trash bags around the city & parks  World Peace  Give money  Bike more  Give people more information and access to environmentally sustainable environment.  Re-use bags, walk as much as possible  More Recycling  Recycle/encouragement  Recycling bin placement-more of them  Walk and bike  Encourage more recycling  Access to solar energy be cheaper  Recycle more-conserve water  Recycle water  Keep smart people employed  To actually follow through with plans  More drought tolerant landscaping  Health & wellbeing  Install solar in my home, purchase new car  Stormwater management  Continued public events for awareness  Create neighborhood level renewable energy co-ops  Help recycle  Install more solar  Affordable housing, well planned neighborhoods  plant more trees and ban topping off trees  Provide more information by give out the flyer  More bus transportation  Water conservation  Have more plants and tree that require less water  Set aside/purchase by city some open land instead of building more houses  Continue water consumption reduction  Better use of water (save water, catch rain water, etc.)  Have more info  More renewable energy  Preserve nature  Promote renewable energy  More areas with abundant drought tolerant vegetation  Water conservation rules being enforced  Less lawn to save money  I would try to recycle more and go volunteer  Tell people about drought tolerant plants  Increase the ability to effectively conserve and use water with better management and collection of water.  Rain water collection  Have more public buildings use solar energy  More frequent removal of liter and trash  More accessible ways to discard hazardous waste  Use was conservation tools  Have access to car charging stations to encourage others to get those types of cars. 21  Advertise how to maintain healthy lifestyles  Reduce car emmissions  Farmers Market  Shop locally  Try to lower the amount of excess driving.  Provide more jobs, trainings  Allow for housing to be built w/ shipping containers  Water  Promote alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure  Make solar energy a requirement for businesses  Open a home for homless  Campaign and tools to better capture rain water for use  Give our more flyer about the Healthy RC information to the community.  I'm ready to pass flyers with lots of info.  Teach the importance of eating healthy and shop locally  Make the community aware  Better public transportation  Helping Rancho to become a safer place to live through our resources.  Purchase an alternative fuel vehicle  Local produce  Open-Ended Response  Prevent using plastic  Preserve nature and less development  More solar  Promote activities or design that reduces discourages use of a motorized vehicle - encourage people to walk or use clean fuel public transit.  Have better public transit.  educate the community by providing information and resources  Eliminate the lunacy about "Global Warming" and focus on the practical aspects of personal responsibility to implement a Sustainability Action Plan  put a moratorium on building new apartment complex's & condominiums  Decrease the allowed building area on a lot. Theses houses are too big for the land they are built on.  I would ride my bike to work.  Provide solar panels  Extend the future Gold Line from Montclair to ONT through Rancho Cucamonga, with stops in Upland, Rancho, and at the airport terminals.  Reduce restrictions on backyard chickens.  Better public transit  Don't charge for parking at Metrolink Station.  Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Facility to open more than just Saturday morning, extend service to an additional weekday.  It would be interesting to have classes or informative sessions on resources or ideas to be environmentally sustainable.  91701-Beryl Park Tennis Court Lights- Court lights remain on throughout the entire night. These lights should not be used for security purposes, rather a more efficient and appropriate energy saving illumination system should be utilized, or a programmable gate locking mechanism installed if vandelism is of concern. At the very least turn off two of the court lights because the court lights from one 22 court can easily light up the court its next too.  Change all of the middle dividers on the streets to something that does not need to be watered. This shows the residents that we are trying to be more environmentally friendly.  Reduce the speed limits on streets where the limit is 50 mph to encourage more walking and biking, create more parklets/pocket parks/shady seating areas to encourage people to spend more time outdoors  More local shops, food and stores  All the chemtrails above us now both night and day have a restriction put on these above our city!  maintain existing open space and discourage unnecessary additional urban development  Find additional revenue sources to properly maintain our parks, parkways, medians, landscapes, trails and trails  upgrade to drought tolerant landscaping throughout the entire city. still so many green belts that need to be maintained.  Implement a robust public transit system to include local access and connect to non-local transit systems including Ontario airport.  Reduce water usage for businesses during rainy days.  Make all city landscapes waterwise and low maintenance using proper plant selection  educate  Get malls,business centers, warehouses to use drought tolerant plants. Get parks to turn off lights in morning. Hire people to enforce water use.  start a bulk item pick up/drop off program to give residents a free way to dispose of items that are cluttering up the house or yard.  I'd like to begin composting and produce less waste.  I would create a after school program where children could volunteer and learn about preserving the environment, maybe they can pick up trash or recycle.  More affordable housing Bike-share programs throughout the City  Remove grass, plant trees.  Have more recycle cans out for public use.  Stop development, use what we have. Example: look at all the cars parked at the high schools all the way down to the elementary. No one walks anymore. Drive down Foothill and Baseline, cars, cars and more cars creating unsafe air  offer more appealing public transportation  reduce private transportation.  Decrease use of electricity through: use of LED lighting and budget based electrical standards on residential and commercial businesses.  City buildings need to use resources more effectively. theres way too much paper and plastic waste produced daily.  Recycle, compost, minimize impact through reusable and environmentally friendly products. Teach my children about all of it.  Have more farmer's market towards different sides of town not just at Victoria gardens  increase more fund to educate not only children; but also adult to a eat healthy 23 diet for healthy lifestyle and prevent diabetes.  Why do we spend time separating recyclable items only to have the garbage truck put them in the same truck? Makes no sense, it's a waste of time and energy.  Provide more pedestrian bridges across busy streets to encourage foot traffic and to decrease vehicle traffic.  Im in a flood zone.. it is environmentally unsafe to live in.. needs to be taken off the flood zone, dirty toxic waste water.  less vehicle traffic. encourage residents to carpool  Have everybody consume less stuff.  Communicate/advertise options for being environmentally sustainable  Have high density housing to have days of the week recycle programs through a local recycling business. i.e. Green Waste - Mon, Plastics - Tues, Cans - Wed, Glass - Thurs, Large & Tech Appliances - Fri, Etc.  I would want to be the first city in the US to convert all of our toilets to not potable water. We waste millions of gallons of perfectly good drinking water on flushing what is already waste. I often think of the water conservation that alone would provide for our residents.  Supply materials to the community for composting.  Volunteer in community  Recycling facilities. There are NONE for the multi-housing complexes (condos and apartments). So many people in Rancho live in these complexes and their recyclables are all going in the trash. City facilities are not good about recycling as the cleaning crews and Burtec do not seem to understand and/or cooperate.  My condo complex does not provide for recycling. I wish that it was required of all complexes to have recycling.  walk to lunch instead of taking a vehicle  I would make a restraint  More green more efficient water system  Use less energy in schools  Help conserve water  Help conserve water  Feel the Burn!  More recycling  Education  More water conservation  Reduce water  Reduce water  Affordable housing  Compost bin for each household  Limitation of city watering.  Population reduction  Stop driving  I would start making a club where they could join and we could all get bags and clean up trash and other stuff  Make more trails  Bring low cost alternatives if transport  Pick up trash when I see it 24 Demographics Information 25 26 1 General Description In an effort to identify the location for preferred sustainability advancements around the City, a mapping exercise with stickers representing new activities or changes was created by both City staff and the consultant team, Raimi + Associates. This exercise was used as part of the city’s “popup outreach materials” or materials that would be available at various community events in an effort to reach a wide variety of community members, business owners and visitors to the area. Participants placed stickers on aerial maps of the city to show support for improvements and activities at specific locations that would advance Rancho Cucamonga’s sustainability efforts. As part of the planning process these results will be analyzed for economic, health and environmental feasibility to be added into the City of Rancho Cucamonga’s Sustainability Action Plan. The mapping exercise was available to participants at various community events between March 2016 and June 2016. Purpose The purpose of conducting the mapping exercise was for participants to identify specific locations which they would like to see certain sustainability related changes. Participants The mapping exercise was circulated at the following events: Cucamonga Challenge CVWD Earth Day Chaffey College Earth Day Terra Vista Farmers Market June Community Forum + Sustainability Expo Alta Loma High School Military March Stickers used in the mapping exercise 2 Participation Mapping exercise responses collected from the Cucamonga Challenge event Mapping exercise responses collected from the CVWD Earth Day event 3 Mapping exercise responses collected from the CVWD Earth Day, Chaffey College Earth Day, and Terra Vista Farmers Market events Mapping exercise responses collected from the Alta Loma High School Military March event 4 Notable Responses While all feedback was recorded and documented there were several trends and consistent responses across a substantial pool of participants. These trends may help shape future policies for the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan by placing emphasis on what community members care most about. Some key feedback included:  Add more lighting and sidewalks and walking trails near city schools  Preserve open space near city boundaries  Improve public parks by adding farmer’s markets, drought tolerant landscaping, trees and green space, bike lanes and bike parking  Add drought tolerant landscaping, farmer’s markets, bike lanes and bike parking around Chaffey College  Preserve open space, add lighting and farmer’s markets around the Rancho Cucamonga Family Sport Center  Improve the areas around Cucamonga Elementary and Rancho Cucamonga Middle School including; add drought tolerant landscaping, bike lanes and bike parking, preserve open space, add sidewalks and walking trails, add trees and green scape, and EV charging stations.  Add higher density development in areas around Etiwanda High School, around the Civic Center, areas between Town Center and Church Street, north of Etiwanda Elementary Park, near Empire Lakes Golf Course, and near Victoria Gardens. Conclusions Feedback collected from the mapping exercises will help identify areas of the city that need activities and changes to make a cleaner, greener community. The majority of respondents expressed strong support for living in a clean and healthy environment. Additionally, preliminary results indicate residents would prefer improvements around schools, public parks and community centers, and increase access to farmer’s markets, safe models of active transportation, and preserved open space. 1 On June 2, 2016 approximately 200 community members gathered at the Victoria Garden’s Cultural Center to share thoughts and brainstorm ideas about the future for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga. The event was held from 5:30pm to 8:15pm and included a sustainability expo with 20 organizations and vendors, complimentary refreshments from local healthy dining restaurants, and a workshop that included a presentation with small group discussions. The formal program began with a brief introduction from the Mayor followed by a presentation about the City’s sustainability efforts. There were 15 tables of small group discussion, where participants answered questions about priorities for sustainability based on a community survey completed by over 1,000 people in the area. Purpose The purpose of the Community Forum and Sustainability Expo was to engage community members in the development of a Sustainability Action Plan, identify values from participants, and develop a clear direction for creating policies for the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan. Marketing In order to ensure robust attendance, and aggressive marketing campaign was launched citywide. Efforts included: city website announcement, a flyer which was available at all public facilities, posters, and a smaller save-the-date card. The Rancho Cucamonga Community Forum and Sustainability Expo Save the date card and flyer for the Community Forum 2 Sustainability Expo The event began with an outdoor exhibit of local organizations who provided information on how to lower utility bills, reduce water consumption, plant your own garden, or utilize alternative transportation. Exhibitors included:  Animal Care & Adoption Center  Southern California Edison  Environmental Programs  Cucamonga Valley Water District  Rancho Cucamonga Fire District  Farm Fresh to You  Fleet Department  Friends of the PE Trail  San Bernardino County Sheriff  Grid Alternatives  SB County UCCE Master Gardeners  HERO Program/Renovate America  Site One Landscape Supply  Inland Empire Biking Alliance  SoCal Gas  Metrolink  Solar City  OmniTrans  The Toro Company  Booth Activities During the expo, participants were encouraged to visit the various activity stations inside the Cultural Center including a photo booth exercise where participants shared their vision for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga, a mapping exercise where participants used stickers to identify sustainability amenities they would like to see around the city, and an editing exercise where participants were invited to edit the draft objectives and vision statement for the project. Participation in the photo booth exercise was high, while the mapping and editing exercises had much lower participation. Outdoor booths at the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Expo 3 Photo booth Participants were invited to pose with sustainability related props and take a photo displaying their sustainability vision by completing the statement, “My vision for sustainability in Rancho Cucamonga is.” These photos where circulated inside the main activity room on a slideshow for everyone to enjoy. Participants responses included:  Electric cars for all!  More bike lanes  More trails  More trees Mapping exercise Participants were encouraged to place activity stickers on an aerial map of Rancho Cucamonga and display where they feel sustainability related amenities are needed. Participants used stickers to indicate the need for bike lanes, a farmers market and bus/rail stops at and around Victoria Gardens. A sticker was placed along Haven Avenue demonstrate the need for electric vehicle charging stations along the busy corridor. Participants also placed stickers for mixed use and higher density development and trees and parks space in the Empire Lakes area and placed stickers near Rancho Cucamonga Middle School and RC Family Sports Center indicating the need for farmers markets. Stickers provided for the exercise Results from the mapping exercise Participants at the photo booth 4 Objectives + Vision Statement Editing Posters displaying the draft vision statement and project objectives were available for participants to edit using stickers, markers and pens. Few participants responded to this activity. Those who did participate placed preference on protecting habitat and biological resources, supporting local small businesses, expanding workforce training, increasing access to locally grown food across the region, and providing safe and convenient walking and biking for residents and visitors. There was no feedback from participants on the draft vision statement for the Sustainability Action Plan. Refreshments Local Healthy RC Dining Restaurants supplied complementary refreshments to participants in the courtyard of Celebration Hall. The Healthy RC Dining Program encourages eating healthy by providing healthy food options for people dining out in Rancho Cucamonga. These restaurants included:  BJ’s Restaurants & Brewery  Corner Bakery Café  Haandi Indian Restaurant  Lazy Dog Restaurant and Bar  Antonio’s  Mica’s Peruvian Sandwiches  Robeks Formal Program At approximately 7:00pm, the evening’s programming began with a brief welcome and introduction from Mayor, L. Dennis Michael. Following the Mayor’s introduction, Fabian Villenas, City of Rancho Cucamonga Principal Management Analyst, and Leeanne Singleton, Senior Planner from Raimi + Associates, presented on the history of the City’s sustainability efforts and briefed participants on the purpose and timeline for developing the Rancho Cucamonga Sustainability Action Plan. Participants were then guided into small group discussions to answer questions about their priorities for sustainability. Participants visiting the Robeks booth for refreshments Results from the Objectives exercise 5 Small Group Discussion Three versions of small group discussion questions were circulated around the tables (referred to Handout A, Handout B, and Handout C). Participants were seated at tables in groups of eight, with one facilitator at each. Participation in this event was higher than expected, producing fifteen tables of small discussion. This activity was approximately twenty-five minutes and included brief conversations on the various questions. The group facilitators documented main points from each discussion question and took turns reporting out their responses. Participants seated enjoying refreshments as the programs begins 6 Handout A consisted of the following introduction and questions: Between March and May 2016, more than 1,000 people participated in the City of Rancho Cucamonga survey. Survey results have been used to develop these questions for group discussion. A1. More than 94% of survey respondents identified a clean and healthy environment to live in as very or extremely important. What are some of the strategies Rancho Cucamonga can employ to provide a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment? Feedback:  Rancho Cucamonga appears to be environmentally conscious  Conserve water for landscaping, use landscape space for gardens, keep fields but make visually appealing, encourage more families to provide gardens  Developable spaces in Rancho Cucamonga are critical  Provide more trash cans and recycle bins throughout community and apartment complexes  Provide trash cans and recycle bins on trails  Educate youth and take pride in neighborhoods  Turn easements into community gardens  Synchronize traffic lights  Create trails going north to south  Offer recommendations on energy efficient windows for residents  expand solar panels on all city buildings and private businesses  Repurpose open spaces to bring the community together and have a greater emphasis on recycle bins  Engage and involve younger kids, the kids will engage parents  Create contests or competitions to spur involvement  Access to better transportation  Continue concerts in the park  Education—stop smoking-walk with the doc, get kids outside and away from electronics  Clean up after pets, pick up trash in common/community areas, recycling in correct bins/locations  A2. What do you think prevents more people from driving alternative fuel vehicles (electric, CNG, etc.), and what can be done to address it? Feedback:  Perception exists that they are slow and short range  High cost, not all can afford  Access and availability of charging stations  Greater education that cars are affordable  Not enough tax incentives or other rebates  Need Dial-A-Ride for more residents vs. seniors only 7  Vehicle maintenance is higher than traditional fuel cars A3. What types of new water conservation programs, incentives or practices would you be interested in? Feedback:  Higher efficiency public water systems to heat water especially in apartments  Incentives to replace lawns with drought tolerant landscaping. Knowledge of plants that are drought tolerant  Availablilty and knowledge of rain barrel systems and rain collection systems for apartment complexes  Water reclaimation systems to better conserve and repurpose water that goes to waste, better and more efficient water infrastructure  Low cost installation of rain barrel downspouts for homeowners  Water saving sprinkler systems  Demonstrations on water saving techniques  Incentives and rebates for homeowners to re-landscape and replace faucets and fixtures  Remove grass around the city in non high-use areas  Enforce water conservation for renters A4. As a group, please rank these items from highest to lowest priority. (1 being the highest, and 4 being the lowest). Water use & conservation Energy conservation Waste & recycling Walking & biking Feedback from each table: Table 1 Table 4 Table 7 Table 10 1.Water use & conservation 1.Water use & conservation 1.Water use & conservation 1.Water use and conservation 2.Energy conservation 2.Energy conservation 2.Energy conservation 3.Waste & recycling 3.Waste & recycling 3.Waste & recycling 4. Walking & biking 4.Walking & biking 4.Walking & biking 8 Handout B consisted of the following questions: B1. More than 94% of survey respondents identified a clean and healthy environment to live in as very or extremely important. What are some of the strategies Rancho Cucamonga can employ to provide a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment? Feedback:  Slow development, it is increasing traffic & vehicle emissions  Offer more public transportation & incentives for drought tolerant landscaping  Closely monitor construction sites to contain dust & emissions  Provide extra signage and community gardens in each landscape district  General trash pickup and motivate people to use doggie bags  Provide more solar/wind projects around Victoria Gardens  Continue drought tolerant retrofits, workshops on landscaping, hydroponics—grow own food, doggie bags on trails, more solar at high schools and city facilities  Clean freeway right of ways  Interconnected bike trails  Increasing recycling, reducing pollution and local accountability  Providing more trash cans  Education on water saving techniques and cleaner living  Providing more solar panels in parking lots, more bike paths  Provide activities for seniors, and school lunches for students  Increase land use density  Increase trash cans and separate recycling cans B2. What do you think prevents more residents from utilizing renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal, etc.) for their homes or businesses? Feedback:  Lack of incentives or rebates  High cost associated with solar  Lack of information and education on solar  Belief that it’s not a good investment  Fear of change  Aesthetics of solar and wind systems  Lack of awareness  Lack of knowledge, increase financial investments, incremental  Price, other: technology solutions, low-tech community awareness 9 B3. A convenient and connected public transit system was frequently noted as one of the items that is lacking in Rancho Cucamonga to lead an environmentally friendly lifestyle. What types of improvements to the local or regional transit system would encourage you to utilize public transit? Feedback:  More frequent, convenient stops and more direct routes  Improve safety on buses, offer safety marshals  Provide incentives to choose public transit  More convenient for senior riders  Lower transit fares  Improvements to first and last mile connections  Providing a family friendly atmosphere  Convenient ways to pay transit fares  Offer free public Wi-Fi access on buses  Provide more bicycle racks on buses  Cleaner conditions on buses  Offer late night bus or trolley B4. Alternative fuel vehicle infrastructure and open space access were noted as the lowest priority for inclusion in the Sustainability Action Plan. Do you agree that these are a low priority? Feedback: Most respondents offered alternatives that they feel are a higher priority compared to open space access and alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure.  Provide wider bike lanes  Provide extra lighting along trails and doggie bags for pet owners  Offer a bike share program  Can’t determine how they compare without the full list of alternatives  Disagree, open space access should be high priority  Agree, alternative fuel vehicles are a low priority  Agree, electric cars are the future, but is a current low priority due to convenience and cost  Alternative fuels, performance, access to infrastructure, technology accuracy, more variety, choices of programs, education, more pros and cons, information, open spaces are priorities for families  Generally agree alternative fuel vehicles and infrastructure, and open space access are a low priority 10 Handout C consisted of the following questions: C1. More than 94% of survey respondents identified a clean and healthy environment to live in as very or extremely important. What are some of the strategies Rancho Cucamonga can employ to provide a clean, healthy, and sustainable environment? Feedback:  Continue planning more parks with walking trails, playground equipment to promote exercising  Plant more trees around the City  Offer more recycling bins  Provide more bags for dog waste pickup  Offer more transportation options for seniors (easier to access more direct)  Offer rain capture systems  Promote rideshare and local volunteering opportunities  Provide more community events similar to this Forum  Provide a City home-efficiency expert than can consult with homeowners to reduce waste  Reduce graffiti especially near parks  Increase volunteer opportunities on city website  Promote carpool and rideshare matches  Promote programs to recycle food from restaurants to local food banks  Dedicated Bus Rapid Transit lane  Provide more public transportation with new development projects to help offset emissions  Offer incentives and ideas for drought tolerant landscaping C2. Many survey respondents felt that opportunities to lower utility bills would motivate people to take additional sustainability actions. What types of policies or programs would encourage you to conserve energy in your home or business? Feedback:  Provide a tiered process for utility bills (SoCal Edison) and demand pricing for certain time periods  Solar panels for apartments and townhomes in Rancho Cucamonga  Offer discount programs for seniors and flexible rates for renewables  Programs similar to Edison’s Air Conditioner Recycling Program  Provide a home-efficiency expert to assist with energy and water savings  Offer incentive for energy use in non-peak periods  Re-evaluate solar so it’s more inviting for different family types (lower minimum monthly charge threshold) 11 C3. Many survey respondents felt that opportunities for recycling could be improved. What types of programs or opportunities do you feel might improve recycling? Feedback:  Offer more separated trash and recycle receptacles throughout the city and especially at Victoria Gardens  Offer more places to turn in recycling for cash with longer operating hours  Offer Ink recycling at stores, reusable or biodegradable  Promote recycling programs for businesses, schools, and all public facilities, reducing waste/encouraging reuse of materials  Educating residents about what can be recycled, where recycling goes, if it is cost effective, and where the recycling centers are in Rancho Cucamonga are located  Provide programs to recycle/reuse graywater; make treated recycled water available for residents C4. Access to parks and trails, as well as safe walking routes for walking and biking were cited as the aspects of Rancho Cucamonga that make it easy to lead an environmentally friendly lifestyle. What can be done to further encourage biking and walking? Feedback:  Offering biking and walking groups  Providing more trash receptacles on trails to make it cleaner  Providing signs around popular places  Offering emails, newsletters, and social media posts regarding trails and groups  Providing safer routes (cars travel fast) especially near schools  Providing guidance and route markers  Providing safe school bus stops  Providing more tree coverage and shade along trails and bike routes  Improve safety on P.E. trail  Offer walking groups/meet up so people feel safe when walking on trails in the city  Offer bike share program, continue to utilize school buses  Offer safer bike facilities  Repair sidewalks  Carpool/rideshare guaranteed ride home program  Better lighting  Wider bike lanes, extra lighting along trails, bike share programs, offer more doggie bags along trails 12 Conclusion The feedback provided in the small group discussions helped to inform key areas for the development of the Sustainability Action Plan. This feedback illustrates there is generally strong support for clean and environmentally conscious living. Common themes presented from the community at this event included:  Providing more trash and recycling receptacles for residents and for public areas around the city  Educating residents on recycling practices, renewable energy systems and water conservation techniques  Offering Incentives and rebates for homeowners and renters to reduce water and energy usage  Providing safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists in addition to planting shade trees, wider bike lanes, a complete bicycle network, and expanding walking trails  Offering improvements to public transit by updating routes to be more direct and by running more frequently  Promoting rideshare and carpool programs for residents who work out of the city Based on the feedback received at the Community Forum, the Sustainability Action Plan should consider a wide variety of strategies to create safe, more walkable environments throughout the city, improve transportation choices and options, educate residents on the value of renewable energy and conservation techniques, and promote recycling within Rancho Cucamonga. (located at www.CityofRC.us/SustainableRC) (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK) 1 Purpose This appendix provides a summary of the triple bottom line (TBL) evaluation process used in the development of the Sustainable Community Action Plan. It includes technical documentation of the evaluation criteria, evaluation process, results, and findings. The purpose of the TBL evaluation was to provide a process and framework to objectively and consistently review the proposed plan policies against community priorities. The results of the evaluation were used to refine the plan’s policies. In the future, the TBL evaluation process can be used to vet proposed policy enhancements or additions, and it can also be used to inform the identification and prioritization of implementation actions. Triple Bottom Line Evaluation Criteria During the development of the Sustainable Community Action Plan, the project team explored various guiding principles to guide the overall topics and goals for the plan. These guiding principles also function ed as the criteria to evaluate the draft plan’s policy directions. These guiding principles were developed through a collaborative process between the community, City staff, and the consulting team and are uniquely tailored to the issues and opportunities in Rancho Cucamonga. The guiding principles (i.e., triple bottom line evaluation criteria) are summarized below. Environment  Reduce greenhouse gas emissions  Reduce resource consumption (water, energy, fuel)  Protect habitat and biological resources  Improve resilience to natural hazards and environmental conditions  Improve air quality  Contribute to thoughtful planning and development Economy  Increase energy, water, fuel cost savings  Support local small businesses  Expand green workforce training and recruitment  Attract environmentally friendly businesses  Offer incentives or funding opportunities  Reduce maintenance and operating costs Community/ Equity/ Health  Improve overall community health  Engage and empower the community and local organizations  Increase access to locally-grown food across the region  Provide safe and convenient walking and biking options  Generate public interest and support for sustainability goals 2 Evaluation Tool Next, the consultant team developed a TBL evaluation tool to support the policy evaluation process. The evaluation tool is a matrix of plan policies and evaluation criteria. Users work row by row to assess the potential impact of the policy and its associated actions against each criterion. A numerical value ranging from -3 to 3 is selected by the user(s) based on their qualitative assessment of how well the policy/opportunity provide or enhances the defined criterion. An expected very negative impact on the criterion would receive a score of -3, whereas an expected very positive impact would receive a score of 3. If the impacts are unknown or not applicable, then a value of 0 would be selected. Evaluation Process The consultant team completed the TBL evaluation process twice during the Sustainable Community Action Plan development. These were qualitative exercises conducted by a multi-disciplinary team, wherein team members quickly provided an assessment of the relationship of the policy to the criteria, based on their professional expertise and unique perspectives. The first round of evaluation focused on the draft policies contained within the first full draft of the plan. During this first round of the evaluation process, notes and observations about each policy were recorded and then used to help refine, clarify, and consolidate policies. For example, some of the policies were strengthened to create stronger linkages with sustainability and TBL outcomes, such as goods investment, land management, and food waste. Following revisions to the policies, a second round of the evaluation process was conducted on the revised policies, to refine and confirm the evaluation results. These results are provided at the end of this appendix. These results should not be used alone to determine implementation priorities, but the relative ranking of GENERAL TBL EVALUATION CRITERIA: Would the opportunity provide or enhance the following? Scale Symbol Definition 3 Very positive 2 Moderately positive 1 Slightly positive 0 Neutral or Not Applicable -1 Slightly negative -2 Moderately negative, impact likely -3 Very negative, impact expected Evaluation Instructions Users should use the drop-down menus on the Scoreboard Worksheet to select the numeric value that most closely aligns with the users evaluation of a particular opportunity against each evaluation criterion. Note that color-coding helps identify which evaluation scale applies to each criterion. 3 policies and their anticipated TBL outcomes can be used to inform future decision making and implementation strategies. TBL Evaluation Outcomes and Observations For each round of evaluation, the completed TBL Evaluation Tool is provided as a Microsoft Excel file. Detailed notes and comments taken during the evaluation process are embedded within the tool. The first round of evaluation identified the following draft policies as ones that warranted re-examination and revision to create stronger linkages with TBL outcomes. These observations and suggestions are summarized below and were incorporated into subsequent plan revisions. 1. Facilitate efficient movement of vehicles throughout the city.  It may be possible to combine this policy with the transportation demand management policy.  Other actions could include anti-idling policies and freight route planning. 2. Food scraps and green waste are recycled and diverted from the landfill.  The food sharing/swap action focuses on food waste more generally, not just food scraps; either the policy or the action needs to be revised/moved for these topics to align. 3. Improve existing public parks and ensure new development meets minimum park standards.  The policy and actions address land for parks, but not necessarily the management of parkland (an opportunity for many sustainability-related practices such as integrated pest management practices, landscaping standards for parks, drought management policies, etc.) 4. Expand programs to increase waste diversion from landfills, recycling, and composting.  Some overlap between composting and the food scraps/green waste policy. May be best to focus on waste diversion, recycling, and hazardous waste materials for this policy and expand the other to focus on green waste/composting. The second round of evaluation revealed that all of the policies in the plan provide some expected benefits in terms of economy, health, and environmental outcomes. In summary, based on the evaluation results, actions related to water conservation, energy efficiency, and redevelopment policies may provide the most robust TBL benefits to the community, but each policy adheres to and supports the Community Sustainability Action Plan’s guiding principles. Future Use The TBL Evaluation tool and process are valuable resources to inform future plan updates and implementation decision-making. The process and tool can be used to further evaluate, compare, and refine future sustainability policies as the plan becomes a living document that evolves over time. Furthermore, the 4 tool and process can be used to evaluate, compare, and even optimize specific implementation actions, such as which new program(s) would create the greatest economic benefits to the community. Users should remember that a collaborative evaluation process is as valuable as the evaluation results. The intent is to engage a multi-disciplinary team to think critically about potential impacts of various decisions. A mix of diverse perspectives will help ensure consideration of potential benefits and tradeoffs as they relate to the City’s stated sustainability guiding principles, and this group dialogue can he lp reshape and improve outcomes. The results can be a helpful documentation of process outcomes, but just because a policy or action that is evaluated may yield a lower score as compared to another, it does not necessarily make it less relevant. Instead, the lower-ranking results could simply mean that anticipated benefits may be concentrated in one portion of the triple bottom line, or that some of the potential negative impacts of a policy or action also need to be considered and addressed. 5 6 7 8 Appendix F San Bernardino Council of Governments (SBCOG, formerly SANBAG) CAP Implementation Tools Final Report (located at www.CityofRC.us/SustainableRC) (THIS PAGE IS INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK)