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Budget 2020-2021 • seem — x` VIV • N W For RancM1O Cucnga Pp.itlenK antl Bus amomo z a '_` PMtallN�ibnce Ragram COVID-19 , Pen\vlFogWeness>rogram COMMUNITY RELIEF PROGRAM ":m.....Plrcneanlg ". °`emw'°', J u a.r maern APPLICATION PERIOD OPENS —' August 24, 2020 �,de rg alnevf OF Ions FISCAL YEAR 1 1 i • © � PAN rov fiv 9 v tl Em enaf ADOPTED iUDGET ®i .. ark.20 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET About the cover This year's cover represents Innovation 2.0. The City of Rancho Cucamonga did an amazing job rallying together n- +-•to assist the community with weathering through the • , COVID-19 pandemic. Here are some examples: :y .. • Senior Food Drive and One-Day Distribution: In order t i � -- to serve our senior population, the Community Services Department (CSD) held a food drive where residents donated shelf-stable food such as canned goods and pastas, as well as toiletries and cleaning supplies to the Central N': Park Community Center. Donations were accepted for R w over two weeks, then prepared for distribution by CSD Staff and finally distributed as a drive-through pick up. y 'h 24,MG Over 600 seniors were served and given a bag of food and essentials! m • You've Been REC'd: The Community Services � � ' •.L'� s ='-_ Department recently launched the #YouveBeenRECd program which delivered fun to 300 randomly selected '• Rancho Cucamonga residents. Each family received a CSD tote bag full of fun stay-at-home activities such as coloring books and crayons, shovels& seeds for planting, bubbles,playdoh and even snacks! Since deliveries were a surprise, each family received a chalked hopscotch near their driveway with a positive message from our team and once the bags were placed on the doorsteps and the doorbells were rung, the staff ran as fast as they could to avoid being seen! These bags were delivered by CSD staff over six delivery dates of 50 families per date. • Library Curbside Pick-up and Material Drop-Off: When libraries were shut down, the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library was pushing the envelope with physical services. Computers were open three days per week at the Biane Library. Wifi was accessible from outside the Biane or Archibald Libraries. And you could reserve books from either branch and pick them up curbside. • Virtual Star Wars Day: The pandemic couldn't stop our Library from celebrating its annual Star Wars Day. They just went virtual! Fans participated through the Library's Virtual Star Ways Day YouTube page. The family-friendly event featured Darth Vader storytimes,panels featuring Princess Leia voice actress Julie Dolan and Star Wars authors Michael Rogge and Kevin Schnick, lightsaber battles,a costumed procession of 150+characters,and more. • RC Cares COVED-19 Community Relief Program: The Rancho Cucamonga City Council took action to establish the RC Cares Community Relief program in order to utilize the City's allocation of CARES Act funding to fund a number of relief programs to assist its residents and businesses who have experienced a financial hardship due to the COVED-19 pandemic. These programs include: Emergency Rental Assistance Program; Residential and Business Rental Forgiveness Program; Outdoor Business Operations Assistance Program;and County COVID-Compliant Business Partnership Match Program. • Virtual Building Inspections: By utilizing drone technology and Facetime capabilities,the Building and Safety Inspectors have been able to complete accurate inspections and provide excellent customer service to our community safely by maintaining social distancing guidelines and limiting face to face interaction. • Open for Business app: The City's Department of Innovation and Technology created an app intended for local Rancho Cucamonga businesses to provide up-to-date hours and/or closure status during the pandemic. CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Introduction 1 City Manager's Executive Summary 3 GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award 79 General Information 81 City Officials 83 Organization Chart 85 Functional Units by Fund Type 87 Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga 89 Population by Age 90 Educational Attainment 91 Principal Employers 92 Principal Sales Tax Remitters 93 Budget Guide 95 Budget Process 96 Budget Process Flow Chart 98 Summaries of Financial Data 99 Financial Summary—Operating Budget 100 Financial Summary—All Funds 101 Notes to Financial Summary 102 Budget Summary 105 Special Districts Summary 106 Landscape Maintenance Districts, Street Lighting Maintenance Districts, and Other Maintenance Districts—Changes in Fund Balance 108 Revenue Summaries i l l Revenue and Resource Estimates 113 Revenue Summary by Category—Operating Budget 118 Revenue Detail—Operating Budget 120 Revenue Summary by Category—All Funds 126 Revenue Detail—All Funds 128 Revenues by Fund 150 Expenditure Summaries 155 Expenditure Summary by Department—Operating Budget 156 Expenditure Summary by Category—Operating Budget 157 Expenditure Detail—Operating Budget 158 Expenditure Summary by Department—All Funds 164 Expenditure Summary by Category—All Funds 165 Expenditure Detail—All Funds 166 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Summaries of Financial Data (continued) Expenditures by Fund 196 Funded Positions by Department—Summary 201 Funded Positions by Department—Detail 202 Fund Balance Summaries 213 Spendable Fund Balances 215 Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances 219 Departmental Budget Details 223 Governance City Council Overview of Department 224 FY 2020/21 Mission, Core Values, and Vision 224 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 225 Three-Year Staffing Summary 225 City Clerk - Overview of Department 226 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 226 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 227 Three-Year Staffing Summary 227 City Treasurer Overview of Department 228 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 228 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 229 Three-Year Staffing Summary 229 City Management Overview of Department 230 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 230 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 231 Three-Yew Staffing Summary 231 Performance Statistics 232 Services to the Community 233 Police Overview of Department 234 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 234 Thrice-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 235 Three-Year Staffing Summary 235 Performance Statistics 236 Services to the Community 237 Fire District Overview of Department 238 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 238 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 239 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Department Budget Details (continued) Three-Year Staffing Summary 239 Performance Statistics 240 Services to the Community 241 Animal Care and Services Overview of Department 242 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 242 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 243 Three-Year Staffing Summary 243 Performance Statistics 244 Services to the Community 245 Civic and Cultural Services Records Management Overview of Department 246 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 246 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 247 Three-Year Staffing Summary 247 Performance Statistics 248 Services to the Community 249 Community Services Overview of Department 250 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 250 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 251 Three-Year Staffing Summary 251 Performance Statistics 252 Services to the Community 253 Library Services _ Overview of Department 254 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 254 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 255 Three-Year Staffing Summary 255 Performance Statistics 256 Services to the Community 257 Administrative Services Administration/Procurement Overview of Department 258 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 258 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 259 Three-Year Staffing Summary 259 Performance Statistics 260 Services to the Community 261 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Department Budget Details (continued) Finance Overview of Department 262 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 262 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 263 Three-Year Staffing Summary 263 Performance Statistics 264 Services to the Community 265 Human Resources Overview of Department 266 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 266 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 267 Three-Year Staffing Summary 267 Performance Statistics 268 Services to the Community 269 Innovation and Technology Overview of Department 270 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 270 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 271 Three-Year Staffing Summary 271 Performance.Statistics 272 Services to the Community 273 Economic and Community Development Administration Overview of Department 274 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 274 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 275 Three-Year Staffing Summary 275 Performance Statistics 276 Services to the Community 277 Building and Safety Overview of Department 278 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 278 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 279 Three-Year Staffing Summary 279 Performance Statistics 280 Services to the Community 281 Engineering Services Overview of Department 282 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 282 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 283 Three-Year Staffing Summary 283 Performance Statistics 284 Services to the Community 285 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Department Budget Details (continued) Planning Overview of Department 286 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 286 Tbree-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 287 Three-Yea Staffing Summary 287 Performance Statistics 288 Services to the Community 289 Public Works Services Overview of Department 290 FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights 290 Three-Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 291 Three-Year Staffing Summary 291 Performance Statistics 292 Services to the Community 293 Capital Improvement Program 295 Summary by Department 297 Detail by Department with Funding Source(s) 299 Appendix 303 Financial Policies 305 Legal Debt Margin 321 Debt Service Obligations 322 Glossary of Budget Terms 323 List of Acronyms 329 Description of Funds by Fund Type 330 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page t THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 2 CITY OF • CUCAMONGA MEMORANDUM Date: July 1, 2020 City Manager's Office To: Mayor and Members of the City Council By: John R. Gillison, City Manager Subject: The Roaring 20s—Pandemics, Business Closures and the Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget PREAMBLE Ronald Reagan, the 40' President of the United States of America, famously said, "Surround yourself with great people; delegate authority; get out of the way." "The greatest leader is not necessarily the one who does the greatest things. He is the one that gets people to do the greatest things." More than 70 years earlier, in April of 1910, Teddy Roosevelt the 26" President of the United States expressed a somewhat different sentiment, but one that harmonizes quite well with President Reagan's statement. President Roosevelt said "It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds;who knows great enthusiasms,the great devotions;who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat." Read together, the message is clear. Those who actually fight the fight deserve the credit because they took the risk without knowing whether success or failure was on the other side. And the greatest leaders are those who recognize that it is the team around you who succeed or fail together under your leadership and that is how history will, and should, remember you. I would like to dedicate this message to the first responders, doctors, nurses, firefighters and police officers who gave their lives to help other Americans whose lives have been lost during the COVID-19 pandemic. They were that person in the arena, and, in many cases, they strove valiantly and did not know success. But neither were they defeated. Their memory should inspire us all, especially those in leadership roles, to recognize that ours is a position of trust and any success which may result is that of the team we lead, not ourselves. Let us notforget the 100,000 plus Americans whose lives have been lost in the last several months, and in our remembering keep their memories alive as we continue the struggle against COVID-19. Fiscal Year 2o2o/2i Adopted Budget Page 3 "Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is,perhaps, the end of the beginning."-Sir Winston Churchill 2019 Budget Message Recap - In 2019, the Local Economic Forecast focused on economic cycles. At the time, I saw the likelihood of an economic contraction/correction as modest over the 2019/20 fiscal year but increasing as we moved into the 2020/21 fiscal year. That forecast was based on economic GDP growth between 2 and 3%nationally in CY 2018, modest inflation in the 1-3% range, interest rates in the 2-4% range, low unemployment around 34% nationally with good growth in business investment; however, consumer confidence was becoming volatile and there was minimal growth in real wages that only slightly exceeded inflation. In California, labor shortages particularly in the construction trades were becoming an issue, there was a housing shortage, growing wealth disparity for those in poverty, increasing government deficits and global trade worries. Added to those ingredients the economy was in its ninth year of continuous growth and the employment numbers were so high it appeared we were near a peak in the cycle. Locally, real estate was once again at an all-time peak. Construction was becoming more difficult and costly due to rising wages, labor shortages and raw materials like steel and lumber and aluminum which were impacted by tariffs. Rancho Cucamonga in March of 2019 stood at 3.20% unemployment, over 1% below the County of San Bernardino. Employment had reached an all- time peak of about 78,000 and was expected to grow between 1,500 to 2,000 jobs a year through 2026. Our largest core sectors at the time were Restaurants/Hotel at 12.6%, Manufacturing at 12.5%, Retail Trade at 10.8% and Administrative Support at 10.6%. Payroll was growing on a per employee basis and median household incomes were in the low $90,000 range annually. Office space, including Class A and B were being absorbed at increasing amounts and new projects were beginning to be built on a speculative basis without signed tenants. Hospitality continued to grow with a 100+ room Hampton Inn approved for Foothill Boulevard and a 68 room Sanctity Hotel (Hilton Tapestry luxury brand) approved for Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard. Housing also continued to be a driver for local growth, as the relative price per square foot was more affordable in the Inland Empire than in Los Angeles or Orange County. Prices finally returned to their pre-recession peak levels and demand continued to outstrip supply in the City and County. At the time, well over 3,000 new single-family homes and apartments had been entitled, including at The Resort, a modem smaller lot/attached unit highly amenitized housing complex on the site of the former Empire Lakes golf course. Despite all this activity, permit issuance remained modest at around 350-400 units per year that were actually built and sold. Work was also well under way at the time on a new 3,000-unit housing tract (including commercial) called Etiwanda Heights in the northern part of the City. The project was subsequently approved. And so, the rest of calendar year 2019 rolled on, much as 2018 and 2017 did, before it gradually faded into calendar year 2020. With substantial amounts of rain and snow early, followed by a dry wanner spell, and then later near the end of the winter, it seemed that 2020 would get off to a good start. Until the end of February 2020, that is. "Nothing is so painful to the human mind as a great andsudden change."-Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 4 COVID-19 Global Pandemic Virtually unnoticed,the first California resident to die of the novel coronavirus passed away in San Jose on February 6, 2020. Having been sick for a few weeks, with what she thought was the flu, this death was not noted as in any way unusual at the time of its occurrence. The first known COVID-19 infection related death was not until some three weeks later on February 29" in the State of Washington. Of particular interest is that this first California victim had not traveled out of the country anytime recently and, therefore, contracted the virus from community spread, likely in early to mid-January. Within just a few weeks thereafter, authorities across the San Francisco Bay area confined nearly 7 million people to their homes for all but essential tasks. Shortly thereafter, California put all 40 million of its residents into a near lock down status. We now recognize what happened as the first early warning signs of the COVID-19 pandemic, Of course, at the time, no one had ever heard of COVID-19. Initially it was called a novel coronavirus. Coronavirus is a large family of viruses that are common in people and many different species of animals. Occasionally, one of the animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people. Earlier examples are MERS and SARS which were both coronaviruses. A novel coronavirus, therefore, is simply a new, previously unidentified coronavirus. In this case, the disease caused by this novel coronavirus is called COVID-19. In an amazingly short time, this novel coronavirus would become a pandemic which is the name for a new virus that infects people, and spreads in a sustainable way between people because there is little to no pre-existing immunity to the disease. There is much we now know about COVID-19 and much we do not. Symptoms that appear 2-14 days after exposure include cough, shortness of breath,fever,chills, muscle pain, headache,sore throat and loss of taste or smell. For reasons yet unknown, many people contract a mild case of the disease and recover in 2 weeks or less. In some cases, people are what is called asymptomatic and carry the disease, infecting others but with little or no outward signs themselves of being sick. Others are not so fortunate and contract a severe case of COVID-19, often battling symptoms for 3-6 weeks or more and need to be placed on ventilators or other supportive measures typically associated with an intensive care unit. The death rate associated with COVID- 19 is about 1.3% based on the best measures to date, which is substantially higher than the 0.1% death rate associated with seasonal flu. Because of the lack of either a vaccine, or an effective treatment, COVID-19 quickly began to overwhelm health care systems around the world. The United States was no exception to that trend. Health authorities began to mobilize and implement stay-at-home or shelter-in-place orders for large groups of the populace, effective shutting down most commerce except for what were deemed to be (based on federal guidance) essential businesses. These health orders were an effort to limit the spread of the virus, accomplishing what has since become known as "flattening the curve" or slowing down the infections (severe and otherwise) to a level which was within the capacity (including native capacity and surge capacity) of each area's health care system to effectively treat. Although Rancho Cucamonga escaped the pandemic comparatively unscathed (our cases per 1,000 population rate in mid-May of 2020 was 1.09,lower than all but Yucca Valley, Apple Valley, Barstow, Twentynine Palms and Needles even with an outbreak at West Valley Detention Center), there was a side effect of these orders. One not initially anticipated. In many ways,just as that first case in January in California went virtually unnoticed, so too did this almost invisible transition from a health care crisis to a full-blown economic disaster. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 5 2020 Local Economic Forecast "All models are wrong,but some are useful." George Box, British statistician The early 1920s were known as the Roaring Twenties. They were a time of dramatic social and political change. For the first time, more Americans would live in cities than on farms. The period from 1920 to 1929 was a time of huge growth as the wealth of the nation more than doubled. The "consumer society" which exists to this day first came into being. Mass culture, and the phenomenon of things becoming"trendy"from coast to coast, began to take hold. Women gained the right to vote thanks to the 19' Amendment in 1920. At the same time, an anti-immigrant hysteria would take hold and eventually the economy would spectacularly collapse in the Great Depression. An economic contraction still remembered some hundred years later and one which generally only ended with the advent of WWII. The early 2020s started off much the same. Dramatic political change with increasing polarization and tribalism. Consumer society run rampant with worldwide trends and a supply chain that delivered products and raw materials from around the globe,"just in time." Anti-immigrant hysteria was on the rise and so was the longest modem period of economic expansion since WWII. Coronavirus would bring that all crashing to a halt with an economic contraction unmatched in its breadth, depth and ferocity. This economic contraction is different than any other and those differences are important, particularly at the local level. Two Harvard professors, Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff (one a former International Monetary Fund (IMF) deputy director and the other a chief economist for the IMF) published a historical review of financial crises in late 2009. At the time, one of the key premises of the book was reminding readers that the 2008-09 crisis which affected credit for businesses, governments and average Americans, was really fairly similar to many other prior financial crises at least in terms of the pattern. Recently, both authors were interviewed about the current pandemic driven economic crisis and their insights are a helpful window into what is happening. In 1918 when the last major pandemic, the Spanish Flu, hit the Gross Domestic Product was growing 9%, far greater than the current US economy was in 2019. The recent job losses (unemployment)have equaled or exceeded levels in less than two months what would have taken two years or more in prior crises. Even the reversal in capital spending happened in four weeks or less at a level that in the 2008-09 global financial crisis took a full year. During 2008-09, the biggest impacts of the financial crisis fell on developed markets and emerging markets were largely spared the worst of things. This current crisis is literally impacting the entire world regardless of development level. Both authors predict that the recovery to 2019 per capita GDP levels could take five years or more. Regional Economy "It's an irrationally behaving market. It's very difficult to figure out where it is going to go."Christopher Thornberg Locally, many of the forecasts reviewed for this budget message indicate roughly similar timing. The University of California Riverside Center for Economic Forecasting and Development is headed by Professor Christopher Thornberg (one of the founders of Beacon Economics), Mr. Thornberg is notably more bullish on a recovery than many economists. As he points out, there is little precedent for this current downturn as there are no recent economic experiences that work Fiscal.Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 6 as a historical metaphor. After all, economists typically try to predict the future by looking at the past, which is a bit like driving a car while looking in the rearview mirror. Acknowledging that inconsistency and lack of data, Mr. Thomberg points out that the longer the current business closures continue, the greater the damage. Businesses and families will fall behind on financial obligations which can result in further negative consequences down the road. Lack of consumer and business spending is disrupting global supply chains which can have major downstream consequences for business recovery. But, the economy was relatively healthy before this began with no major structural bubbles. Still, we could see a shakeout in stressed sectors like restaurants and the move to more online retail is likely to accelerate. In the second half of the year we are likely to see a slowdown in business investment as businesses work to rebuild sales, improve workplace safety for employees and customers and cautiously look at re-hiring furloughed employees. Long term business travel is likely to change which will have significant impacts on the hospitality sector. Even in his optimistic view, Mr. Thornberg sees a full recovery taking at least until 2022, assuming there are no additional setbacks. Local Hospitality Sector HVS Convention, Sports and Entertainment Facilities Consulting has reviewed the overall California hospitality market specifically related to hotels and prepared a two-scenario forecast. One scenario is the quick V-shaped recovery favored by Mr. Thornberg and the other is a longer U-shaped recovery favored by those who are more pessimistic. Under the best-case scenario travel restrictions are lifted in July of 2020 and the recovery period begins in late 2020 into early 2021. Under the worst-case scenario travel restrictions are not really lifted until December of 2020 and the recovery period does not begin until the first quarter of 2021. The former has hotel room revenue returning to its 2019 levels by late 2022 or early 2023 while the latter does not have room revenue recovering until 2025. One of the key variables is something noted by Mr. Thornberg — business travel. In past recessions, business travel led the way to recovery first, followed later by leisure travel. To the extent the current pandemic sparks a more permanent use of virtual solutions as a replacement for some amount of business travel, the recovery will be delayed and locations, including the Rancho Cucamonga/Ontaric area, which are dependent on business travel, may take longer to recover. For context, in the FY 2018/19 budget, the City of Rancho Cucamonga received $4.5 million dollars in transient occupancy tax (hotel bed tax) making it our General Fund's fifth largest revenue source. Along with HVS, the Greater Ontario Convention and Visitors Bureau prepared a customized report for Rancho Cucamonga and Ontario hotels. Going back to 2012, the City has averaged an occupancy rate in the low 70% range during the worst years,with an Average Daily Room rate of $100.00, during the worst years. In the better years, occupancy rates pushed into the high 80% range with an Average Daily Room rate that was nearly $140.00. The forecast for FY 2020/21 is for an occupancy rate that will average about the mid-40% range with an Average Daily Room rate of about$115.00. It appears that occupancy and room rates will not likely recover until the latter part of calendar year 2022 (nearly three full fiscal years from now). Revenue per average room will likely be somewhere around what it was between the years 2012 and 2016 depending on whether hoteliers lower the average daily room rate to try and grab market share from one another. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 7 Monthly Forecast -Onlano CVB-Cdy of Rancho Cucamonga,CA RevPAR Cycle - Ontario CVB - City of Rancho Cucamonga, CA May 2020 S145 Legend l �qd,e • Histoncal Data $135 O O O A Apr 18 • Forecasted Data OO od 17 O O Oc120 Apr 17 s1n 00 O 00 Od 16 gs1u .� Apr 15 od 15 Apr 15 3f05 Od 1d Apr 1d 13 13 "S Ocl 12 S85 , - - - _-, 34% 44% S4% 64% 74% 64% 94% TIM Occ I%t One of the few bright spots for 2020/21 is that there are two new hotels still under construction in Rancho Cucamonga. The 100+ room Hampton Inn (Hilton) hotel on Foothill Boulevard east of Milliken Avenue is rising out of the ground and will be completed later this year. The 75+ room Tapestry Hotel (Hilton), an entry level luxury hotel, just pulled permits and should be completed in 2021 at Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard. Hopefully, by the time both hotels are ready to open, the current restrictions on leisure travel will be lifted. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 8 Local Sales Tax "The sales tax is the best and most equitable tax. The gasoline tax, which is nothing but a sales tax,has proven painless,productive and punitive. Everything we buy should have its equal proportion of tax, outside of cheap food and cheap clothes." Will Rogers HdL Companies (HdL) is the leading statewide consultant for local government sales tax in California. For over 20 years, the City of Rancho Cucamonga has used HdL for property and sales tax consulting. HdL works with Beacon Economics to prepare consensus economic forecasts for the State of California as well as local areas. The latest consensus forecast assumes the stay-at-home order generally is lifted at the end of May 2020. Not factored into account either is the Governor's potential (allowed)90-day filing extension for taxpayers with a tax liability of less than $1 million or the 12-month tax payment deferral program of total taxes up to $50,000 for small businesses. Also not modeled are any fall or early spring flare ups of the novel coronavirus which negatively impact the economy. HdL is forecasting that many marginal or overly leveraged businesses will not survive the shutdown even with federal subsidies. Further, a return to previous spending levels is not anticipated to happen immediately but will evolve over time. Consumers may take some time to get comfortable again with leisure travel. Businesses are likely to be more cautious about capital investment and the hiring, or rehiring, of employees. It is expected that some amount of business travel will not return and will instead continue as teleconferences. And some consumers who previously were hesitant about online shopping will likely not adopt permanent changes in their spending habits. Statewide the forecast for major sectors of interest to Rancho Cucamonga include flat growth in Building and Construction and Fuel and Service Stations, a 5.4% decline in Business and Industry (tied for Rancho Cucamonga's third highest sales tax category at 14%), a modest 2.0% growth in Food and Drugs, a small 2.5% decline in General Consumer Goods (Rancho Cucamonga's highest sales tax category at 36%) and significant 6.5% decline in restaurants and hotels (tied for Rancho Cucamonga's third highest sales tax category at 14%). Hdl's models assume the virus is largely contained by the end of September and tax declines bottom out in early 2021. A prolonged recovery, which does not see revenues returning to their pre-pandemic levels until probably late 2023 or early 2024, is possible and this model factors into account the shift to online sales and depressed levels of business travel. State Budget A major impact on local recovery is the health of the State budget. As of this writing,the Governor is projecting a State budget deficit of some $54 billion with continuing deficits until FY 2023/24. The Legislative Analyst's Office has reviewed the Governor's projections and largely concurs with the scope of the problem. Somewhat more middle of the road than some economists who fall into the pessimistic or optimistic scenario, the LAO estimates the state is currently in a deep recession,the impacts of which depend on its depth and duration. Accordingly,the LAO forecasts two middle of the road scenarios, a somewhat optimistic "U-shaped" recovery and a somewhat pessimistic"L-shaped" recovery. Under the"U-shaped"scenario economic activity would remain below pre-recession levels well into the middle of 2021 before picking up steam. By contrast, the "L-shaped" scenario has the economy in a recession through all of 2021 with things gradually beginning to recover in 2022. Some of the unknowns which could bring about this scenario include the number of businesses unable to re-open, the number of businesses which cannot Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 9 adapt their operations to the new health criteria, and the extent to which many workers remain out of the workforce for an extended period of time. Calculating the Budget Problem (In Billions) o..a r+.°.e.rs° IAgd naowe I.ow�a.xa ®nm nm� fMlWtl, {le Mhn Pa erm >i]I MY U-Shaped aecevlw L-Shaped Becevion 10 $18 Billion Budget Problem $31 &Ilion Budget problem Raroe trva' aa.a,y are MpeFydeA�f�i0_ -0 eYed AYaW lYara,¢ -�Wv1D19 aR ds rbm,J�, Abe r.,aap r_ m wla ramlun rauma'cvWvmj� nn e IIaIa CGV618 Lp9 earOW �dV � K1<e1YtlJ�, e Na d Sff U L`9aw aC bbY,N,W m,vih GMplBv artlOVYLL'(EeK581JIB etl Sf£U-Sq HNNbFUTmicIMA� Depending on the recovery scenario used, the State budget problem is $18 billion to $31 billion in scope. The Governor's estimates of a larger budget problem use"gross"numbers as compared to the LAO's use of net numbers. Regardless of the scenario, or the exact numbers used, all predictions agree the State fiscal challenges will not likely end soon, extending well beyond the _ end of the pandemic. Budget deficits will persist at the State level through thru at least FY 2023/24 or longer depending on the speed of the recovery. Further exacerbating the problem is that the budget reserves for California are at best around $16 billion, which will help with a recovery but are clearly insufficient to plug the budget hole. Illustrating why it will be so difficult for local agencies to prosper while the State is in trouble are some of the numbers in Governor Newsom's budget as it relates to California's public schools, physically closed since mid-March of 2020. The Governor is proposing a $6.5 billion cut to schools' main source of funding as well as other reductions that, if enacted, would mean single-year reductions to public education at "EDUCATION I I POLICY least equal to and possibly greater than those THERE IS." experienced during the Great Recession a decade ago. At that time more than 30,000 TONY BLAIR educators were laid off, a scar for the state's teacher workforce which had only recently been healed. The proposed education cuts Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page to will arrive as schools expect to incur additional physical and labor related costs to safely reopen their doors for teachers and students in the fall or next spring. And this comes on top of the fact that about 7 in 10 California school districts were spending more money than they were receiving before the pandemic, according to the California School Boards Association, and 40% already were weighing employee layoffs to help offset rising costs. Scope of Local Revenue Loss If money is your hope for independence you will never have it. The only real security that a man will have in this world is a reserve of knowledge,experience, and ability. Henry Ford IL As this message is being written, the economy in California has been shut down for over 11 weeks. Ironically, however, Governor Newsom has finally begun to allow most counties in California to progress into Stage 2 of re-opening which includes non-essential, low and medium risk type businesses that, generally speaking, can implement protective measures against the spread of the novel coronavirus. This includes things such as retail, shopping malls, restaurants with dine-in and other similar businesses. As sure as the sun will rise tomorrow, those of us in local government realize that in another 11 weeks the memory of this closure and the lost business will have begun to fade for many of the public and now that business is re-open they will expect programs, services and assistance similar to what they were accustomed to receiving during the year prior, 2019. The challenge is to encompass the scope of the losses the last 11 weeks in a concise picture and description which is both realistic and meaningful. In FY 2020/21, based on the best estimates available, the City is projected to take in $28.74 million in sales tax. Sales tax is Rancho Cucamonga's largest revenue source and in FY 2019/20 the City budgeted for approximately$32.55 million. The main areas of largest impact are General Consumer Goods, Restaurants and Hotels, Building and Construction and Fuel and Service Stations, all of which are down approximately 20% for FY 2020/21. In reviewing prior budgets to find a similar number, staff had to go back to FY 2016/17 when the City adopted a budget with $28.85 million in sales tax. Essentially, Rancho Cucamonga has lost approximately four years of sales tax gains. This is equivalent to the losses during the Great Recession in 2008-2010, however, this loss happened in just a few short months rather than spread out over several fiscal years. Put another way, in FY 2005/06 the first full year that Victoria Gardens was open,the City received an additional $4 million in sales tax. So, the loss for next fiscal year is as if we closed down Victoria Gardens. Staff calculated that for each month businesses were closed down during March and April 2020 the City was losing over$1 million per month in taxable sales. Of particular concern is the impact of the shutdown on already struggling brick and mortar retailers. Real estate giant Irvine Co. recently warned about a "protracted" downturn creating .new economic realities." This warning came after the Irvine Company, a privately-owned Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 11 - company with extensive liquidity, laid off 181 workers, primarily in its shopping center management business, and 1,076 hospitality workers at two of its hotels. Well-known Los Angeles retail developer Rick Caruso, recently called any economic recovery "a survival-mode exercise." This decline hits at the same time as another trend, which is the shift to online sales. Over the 2012-2019 time period brick and mortar sales grew by 11.4% compared to online sales which grew 236% in the same time period. Some of the early impacts of this pending retail implosion: • Hertz filed for bankruptcy • JC Penney filed for bankruptcy • Sears is still in bankruptcy and may not emerge • Macy's is teetering on bankruptcy and borrowing against their real estate portfolio • J. Crew filed for bankruptcy • Victoria Secret is closing 25% of its stores • Brio Italian restaurant filed for bankruptcy • Souplantation closed all its locations permanently • Neiman Marcus fled for bankruptcy • Pier 1 filed for bankruptcy A few other key comparisons for Economic depression cannot be cured by perspective. Transient Occupancy Tax legislative action or executive pronouncement. (TOT) for FY 2020/21 is projected at Economic wounds ImustII ,I healed by the action of $1.83 million dollars, which compares to the cells of the I $1.84 million adopted in the FY 2012/13 iF and consumers themselves, budget. That is eight years of revenue (Herbert Hoover) gains lost in less than three months. At the time, in FY 2012/13, the City had nearly 1/3 fewer hotels than it does now. Last year, for comparison, we projected $4.61 million in TOT revenues. - In other respects, as well, the COVID-19 Recession is different and more severe than anything else in recent memory. Cities have experienced direct revenue losses on a scale (breadth) and scope(depth) not seen before; some examples include lost recreation and cultural arts fees, lost planning/building/engineering fees and permits, lost parking revenue, lost business licensing revenue, lost electricity and water charges, lost franchise fees for utilities and refuse and lost utility user charges. Prior years' budget messages included discussion of unemployment, however, that is being purposefully omitted this year. With unemployment (a lagging indicator, where the data has to catch up after the fact with the action having already occurred)still rising from the layoffs in March through May 2020, a comparison would serve little purpose. Last year, in March of 2019, unemployment was 3.2% in Rancho Cucamonga and 4.3% at the San Bernardino County level. State unemployment was over 15% in early April and by most projections will probably continue rising into the 25 -35% range (levels not seen since the Great Depression) thru June and then slowly begin decreasing as businesses reopen. A further comparison would yield little useful data other than the obvious conclusion that when all non-essential businesses are closed, unemployment is high. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 12 Similarly, prior years' messages included discussions of office, hospitality and housing market sectors. Brief discussions of the housing and office sectors are included later on in this document under the 2020 Prospects and Projects for Economic and Community Development section. The current and future state of the hospitality (hotel) sector was discussed above and restaurants (also part of the hospitality sector)will largely follow the recovery of the retail sector as also noted earlier on. Personnel Costs and Staffing Levels CDRNRATC DILCNNS In FY 2019/20 the City budget had 178 FTEs for part-time staff, however, in FY 2020/21 the budget is projected at 122 w. FTE's (a 32% reduction) of which another 60 FTEs are conditional (approximately 33%), meaning they only exist on the books and will not actually be hired until the Community Services (CSD) and Library Services Departments are able to resume more normal services. As expressed in dollars, the adjacent chart illustrates the tremendous drop in part- time salaries. Due to the shutdown impacts, the City reduced part-time salaries by over$1.3 million dollars for FY 2019/20. Salaries for part-time staff for FY 2020/21 are DIYETaRE N EHMMES I. down nearly $1.6 million from adopted to proposed, but of that amount$2.9 million is staffing for CSD and the Library which Is PART-TIME SALARIES-ALL FUNDS conditional upon a lifting of the current health orders impacting mass gatherings. Should that not occur, it is possible that actual part-time salaries may be more in the range of just over$1.0 million dollars next fiscal year, a reduction of nearly 4/5 from the prior year. Full-time staff have also been negatively impacted. In FY 2019/20 the budget was adopted with 387 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions, excluding the Fire District. For FY 2020/21 it is recommended at 350 full-time equivalent positions, a 10% reduction. Overall, the ^,,,�«.., ^�Hma•,m.,^mw,..... ^"LC�•N City's estimated General Fund payroll went from$30.2 million in FY 2019/20 to $29.6 million in FY 2020/21. Following is a summary by position of the various full-time personnel reductions that are incorporated into the FY 2020/21 Adopted Budget. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 13 SUMMARY OF FULL-TIME PERSONNEL REDUCTIONS Number of Bargaining savings/ Proposed Action Status Positipn PodationS Unit Deoarinenl (cost) Fully Deaver! Vacant Administ2lite Aasistam ,a General Animal Wre and Services S 71.DW Fully WNnd Vacant Animal Caretaker 1.0 Demand! Animal Careand SMAces 74,293 Fully Demnd Vacant Animal SeNces Officer 11 1.0 Genera! Animal Gala antl SeNces 10i'm Fully Demnd Vacant Administreare Assistant to Genes! Building and Salary SeNces 71,030 Fully Defied Vacart Public services Technical I 1, General gaining ant Salety Sericas 08.450 Fully Demad Vacart Adminirmare Aleatad 10 Genera! Community SeNces 71,D30 Fully Deduced Vacart Community Services CwNirarmr 1.0 Deal Caremark,SeNces 106,370 Fully Defend Vacant Community Savers Manager 1.0 MuFManager Community SeNces 1401630 Fully Defund Vacant Community Strauss Superinteadent 1.0 Mid-Manager Command,SeNces 149,340 Fully Detailed Vacant CamaunOy Taster Producer 1.0 Genarel Community SeNces 106,370 Fully Deland Vacant Titre TecMuclan 111 1.0 General Cartel Semites 92.00 Fully Defond Vacant Engineering Technician 1.0 General Engineering Services 101,)40 Fully Defend Vacant Executhe Asslenad 1 1.0 General Engineering Services 93420 Fully DeMM Vacant Public Wales lnspectaril 1.0 General Engineer,Services 114,070 Fiat,Deland Vacant Account Tomaidan 1.0 General Finance 92,980 Fully Demad Vacant Adminisdratre Assistant 10 Gmand Human Reseurni 71,030 Fully Deland Vacart GR Specialist 1.0 General Inescal on and Te rmartgy 109,640 Fully Defund Vacant Inbnmation Teachers![,,Technician 1.0 Gaara! Issued.and Tbabnl 87.590 Fully Deland Vacart 1-lb2ry Tembnkian 1.0 General Librzry SeNces W,060 Fully Defund Vacant lead Maintenance Waller to Teamatere Public WmkaseNnes 96290 Fully Deland Vacant Malmersrue Walter 7.0 Terminals Public Walls SeNces 55l Toted Defended-Vaunt Status 27.0 $4TI,450 Fully Deal Fllbtl Adminstal Assistant 1.0 Geraa! Community SeNces ell Fully DefuM Filled Aria Pm]uca-MasSmant Tdeatre 1.0 Gerg21 Gommuni services 106,390 Fully Deland Filled Criminal services Cammad Io Dal Gommwlty Strain. 91 Fully Defund Filled Cultural Center Manager t0 MaManaga Community Sect. 1451020 Fully Defunct Filed Treadle TecMician 111 3o Gerreral Community SeNces 2481010 Fully Demnd Filed Management Analyst 11 1.0 Sua misamnPreessenal Comm.SeMces/Li rem,SeNces 13S54o Fully Dee. Filed Admiderma,Assistant I'D Goal Engineering Serices 71,040 Pat,OefuM Filled Adminis08tre Assistant 1D small Planning 531 Total Defended-Filled Status 10.0 915,410 Total Uefunded 37.0 0 3,392.860 These reductions roughly track actual workload impacts for the customer-facing Community Development departments. Near the beginning of the pandemic, the City started tracking activity levels in the Community Development-related departments and continued tracking those activity levels through to the present. Generally speaking, activity is down about 20% across departments, and the trend line continues to decline. City Hall Lobby Visits Per Week to I Lid i t L Ir. LL w.,, Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 14 Phone calls have been increasing. City Hall Phone Activity-Total Calls Per Week a. 166 816 s63 u1 m Breaking down the data further into the key departments that serve as the intake funnel of development activity, one can see the significant downward trend line for Engineering. Engineering Services Activity Planning has been relatively constant on activity (which is consistent with past downturns) but as the dark blue data reveals, application submittals have fallen off. This does not bode well for future construction activity. Planning Services Activity I. ao fio ao 10 p ■1�_ �I1 ■— ■I■_ ■_ ■ ■_ ■I1_ ipnl6.9 Gpnl13 I6 4pn130-E3 A,111 30 M>ya,> aV 11 P Ma 19 31 Wn WS W6 W7 W6 W9 W,0 �Rpprlulion5ubmn,Y �PMne Wls �Emais �[wnrar Vivn �iaal Staffing levels are critically important for several reasons. They are nearly always the single biggest expenditure item for any local government. With respect to Rancho Cucamonga, personnel costs (excluding police and fire) typically constitute 23% of our budget (based on FY 2019/20), and when combined with police and fire (both personnel intensive departments) that percentage increases to 74%. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 15 Staffing levels should ideally be relatively matched to both workloads (discussed above) and ongoing revenues(to ensure sustainability). Closely tied to the staffing level are PERS Employer Contnbutions. We are in year three of a multi-year rate increase which was expected to level off in FY 2022/23, relatively speaking. City Misc.Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as%) MCC% 2I.506 164% ].1% 2]6% 0% 2500% 23.2% 22.56% 21 a4 20.00% 18 G"5 17.50% 15.e% 16.7% _ 6% IOW%. 11 11 11 I I 1350% FY Wn FY W14 FY 3415 %IV15 HIV17 FY 17/18 f WO HIWX FY]11121 %2V/ FY 22/23 FY 2V24 FY 2/25 Fire Misc.Tier 1 Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as%) sm6 45% % 4z.asx 43.20% 40.03 4x.01% 40% 5% 34.28% 31.41% 30% 25% 22.92% 9.20% 10% I5 IS�% 1' ' FY Wn flIVM HW17 fl12/18 iYW8 H 19/20 "n21 FY21/22 %2Y23 MUM M2025 Fire Safety Tier 1 Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as%) W 5662% 54.63% 5566% % % 50% 49.18% % Qsc% M 32.21% % -a- 32.98% � E2�% 2r l � I I PW/B H15/16 H16/12 FY 17118 FY18/19 H19/2n FYp/21 P21/22 FY22/23 FY23124 FY24/25 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 16 "Oh, buy and buy. We buy and buy. But ain't nobody buying time. We spend our lives, dollars and dimes, but ain't nobody buying time." Ross Ellis. Buy and Buy Unlike much of the regulatory relief granted to private sector entities during COVID-19, there is no similar rate increase relief for CalPERS. Converting those rates into dollars, brings the costs _ from the abstract to the concrete. City of Rancho Cucamonga Estimated CaWERS Employer Costs (In Millions) $10.0 $9.1 $9.5 $94 $&0 $7.2 $6.0 $4 0 $2.0 $- FY 2020/21 FY 2021/22 FY 2022/23 FY 2023/24 FY 2024/2S FY 202S/26 ■Normal Cos[ ■UAL Fire District-Miscellaneous Estimated CaIPERS Employer Costs (In Millions) Sa.W 50 $0.49 $0.49 $a.49 $aAfi $0A7 $0.41 SO.ao S0.30 S0.20 $0.10 $ FY 202R/21 FYMV22 H2M2/23 H2023/24 FY 2024/25 H2M5/26 ■Normal Cost ■UAL Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 17 Fire District-Total Estimated CaIPER5 Employer Costs (In Millions) $8.0 $7.3 $7.5 . $7.0 $6.1 $6.7 $6.9 $6.9 $6.0 S5.0 $4.0 $3.0 S2.o $1.0 $ FY 2020/21 FY 2021/22 FY 2022/23 FY 2023/24 FY 2024/25 FY 2025/26 ■Normal Cost ■UAL At the time of this printing, the stock market was still down over 3,000 points from its high in early 2020. That will translate into lost earnings at CalPERS(for the fiscal year ending 6/30/2020)who will then pass those losses on in the form of higher rates to employers in FY 2022123. As it stands today, CalPERS costs are increasing 16% from FY 2019/20 to FY 2020/21, which is on top of prior year's wall increase, which went from total of$4.4 million to$6.2 million, an increase of 41% year over year. The timing of any future CalPERS cost increases will be inauspicious at best as there is another$1.00 minimum wage hike in January 2021 and a final one in January 2022, both of which appear to be inevitable. Each minimum wage hike costs the City just over$100,000 in additional costs both direct (staffing) and indirect (contracts and salary compaction issues) per month. 1:1 As the CaIPERS pressures combine with the economic impacts of a recession and increasing wages, the City will again look to restructure and re-organize its workforce to reflect the dynamics and demands of a new business environment. Certainly, remote work will play some role in that conversation. As was made clear during the pandemic, highly specialized positions are vulnerable to work interruptions and the City has for some time been seeking to create fewer position titles with a broader array of responsibilities that span multiple departments. That work will continue, and even accelerate, as we utilize vacancy control strategies and strategic workforce reductions to reduce costs and improve efficiency during the economic downturn. Impacts to City Services "The future depends on what we do in the present" Mahatma Gandhi As this message is written, it is not possible to forecast all the impacts to City services throughout the year. There are too many unknowns. Just this week, the County was allowed to move into Stage 2 of the Governor's Reopening Plan and some businesses that were in Stage 3 were moved into Stage 2. We don't know when the health orders limiting mass gatherings will be lifted or when Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 18 rentals and mid-size group activities can begin again. No one knows when robust therapeutics will be developed or when a vaccine will become commercially available. Too many unknowns. Nevertheless, for transparency purposes, a clear and relatively concise list of major service and program impacts was developed for this Budget Message, and is as follows: • City Hall is open for walk-in public access on a reduced hour basis Monday through Thursday. Appointments are encouraged and most services are available remotely. • Animal Center is open by appointment only for emergencies, animal drop offs, and by appointment only for adoptions. • Archibald Library (Wednesdays and Fridays, 10am-6pm) and Biane Library (Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 10am — 6pm) are open for curbside pickup of materials only. The Tech Center at Biane Library is open Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays, 10am — 6pm. No walk-in access is allowed at either library, and all in person programs are cancelled including Passports. • Central Park is open Monday through Friday from 10am — 6pm for very limited senior services and distribution of commodities. Wellness Pass is closed along with walk-in services and all rentals at that location canceled. • Lions East/West is closed and all programming or services at that location canceled. • Sports Center is closed and all programming or services at that location canceled. • Cultural Center at Victoria Gardens is closed and all rentals at that location canceled. • Lewis Family Playhouse is closed and all shows or rentals at that location canceled. • Family Resource Center is closed and all programming or services at that location canceled. • All Fire and Police Stations remain open but walk in access is prohibited or restricted. • All City Parks are open but large group gatherings and organized sports activities remain prohibited. Playgrounds are still restricted, however,tennis courts and outdoor basketball courts and the skate park have been reopened. • Community Services in person Programs and Classes are canceled. • City Council and Planning Commission meetings remain closed to public access More changes are possible throughout the year. Indeed, although Rancho Cucamonga has adopted a FY 2020/21 budget, we know that this fiscal year is one in which several evolutions of the budget may be necessary. Many public agencies are adopting a workload budget (same as last year)or a continuing resolution to carry them through Q1 of the fiscal year until better revenue and expense estimates are available. Rancho Cucamonga has chosen instead to adopt a traditional sustainable fiscal year budget; however, we recognize that depending on the scope of the downturn, or the speed of the recovery, further adjustments at the end of the first quarter, at mid-year and perhaps even in the third quarter will be necessary. Accordingly, the City will be extremely cautious in filling new full-time vacancies, practicing what is called vacancy control for those openings resulting from retirements, promotions or career advancement in other agencies, as we want to ensure sufficient budgetary flexibility to account for additional flare ups of the novel coronavirus or further economic impacts not yet immediately apparent. Additional tactical budget strategies in use for FY 2020121 include monitoring and limiting use of overtime, enhanced purchasing practices, review of ongoing expenditures, review of consultant use, review of fees for service, enhanced billing and collection procedures, enhanced opportunities for partnering with other public and private organizations, limited debt, capital and equipment spending, closure of facilities and reduction in hours of service at facilities that remain open, increased employee Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 19 contributions toward retirement benefits and reorganization of service delivery. These tactical approaches ensure the current budget is able to provide service levels (for the next 12 months) which are fiscally sustainable on an ongoing basis until the economy returns to its pre-recession levels in three to four fiscal years. Infrastructure and Major Capital Improvement Projects/Programs "You and 1 come by rood orrail, but economists travel on infrastructure."Margaret Thatcher Beautification. The City continues to invest in projects which will yield long term cost savings, both water and/or maintenance, to Rancho Cucamonga residents. One such example is $400,000 next year for removal of additional grass areas in LMD 4R(Terra Vista area)to replace them with drought tolerant landscaping. Similarly, the lighting fixtures in Old Town Park, which have plenty of service life left, have pole foundations that do not meet the most updated wind load requirements. The City will be spending $40,000 out of LMD 1 funds to prepare updated specifications for the foundations with the goal of replacing them to maximize their useful life. Another$400,000 will help with drought tolerant landscaping replacement at parks, parkways and medians throughout LMD 2, on the eastern side of Rancho Cucamonga. Facilities. Maintenance of municipal facilities is often one of the first items deferred during an economic downturn. Ironically, it should be one of the last items, because in the end deferring critical maintenance items simply increases long term replacement costs. Even with the Lewis Family Playhouse closing next year, the City is investing $50,000 to upgrade the architectural lighting control systems in the Cultural Center lobby, Celebration Hall, and theatre halls and house lighting. The existing system in Celebration Hall has been failing for the last two years and replacement parts are no longer manufactured.The electronic"brains"of the systems have been and continue to fail. Work with continue on the design of the Second Story interactive Children's Museum exhibit space at the Biane Library. Using previously raised outside funding, most, if not all, of next fiscal year will be spent on the current$925,000 design contract. Also at Biane Library, $20,000 will be spent for the design and planning of the sectional carpet replacement at the facility. Slightly to the south, at the Animal Center, $250,000 will be spent over the summer to replace the roof on the building that is old, leaking and well past its useful life. This will ensure the interior improvements done several years ago are protected. Another $50,000 will be spent for the design and installation of new interior and exterior lighting controls,along with HVAC controls,for all City buildings. The current lighting controls for the Civic Center were installed in 1989 and are obsolete. There is no manufacturer support for the current controls and parts are no longer available. The same situation is true for Central Park, Lions West, Lions East and the Archibald Library. Out-of-date HVAC control systems are another problem for City facilities. Since they are in use at the same time, this projects goal is a standardized HVAC and lighting system (preferably with Wi-Fi capability)for all City facilities. Also at the Civic Center, the City will spend $1,500,000 to replace the three (3) 150-ton chillers and related pumps which have exceeded their expected service life. The current chillers and related pumps have been in service for 28 years, which is well beyond their expected service life. The new chillers and pumps will be of premium efficiency along with a change from a constant Flow chilled water plant to a variable Flow plant. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 20 Miscellaneous. Not all projects fit neatly into categories. One such project is a $125,000 installation of a Solar Photovoltaic System at the Hellman Fire Station 177. This system will eliminate greenhouse gases and provide ongoing free energy that reduces operating costs for the facility. One other unique project is a $1.7 million ATP Cycle 4 Grant funded project in partnership with SBCTA (with a 20% City match to be paid over next two fiscal years) that will help construct a Class IV protected bike lane on 6th Street improving accessibility to the RC Metrolink Station. This project will ensure that we connect southwest Cucamonga to southeast Cucamonga along the 6th Street corridor and will provide increased accessibility to the RC Metrolink Station. RCMU/Fiber Optic. Investment in our City utilities remains a priority. $197,000 will be spent for a distribution line extension to service City Hall's east parking lot with RCMU electricity, lowering overall long-term operating costs. Similarly, for a$57,000 investment the Fire District will be able to extend an RCMU distribution line extension to service Fire Station 3. Lastly, as part of the West Side Public Safety Facility, we have programmed a $237,500 project to connect this new facility to the City's networks via the existing Rancho Fiber backbone. This backbone fiber will need to be extended from the Haven Avenue/Foothill Boulevard intersection to the new facility via existing City-owned dark conduit. This fiber extension will have multiple benefits, including the connection of Station Alerting and the SBCSD network,the extension of the Rancho Fiber project backbone footprint to the west side of the City for future growth and expansion opportunities, as well as fiber connections for the City's ATMS project, connecting intersections on Foothill Boulevard west of Haven Avenue. Parks. With over 30+ different parks in the City of Rancho Cucamonga, maintaining this asset is a continual process. To that end, the City has prioritized a number of projects for FY 2020/21. Work continues on the State grant funded $3 million dog park at Central Park. The additional improvements include traffic signal modifications necessary to accommodate vehicular/pedestrian operations as a result of a new north leg at the intersection of Base Line Road and Spruce Street. Thanks to funding from the Fire District, who uses Heritage Park as a staging area, work will begin on the $280,000 design to replace the pedestrian and vehicular bridges at Heritage Park. This project will replace the main three parallel bridges with one multi- use bridge(separated uses)that spans the Demers Creek Channel at Heritage Community Park. The existing bridges are aged, being constructed from wood, and need to be replaced to continue to maintain access to the park and existing trails. $25,000 will be invested to replace rusted and declining light poles that have been wet-set in concrete in Ellena and Vintage Parks. Several light poles have already declined to the point of removal and more are failing. This project will eliminate the poor condition and poor installation issues and replace the light poles with new ones installed in raised footings with removable hardware. $148,000 will be used to replace deteriorated rubberized playground surfacing at Rancho Summit Park with new rubberized playground surfacing, thereby ensuring the new rubberized playground surfacing meets the impact requirements for playground safety as required by the NRPA Playground Safety Standards. For the tennis courts at Day Creek Park, $68,000 will remove and replace all existing lights in four courts with LED fixtures. This project will help reduce energy costs by 30%, reduce maintenance services and extend the life of the system. These new lights will also improve visibility during night play and reduce customer complaints. Last but nowhere near least, Community Services will invest $250,000 in a Parks and Recreation Master Plan that goes beyond the Park Facilities Master Plan that was updated a number of years ago. Combined with the re-tooling of their Fiscal.Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 21 community program and class offerings, as well as the budget changes, this will help ensure a solid foundation for the next 40 years for Community Services. Streets. There are 460 miles of roads in Rancho Cucamonga, which is 14% of our land area. Maintaining and resurfacing those streets is the equivalent of building a continuous highway over a 50-year time period from Rancho Cucamonga to Tuscon, Arizona. As we continue to whittle away at this mountainous task, next year's Capital Improvement Program contains a number of important projects in this category. The City is spending $950,000 to rehabilitate the pavement on 41h street from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue, in conjunction with the City of Ontario. Another$152,000 will go to design street widening on the east side of Etiwanda Avenue including curb and gutter, sidewalk, street light and utility relocation, as well as pavement rehabilitation. Also on Etiwanda Avenue,from Foothill Boulevard to Wilson Avenue,the City will spend$100,000 for the design of a comprehensive pavement rehabilitation and related improvements project. In conjunction with the Etiwanda Grade Separation project, $700,000 is being spent for pavement rehabilitation and widening on Pecan Avenue between Whittram Avenue and Arrow Route. On the west side of town, the City will spend $370,000 on Foothill Boulevard for design to construct new curbs and gutters, add sidewalks, street lights, striping for two lanes in each direction with painted median island, pavement rehabilitation, and realignment of Red Hill Country Club Drive to a new traffic signal at the Magic Lamp Restaurant, within existing rights of way. Nearby, $187,000 from a Federal Safe Routes to School grant will construct sidewalk, curb and gutter on the south side of 9th Street and install bicycle/skateboard racks at Los Amigos Elementary School, thereby improving pedestrian safety in southwest Rancho Cucamonga. Finally, $100,000 will be spent to construct ADA compliant ramps at various locations citywide. Traffic. As the City grows, prioritizing traffic improvements is an ongoing process, similar to street maintenance. Investing in the upgrade of the City's traffic infrastructure is critical to minimize traffic congestion. The main project for FY 2020/21 is $600,000 for the design of the Advanced Traffic Management System Phase 2 which will install Closed Circuit Television(CCTV)cameras, video detection system (VDS), fiber optic cable and conduit, communication networking equipment including hubs, upgrade and integrate over 50 traffic signals into the Traffic Management Center(TMC) located at City Hall, and implement traffic signal coordination timing. $361,000 will be spent to synchronize ten traffic signals through the installation of fiber optic cable and conduit, communication networking equipment, upgrading and integrating the signals into the Traffic Management Center(TMC) located at City Hall. This project will utilize Crown Castle fiber to lease existing fiber infrastructure to connect signals. Another$277,000 will be used to replace TESCO battery back-up systems in the traffic signal controllers citywide as part of a multi-year program. $240,000 will be used to upgrade the traffic signal at Vineyard Avenue and San Bernardino Road, install a fiberoptic interconnect and related equipment from Vineyard Avenue at Foothill Boulevard to Carnelian Street at Red Hill Country Club. Just as important as traffic management is traffic safety and that is why the City will spend $247,000 of CDBG funding for an enhancement of school crosswalks at seven locations by modifying access curb ramps, installation of solar powered flashing beacons (at specked locations), and installation of high visibility crosswalks. Cyber Security. The City continues to make incremental improvements to the its cybersecurity posture to avoid a cyber intrusion incident, such as ransomware or data theft. Beginning in 2016, the City has made continued investments in replacing outdated IT infrastructure with state-of-the- art equipment covering network, data center, endpoint devices and enterprise software platforms. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 22 At every step of these improvement plans, the Department of Innovation and Technology(DoIT) has ensured that every available security improvement was considered and either implemented or added to a roadmap for security enhancements. "The only thing worse than being blind is having sight but no vision."-Helen Keller In the upcoming fiscal year, DoIT will be implementing several initiatives to continue fortifying the City's digital estate, including enacting multi-factor user identity management to safeguard account credentials; activating Network Access Control (NAC) to prevent unauthorized devices from connecting to the City's data network; conducting the City's first-ever cybersecurity response - exercise in coordination with the Fire District's Office of Emergency Management; publishing an updated cyber-incident response plan that reflects updated requirements from the State of California; conducting backup restoration testing to ensure archived data is retrievable; and implementing comprehensive network and data center activity logging. General Plan. Fiscal Year 2020/21 will bring the most substantive General Plan work efforts ever experienced by the City. First, over this summer, the team will be working closely with the community to develop the Plan's Vision and Guiding Principles. This task will be one of the most critical. The General Plan will have the greatest chance of success if it is grounded in the community's hopes and dreams. The Vision and Guiding Principles will form the foundation for developing, analyzing, and selecting a preferred land use and circulation alternative. In the fall, the General Plan team will work with the community to evaluate a range of alternatives and craft a preferred direction for the next generation of development and investment in our community. Once a preferred direction has been selected,the team will begin creating the General Plan. Much of the winter and spring will be focused on translating this direction into a land use and transportation plan that provides for a healthy community, economic development, and meets the housing expectations set by the State. Before the end of the year, the City will need to have a draft Housing Element that can be submitted to the California Department of Housing and Community Development to begin the process towards getting the Housing Element certified. During this time, the team will also begin conducting environmental analysis on the plan. All of these efforts will be moving in concert in order to bring the community a draft General Plan and Draft EIR by the end of summer 2021. "Make no little plans,,they have no magic to stir men's blood." Daniel Burnham. Operating Budget "Crisis doesn't create failure, it accelerates it. Crisis doesn't create momentum, it accelerates the momentum that was already there."Carey Nieuwhof The Operating Budget of the City is that portion of the annual budget which includes all the regular non-capital related revenue and expenses from year to year. In the City of Rancho Cucamonga that is primarily composed of the General Fund, which is a catch-all tens that encompasses the major regular revenue sources for the City which are not otherwise restricted in their use and the associated expenses that are regularly charged to those revenue streams. General Fund revenue for FY 2020121 is expected to total $89.3 million, up just slightly from the $88.2 million in revenue originally budgeted for FY 2019/20. This nominal increase, however, is considerably less than the normal $3-5 million per year increases in prior years, and would otherwise, in a normal year, be insufficient for the regular expenses of the City. The overall Operating Budget is divided up among the various departments as indicated below: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 23 City Operating Budgets City General Fund, Fire District Funds and Library Funds $3,106,100 _ $1,279,650 •Governarce I� $8,119,410 •Rands Mgm $5,750,360 .communtysavices $12.744,860 • LitraYSmrices $802,202,270 •Aomn Sautes •Econ.and Canm on. $1,766,050 .Butlhg&safety,services `1 $ , 3,300 •Ereineaing5ayces $1,63633,770 ,Planning $10,268,290 .Pubic Wakssavices $3,161,730 •Anima Care&Services •Poke •Fire As is typical for most cities, Police and Fire make up the two largest cost centers. When combined with Animal Care and Services, these three departments make up over 65% of the City's Operating Budget, reflecting a historical and community predisposition to fund public safety at a very high level. The 65% number is 2% larger than last year(at 63%) reflecting the shrinkage in staffing costs in the non-safety departments during this pandemic induced recession. One item of note is that Fire is actually a legally separate subsidiary district with a separate(mostly property tax based) General Fund that cannot be used to supplement non-emergency services related expenses. Overall, the Operating Budget increased by 5.01% from last year. However, $2,557,360 of this increase was due to the combining of the Community Services recreational and community activities into the General Fund; previously, they were accounted for in separate special revenue funds. Excluding these added activities, the Operating Budget increased only 3,06% from last year. This is the smallest percentage of growth since the City exited the Great Recession in FY 2012/13, as noted below: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 24 Changes in Operating Budget $150,0DD,00D 5140,0D0,00D 5130,000,00D $120,000,ODD $110,000,000 $100,000,00D 50000,000 I I I I I I I S60,000,000 570.000,000 $60,000,000 550,000,000 o�����8'8�tio yo\y��"'�~'L�1�•;r y�\ti° ,°�~e�`'��0�sD�~^ ����0��•sy�°s��o 1ary~ ■GencalFud ■Library FWd ■Fie Dktrict General Fund The City's General Fund is the primary fund used by a government entity for municipal operations. This fund is used to record all resource inflows and outflows that are not associated with special- purpose funds. The activities being paid for through the General Fund constitute the core administrative and operational tasks of the government entity. One way to think of it is, if government is an essential service, the General Fund pays for the essential activities of that government entity. For Rancho Cucamonga the General Fund is comprised of seven major revenue sources, making up 85% of revenues, as indicate below: Ptp ue Ve Gamelees $21,133,6W S10,OrL100 BWnm Ikwes $L)aaG Sells tax rmmnise lee: - - $28,744,580 n,a4s.6m Sales Tax remains the City's primary revenue source at$28.7 million. Approximately 20% of the City's sales tax comes from Victoria Gardens. As large as that may seem, sales tax alone is insufficient to even cover the expenses of the Police Department contract at $42.7 million. Rancho is a modest sales tax city, receiving less revenue than either of our large neighbors to the south or east. Further, growth in sales tax remains a concern as brick and mortar revenues continue to flatten and more shopping moves online. Right now, online sales tax goes to the County pool which is distributed based on each City's proportionate share of overall"point of sale" Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 25 receipts, not where the tax is generated.This disadvantages smaller communities as well as more upscale communities whose revenues are not sourced back to their origin. If the pandemic does mark an even more extreme shift towards online shopping, reforming sales tax distribution will become an even higher priority for many communities. Sales Tax $34 W0,�0 $32,552,4sa $32A00.a00 -12% $3oaoo,aao $28,617,960 $28J44,580 52a000,o0a $26.0]O.D20 $2a,OLO,WO $22,000,000 I ' ' I $20,000,000 FY 0]/08 FYM/03 W 03/10 FY 10/11 FY 11/12 FY 12/13 FY 13/14 FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/2]FY ll/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY W/21 Vehicle License Fees and Property Tax In-Lieu of VLF are another significant revenue source for Rancho Cucamonga, estimated to be at $21.2 million for FY 2020/21 which is $944,370 more than in FY 2019/20. In a community like Rancho Cucamonga, where property tax valuation typically increases at a healthy amount from year to year, VLF and Property Tax in-Lieu of VLF are likely to remain a growing revenue source as noted below: VLF and Property Tax In-Lieu of VLF $22,000,000 $21,000,000 $20p00,000 $19,000,000 $18;0001000 $17,000,000 $16,000,000 $15,000,000 $14,000,000 $13,000,000 J'1�\J -6;y' -6�\ 'P' oNy '0� 'J'1�~6\J'Ny Q^\J Q'Pva\J9\ O\ry1 Q Q 4J qk � FJ FJ Q Q Zk Property tax has always been a modest revenue source for Rancho Cucamonga, owing to our post-Proposition 13 incorporation. For FY 2020/21 it is estimated at $10.0 million dollars which Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 26 is a 4.2% increase from the prior fiscal year. While we are known as a low property tax city, that is a misnomer. Property Tax rates are the same as anywhere else: the difference is that most of the revenue goes to the State, School Districts and County. Only a modest $0.05 goes to the City of Rancho Cucamonga as shown in the property tax dollar breakdown graphic below: Property Tax Dollar Breakdown e I rd� II uC ca.,nc d Fmd 113< RC Fn pwb $.14 cq ase med r„p,. unLnmapnky MIII 9r fbod Cumd Abnini,ko�icn As the City matures, however, we are taking a new look at property tax as an opportunity to maximize and diversify our revenue stream. The City is beginning to look at value per acre,similar to what a farmer or developer might do, and seek to maximize our revenue value per acre, jobs per acre,and assessed valuation per acre. This new way of looking at revenue will help maximize certain key areas of the City which will help increase property values and revenue overall. This will be explored more in our new General Plan and if adopted as standard will find its way in far more detail into future overall budgets. Franchise Fees are those fees paid by utility providers in the City of Rancho Cucamonga, including Southern California Edison, Southern California Gas and Burrtec for the privilege of operating exclusively in the City using the City rights of way. These fees may be regulated in some cases by the California Public Utility Commission and can be volatile from year to year given changes in rates, conservation and increasing efficiency and recycling standards. Franchise fees are estimated at$7.4 million for FY 2020/21 which is 11.9% higher than the prior fiscal year, as shown below: Franchise Fees saim.M $7,5MM $],(M,M $6,SW,o S6,",M $5,500,000 I I I I $S,W0,000 �V \S �V ,bp ,Y^\,y4 .Y4p �9V FJ F� FJ F�� Fib 0", 0^` e G'" F�� o Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) is a tax placed per night on the use of hotel rooms where the occupant stays 30 days or fewer. TOT is a percentage of the hotel room rate, and it currently sits Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 27 at 10% in Rancho Cucamonga, some 2% lower than our neighboring city of Ontario to the south. Once a modest revenue source for the City, over the years with the growth in the number of hotels and rooms, along with increasing room rates, this has become a significant revenue source for the City. Rancho Cucamonga estimates it will collect$1.8 million in TOT for FY 2020/21 which is $2.7 million less than was collected in FY 2019/20, owing largely to the impacts of the pandemic on leisure and business travel. This is a 60% reduction in this important revenue. Transient Occupancy Taxes SS,MM $4,s]a,4]a 54,50gM S4,=," $3,5W," $3,=,= $Z5WIM $I,5W,000 ' 1P:1S 1\,,,6 ,b\,11 1\,l0 ��,�9 1q\,]O �KI,(r Businesses License and Development Fees are the final two revenue sources which make up the City's top seven General Fund revenues. Business license revenue is a tax on the privilege of engaging in business in the City. This revenue is estimated to be $2.7 million for FY 2020/21 as noted in the chart below: Business Licenses $2,950,000 $2,800,000 $2,650,000 $2,500,000 $2,350,000 12,100000 I I I I I I I I $2,050,000 $1,900,000 $1,750,000 \°� e ,,a O.o�y F' <1 IZI Fzl I° F�� F`� F�� Fri �� <1 t�ryo I'll GIB Similarly, Development Fees are estimated to be at $4.8 million next fiscal year, a moderate 17.0% increase from the prior year due to an anticipated increase in development activity, but they are still not back to their levels before the Great Recession. This largely reflects the City's built out nature. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 28 Development Fees Ss,s00,000 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2:::: I I I I I $1,50Q000 boa \'`o yo�titi ,y�'`ry wry\''^, �\tia vR\�y ,��''o yb�tiry y^�ry� ry��ryA yq�ryo ryo�ry, �,��,�'��.yo �ryo �ryo �ryo �iryo �ryo �ryo �ryo �ryo �ryo �ryo Use of Reserves. The last time the City of Rancho Cucamonga used reserves to balance its Operating Budget was FY 2010/11 and that year we used $908,130 during the Recession. Over the ensuing years, Rancho Cucamonga cultivated a regular habit of adding to reserves, accumulating a total budgeted contribution to reserves of $5.7 million dollars in six years. Unfortunately, this most recent fiscal year we estimate we will have to use $417,860 of reserves to finish the year with a balanced budget and we anticipate using $700,000 amount of reserves in FY 2020/21 to cushion the dramatic revenue loss. Nevertheless, we eagerly anticipate returning to our regular habit of contributing to, not withdrawing from, budgeted reserves. Library Last year, the budget message noted that the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library, which has received the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation's highest A library is the honor for libraries and museums, was noted from its very delivery early days for flexibility in programs and services to the community. The Library Staff are an entrepreneurial group r always trying new ideas and programs. Never was this more Wit IpVj k1Wr evident than during the pandemic. Rancho Cucamonga was one of only a handful of public libraries in the State that where history remained open, delivering essential services to its residents comes to life. during one of their times of greatest need. Rather than close, as most libraries did, sending their staff home and denying the community all access to the knowledge and resources contained therein, the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library remained open with enhanced curbside pickup and drop off services, book deliveries, enhanced e-book access and even a computer lab that remained open while practicing social distancing. For FY 2020/21 that innovative spirit continues to flourish, even though this will be one of the more modest operating budget years as noted below: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 29 Changes in Operating Budget- Library Fund $6,000,000 $5,500,000 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $a,000,000 $3,500,000 A„p�yOvVOryvryO,1P�,yh4Yy,yryO,tb�y4Y Work also continues on the Library's Second Story, a space that now features an Art Studio, STEM lab, Workshop, Kitchenette and Open Exhibit area. Originally planned as an interactive children's museum that would potentially have begun construction as early as FY 2020/21, the Second Story will now go through an extended design period while staff and the consultants determine the changes necessary to ensure that an interactive high touch children's learning environment can function safely while still challenging children's imagination and creativity through a literature themed environment of continuously changing interactive exhibits. Construction will be pushed back at least one year, but the goal remains the same, to win a second IMLS Gold Medal, this time as a children's museum. Fire District "Training is not about being better than someone else, it's about being better than you used to be. This year marks nearly 100 a years since the early community of Alta Loma first grappled with the issue of fire protection. From humble beginnings as different volunteer community-based _ . departments, the Foothill Fire District first formed, ultimately -r a becoming a self-governed subsidiary district of the City of Rancho Cucamonga known as the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. The original fire house in old downtown Alta Loma is no longer functioning, but today the District has seven fully functioning modern fire station locations. Station 8, to be situated in Terra Vista behind Target, east of Haven Avenue and south of Church Street, is partway through the design-build process. The District recently acquired land just east of Archibald Avenue, south of the railroad tracks, for a Station 9. And following closely on the heels of the highly successful 2018 launch of the All Risk Public Safety Training Facility off Jersey Boulevard and Milliken Avenue, will come the 2020 debut of a West Side Public Safety Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 30 Center at Carnelian Street and San Bernardino Road. This unique approach, the first of its kind in the County of San Bernardino, will pair on the same site a full size replacement for the aging and undersized Fire Station 2 off San Bernardino Road near Archibald Avenue with a full Sheriff substation that will be staffed and include department-wide evidence storage capability. Having reached a huge milestone in FY 2019/20 with the first ever 4-0 staffing for both ladder trucks, the department cautiously approaches the FY 2020/21 fiscal year. Dependent nearly completely on property taxes, prudence is the watchword of the day as we wait to see how property related values hold up through the pandemic. The Fire District budget for FY 2020/21 is $41.9 million, a 12.8% increase over the prior fiscal year. This growth is largely attributable to the addition of six new Firefighter positions that were added midway through FY 2019/20 in order to provide 4-person staffing on each of the District's two ladder trucks, as well as PIERS and other personnel cost increases. Changes in Operating Budget- Fire District $45,000,000 $40,000,000 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 I I I I I I $15,000,000 oa, \~o,,ry� o��'osn��yo5��o,�6�.,10\��o,�ro\N9tia�tiotio�tih 4 4 ti�ti� ti ry ti T ti ti ti ti 'f 1 ti Special Districts "I will study and prepare, and someday my opportunity will came." —Abraham Lincoln There are thirty-five special assessment districts in the City, and these districts play a key role in the City's budget. Specifically, these districts help ensure that new development pays its own way. Whether the improvement is new streets and storm drains, or parks and trails, most all new development after 1985 has been part of one or more special tax districts. These Mello-Roos taxes and Lighting and Landscaping Maintenance District assessments help pay to develop and maintain the infrastructure in the community surrounding a home, so the burden for that infrastructure does not fall to existing taxpayers in the City. Most of these districts were created prior to Proposition 218 (Prop 218) in 1996 and, therefore, have no index to adjust regularly for rising costs. Before Prop 218 that regular adjustment was a function of the City Council approving each years budget and rates. After Prop 218 the City Council retained approval over the budget, but any change in rates required voter approval. During the high growth years of 1990-2003 the continual addition of new residents in each district Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 31 kept revenues growing at a steady pace. As the districts slowly built out, the improvements also began maturing and maintenance costs increased. The early 2000's marked a change as balancing budgets became evermore challenging. Eventually,voters inmost of the districts were given a choice to adjust services downward to live within existing revenues or approved updated assessment rates to maintain the improvements at their historical high levels of care. Consistentwith the historical City Council policy of fiscal equity,the General Fund provides certain minimum levels of funding (some of which are required by law)to some of the Districts. The City Council, acting as the governing body, has adjusted services and maintenance levels where and when needed when the funding streams remained insufficient to cover expenses. This situation has become most acute on the west side of town where voters have refused to entertain any type of rate increase in over 35 years. Accordingly, the list of deferred and unfunded maintenance items continues to grow, and includes: • Ball field lighting replacement at Old Town Park, Red Hill Park, and Heritage • Playground replacements and resurfacing at Old Town Park, Heritage, Church Street Park, Hermosa Park, Bear Gulch Park and Red Hill Park • Shade shelter and amphitheater repair and replacement at Old Town Park, Heritage Park, Golden Oak Park and Red Hill Park • Bridge repair and replacement for the two western ped/equestrian bridges at Heritage Park • Restroom repair at various parks • Irrigation system replacements at all parks; shade shelter wood repair at various parks • Walking and jogging path resurfacing at various parks • Fence repair and replacement at various parks • Ball field/soccer field rehabilitation and renovation at various parks A new approach will eventually be needed to ensure fiscal stability for the west side parks and landscape districts. The FY 2020/21 Adopted Budget includes $110,000 for west side parks public engagement to assist with this effort. For those districts in the City where the residents have entrusted their City Council with the ability to regularly adjust the rates, the City acts as a fiscal steward of that public trust, recommending rate increases only when absolutely necessary to balance budgets and keep pace with rising commodity, utility or contract labor cost increases. Below is the updated chart for each of the districts with a rate adjustment mechanism. Maximum Recommended Distrito Recommendation Change(%) Assessment Assessment LIVID 2 Keep Flat 0% $534.49 $503.80 LMD4-R Keep Flat 0% $471.84 $397.15 LIVID 6-11 Increase 3% $451.92 $451.92 LMD9 Increase 40% $622.21 $436.69 LIVID 30 Increase 3% $904.44 $758.72 CFD 2000-03B Increase 6% $1,470.90 $1,470.90 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 32 2020 Prospects and Projects for Economic and Community Development "The COVID-19 pandemic will reverse the trends of globalization and urbanization, increasing the distance between countries and among people. These changes will make for a safer and more resilient world, but one that is also less prosperous,stable andfulfilling." Wharton University of Pennyslvania, Dean Geoffrey Garrett As the Spring 2020 Coronavirus shut-down begins to wane, enough dust has settled that we can begin to discern some of what the future might hold for community development. Before the coronavirus pandemic hit, everyone was experiencing a statewide housing crisis, unprecedented demand for industrial developments of all sizes, moderate growth in the hospitality sector, steady demand for restaurants in an industry not known for long term stability, and challenging times for retail as brick-and-mortar shops battled online e-tailers for consumers dollars. Rancho Cucamonga was experiencing historically low unemployment and the national economy was about 70% consumer based. And yet, as of this writing, more than 26 million people have filed for unemployment. With the re-opening on its way, there will be a new normal that will gradually take hold, and the demands on real estate development will change in kind. One of the great national experiments now underway, which has the potential to change the built environment significantly, is in the area of remote work. The City of Rancho Cucamonga, like so many other organizations, approached remote work cautiously, fearing a loss of productivity and concerns with workplace communication and team integration. Afterall, working together in close proximity gives us the opportunity for spontaneous collaboration and communication. Yet, the world has adapted fairly well to the COVID-19 pandemic-induced distancing, and everyday our virtual working and communication tools are improving. Many organizations are finding quantifiable productivity benefits from remote work for certain positions. In a recent study done by the University of California Riverside Inland Center for Sustainable Development, 43% of employees worked remotely with some frequency, 56% of employees had a job where at least some portion could be done remotely and prior studies have shown a 10-15% boost in productivity, reduced sick days, and improved job satisfaction from remote work. Not to mention the quantifiable savings in greenhouse gases when people do not have to commute. "We like to give people the freedom to work where they want safe in the knowledge that they have the drive and expertise to perform excellently, whether they at their desk or in their kitchen. Yours truly has never worked out of an office, and never will." -Sir Richard Branson,Virgin America Some hybrid of remote work and in-person work is likely to be with us far into the future. As a result, we are likely to see a change in the type of office space businesses need as well as a reduction in demand for overall large office space. Future office space will likely trend towards three attributes: fewer small individual offices and cubicles, more large spaces for collaborating and team meetings, and flexibility to adapt to shifting needs. Locally, there are no new office buildings under construction or in design. The market was seeing gradually increasing prices per square foot; however, the market began to soften over the winter and with the onset of the pandemic and the shift to remote work, it does not appear likely there will be significant new office in the immediate short term future. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 33 "If it is asserted that civilization is a real advance in the condition of man —and 1 think that it is, though only the wise improve their advantages—it must be shown that it has produced better dwellings without making them more costly, and the cost of a thing is the amount of what I will call life which is required to be exchanged for it,immediately or in the long run." Henry David Thoreau,Walden With respect to the housing market the story is both somewhat similar and somewhat different. CnY Of RANCHOCUCAMONGA: EMPLCNMEmaY FIRMS AND HOUSEHOLDS oaoo Como — - wpee x••e,ae wMno HNo +r,a, 0.. canna ava..N a t�$$$$$i4$$$4 4�434�4 444 9�44 944�$dd9'r94d4 The chart above indicates, the sources of demand for new homes in RC remains strong. The numbers of working households continue to rise and the City remains a jobs center. As the following two charts indicate, however, the availability of new projects is constrained as the City approaches buildout. Accordingly, sales of new single-family housing has declined and plateaued. RANCHOCUCAMONCA: 5NGLE FAMILY DETACHED ANDATTACHEDHOUSNG MI ES atl 5 i g ' • n srµrm.,Xowen Further, with the growth in potential buyers, but declining availability, prices have continued to rise, largely returning to their pre-recession peak. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 34 MNCHOCU 11,10 &- SINGIF 1A 11LYOEiACHEDIWOAT7ACHEDHOUSING PRICES t i e HmAm E e i E 4 vmAm 3 r s s E e ,mam � 9R01 0asa° 4? 4'' s' B' +' 9'' 4°ems. •prtez SnpkimiR Demael •Prc64axNJ In addition, the value ratio for housing (price divided by living area) peaked in 2009, declined during the Great Recession, but since has grown strongly to new record levels. Ott Of RANCHOCUGMONGA NEW RESIDENTM PROIER5:SA TRENDS AND PEKE PATTERNS 350 05 AS 300 - — - 5397 —5 E]i 250 36 3i4 3D M 200 ISO - 1 11 100 63 6] 50 D 2009 2010 3011 ZOE 2033 2014 2015 2016 Nll 201E 2019 al Rale Annually •Value Ralie,Av9. Reviewing this data, staff sought to understand why we were not seeing more homes built(given the thousands of entitled units on the books)and why the homes we were seeing often sold at a substantial price premium compared to surrounding communities. Rancho Cucamonga has a number of inherent locational benefits for home buyers. The City's evolving status as a jobs center helps increase housing demand. A centralized location, which makes both Los Angeles, Riverside, Orange and San Bernardino counties accessible, further helps with demand. Our numerous strong school districts serve as the bulwark which continue to help us attract families as well as professionals. Despite this, we continue to see many fewer homes built than are permitted at price premiums approaching 30%+over adjacent communities. Fiscal.Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 35 COMPARISON OF PRICES FOR NEW HOMES RANCHO CUCAMONGA VS.ONTARIO BOTH PR02ECTSBY 0.R.H0RT0N SINGLE-FAMILY H0ME:2300 SQ.HT. Sem,= R.mt . uomcm,h..Rice Premium al?31% $7mm0 $699,880 $6m,m0 $S33A90 $Sm,Om $mLM $300.000 S2m,0C0 $lU3,Ob $0 ONTARIO RANCHOCUCAMONGA One factor which affects the local Rancho Cucamonga market is that, due to high cost and limited supply, some demand has been displaced to nearby communities. RANCHO CUCAMONGA: COMPARISON OF RECENT DEMAND-SUPPLY FOR NEW HOUSING DURING 2006-2019 (BASE YEAR:20D6-PRIOR EMPLOYMENT PEAR) 12,m0 �000 9,861 8OW ],696 5,]35 6,Om A,OW z6m a 3,N0 -1,760 AM EMPLOYMENT ESTIMATEDDEMAND ACTUALSUPPLYOF SPILLOVERTOOTHER GROfTI-FIRMSIN FORNEWHOMES' NEWHOMES CITIES CITY:2m6-2019 Area cities including Chino, Ontario, Eastvale and Jurupa have been the beneficiaries of this displacement. With greater land availability, at a lower price premium, they have been able to build more homes and bring the prices on those homes to market a lower level. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 36 NEW RFNOEMLLL: fM-ERlE1tlRIF5NNOAIMTRIENTE l.Bm L. as�'aee_[ xa¢LO�EFNRSL � PECnT 6C0\FA\ Um LBR 1.0m Bm 6m V4 Ila a •CIBro 21n.FmMN�mN •QFO .OMCOIwm-N •Q1�e AW[meuo� NFWREWEMW: FMbWEWWSAMAMRTWW$ Lem I.Bm Llm _ Lem i m y4 dm Llt vo vn.fmMPemN •awn N¢Rmirtnee .mvo 4mmess NEW RFNYENTLLL: NMSREENONFSMDAYMTWNTS eoo dm Sao ma Im o — •sd9ah sMBY FaMN PomYe .FUM[ 1OxMOPernN .F:N/. roxnune Fiscal Year 202o/21 Adopted Budget Page 37 NFWRELDFNML iOP-SILLF NOMESNIDRNNTYffNFS aoeisxsse.r suvs mum0�'IwcO VW aN 35p XO 2W ]40 ]50 1M 0 ,P,A't� eB e6''0'fl'AaPQPe air e e'r`` e`'p"J k)wPVNY SkkiknY/ismb •1wW VYy 11fY1p1MmU •IUW VYq Igm,p6 Buyers in the market for more moderate priced homes have found a place to buy in neighboring communities. In particular, Ontario,with the Ontario Ranch/New Model Colony development, has a large area which ultimately could hold another 40,000 homes and generally came online in 2014. NEWRESIDENTIAL: FOR-SALE HOMES AND APARTMENTS 3.OW µ MD 1.11rtl RH-�4pc J_iEnNoS ItECV'. i(EcaA FRI' I'M LEW OW kVA N 8N fi00 40D 30D 0 4° 91'aP 9941 4ot 41 -.1 •murb vrNk EamN Pe,min •mum au�nea Pmrvu •amaro aoanmenu Similarly, northern Fontana, awash in undeveloped land, has also seen a huge spike in growth beginning in 2014. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 38 NEWRESIDENTIAL: FOR-SALE HOMES AND APARTMENTS Lm ROBLSi FtBRLF F£CESSIO\'p➢R6U0\ FFtE\'i P%MFAI' l,eW LND ' Ln� LM tm e 8W HIO ADO Zp 0 •Fv,tlnn sM.v.mRr P.,,,,n. •i.,u,a Nummv.�„,In •Emlane �F..menu With greater land availability, at more moderate prices, homes in these communities are simply more appealing to price conscious buyers. Developers, recognizing this, size and price their product accordingly and the market has responded. Rancho Cucamonga,who once upon a time in the 1980s and 1990s had similar amounts of undeveloped low-priced land, no longer is in that category. Further, with higher achieving school districts, higher design standards, public art and high-end retail which are not common in other communities, these amenities create a "premium" market for Rancho Cucamonga. Accordingly,we attract buyers who are willing to pay more for a smaller home or smaller piece of land or both in many cases. As Rancho Cucamonga moves into more specialized and complex development types, and luxury communities, developers take longer to bring those projects to the market and prices adjust accordingly. Further, rather than compete with greater land availability and lower prices in neighboring communities, developers rationally maximize their profit by taking advantage of the Rancho Cucamonga price premium and build fewer units at any one time, which also helps keep prices stable. It is likely we will continue to see this trend moving forward even as house designs change and respond to the pandemic. For those working from home with a spouse and children, we have learned the value of having dedicated spaces for professional work. As a result,we will likely see more and more new housing designed with separate office spaces to meet this need.Many single- family builders already offer these amenity rich spaces, while many multi-family builders offer small business centers in their club houses. Expect to see these remote workspaces grow in size (possibly resulting in larger homes), amenities,and frequency to meet this new demand. Rancho Cucamonga will likely be at the front of this design change, with prices adjusting accordingly for those who want these amenities. Places like Rancho Cucamonga might also see increased demand for more moderate size homes, which already make up a substantial portion our housing stock, as families who experienced the quarantine period in smaller apartments in coastal cities look for larger spaces. It is very likely that people who spent weeks in quarantine in 700 square-foot apartments may not want to take the chance of being cooped up in such small spaces should the coronavirus or something similar resurge. The future of for-sale versus for for-rent and recent trends towards the rental market may change. No one knows if tenants, at the mercy of landlords who may have Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 39 tried to evict them in the pandemic but for government intervention,will want the potentially greater independence and corresponding financial obligations, that come with home ownership. It is also not likely that the coronavirus will drive any real changes in housing density.At the very least, the State of California's housing policy, as promulgated by the Governor and Legislature as well as thru the activities of the state's Housing and Community Development Department, will continue to support increasing density. In Rancho Cucamonga, high land values and a decided preference for higher amenitized housing developments will also continue to drive the trend towards medium density housing. Perhaps the most compelling argument will be if the virus spreads through human contact, is the increased potential for contact from higher density living a greater risk?The answer is that no one is sure, but it is a possibility. We will have to follow the data and see where that leads in the months and years to come. For now, there are immense public health benefits that come with appropriately designed density: reduced dependence on automobiles for getting around also nets us less air pollution, less respiratory disease, less heart disease, reduced incidence of diabetes, fewer automobile-related injuries, more physical activity, and better access to services. If there is a desire to plan directly in response to COVID-19, we must take note that the hardest hit Americans are those with high blood pressure, diabetes, and respiratory disease, all of which are health conditions that are addressed by increased physical activity and reduced exposure to air pollutants. With regard to housing, a big challenge will be finding a way to provide attainable housing with enough space to provide for the ability to work at home, opportunities for experiencing the outdoors at least in semi-private in case social distancing returns,while providing for the benefits of well-designed communities and avoiding the impacts of poorly designed high density development. After twelve years of working hand-in-hand with the community to improve health and well-being, Rancho Cucamonga is particularly well suited to thread the needle on this complex dilemma. "What will that new landscape mean for brands and retailers in North America?The post-pandemic commerce world will be shaped by three forces: • Consumers will have adopted short-term behaviors during the pandemic that in many cases will become permanent. • Consumers will emerge from the pandemic in a new economic reality, changing commerce behaviors in profound ways. • A significant consolidation of retailers will fundamentally alter the competitive and partner landscape." Forbes Magazine-Jason Goldberg article;The Impacts of COVID-19 on U.S. Brands and Retailers The retail and commercial sectors will have a tough road ahead, post COVID-19. With statewide stay-at-home orders in place, most people were forced to expand their use of online purchasing and delivery services. The convenience of these services may not be easily forgotten, and the retail and restaurant sectors will have to adapt more quickly.We will likely see an increased trend towards smaller retail spaces. Retailers will have even less need to maintain onsite inventories and many will evolve into showrooms and consultation spaces. Even more stores will become a place to inspect goods, speak with an expert, and perhaps make a purchase that will be shipped to your home. Under our current sales tax system, these revenues are largely sourced to the County pools which distribute revenues to each city based on their proportionate share of the County's property tax, without regard to the origin, destination or shipping movements of the Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 40 goods sold. This detrimentally impacts those communities who have fewer physical locations, in particular, those geographically smaller communities, and rewards geographically larger communities, particularly those with large malls, auto malls and big box retailers. Restaurants may trend in two different directions. Those that are based on a guest experience may grow larger in order to provide greater distances between patrons. If they don't grow, at the very least they will need to rethink interior design including air flow,table arrangements and patron proximity in order to minimize the spread of pathogens. We will likely also see the trend towards additional outdoor seating increase in order to provide distance between patrons and the benefits of fresh air. Other restaurants have begun to experience the benefits of serving take out, such as reduced staffing needs and reduced overhead costs of big dining areas, and some may pivot away from onsite dining. In these cases, automobile traffic will increase correspondingly, and we will have to think very carefully about how we design and manage our curb spaces and parking areas for this traffic as we also see an increased demand for drive-thrus. Due to the current high levels of unemployment, demand for consumer goods will take some time to rebound. In a consumer-based economy, we have a chicken-and-egg dynamic: we need people purchasing goods and services for there to be jobs in consumer goods, retail and manufacturing, restaurants,and other services.As a result,we will likely see near-term reductions in demand for large industrial facilities for logistics and goods distribution. If this pandemic has taught the world anything, however, it is that a global supply system in which most of our goods are produced offshore is a fragile system that is easily broken and subject to delays and price increases. We have already seen local entrepreneurs responding with applications for new manufacturing facilities here in Rancho Cucamonga. It is likely that we will see continued growth and demand for small and medium scale industrial development as businesses spool up new manufacturing facilities and larger businesses retool and regroup in response to changes from the Coronavirus, such as social distancing. "Nobody comes here anymore. It's too crowded."-Yogi Berra As we exit the pandemic, cities are likely to see a few community development trends continue into the future which will accelerate the changes already underway with respect to how we deliver development services. On the private side, while it may take as much as several years for the economy to recover, we are likely to continue to see a strong demand for development in the residential sector. California has long suffered a housing supply shortage, leading to increasing housing costs, and making attainable housing scarce for more and more families. When the pandemic passes, those families in need of housing will still need housing. For one, the record unemployment we are experiencing will make it very difficult for families to maintain their housing or attain new housing.Two, it is very possible housing builders will slow down as capital becomes harder to secure and the available qualified buyer pool shrinks. Yet the state's population will continue to grow and each year the demand for more housing will increase. On the other hand, demand for office and retail will likely lag. Just as millions have become more adept at shopping online, millions have become adept at working remotely through online tools and services. This will reduce the amount of office space business needs. In Community Development, one of the primary lessons all local governments have learned from the COVID-19 pandemic is the importance of delivering development services as one cohesive unit, rather than as multiple planning, engineering, public works and building and safety departments. Moving forward, the City will continue to focus on reducing/eliminating any overt Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 41 silos. A new focus will be placed on how we deliver services and whether some things, such as inspections for example, can be done remotely. Lastly, the City will focus on modernizing our physical space to improve efficiency and reduce customer dwell time, improving productivity and the customer experience while ensuring a safe and healthy environment. Economic and Community Development Building and Safety Services Hiahlights of Continuing and Evolvina Proarams. Projects and Services The Accela Permit Program provides a platform that can perform many functions, and the possibilities are numerous. Yet, the system requires customization and personalized prompts within the framework to be effective. Previously, the City utilized the consulting business that developed the software to create these prompts and improve the software, which was expensive and time-consuming. Over the past two years, the Department has invested time and training with our staff to perform these functions in-house. These new in-house skills and ability to design and build the system to our requirements have allowed us to: • Process applications online � Q E • Review plans online • Provide immediate access to applicants regarding comments or approvals • Issue permits online • Schedule inspections online • Provide history tracking online On January 1, 2020, implementation of 100% electronic submittals for permits put the City ahead of the curve during the COVID-19 social distancing restrictions when other jurisdictions were scrambling to implement "no-paper" submittals. Our online capability is a leader in California, with less than 10% of cities in California having this service. The system provides live tracking by the applicant. It offers a transparent view of the workflow from beginning to end of a project. Constant improvements and refinements to the Accela system are underway as we continue to explore better ways to increase efficiency and streamline the permitting and inspection process. The Department has increased the use of technology to provide customer service and meet the inspection demands of the development sector. The Department implemented drone technology into inspection performance, but not until recently has the full potential of drone and virtual technology for inspections been realized. Inspectors have also been conducting inspections via Facetime and video,which has helped to ensure the health and safety of residents and inspectors alike. Utilizing this technology, the Department will continue to be an innovative leader in inspection practices and set a standard for the industry, as well as provided efficient and accurate services to our community. A texting system, known as Quiq, is another system recently acquired by the Department. This software allows the public to communicate with office staff regarding inspections scheduled for Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 42 the current day. Once an inspection is scheduled through Accela, the permit holder may access the schedule the morning of the inspection to verify their appointment window. A permit holder can also text with staff to request a change in appointment time or provide additional information. This functionality reduces phone calls to the inspectors and office staff and engages in clear written dialogue and effective outcomes. During the third quarter of Fiscal Year 2019/20, environmental and social conditions required the increase of remote meetings and teleconferencing. Although the Department has embraced this concept in recent years, the increasing use of virtual gatherings has solidified our engagement in this mode of communication. Remote meetings have reduced the length of meeting times,allowed for more flexible times and locations, and resulted in better comprehension and post-meeting follow-up. The Focus of Work Effort in the Next Year The Department will be evaluating current processes with an emphasis on improving communication between departments and the public. Accela will be developed further to meet the changing needs both internally and externally, and texting systems, virtual meetings, and digital information will be shared in live environments. There will be a significant focus on staffing within the Community Development Department for Fiscal Year 2020/21 as we seek to function at a more efficient level. The Department will aim to develop a public-facing Public Services Technician Team and a cohesive Administrative Assistant group by working together and combining the duties and tasks of current positions based on defined outcomes. The Public Services Technicians will greet and direct visitors entering City Hall to specialists, process and issue permits, schedule meetings, process applications and route documents, answer general phone calls from the public, and perform other tasks delegated by the Administrative Assistant Team. Centrally located in the City Hall rotunda, this team will be considered"Community Development"specialists bringing a sense of unity to these Departments. Similarly, the creation of a unified Administrative Assistant Team will eliminate knowledge gaps and enhance performance across Community Development. The aim is to share duties and remove"specialists" at this level as well as avoid the "hand-off" of projects and people. The Department will also further develop our community outreach through informative videos about inspections, permits, and code requirements. These videos are geared towards the homeowner, owner-builder, and small contracting companies to educate and inform about"why" permits are required, "how" to obtain them, and "what" to expect during an inspection. Additionally, instructional videos will be available for applicants to assist them with navigating the Accela and Quiq systems in the most efficient way possible to manage their permits and records with the City. In summary, the Department will continue to enhance our online services and communication to the public; continue to integrate Building and Safety, Planning, and Engineering to create a seamless flow of information and process in Community Development; and augment our video library by adding helpful and informative aides for the public to understand better and use the services offered by Community Development. Remaining flexible during this unique environmental and social climate will be critical as we move forward with cautious optimism and focused intent to further our goals of improvement and fiscal prudence. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 43 Engineering Services The Engineering Services Department's purpose is to build infrastructure that supports the community and to create a great place to live, work, and play. This is accomplished through strategic design, well-planned maintenance, and fiscal and environmental sustainability. The execution of this vision occurs through the Department's four sections. Capital Project Environmental Management Programs Planning Integrated Recycling Waste Storm Design Construction Water Entitlement Plan Check Electricity Street Lights Support Traffic& Permitting Rancho Fiber Transportation Land Developments Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Transpcnination Utility RCMU Despite the poor economic conditions forecast for Fiscal Year 2020121, the Department remains committed to this vision for our community. Although some services, projects, and activities have been scaled back, key projects are proceeding to ensure that the City's long-term infrastructure needs are met. Planned Program Reductions and Delays The following two program changes are planned for Fiscal Year 2020/21: e Pavement Management: The pavement management program is funded through a combination of gasoline taxes from the State and local Measure I revenues. The League of California Cities and the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority are both projecting revenue reductions between 10%to 15%as a result of the economic impacts of COVID-19. Accordingly, proposed appropriations for major road and local street rehabilitation and resurfacing projects have been reduced by $2.75 million. These projects will be identified by pavement condition and project location to utilize the funding to improve the most needed and effective roads and streets. e Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS): The goal of the ATMS program is to construct fiberoptic interconnections between the City's traffic signals and the Traffic Management Center, which allows for more efficient and effective traffic operation on City streets. As a result of economic restrictions, the construction of Phase 2, initially planned for Fiscal Year 2020/21, has been delayed at least until Fiscal Year 2021122. Phase 2 includes Milliken Avenue, 19n Street, Arrow Route, Rochester Avenue north of Base Line Road, and Day Creek Boulevard north of Base Line Road. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 44 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Highlights - While the programs listed above are experiencing some reductions and delays, the following programs and projects are planned for Fiscal Year 2020/21. • Etiwanda Grade Separation Proiect: The design and right-of-way phases of the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project are planned to continue through Fiscal Year 2020/21 and into Fiscal Year 2021/22. Construction on this project is anticipated to begin in July 2022. • Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS): The construction of improvements for Phase 1 of the ATMS program will begin this fiscal year along with the design for Phase 2. Phase 1 includes the installation of fiberoptic network infrastructure, equipment upgrades, and retiming of traffic signals along the Foothill Boulevard and Haven Avenue corridors. • Heritage Park Bridge Replacement: The design and permitting phases for the replacement of the three independent bridges at the entrances to the equestrian center at Heritage Park with a single use-separated concrete bridge is planned for this fiscal year in advance of construction in Fiscal Year 2021122. • Pavement Management Program: Pavement Norehabilitation, resurfacing, and slurry seal is scheduled in Fiscal Year 2020/21 on the following roads and streets: A o Foothill Street from Haven Avenue Avenue o Foothill Boulevard from Millikenn Avenue to I-15 Various Local Streets • Safe Routes to School: Improvements are planned for seven school crosswalk locations using Federal funding from the Community Development Block Grant program. This project will include striping, signing, and installation of rectangular rapid flashing beacons. • Rancho Fiber: Construction of the Rancho Fiber network will continue in Fiscal Year 2020/21 to expand the program's customer base and provide high-speed internet to businesses and residents in the service area. • Senate Bill 1383 Implementation: Senate Bill 1383 requires jurisdictions to take multiple actions to reduce emissions of short-lived climate pollutants. The regulations to meet the organic waste reduction and edible food recovery targets take effect on January 1, 2022. Environmental Programs staff will continue working with partners and stakeholders to develop an implementation plan for compliance. The Department will focus on seeking food recovery partners and updating the municipal code. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 45 School Food Share and Composting Programs: In 2019, the City implemented a successful food share program with the Cucamonga School District. This program reduces food waste,while at the same time, making additional food available for students in the cafeteria. I In addition, a food composting program has been initiated at Etiwanda High School to put food waste to work in the school's garden. The Environmental Programs staff will continue to seek opportunities to expand these programs to help create a sustainable community for current and future generations of the City. Planning The Planning Department is one of four departments that constitute Community Development. The purpose of the Department is to assist with proposed development projects, establish policy evaluate market trends, and work with commercial, industrial, and residential users seeking to locate or relocate within the City. Most importantly, the Department does not operate outside of or in a vacuum from the rest of Team RC. Partners in all departments, as well as Healthy RC, the Chamber of Commerce, and other community and business partners, are critical to accomplishing our Vision: Together, we are planning the City of Tomorrow, today. Our principles are Innovation, Equity, Diversity Our tools are Collaboration, Technology, Data The Department will begin Fiscal Year 2020/21 with the loss of a Planning Technician; however, the Department is included in the overall plan for the establishment of a public-facing Public Services Technician Team that will enable staff to more efficiently meet the customers' needs at City Hall. See additional discussion under Building and Safety Services above. The most important addition to the Department's Fiscal Year 2020/21 work program will be assisting our local economy to recover from the COVID-19 closures, and then thrive in the new environment. We will seek to accomplish this task by surveying businesses to understand better and anticipate their recovery needs as COVID-19 orders are lifted in phases. We are proactively evaluating ways to support businesses by focusing on adapting to a changing business model without adding layers of review or permits while providing clear, simple guidance to ensure public health and safety. Furthermore, the Department is looking for new ways to establish long-term and innovative applications as a result of the changing business model. Lastly, the Department will be developing and executing a business assistance program utilizing $604,820 in CDBG funding provided by the CARES Act. In addition to the Department's post-COVID recovery efforts, we have identified three strategic initiatives that will be the focus of the Department's work efforts: Strategic Initiative 1 — Establish a housing program. Increasing housing and reducing barriers to development have been a key focus of the legislature over the last two years through the passage of multiple bills to address housing. Because of this, the Department has identified that developing a plan to address housing growth that meets our desire for high-quality development Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 46 is a fundamental need for the City. In concert with our General Plan Update, this initiative includes: 1. Implementing the recommendations of the Inclusionary Housing Committee. 2. Revising the development standards for the Red Hill area and removing barriers to housing construction. 3. Working on the housing element in concert with the General Plan Update. 4. Looking for innovative workforce housing solutions on vacant private or City-owned parcels. Strategic Initiative 2— Implement a new customer service system for Community Development services to provide an excellent customer service experience 1. Work with Building and Safety and Engineering Departments to recruit Community Development technician level employees that will work as a team to handle public inquiries for all three departments. 2. Explore ways to leverage technology to better provide remote services to the public without requiring a trip to City Hall. Strategic Initiative 3— Invest in our staff through training and innovation to reduce attrition and develop our Planning team to address development challenges as an infill city. 1. Increase participation in professional organizations for staff. 2. Be a regional leader by proactively engaging other local and regional agencies to better understand their goals and provide improved results for our community. 3. Rethink how and where we do our work. Leverage our extensive technology to promote remote work and encourage a positive work-life balance. Economic Development The goal of the Economic Development Division is to develop and strengthen the community's economy by facilitating community investment, enhancing the quality of life, and encouraging a broad range of housing options. The Economic Development Division has also implemented three strategies to achieve these goals over the next year. Strategic Initiative 1 - Connect businesses to resident consumer needs (132C), as well as connecting business to business needs (B2B). • Open for Business Map—A listing of open and essential businesses has been created using mapping technology. The map allows residents to connect with businesses providing services in the community. • Increase social media posts to drive business. • Create an RC Unity-type video of staff going to local restaurants for lunch. Share to remind residents that businesses are open for takeout. #RCTakeoutTuesday. • Create a one-sheet Working from Home (WFH) Resource — Identify which businesses in the City provide the materials you need to make WFH adjustments. Strategic Initiative 2 - Provide information and resources to businesses and residents. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 47 • Through a cooperative agreement with the Inland Empire Small Business Development Center (SBDC), the SBDC will provide an educational workshop series at no cost to businesses in the City. • Provide information including federal, state, and local guidance as well as loan resources. • Share Open for Business Map and encourage owners to submit their business as part of the listing. • Coordinate efforts with the Chamber of Commerce to create a ShopRC campaign. Public Works Services The Public Works Services Department maintains the City's infrastructure, including approximately 534 lane miles of roadway; 220 signal-controlled intersections and traffic crossings, with two additional signals anticipated in Fiscal Year 2020/21; a comprehensive inventory of trees; 31 parks; 15 City facilities; and 8 Fire District facilities. Planned Prooram Reductions and Delays The Department has scaled-back and/or delayed various capital projects that were originally planned for FY 2020/21 due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Following are a few of these projects: • Concrete Repair: The concrete repair project is funded through a combination of Measure I and General Fund revenues. This program repairs sections of concrete sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and drive approached which are damaged and pose a public safety hazard. The Department annually surveys sections of the City to determine where repairs need to be made; however, due to anticipated reduced revenues, the sites that will be repaired will be kept to the most severely damaged. Accordingly, the proposed funding has been reduced from $475,000 to $200,000 in the General Fund. • Public Works Services Department Warehouse Expansion: The current warehouse has nearly reached capacity resulting in the Department's equipment and supplies being stored in cargo containers. In order to preserve the City's capital reserves, this project has been delayed to a future year (estimated cost of $2.14 million) and efforts will focus on the elimination of unneeded materials as well as a through cleanup and organization effort for those stored materials which will remain in the current warehouse. • Various Carpet Replacements and Office Reconfigurations: This project encompasses the replacement of original carpets at various City facilities which have exceeded their normal use, including carpets at the Civic Center which were installed in 1990, along with various department reconfigurations. While these projects will ultimately improve the efficiency of office spaces to better serve internal and external customers, they are not considered essential for the City's operations at this time (estimated cost of$1.47 million). In addition to the impact on capital projects, the COVID-19 pandemic has also impacted staffing in the Department. Part-time staffing has been reduced by 29 positions for FY 2020/21 and 8 full- time positions have been frozen pending a turn-around in the economy. The Department will utilize the authorized staffing levels to support the services and programs offered by other departments as much as possible. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 48 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budaet Highlights • Minimum Wage: The impacts of minimum wage increases are, and will continue to be, one of the more significant reasons for budgetary increases in the Department. For Fiscal Year 2020/21, due to minimum wage increases that impact contract labor services, such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services, the Department's budget includes an increase of approximately$106,000. • West Side Public Safety Facility: The West Side Public Safety Facility, which will provide police and fire services to the west side of the City, is expected to be completed in late 2020. The opening of this facility, which will cover approximately 16,000 square feet, will increase the overall maintenance budget provided by the Department. The estimated costs to provide services to this new facility have been included in the budget. • Overseeding: In the actively used area of the parks and sports fields, additional funding for field maintenance has been added into the budgets of Landscape Maintenance Districts 4R and 9, as well as Community Facilities District(CFD)2000-03. This funding will be used to dethatch, aerate, and overseed turf areas that have compacted and where reestablishing turf has been a problem. The process will strengthen existing grass, help reduce soil compaction, and improve overall soil and turf health. Staff will address these issues at Milliken Park, Garcia Park, and Legacy Park. • Landscape Maintenance District 2 Light Pole Replacements: This project replaces rusted out wet set light poles in Landscape Maintenance District 2 parks. Fiscal Year 2020/21 is the first year of a three-year project and will focus on Ellena Park and Vintage Park. The installation of new poles will increase safety and reduce maintenance costs in the parks. • Water Audits: The Department takes a holistic approach to water management to identify opportunities to save water, not k by focusing on the irrigation system alone, but evaluating the entire landscape site. One way the Department does this is by conducting comprehensive water audits. These water audits evaluate current horticultural practices, plant palettes, irrigation programs, and the physical condition of the landscape and irrigation system. The results provide a guide for improving the landscape while reducing overall water consumption. • Drought Tolerant Landscape Renovations: As part of the water-saving effort, $800,000 has been set aside in Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMD) 2 and 4R for turf removal. After the turf is removed, new drought-tolerant landscaping will be installed. Also, the Department hopes to identify grants and rebates that can offset these costs. The work in LMD 2 will continue on Victoria Park Lane, just east of Day Creek Boulevard, and includes the removal of turf in parkways and tract inlets, along with converting existing planter sections to new low water use landscape plants and materials. Likewise, the work in LMD 4R will be a continuation of previous turf removals and the addition of new drought-tolerant landscaping. Work in Fiscal Year 2020/21 will be done mostly in parkways and paseos along Base Line Road, east of Haven Avenue; however, additional work may be done on landscape sites within the neighborhoods. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 49 • Rubberized Playground Surface Replacement: The rubberized surfaces installed under the playground equipment at the various City parks must meet requirements of the National Playground Safety Standards. As a result, the replacement of the deteriorating rubberized surfaces at Rancho Summit Park in CFD 2000-03 will be completed in Fiscal Year 2020/21. • Park Facility Painting: This painting project will address all paintable surfaces of structures and amenities located in a park site at one time. This process will ensure that the finishes protecting wood, steel, and other materials will be uniform throughout the park. Also, this project extends the service life of the amenities, which reduces risk and the need for more significant maintenance. All City parks will be completed over a period of five years,with parks in LMDs 2 and 4R scheduled for completion in FY 2020/21. • Day Creek Park Tennis Court Lighting: Replace all light fixtures on the four tennis courts at Day Creek Park with LED fixtures which reduce energy and maintenance costs and extend the life of the lighting system. • Signal Maintenance: In Fiscal Year 2020/21, the City will have two additional signals installed at Hellman Avenue at 6th Street and East Avenue at Highland Avenue. • Traffic Signal Cabinet Modifications: This project will repair and modify the City's thirty- year-old traffic signal cabinets. Beginning in Fiscal Year 2020/21, the Department will work on Base Line Road at Etiwanda Avenue and Carnelian Street at Lemon Avenue. The modification of the traffic signal cabinets will increase traffic safety. • There are several on-going and multi-year projects related to traffic signal equipment replacements included in the Fiscal Year 2020/21 budget: o Traffic Signal Battery Replacements ($76,500): These are replacement batteries for the traffic signal uninterrupted power supply systems. The average battery life is three to five years. o Traffic Signal Cabinet Replacements ($140,000): Traffic signal cabinets are involved in traffic collisions approximately two or three times per year. While the City makes every attempt to recover funds from the responsible driver, each cabinet costs $60,000 and requires several months to be built. The Department typically builds the cabinets in advance so they are ready to install when the need arises. o Traffic Signal Controller Replacements ($25,000): Traffic signal controllers control the traffic signals for directional signals at an intersection. Each controller costs approximately $5,000, and the Department must replace -_ outdated controllers that are no longer repairable. o Traffic Signal Emergency Vehicle Pre-empt (EVP) -- ' Replacements ($50,000): The EVP equipment is needed to help emergency vehicles reach their destination quickly and safely. o Traffic Signal Video Detection System Replacements ($75,000): The video detection systems are required to replace aging equipment, as well as those knocked down from traffic collisions or electrical spikes. o Traffic Signal UPS Replacements($40,000): These uninterrupted power supply(UPS) Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 5o systems for signalized intersections are needed to replace aging equipment. Each replacement is approximately$10,000. o Traffic Signal Battery Back-Up System ($277,500): This project will replace outdated traffic signal back-up systems. • Civic Center HVAC Plant Replacement: Replace the three 150-ton chillers and related pumps that serve both City Hall and the Public Safety building. The current equipment has been in service for 28 years, well beyond its expected service life. The new chillers and pumps will change the system from a constant flow chilled water plant to a variable flow plant. This change will increase energy efficiency and reduce operational costs. • Fleet Shop Rental Space: This project will convert underutilized space in the fleet shop to rentable office space. 2020 Prospects and Proiects for Community and Cultural Services "Being positive in a negative situation isn't naive, it's leadership."-Ralph Marston As noted already, the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic upended the traditional working environment. The City Manager's Office(CMO)staff for Rancho Cucamonga quickly adapted to both remote work and responding to the COVID-19 pandemic-driven needs.The existing systems we had in place allowed the team to seamlessly shift gears to tracking legislative and data analytics related to the pandemic and instituting a robust COVID-19 community engagement operation without missing a beat. Overall, the team, a small group that is nimble and technology focused, pivoted well in the new pandemic environment. Similarly, the Community Affairs Network(CAN) also adapted well to the pandemic. In fact, this group took a very different approach to communicating with the public. During the pandemic, most organizations took a very traditional Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Public Information approach; whereas, Rancho Cucamonga took a "compassionate community" approach. The success of this approach was evident in the total impressions (the total number of times people saw our content) for March through April 2020, which included social media, eNews, and web analytics, cumulating at 1,900,000 impressions. Impressed at how well the Community Affairs team worked together during the pandemic led us to shift all the Community Affairs team members under the umbrella of the City Manager's Office going forward rather than reporting through different departments (with the exception of the Fire District). Restructuring CMO to be a hub for engagement ensures the City's ability to direct resources that support other departments' communication and engagement efforts, which fluctuate throughout the year. Healthy RC was the only division in the organization that had already been using a paid Zoom account through a technical assistance grant and thus was able to quickly pivot its numerous in- person community meetings to the online forum. In fact, the Healthy RC Steering Committee saw an increase in participation at its monthly meetings in the virtual space as did the quarterly Legislative Breakfast. Working together with Healthy RC, the CMO and Human Resources Department created an internal cross-departmental Mental Health Task Force to provide mental health resources and support to both the employees and the community during the pandemic. This work will continue as removing mental health stigmas becomes deeper woven into the Team RC fabric. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 51 "Great things are done by a series of small things brought together."-Vincent van Gogh The City Clerk's Office was well poised to weather the storm of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last three years, almost all the Department's service offerings had been moved to cloud-based platforms,the most notable being GovQA,the platform used to process Public Records Requests. Due to the reduced hours and working conditions for other departments, the City Clerk's Office noticed City staff producing the records responsive to the various mundane requests faster, and as a result, we were able to respond sooner than usual. A permanent shift in City Hall hours and, potentially, the increase in productivity seen with employees working from home, could continue this trend into the future. The City Clerk's Office would also like to see the County of San Bernardino send vote-by-mail ballots to all registered voters for the November election and offer in-person voting options that ensure the safety of voters and volunteers. Concerns about coronavirus transmission could lead to difficulties recruiting election workers and accommodating the need for physical distancing while meeting voter demand. "It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are,for more than our abilities." -Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets When the California stay-at-home order was instituted, many cities chose to close their libraries and deem them "non-essential". In Rancho Cucamonga, the City took a different approach, knowing that libraries are essential. The benefits of libraries are well documented and go far beyond simply enjoyment and amusement to being an essential form of relaxation for some people, helping to relieve stress, providing a break from the pressures of everyday (or COVID- 19) life, providing educational materials, and supporting homeschooling parents. Despite closing the physical locations to the public,the Rancho Cucamonga Library, like most libraries, continued its virtual services.We saw over a 50% increase in eBooks/eAudiobooks compared to usage prior to COVID-19. But where Rancho Cucamonga really stood apart from the crowd and excelled was in pivoting to accelerate new service offerings like Curbside Book Pickup.The Library had planned to roll out curbside services over the summer, but when the pandemic hit, the future pilot program became a priority service and overnight success. Similarly, the Library had been looking at providing streaming video and music services and moving the Summer Reading Programs to a new virtual platform. During this time of reduced hours to the public, the Library was able to move staff scheduling into a new cloud-based portal and to ramp up the new Integrated Library System (ILS)acquisitions module. During the stay-at-home orders, the Victoria Gardens Tech Center and Tech Junction at Central Park were the only free sources of computer and Internet access for the community. Adults were able to file for unemployment, update resumes, check email or use social media. One teacher sent weekly progress reports to students. However, due to physical distancing standards, the Tech Center was limited to 7 simultaneous users. With the installation of a new laptop vending kiosk, we will be able to spread out up to 20 laptop users throughout the building and repurpose the much-needed space. While the City had planned to"get to"the above-mentioned program and technical advancements, there were other unplanned changes and impacts, with the most notable impact being the construction plans for Second Story and Beyond®being pushed back for a least a year. Despite Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 52 the extraordinary work done by the Library Foundation to raise funds for the project,with the City's revenues in flux, the multimillion-dollar investment in the space must wait. Additionally, staff want to understand any post-COVID-19 impacts on best practices for high-touch surfaces like the exhibits before investing too much into the final design of the space. So, for now, the project construction has been delayed and additional time will be invested in the design phase. "When I let go of what 1 am, I become what I want to be."-Lao Tzu Arguably, the department that will be most impacted coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic is the Community Services Department. The majority of the Department's programs and services are not conducive to the physical distancing guidelines that are likely to be in place until a vaccine and/or therapeutics are discovered to fight future outbreaks of the virus. This, tied into the fact that the Department's programs are largely funded by fees for service, thrusts Community Services into new and uncharted territories. In looking at the long-term sustainability of the Department and its programs and services, staff is taking this time to reimagine and recreate from the ground up the service delivery models, beginning with how we budget. Previously, all full-time staff were budgeted in the General Fund while all part-time staff and maintenance and operational costs were budgeted in two special revenue funds. This budget structure was created in the 1980s and served the City well, until recently. When COVID-19 hit, the health restrictions legally prohibited group classes and gatherings which are the heart of Community Services core programs. Accordingly, the part-time staff that largely provide these classes and help staff the facilities seven days a week had their hours reduced to zero. Unfortunately, without program revenue, those staff have no funding mechanism to bring classes back online and the full-time staff in the General Fund are insufficient to provide classes and keep facilities open as the community had come to expect. It is clear that a change is called for. Beginning with the 2020/21 fiscal year, all the costs for the Department will be moved into the General Fund, distinguished by divisions relative to program operations. This budgeting approach was long overdue, butthe pandemic provided an ideal time to implement this major change. Now we will be able to more accurately track every program's fully burdened costs against its revenues and maximize both services and cost recovery. Unfortunately, going into the new fiscal year, the majority of the Community Services Department's programs will remain dormant. At the present time, the health orders still do not permit large non-family group gatherings and in addition the tremendous drop in City revenues is such that there is extremely limited funding for part-time staff. Programming will first resume at Central Park, at the James L. Brulte Senior Center and the Goldy S. Lewis Community Center, respectively, as physical distancing, new sanitation standards, and demand for services dictate. These facilities are the City's largest, newest and most centrally located and the most conducive to separation of uses and users. The Department will be developing policies related to its core services and cost recovery standards against which each legacy program and future program, service, and event will be evaluated by, in conjunction with any health directives necessary to keep our community safe. As of this writing, we do not anticipate hosting our regular summer events or opening the RC Sports Center, Family Resource Center, or Lions East and West before January 2021, pending the aforementioned evaluations. Based on the directives from the State that indicate that large gatherings like theater concerts and plays will not be allowed until a vaccine or therapeutics are developed, we do not anticipate opening the Lewis Family Playhouse for the Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 53 2020-2021 Season and it is questionable as to whether the 2021-2022 Season will resemble anything previously hosted. What we do know, is that the programs and services provide by the Community Services Department are a vital service and one that makes Rancho Cucamonga a world class community. Although things are temporarily paused, we will continue to prioritize services in this area as the economy recovers. The Virtual Recreation Center and You've Been Redd programs launched during the pandemic are just a few examples of our team's creativity and desire to continue to make life better. This thoughtfulness and commitment to providing world class service to the Rancho Cucamonga Community will continue as we work our way back to a full complement of programs, services and events that will set the standard for best-in-class Community Services. Civic and Cultural Services City Clerk/Records Management The City Clerk's Office/Records Management Department promotes community involvement and awareness and supports the City Council, staff, and the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga by coordinating the municipal legislative process and administering City elections. Governed by provisions of state, election, and municipal codes, the Department serves to preserve and protect - the official documents of the City. The Department assists with several essential activities, including accurately preparing and processing agendas; administering the Citywide records management program; records imaging, storage and destruction; and coordinating general municipal and special elections, including the filing of Candidate Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interests, as required by California State law. Fiscal Year 2020/21 budget changes include: • Elimination of one part-time Administrative Assistant position due to the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, thereby reducing office coverage and other administrative functions. • Funding in the amount of $800,000 to cover one-time contractual costs for the San Bernardino Registrar of Voters Office to administer the 2020 Presidential Municipal Election for the City's three elected positions and any proposed ballot measure(s). This includes election service costs for the City Clerk and City Treasurer positions,which are elected city- wide, two City Council seats elected by district, and any proposed ballot measure(s). • Elimination of funding for contractual off-site storage of City Council meeting videos due to a change in storage location. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts The Department will: • Implement a new electronic agenda management system (PrimeGov) for City Council, Planning Commission, and various other City committee meetings. The agenda management system will improve agenda compilation, publishing, and related document Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 54 management. During the implementation, Citywide staff will receive training on the new software and planned revisions to the existing agenda process. • Administer the November 2020 Presidential Municipal Election following all Federal, State, and local statutes and policies, including submitting Official/Officer responsibilities related to Fair Political Practices Commission (FPPC)filings. • Increase the capacity, utilization, and training of the City's document imaging system (Laserfiche) by departments for retaining current, vital, permanent records, ensuring preservation and accessibility of records by staff and the public. Focus this year continues on scanning the remaining Building&Safety plans and permits for electronic access by staff and residents. • Continue providing secure storage of active and inactive records in accordance with Department Records Manual and state law and guidelines. • Conduct the bi-annual review of the City and Fire District's Conflict of Interest Codes as required by law and adopt updates if necessary. City Manager's Office The City Manager's Office(CMO)currently houses 17 full-time staff members that directly support the City Council, as well as an array of interdepartmental projects and programs. The primary functions include the implementation of Healthy RC programs and services, managing legislative affairs, gathering data for performance measurements, and fostering a culture of communication and engagement through the Community Affairs Network(CAN). The focus for Fiscal Year 2020/21 will be on action,as a handful of strategic planning efforts come to a head. These efforts will include succession planning, as the Department prepares for the retirement of a long-time Senior Executive Assistant to the City Council and City Manager. Reclassification of existing staff will provide an opportunity for job shadowing and ease in this transition. Also,there will be a restructuring of the CAN to allow staff members who had previously reported to the Community Services Department to become members of the City Manager's Office.This move strengthens the City's ability to direct resources that support other departments' communication and engagement efforts, which fluctuate throughout the year. For instance, the Community Services Department offerings will be limited in Fiscal Year 2020/21 resulting in a lesser need for support; yet, the Planning Department will require additional CAN resources for PlanRC and supporting Economic Development in the wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic. Restructuring CMO to be a hub for engagement ensures that we have the right resources, in the right place, at the right time. This restructuring also supports the City Council's mission to Ensure and Advance the Quality of Life for the Community through Inclusive Decision Making. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • Continuing development of the Public Art Strategic Plan c This plan will help both the Public Art Committee and staff understand how to incorporate public art as a method of placemaking and community building within Rancho Cucamonga. The plan will ultimately help to guide the Public Art Committee with decision-making related to utilizing funds from the Public Art Trust Fund. • An organizational approach to Data Collection and Performance Measurement c Quarterly Department Performance Measurement Reporting Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 55 • Over the past year, the City has focused on shifting the organization mindset to embrace data collection, analysis, and reporting. This year will focus on continuous reporting and feedback to create a cycle of data-driven decision-making to help further organizational and departmental efforts. o Quality of Life Survey Evaluation • The most recent citywide Quality of Life Survey was deployed in late 2019.With almost 2,000 responses received,the Department has been able to analyze the data from the survey to learn more about potential gaps in service. The results of the survey analysis will help guide the City in developing new and continued programming and services _ for implementation over the next three to five years. o Teen Quality of Life Survey Deployment • The first-ever Teen Quality of Life survey was deployed in early 2019, reaching over 1,000 students from two high schools in the City. This survey provided quality data that allowed staff to gain insight into teen needs in the areas of mental and physical health and wellbeing. The second round of this survey will be deployed this year with the hope of understanding developing trends within our teen population. • Understanding the changing landscape of transportation options o Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Plan • With State goals and a naturally shifting market, Rancho Cucamonga has recognized the importance of preparing forthe rise of electricvehicle(EV)ownership and the need for public charging options.The City has also continued to purchase EV's for its vehicle fleet and will need to prepare for an anticipated increase in demand for EV charging options. This fiscal year there will be a focus on upgrading and building-out the City's EV infrastructure for both private and public use. o Transportation Network Company(TNC) Partnerships and Shared Mobility Options • As transportation options and individual preferences continue to evolve, the City must stay in front of the rapidly developing trends. Both TNC and shared mobility transportation options are effective ways to close the first or last mile gap that creates a barrier and has discouraged the broader use of public transportation. Also, it allows for more equitable ways for our community to travel to and from their destinations. These partnerships will be explored more deeply with the hope of implementation this year. o Rail and other Public Transit Options • As various transit rail alternatives are considered for our region, it is essential to understand the impact on the City. The CMO Legislative Affairs team has been monitoring planning efforts within our region, specifically related to rail connections to lobby for the City's best interest in this arena. A particular area of focus is connection of the Metrolink RR line from the Rancho Cucamonga station to the Ontario Airport. • Communicating with our Community Effectively and Equitably o Implementation of the Community Engagement Policy with Health Equity Framework • Upon the finalization of the policy, CMO will begin to conduct training sessions with staff to ensure that the plan is adopted Citywide. This effort will provide for consistent and equitable community engagement throughout all departments. The Policy will also provide tools for staff to measure engagement success, o Support Community Engagement Efforts for PlanRC • As the City continues to work on the General Plan update, the CAN team will Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 56 have a crucial role in providing meaningful community engagement. In order to ensure a tailored approach, the CAN team works closely with the outside General Plan consultant and Planning Department to help develop and distribute outreach content across multiple platforms. o Continuing to communicate with the public during the COVID-19 Pandemic • As the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, the CAN will continue to inform the public while maintaining our core message of#TogetherRC. While it is impossible to predict the next phase of this public health emergency, CAN will continue to foster a message of a safe and healthy environment for all. As the economic recovery begins,engagement efforts specifically related to Economic Development will need additional attention. o Adapting to a Virtual Environment • Internally, staff have also needed to adapt to the COVID-19 pandemic. Department staff have transitioned virtually overnight from in-person to virtual engagements. Staff will continue to be creative with their virtual offerings and assist the public with the transition to virtual meetings. Planning and Measuring our Success as a Sustainable and Resilient Community o. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)for Cities • After receiving official certification from the LEED for Cities program, staff will work to continue efforts in developing actionable strategies to achieve higher levels of certification in five years. o Explore Opportunities for Resiliency • Staff will continue to explore how the City can advance our resiliency, whether it be to climate change, financial resilience, or resiliency in heath. A new annual membership to the recently formed Inland Southern California Climate Collaborative (ISC3) will allow Rancho Cucamonga to work with other regional agencies to identify effective strategies and actionable implementation efforts. Staff will continue to participate in regional meetings once a month to represent Rancho Cucamonga's interests. Community Services The Community Services Department's mission is to serve the community by creating opportunities to play, celebrate, connect, explore, and be entertained through quality programs, safe parks, and well- maintained facilities. The Department coordinates «• . " programs and services through seven divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Arts/Playhouse Operations, Senior Services, and Human Services. The Department also oversees park development activities including the planning, design and renovation of parks and facilities, as well as advocating for open space, thus helping to enhance the quality of life for individuals of all ages. There are more than 30 parks in the City, all of which are heavily used for organized youth and adult sports, picnics, and general recreational purposes. The parks provide a variety of amenities including picnic areas, park shelters, playgrounds and tot lots, exercise courses, sports fields, equestrian features, volleyball courts, basketball courts, tennis courts, and trailheads. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 57 The COVID-19 Pandemic has created a unique impact to the Community Services Department. Traditional programs and services are not consistent with mass gatherings physical distancing guidelines that will most likely be in place until a vaccine or robust therapeutics are developed. Physical distancing guidelines and limitation on social gatherings will directly impact Senior Services, Recreation Classes, Theatre Performances, Youth Sports, Tiny Tot Programs, Facility and Park Rentals, and Special Events. Addressing the impacts of COVID-19 provides an opportunity to evaluate all services for sustainability and cost efficiency. Historically, the c Community Services Department has operated through special revenue funds with revenues based on charges for services.These special revenue funds have been partially subsidized by the General Fund, which has covered full-time staffing costs. As a result of COVID-19, reductions in program and service delivery and, therefore, revenues, necessitated the layoff of 230 part-time staff in March 2020, w followed by the layoff of eight full-time staff and defunding of six full-time vacancies in May 2020. As we transition away from the special revenue funds to the General Fund only, the goal will be to maintain at a minimum the current 50% program and services cost recovery model. In response to the recent pandemic, the Community Services Department will evaluate and rebuild core park, recreation, and cultural and arts services in a post COVID-19 world, while focusing on maintaining a world class community. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Program and Service Delivery — Physical distancing and social gathering guidelines directly impact programs and services. Operation of essential services will remain in flux until revenue sources are reliable. To reduce operating costs, as the new fiscal year begins, Lions East, Lions West, RC Family Resource Center, RC Sports Center and Victoria Garden's Cultural Center will remain closed. As physical distancing and social gathering guidelines are modified or lifted, recommendations to bring back full operational services and facilities will be evaluated and considered. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 58 • Essential Services — Connecting to our residents and offering essential services is extremely important. Seniors, more than ever, need services during these unprecedented times. The James L. Bruits Senior Center, located at Central Park, will continue to operate; however, the model may not be as robust as pre-COVID-19. Central Park will continue to provide the community with Wi-Fi access, computers, restrooms, and other services while adhering to CDC guidelines. Virtual classes and services, such as the "Virtual Recreation Center', will continue to be offered to allow safe connection with our residents. Additional programs like "You've Been Rec'd" will be created to provide connection points with the community. Park Rangers will continue to monitor our parks as the volume of residents utilizing the parks increases. Moving forward, rentals(when permitted by health orders)will be essential to generating revenue.As CDC guidelines are modified or lifted, new standards for facility rentals will be put into place. • Minor Capital Improvement Projects — While facilities are closed, minor capital improvement will occur. Victoria Garden's Cultural Center will receive exterior painting and the audio-visual equipment will be repaired. At Central Park, the audio-visual systems will be replaced in two banquet rooms. These Capital Improvement Projects will enhance both the user experience and rental capacity when the CDC Guidelines are modified or lifted, and social 410 gatherings can occur. • Community Partners and Volunteers — It will be important to solicit partners or contract services, where appropriate, to provide services to the community. Equally as important will be Community Services' support to our partners and City departments who are offering low income services and mental health education. To continue to offer world class services, the Volunteer Program will be expanded to solicit,train and retain community resources to offset expenses and expand service delivery. • Park and Recreation Service Master Plan - The Community Services Department does not currently have a Master Plan for Parks and Recreation Services (there is a facility plan, however). COVID-19 has — significantly altered the way in which programs and service delivery are conveyed. Staff anticipates that as COVID-19 recovery ensues,the types of programs and services and how they are implemented will change and evolve based on need. The Master Plan is intended to identify those needs. Preliminary thinking is that the development of the Master Plan will include a community outreach/needs survey to gather program information based on citizen age, interests, and related demographics. Library Services The Library Services Department's mission is to: • Ignite Curiosity • Transform Lives • Create Community Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 59 The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable, service-oriented staff. The Library Services Department provides services and programs from two facilities:the Paul A. Biane Library and the Archibald Library. The Department is comprised of eight divisions:Administration, Circulation Services, Adult and Young Adult Services, Children's Services, Literacy, Bookmobile Services, Technology Services, and Second -i Story and Beyond®. Each year the libraries are visited by over half a million users who borrow almost one million physical items and more than 100,000 digital items. The libraries' public access computers are accessed more than 73,000 times throughout the year. I Annually, more than 20,000 children attend storytime sessions where the Library's early childhood development experts help its youngest visitors expand their vocabularies, gain experience in social settings and develop a love of reading. Throughout the year, the Library hosts multiple large- scale events creating opportunities for families to come together to celebrate culture, art, and literacy. Special events include Asian Pacific Islander Night, Black History Night, Hispanic Heritage Night, Read Across Rancho, and the Library's annual signature event—Star Wars Reads—which attracts close to 5,000 regional visitors in May. In addition to traditional public library services, the Library Services Department provides Passport Services to over 3,700 area residents throughout the year. The Library also offers outreach services, as well as delivery services to the City's homebound residents. Through a full-service Virtual Library, residents have 2417 access to eBooks, research databases,online homework tutoring,and language learning software. Lastly, sensory storytimes offer programs explicitly targeted for our special-needs patrons and their families. Due to the economic repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Library will be freezing all expenditures related to Bookmobile Services. Visits to local schools will be paused during the freeze. However, both library locations are offering curbside pick-up and material drop-off during the pandemic to help make library resources accessible for our citizens. Fiscal Year 2020121 BudnetFiscal Year Budget Hiahliahts • Enhanced Integrated Library System (ILS): Two new modules will be added to the existing ILS: Acquisitions and Analytics. The Acquisitions module will provide streamlined, digital workflows for acquiring new titles in all formats, allowing the ILS to communicate in "real time" with vendors' warehouses ensuring up-to-date inventory information, quicker turnaround times, and automatic bibliographic record creation making newly ordered Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 6o materials discoverable in the catalog.With the new module, newly acquired titles will appear in the catalog the same day they are ordered, and library users may instantly place holds on popular,forthcoming titles. The Analytics module will provide enhanced system analytics with more accurate and granular reporting on the use of the Library's physical collection that will inform data-driven collection development decisions. Aging and well-used collections can be refreshed and updated more quickly. At the same time, user metrics will help collection specialists target collection spending where it is most needed. • Second Story and Beyond®: Further development of the Second Story and Beyond interactive discovery space will take place as Library Staff continue to work with a consultant to engage the services of a premier museum exhibit designer. Design time is being extended a year to work through the complications associated with COVID-19. • Streaming Video and Music Services: The Library will be adding a new digital service to its Virtual Library via Hoopla. Hoopla offers digital content for streaming or downloading in the following formats:videos, music, audiobooks, comics, eBooks, and television programs. • Expansion of Laptop Computer Services: The Archibald Library will add a laptop dispensing kiosk to the Library's digital device lineup. Patrons will be able to check out a laptop to use from anywhere within the Library. Patrons will no longer need to confine their computer use to the hardwired Technology Center.The Library was a recipient of 50 laptops as part of a Spectrum grant in Fiscal Year 2019/20. The kiosk will allow the Library to circulate, secure, manage, and update the software on the devices. • LINK+ Interlibrary Loan Services: Through a California State Library grant, the Library will be joining a statewide interlibrary loan lending consortium called LINK+. LINK+ is comprised of more than 65 public and academic libraries, lending materials throughout the State with a typical turnaround time of two to four days. The LINK+ catalog contains more than nine million titles in multiple formats.This service will be provided at no additional cost to Rancho Cucamonga Public Library patrons. • Expansion of the RC Kits Program and Library of Things: The Library's RC Kits pilot program (funded by a State Library grant)was an enormous success during the Fiscal Year 2019/20. With support from the Friends of the Library,the Library will add additional RC Kits and launch the Library of Things, circulating materials to assist with household DIY projects (hammers, screwdrivers, levels, etc.), provide popular hobby equipment, and more. • Study Room Reservations and Summer Reading Programs Go Online: The Library continues to explore opportunities to couple convenience and services through virtual portals. In Fiscal Year 2020/21, the Library will allow patrons to reserve study rooms through a new online service. It will be migrating the popular Summer Reading Programs to an online environment allowing participants of all ages to register and track their reading through Beanstack. • Increased Materials Collection: All media formats of the materials collection will be expanded with new and updated titles ensuring an informative, contemporary, relevant, and appealing collection overall. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 61 2020 Prospects and Projects for Administrative Services "An investment in knowledge pays the best interest."-Benjamin Franklin Our City's ongoing investments in technology,first begun over ten years earlier and supported by the City Council, have paid great dividends during this current pandemic. The City had both the physical infrastructure and staffing in place to support a quick pivot to remote work and scaled-up online services using existing resources. A layered approach to technology access allowed for staff at several levels to successfully transition to remote work without the need for immediate investment in services and equipment. The City already had web-based enterprise applications in place for the public which allowed us to provide core services and stand up new initiatives from virtually anywhere with minimal notice or lost productivity. Many legacy local governments have struggled during the pandemic, having under-invested in the technology, personnel, and ongoing training. Similarly, the continued investment in infrastructure the City has made since 2016 paid off with the ability to quickly transition a sizeable portion of the workforce to remote work at the onset of the stay-at-home orders. Rancho Cucamonga had already established a remote work policy several years ago, and staff did occasionally work remotely, but it was not an established norm; meanwhile, remote work for knowledge workers has become relatively more common in the private sector. Now, the door has been kicked wide open to experiment with remote work on a large scale and how that will function in local government operations. Like most things, it has pros and cons. It provides uninterrupted time for people in certain high skill positions to focus on their core tasks. Others struggle to focus, wanting more direct connection to their team members. For both, supervision and communication are key. It is likely that the use of remote work on a regular basis will become a new norm where it makes sense for both the City and the department.The exercise has also proven that a remote workforce can be productive and responsive, opening the door for enhanced remote workers in the future. The ability to recruit talent from other regions, with lower cost of living, will expand the City's access to talent. A boom in remote work will also create demand for a new city service, specifically, high speed reliable fiber enabled internet access. The City of Rancho Cucamonga rolled out RC Fiber a year ago and already has both residential and non-residential customers at gigabit plus speeds. Nearly all City facilities have been transitioned to fiber and there may be opportunities in the future to re- purpose existing office and conference room space to allow for public reservations for a small fee, similar to the event rooms at Central Park and the Cultural Center. Certainly, even beyond City facilities, one of the most frequent calls during the pandemic was from residents upset about the quality of their internet access and inquiring about higher speed more reliable alternatives. The City also quickly adapted to using video conferencing tools both internally for staff in lieu of meetings, but also externally for Planning Commission and Healthy RC Steering Committee meetings, for example. Now that most Americans have adopted the word "zoom"as a new verb, we can expect the community to seek to use these tools more often in lieu of physical visits to our facilities. To meet the likely demand, we will need to further invest in and build our skills using _ these video conferencing tools in everyday business where it makes sense. While technology is making new norms for services and work possible, we still have to foster connection and support the mental health of our workforce. The Team RC culture has long Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 62 - focused on physical health, however, the pandemic highlighted the critical importance of mental health. A Mental Health Task Force was created to provide needs-based supportive activities and resources. Going forward, a continued focus on the mental health of our employees is here to stay. In the world of finance, we continue to advance toward reducing and eliminating our legacy paper processes. Multi-year plans are coming to fruition in FY 2020/21 with the implementation of electronic accounts payable processing and approvals; this is a huge step forward toward eliminating what is probably one of the most paper-intensive process remaining. In the future, the City may want to consider having our City's financial system hosted in a private, secure cloud environment, ratherthan on physical servers, so that the system can be substantially run remotely without the loss of functionality that can come with using the current virtual simulation remote access tools. Similarly, with the retirement of our long-time treasury management staff member last year the City is focusing on greater access to historical data, more analysis, and better reporting and forecasting tools to manage our cashflow and investments. With the economy in continued flux, these tools are needed to maintain our tradition of fiscal prudence. The future definitely has changed in the last few months, or at least what we thought the future might be. More broadly,with a leaner organization and one that is fine-tuned to focus on the most in-demand, utilized services to the community, the Administrative Services team is ready to serve as the organization's team of internal consultants, working as a business partner and providing expertise and advice in support of the public-facing departments. Looking forward while learning from the lessons of the past has never been more important. Ben Franklin would be proud. Administrative Services Department of Innovation and Technology The Department of Innovation and Technology CENTER FOR DIGITAL GOVERNMENT (DoIT) facilitates the impactful use of technology DIGITAL across all City Departments, allowing for increased efficiency, improved transparency, and overall CITIES enhanced service to the community. In 2019, the City was once again ranked among the top orCities SURVEY nationwide in our population category by Government Technology's Digital Cities Survey for our use, management, and imaginative application 2019 WINNER of technology to solve complex challenges and ensure the seamless operation of governance. DoIT is comprised of four divisions, including Systems and Network, Enterprise Applications, Geographic Information Services, and Operations. In the wake of the 2020 Coronavirus pandemic, priorities have shifted to expand digital access to services for the community and increase the City's capacity to support a remote workforce. Although DoIT has worked towards these objectives over recent years, the current and near- _ future expectations are increasing the exigency to provide alternative access to core services. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 63 The Department's technology strategy covers four key areas: 1. Maintaining and securing current technology, including infrastructure, hardware, and applications; 2. Managing user experience with technology through training and continuous quality - improvement on existing platforms; 3. Continued planning for the evolution of technology lines and services; and 4. Facilitating the innovative application of technology in business practices and service delivery to the community. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • Investment of over $100,000 in enhanced cybersecurity measures, including multi-factor authentication for all City user accounts using Okla identity services and the application of machine learning and At tools, to provide holistic threat detection and mitigation in the data center using VMWare App Defense. • Continue to keep Citywide user training and awareness at the forefront of cybersecurity by requiring all users to complete security training using the SANS Secure the Human platform. • Expansion of the City's use of drones to assist with community development, construction inspection, hazard mitigation, and public safety response. • Implementation of improved business practices to enhance the secure handling of personal identifying information(Pit)and Payment Card Information(PCI), potentially lowering future payment card processing fees. • Continue to support the expansion of municipal fiber optic network services in cooperation with the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility. • Replacement of legacy physical servers to ensure operational continuity and take full advantage of the City's dual data center architecture. • Continued development of workforce automation tools, including work order management and reporting, using ESRI GIS and Microsoft Office 365 platforms already in use Citywide. • Upgrade of the City's OneSolution Financial Management system to an HTML-based platform, increasing user access and overall functionality. • In response to the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, DoIT has frozen two vacant positions, one Information Technology Technician and one GIS Specialist. The operational impact of the reduced staffing will be absorbed by postponing projects that are not immediately critical to operations and increasing completion timelines for existing initiatives. Finance The purpose of the Finance Department is to provide excellent customer service, focusing on fiscal responsibility, transparency, integrity, and teamwork. Our customers are both external and internal, which means we need to provide a variety of needs,whether it be to a department within the City, another governmental agency, a resident, or a local business. However, in all situations, we strive to be a trusted business partner and anticipate the needs and solutions by implementing leading practices in financial management, internal controls, and providing clear and understandable financial information. The Department is responsible for managing the financial operations of the City in accordance with applicable laws, regulations, and City policies. The Department consists of five divisions to Fiscal Year 2o2o/2i Adopted Budget Page 64 accomplish its mission: Accounting and Financial Reporting, Budget Management, Business Licensing, Revenue Management, and Special Districts. Each of those divisions has individual purposes and responsibilities that cultivate a well-functioning and finely tuned financial machine! Although there are areas with the Department will look to enhance and improve processes during the Fiscal Year 2020/21. Specifically, we will look to automate and digitize processes which will enhance the workflow for the City overall, as we move towards a, potentially, more robust remote workforce. Implementing these changes should yield immediate impacts for the City as a whole, and ease some of the challenges caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • Updates to the Accounting System: The Department has plans to update its financial system during Fiscal Year 2020/21 with assistance from the Department of Innovation and Technology. However, this is more than just an update. Instead, this will be a shift to a completely web-based financial software system. The system is anticipated to provide easier access to real-time financial information, as well as, personalized workspace configurations to ease navigation for each user by showing only what they need. Powerful analytics and reporting tools are integrated within the software so that reports can be easily created as well. • Electronic Accounts Payable: The Department will be transitioning to electronic accounts payable to improve the workflow of cash disbursements and significantly reduce the number of physical records. This transition will be completed in incremental phases. Each step has been thoughtfully designed to build-upon the previous step and is centered around how the user will interact with the system. The culminating step in this transition is an electronic accounts payable system where invoices are electronically routed for approval seamlessly amongst departments to the Accounts Payable Division for processing. Once fully implemented, there will be no need to retain physical records, as all documents will be digitized and available for immediate use when necessary. Additionally, the electronic system will capture data points that aren't available under the current process, which can be used to identify issues and create performance benchmarks to measure success. • Public Access for Business Licenses Applications and Renewals: Due to the COVID- 19 pandemic, many of the City's departments have had to adjust processes and procedures to minimize or eliminate the need for interaction with the public due to social distancing requirements. In order to support this effort and streamline the business licensing process going forward, a computer will be made accessible in the City Hall rotunda for customers to input their business information in advance of being assisted at the counter. This will allow the Department to simply verify the information, and obtain/view any required documents, if necessary, rather than keying it all in at the counter as is currently the practice, reducing the customer's time at City Hall. Business license renewals do not require a visit to City Hall. They can be completed fully online as indicated on the renewal forms that are sent out to renewing businesses. • Changes in Staffing: In response to the economic downturn from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Department will be defunding a vacant Account Technician position. While this position would assist with tasks for both the Revenue Management Division and the Accounting and Financial Reporting Division, the Department will be able to absorb the responsibilities amongst the current staff or defer tasks until staffing levels can be replenished. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 65 Additionally, the Department will streamline the cashiering function at City Hall by combining the duties of the Account Clerk responsible for cashiering and the Business License Clerk. The consolidation of these two current counter positions into one class titled "Customer Service Representative" creates an opportunity for the cashier counter to be a "one-stop- shop." Either position would be able to complete a full transaction for a customer—business license AND payment. Rather than having two lines for the counter, there will be one with either counter staff able to assist each customer. The Department expects that this change will improve our customer service, but also increase the skills and versatility of our staff. • Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) Audits: After the Department's completion of its inaugural TOT audit of all the City's hotels in late 2016, it was determined that we would continue to audit the City's hotels on a rotating basis. The first rotation of these audits will take place during the third quarter of FY 2020/21. It is anticipated that all the City's hotels will be audited once over a four-year period. Human Resources The Human Resources Department oversees the City's human resources and risk management functions. The Department is responsible for managing a broad range of employment-related services, including recruitment and selection, classification and compensation, benefits, organizational and employee development, and employee and labor relations. Also, the Department provides risk management services, including employee wellness and safety, and administration of workers compensation and general liability claims. In the next fiscal year, the Department will focus its work efforts on programs and services to further business partner relationships with City departments and enhance the employee experience. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Hiahlights • Continue to grow social media marketing and presence to increase employer branding, applicant engagement, and improve recruitment efforts. • Initiating enhancement to the performance management program to improve the user experience. • Initiating enhancement to the recruitment process by adopting a leaner workflow process to reduce onboarding,focus on attracting a modern workforce,and improving the quality of the candidate pool. • Continue to manage the City's volunteer intern program, which provides work experience for students and helps City departments manage projects to enhance City programs and services. • Continue to administer and proactively track legislative changes to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and CARES Act. The key components continue to be the tracking and reporting of information and the updating of City policies and procedures to ensure compliance with the changing mandates and deadlines of the programs. • Continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development, and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs and incorporate the Learning Management System to assist in this area. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 66 • Maintain prompt and fair delivery of workers' compensation benefits, risk assessment, and cost-effective risk transfer when appropriate, litigation management, and the fair and fiscally responsible analysis of third-party claims. • Implemented the updated Injury Illness Prevention Program as required by OSHA. Community Services Department(CSD)staff has also been trained to train new employees. Utilizing this train-the-trainer program provides cost savings to the City as it increases CSD's ability to train new employees promptly and within OSHA guidelines. • Updated language in waivers signed by City volunteers for risk of injury to comply with PARSAC recommended standards. • Through a partnership with Kaiser, the Department expanded our current health and wellness program as a result of a Citywide employee wellness survey. Employees will begin to have access to wellness training, as well as health education courses provided by Kaiser Permanente Workforce Health Consultants and a Physician Ambassador at no cost to the employee or City. Also, secured $1,500 of funding through the partnership for courses on health education,financial wellness, healthy eating, stress management, healthy sleep, and healthy celebration. These courses are available electronically through workbooks emailed to employees every week,and through an assigned physician ambassador that cover topics on mental health and men's health. • Teamed up with The Counseling Team International to offer TeleHealth, an employee assistance program, to provide employees access to mental health professionals using video conferencing as a result of COVID-19. • The Department is providing virtual ergonomic assessments for employees' workstations, whether at work or home. These assessments help ensure proper workspace setup which reduces potential injuries, as well as any pain or discomfort caused by improper configuration. This program is separate from the Department's ongoing commitment to improving employee health and safety. • Collaborated with DoIT to develop a GIS tracking tool of all claims submitted to the City in the last 5 years. The purpose of this tracking tool is to identify hot spots of excessive claims due to hazards to identify any trending issues. • Rolled out NEOGOV's LEARN platform, a learning management system that will track staff certifications and training, as well as conferences attended. These internal training tools reduce costs by eliminating the need to host live training events and makes training more accessible to City employees. Additionally, it allows the Department to track and assign trainings to staff. • Through our ongoing risk management function,the Department worked towards recovering losses and damages to City property due to the fault of others. Over two fiscal years, the Department recovered $196,000. Risk Management has also created a subrogation team that includes Public Works and RCMU to seek reimbursement from insurance companies and or vehicle owners. Furthermore, the Department has started filing small claims to aggressively pursue individuals who are not insured at the time of loss to recover money owed to the City. Procurement The Procurement Division is authorized to procure services or goods for the best value at the lowest price from the most responsive vendor. The Division performs as the City's centralized Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 67 procurement agent and authorizes all City purchases in accordance with the City's Municipal Code. It is also charged with the disposition of surplus and obsolete property. Division highlights for Fiscal Year 2020/21 include the following: • Completion of a revised Procurement Manual, reflecting cumulative changes in policies and procedures since the last publication in 2013, and introducing a new format making reference material more convenient for staff to use. • Continue to conduct procurement tasks in accordance with public procurement best practices to enable the Division to apply for the 2020 Achievement of Excellence in Procurement(AEP)award issued by the National Procurement Institute, Inc. to achieve the goal of receiving this award for twelve consecutive years. • Evaluate the efficiency of the Request for Proposal "RFP" process to ensure that it is providing the best value to the City and staff in a timely manner, while complying with the City Municipal Code, best practices, state and other government regulations. • Facilitate the efficient disposal of surplus City assets through an online surplus auction site to generate additional revenue for the City. 2020 Prospects and Projects for Public Safety "...One thing'sfor certain, I stand up for what/believe. That might not mean much to you,but it does to me."Does to Me Luke Combs Public Safety Animal Care and Services Rancho Cucamonga has innovative Animal Services Department. The Department cares for nearly 5,000 homeless pets and responds to more than 6,000 animal-related field calls annually. The Department offers care and enrichment to animals received, reunites lost pets with their owners, FM promotes pet adoptions,and has a comprehensive veterinary program. The w+cxo auaoran Department's Field Services program is responsible for picking up stray and ANIMAL aggressive animals, animal welfare calls, rabies control, and assisting the CENTER community with their animal-related concerns. The Department also has a robust community program division,which includes volunteers, foster care, outreach, spay and neuter opportunities, and a neonatal kitten nursery. During Fiscal Year 2019/20, the Department updated its logo, mission, and vision statement, and values to be more reflective of current operations and goals. Mission: Creating PAWsitive impact by enriching the lives of animals and people. Vision: Inspiring a compassionate community where animals and people thrive together. Values for RCAC: R-Resilience in overcoming obstacles to rescue, rehabilitate, reunite, and rehome animals. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 68 C-Compassion to provide above and beyond care for the animals and people we serve. A-Achieving goals to lead, advance and promote the highest standards in animal welfare. C-Commitment to enhance community partnerships, public safety, and humane education. "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." Immanuel Kant Fiscal Year 2020121 Budget Hiahliahts .�% The Department continues to budget for high-quality care of the .� animals, prompt public field assistance, and community programs. To manage the fiscal effects of COVID-19, as well as prevent crowding in the tight quarters of the Animal Center which would violate Health Officer orders, the Department will reduce its public hours to visit with the animals. It will also reduce labor costs by freezing three vacant full-time positions and several vacant part-time positions. Although not ideal, these changes will bring opportunities to explore creative ways to enhance programs while being fiscally prudent. Specifically, streamlining the adoption process, increasing foster homes and 501(c)(3) rescue partnerships, piloting office pets for the day programs, and continuing partnerships with Western University College of Veterinary Medicine and other community organizations. The Department also plans to update its five-year strategic plan. The goals of the strategic plan include growing sustainable, humane education programs and restructuring the community cat and kitten program to reduce the number of care days from date of intake to the date of adoption. Furthermore, the strategic plan will focus on developing action items to increase the amount of private funds raised by the Animal Care Foundation to help offset the Department's budget. Fire District The Fire District's mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting, and demonstrating a readiness to respond to and reduce threats to life and property through the efficient and effective delivery of emergency and non-emergency services and programs. Three pillars establish the foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services: Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Response, and Emergency Management. Leading our Risk Reduction efforts, the Prevention Bureau manages hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction, public education, and community outreach. Additionally, through the Emergency Response pillar firefighters deliver efficient and effective mitigation protocols for structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, technical rescue, and tactical response. The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency,and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness, and response programs. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 69 The Fire District will continue to foster a high level of readiness through the development and training of a diverse workforce. The workforce is focused on enhancing the emergency and non- emergency services the District provides. Best practices and cutting-edge innovations while leveraging partnerships, resources, data, and technology will also be utilized to maximize value in the delivery of our services. Leadership is the art of accomplishing more than the science of management says is possible.—Colin Powell Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Highlights • In collaboration with the City, the Fire District will complete the construction of the West Side Public Safety Facility, which includes the relocation of San Bernardino Road Fire Station 172, as well as a Rancho - - Cucamonga Police Department Sub- - Station. The new facility will provide a fully functioning, community-based facility at San Bernardino Road and Vineyard Avenue. The location of the new facility will improve customer service and response times for residents and business owners on the west side of the City. With modem design and construction, the facility will meet the joint public safety mission for a minimum of fifty (50) years. The staffing for the new station is currently being evaluated, and the facility is expected to be opened in late 2020. • The Fire District proposes to continue the ongoing design-build process for the future Fire Station 178 to be located on Town Center Drive, east of Haven Avenue. As part of the strategic relocation of Fire Station 172 to the new West Side Public Safety Facility, impacts to the overall distribution of the District's various fire stations were considered. In anticipation of this relocation, the District purchased land located on Town Center Drive in 2016 to support the optimum distribution of stations and ensure the corresponding demands for service will be met. Fire Station 178 is closely inter-related with the development of The Resort at Empire Lakes and the timing of the design is matched to the pace of development. • As part of the City's environmental sustainability efforts, Fire Station 177 on Hellman Avenue will be retrofitted with solar panels. Continuing to invest in clean, renewable energy strengthens community resiliency and further positions the Fire District as a trusted leader. These solar powered systems will provide utility bill savings and energy independence that is both economically and environmentally beneficial. This solar energy retrofit will be the third fire station to be completed. The Fire District anticipates the 35-kW solar-powered system will offset the electrical load by approximately 80%. • In conjunction with the General Plan update, the Fire District will update the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan(LHMP)to meet the needs of the current and future community. Overall, the LHMP is an effort undertaken by the City and Fire District to manage the effects of natural hazards and reduce their impacts on people and infrastructure. The LHMP has a goal of decreasing the amount of time before a community can return to normalcy. As part of the LHMP the Fire District will begin the process of identifying potential hazards that could impact the community. Once identified, strategies can be proactively developed for when a natural disaster does occur. Although natural disasters cannot be prevented from Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 70 happening, the effects can be forecast, and efforts to educate and increase public awareness implemented. Additionally, the LHMP plan enables the City to gain access to grant funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency(FEMA)to execute hazard mitigation projects, programs, and activities throughout the City. • Also, in conjunction with the General Plan update, the Fire District will complete an evaluation of the Community Wildfire Protection Plan. This evaluation will identify the hazards and risks specific to wildfires throughout the Fire District's service area. Utilizing this analysis, the Fire District can focus on reducing the hazards, risks, and associated - vulnerabilities from a wildfire. As an outcome,the Fire District will implement a plan that will result in a measurable and verifiable reduction in wildfire risks. This work will establish wildfire awareness and prevention and a culture that continually seeks out innovative methods in protecting residents and the environment from the effect of wildfires. • The Fire District will complete an Emergency Evacuation Plan to improve evacuation scenarios as a supplement to the work being done on the General Plan update. Natural disasters are swift and can occur with little or no warning; they can occur during the day while people are at work or during the night while residents are sleeping. The purpose of the Emergency Evacuation Plan is to establish procedures for the orderly and coordinated evacuation of the community, to outline warning procedures used in evacuations, and to identify primary evacuation routes for use during a natural disaster. • The Fire District entered into a contract with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire)on October 1, 2015, to receive supplemental wildland fire protection of approximately 1,206 acres of wildlands within the Fire District's service area. This wildfire protection contract ensures that in the event of a major fire, the City will have the resources of Cal Fire, including aerial support, to call on without having to worry about after the fact cost reimbursement. In support of the Etiwanda Heights Neighborhood and Conservation Plan, the Fire District will update the agreement to account for the increase of wildland area within the Fire District boundaries resulting from the future annexation. The growth in the service area will be supported with Cal Fire resources and at a level of service currently provided on the adjacent state-responsible area without the burden of a significant unfunded liability to the Fire District, such as the costs for aircraft and handcrews. • The Fire District will be procuring a mass notification system to improve our ability to communicate important information to the public. This notification system will send alerts to the public, as well as internally to City and Fire District staff during emergencies and disasters. Its use will greatly improve public communication during disaster situations. • The Fire District will also replace the 1997 Type 1 Heavy Rescue apparatus,which supports the Technical Rescue Team. This apparatus transports personnel and their equipment to the scene of Urban Search and Rescue(US&R)incidents, such as earthquakes, extrication, trench collapse, confined space rescue, and advanced high angle rope rescue. The apparatus is self-sufficient as it can power its own equipment and lighting, as well as provide air and hydraulic supply for the variety of lifting, cutting and breaking tools and equipment. It must carry the minimum equipment required by CAL OES for Type 1 Heavy Level Rescue. The service life of the new heavy rescue is expected to be a minimum of twenty years. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 71 • Active shooter threats continue to impact the greater society. Over almost two decades, Rancho Cucamonga Police and Fire personnel have facilitated 190 dynamic training sessions to more than 6,000 first responders throughout the region. The training grew into a whole-community approach, which has collectively trained over 36,500 civilians from schools, businesses, places of worship, and community classes. This training focuses on empowering people with proper survival strategies and medical intervention skills should they find themselves in an active shooter scenario. The Fire District will continue to expand workforce and community-wide training in how to react to an a.,. active shooter or purposeful mass injury incident. • The Fire District continues to fund proposed operations and capital projects while holding Community Facilities District(CFD)assessments at their prior levels. • Lastly,for the eighth consecutive year, Fire Prevention Permit and Inspection Fees continue to be suspended. This year in particular that fee suspension will assist businesses recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. Police Department Anymore when a restless feelin, keeps me up at night. Fallin'on my knees is my turning'on the light. I keep my faith intact make sure my prayers are said. 'Cause I've learned that the monsters ain't the ones beneath the bed." Monsters Eric Church The Police Department is committed to providing the best law enforcement services possible to keep the City of Rancho Cucamonga amongst the safest cities in the state. The low crime rate is a direct result of the commitment and hard work by the men and women of the Department, and the support they receive from the City Council. The Department remains committed to working with our local schools to provide safe learning environments. The station has six School Resource Officers(SRO's) responsible for a total of 35 schools. Four of the SRO's serve the four high schools and are on campus all day long; they also provide services to the City's eight middle schools, and two SRO's serve the 23 elementary schools. The SRO's work as a team and remain in communication with school administration and security staff to keep our schools safe for all children. When school is out the SRO's supplement the City's regular law enforcement services. The Crime Prevention Unit continues to host events to educate and mentor young kids and pre- teens. An example of such a program is the Be Brave, Be Ready, Be Aware, Be Victorious, and Be Empowered, or B.R.A.V.E. The Joyful Child Foundation developed this program in memory of Samantha Runnion. It is dedicated to preventing crimes against children through programs that educate,empower, and unite families and communities. Specifically, the B.R.A.V.E.program teaches kids self-defense and opens their eyes to their surroundings. The skills are basic, but, coupled with education and prevention,the program has had successful outcomes,and the public truly enjoys it. Additionally, the program includes a workshop for parents — topics include predatory behaviors, reducing vulnerabilities, and the grooming of children. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 72 Another successful program is Teen Human-Trafficking Awareness Talk, or T.H.A.T. Human trafficking is a nationwide epidemic. Still, much of the public,especially teens, remain uninformed. Crime Prevention personnel aim to educate the community with awareness and prevention strategies. Crime Prevention utilizes the assistance of Opal Singleton, a national expert best known for her research and work on human trafficking, sextortion (blackmail by photo), and cyber child exploitation. Opal's goal is making the public aware of how criminals use technology to exploit the innocent, as well as strategies to protect kids from predators. The Solution Oriented Policing Team (SOP) consists of one Corporal and five Deputies. SOP Deputies manage Citywide quality of life issues. Working with the County's Homeless Outreach Proactive Enforcement Team (HOPE), SOP Deputies provide resources and housing to the homeless who request assistance. They also remain in communication with local businesses and property owners to ensure they aren't negatively affected by the homeless, particularly those with substance abuse problems. SOP Deputies partner with Alcohol Beverage Control (ABC) to ensure local establishments serving alcohol remain in compliance. Additionally, they conduct regular business checks at massage parlors to ensure proper licensing and business practices are followed. The SOP Team will continue working with the Fire -� District to host two large scale Active Shooter training ,�_ - i=-.---aL events. This type of training is generally done twice a Lip year. it includes local law enforcement, federal agents, - *_ and local fire departments. The training is useful for all -' who participate and allows law enforcement and fire - professionals to work together and simulate an active shooter scenario to ensure they are prepared to handle _ a real event such as happened at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino several years ago. During the last fiscal year, the Department restructured the Multiple Enforcement Team (MET) and added two Detectives. After the restructuring, the team now consists of a Sergeant, two Detectives, and six Deputies. Each Detective leads a team of three Deputies. MET responds to and investigates the most violent crimes in the City. The team has an investigator on-call 24/7 to respond to in- progress calls or cases with viable leads. With the addition of the two Detectives, MET has solved multiple recent cases, including attempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon, robbery, carjacking, and narcotic related crimes. Additionally, two of the MET Deputies received specific training in investigating marijuana grow houses, which MET has investigated and shut down at multiple locations within the City. Fiscal Year 2o2o/21 Adopted Budget Page 73 The Automated License Plate Reader(ALPR) program continues to produce great results for the City. The goal of the program is to capture data on wanted vehicles and allow Deputies to locate the vehicles before additional crimes are committed. In the last year, the Department received 305 ALPR notifications, of which, 74 resulted in arrests for crimes such as possession of stolen property, felony evading, possession of dangerous weapons, narcotics, and wanted persons. In October 2019, the Department welcomed its newest member, a bloodhound named "Nyx." Deputy Casey Allen and Nyx continue to train and have become a great team. Nyx's training has proven successful, and she loves assisting Deputies in the field. When Nyx is not training or out on a call, she enjoys taking walks and visiting her friends around the station. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Budget Highlights Currently, the Department operates out of the main station on Civic Center Drive and a satellite office at Victoria Gardens. Construction of a West Side Public Safety Facility is set to be completed at the end of the 2020 calendar year. The new station will include both police and fire personnel and services. It will improve customer service for residents and business owners on the west side of the City by allowing deployment into the field directly from the facility. A staffing plan for the new station is currently being evaluated and developed. The SOP Team will continue interaction with the homeless population to limit the impact of quality of life crimes such as littering,loitering and panhandling. SOP will continue to work with the HOPE Team to stay up to date on rehabilitation programs and transitional housing available to the homeless. These activities occur in conjunction with the Healthy RC efforts to prevent future homelessness by intervening for those most in need before they become homeless. The Crime Prevention Unit will continue to host events - educating the public on Teen Human Trafficking, self- defense and internet safety for kids, Every 15 Minutes— DUI education program, Citizen Advisory Committee, f and National Night Out. Additionally, Crime Prevention plans to host an Open House event for the general public. This event will allow members of the community to communicate and positively interact with members of the Police Department in a non-response type of environment. Building on the past success of the ALPR program, the Department will also add additional ALPR cameras to the intersections at: • Archibald Avenue and 19' Street • Etiwanda Avenue and Arrow Route • Milliken Avenue and Kenyon Way These efforts are part of the City's focus on building out the ALPR system so that all entrances/exits to/from the City are covered along with key internal intersections. This technology Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 74 assist law enforcement to solve crimes, intercede proactively for individuals with warrants or driving stolen vehicles, and enhance the safety of residents throughout the City. "To those of you who received . . awards and distinctions, I say well done. And to the C students, I�y you, too can he president of the United States." FY 2019/20 Awards: • 2020 All American Cities award finalist • 2019 Helen Putnam Award of Excellence from the League of California Cities for the "Campeones pare La Comunidad" (Community Champions) in the category of Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics, &Community Involvement • 2nd Place Directing Change Program and Film Competition awarded by Each Mind Matters for the Healthy RC Youth Leaders Mental Health video • Cal-ICMA Talent Initiative award for Overall Excellence in Talent, recognizing our outstanding human resources programs • LEED for Cities Silver Certification - LEED for Cities is the leading international rating system and certification program for evaluating the sustainability and quality of life in a city or community. Rancho Cucamonga was the only City in California to be selected as a part of this initial cohort. • California Firefighter Joint Apprenticeship Committee (Cal-JAC)award for Labor- Management Partnership between the Fire District and RC Professional Firefighters Loca12274 • The 2020 Richard H. Driehaus Form-Based Code Award -The Etiwanda Heights Neighborhood Heights and Conservation Plan is one of two codes receiving the Award this year from the Form-Based Codes Institute (FBCI)of Smart Growth America, a professional organization dedicated to advancing the understanding and use of form- based codes. The award recognizes outstanding form-based codes that other communities can use as models. Nominated codes are critiqued by a jury of code experts and practitioners to select each year's winners. • Ranked 7'h among cities population 125,000-249,999 in the 2019 Digital Cities Award issued by the Center for Digital Government • Mission Lifeline EMS recognition for the Fire District—This is the American Heart Association's program that recognizes EMS Agencies for their quality of care for STEMI and Acute Coronary Syndrome(ACS)(heart attack) patients. • California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO)Award of Distinction in the category of Multicultural Outreach/Campaign for the Spanish Your Mind Matters Campaign Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 75 • Procurement received the 2019 Achievement of Excellence in Procurement(AEP)award issued by the National Procurement Institute, Inc. • Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2018 and 2019 • Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2019 • Received the Digital Transformation Award for Excellent Laserfiche Achievements for the design and implementation of the City's Laserfiche Weblink portal on the City's website. City Council Goals "A goal is not always meant to be reached, it often serves simply as something to aim at" Bruce Lee In FY 2019/20,the Rancho Cucamonga City Council set out to revisit, revise and readopt updated Goals, Mission, Vision and Values. Along the way, the City Council also adopted a set of Core Ethics and a Governance Resolution. These tasks were accomplished via multiple staff facilitated workshops held at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center throughout the year. The end result is a robust planning document that sets out the framework and ideals to guide the governance of the City into the 21s' Century. The first section includes the new City Council Goals intended to be accomplished in the next three (3)years: 1. Determine an official City position on the Gold Link and Gold Link issues in Qt of 2020. (COMPLETED FEBRUARY 2020) a. Support enhanced Metrolink service to Ontario International Airport via the Rancho Cucamonga Metrolink Station. b. Support connecting Ontario International Airport to the wider Metrolink network via high quality transit to provide better regional connectivity. 2. Within 1-3 years, obtain funding for another phase of Central Park. 3. Complete the General Plan and Housing Element through an inclusive process by Q4 2022. 4. Attract new businesses to increase ongoing net revenue by $500,000 in the next two calendar years. 5. Reduce delays for NIS traffic flow on the Haven Avenue corridor between the 10 freeway and the 210 freeway, particularly during peak congestion periods, by working with the City of Ontario and the San Bernardino County Transportation Agency to implement advanced technology for traffic control communication and control systems by December 2023. 6. Complete the ALPR ring around Rancho Cucamonga, including all turn movements at all freeway on/off ramps and key major interior intersections by 2022. Next, the City Council adopted a new Mission Statement. The mission statement establishes our organization's purpose and serves as a focal point for current and future endeavors. The Mission - Statement succinctly sets out the organization's everyday work focus: Ensure and advance the quality of life for the community through inclusive decision making. All World Class organizations also have a clearly defined vision. A vision statement defines the target outcomes for an organization with respect to those things it seeks to accomplish in the near future. For Rancho Cucamonga: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 76 Our vision is to build on our success as a world class community, to create an equitable, sustainable, and vibrant city, rich in opportunity for all to thrive. Goals, Mission and Vision statements do not exist in a vacuum. It is critical they are surrounded bycorevalues. Core values that we hold individually area set of fundamental beliefs,ideals or practices that inform how you conduct your life,both personally and professionally. Businesses can also have and maintain core values. These can help an organization determine how to allocate resources, make important decisions and grow. Rancho Cucamonga's care values include: - Providing and nurturing a high quality of life for all. - Promoting and enhancing a safe and healthy community for all. - Building and preserving a family-oriented atmosphere. - Intentionally embracing and anticipating the future. - Equitable prosperity for all. - Working together cooperatively and respectfully with each other, staff, and all stakeholders. - Continuous improvement - Actively seeking and respectfully considering all public input. "All" is meant to be inclusive of residents, businesses, non-profits, schools, other government institutions-truly all Rancho Cucamonga stakeholders. Summary "A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read."-Mark Twain Having reached the end of this budget message, all of you who read these words have clearly proven that you do read and have the advantage of the knowledge that comes with that practiced skill. Last year, I noted in the Budget Message that although we did not know when, we did know winter was coming, and prudent fiscal management dictated saving resources for that winter. Those who fail to prepare for winter often never see another spring. Of course, at that time, neither I nor anyone else had an idea of what the coming winter would bring or when it would be upon us. But the words ring true today. The pandemic may have taken the lives of over 100,000 Americans, but it will be the fiscal winter that will take the lives of unprepared businesses and local governments. Those who prepared will have a much better chance of making it through the night to the dawn on the other side. FY 2020/21 will go down as a unique year for many reasons, I suspect. Not the least of which will be the unprecedented fiscal challenges to our economy at the local, state and national level. No city is an island, and Rancho Cucamonga is certainly not immune to the effects of the pandemic and the economic disruption. But Rancho Cucamonga has prepared prudently for this day. Reserves were set aside beginning back after the Great Recession to help cushion against another downturn. Those same reserves are now available to soften the revenue declines in the FY 2019/20 and FY 2020/21 budgets. Similarly, the City has made an effort to stay current on maintenance when resources were available, and now we are better able to continue functioning during a lean time. Diligent attention to continuous reorganization is the kindling that feeds the fire of improved efficiency. Investments in future technology, including remote access, remote permitting and high-speed fiber, enabled the City to pivot with minimum disruption of services and Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 77 personnel and have already formed the foundation for further evolution of our service delivery methods. We hope the worst is over, but there is no way at this time to know how long the current disruptions may last. Nevertheless, what we do now will bear fruit tomorrow. Now is the time to prepare a new General Plan for the next 20 years of the City. Now is the time to improve our backbone infrastructure and prepare the way for a 21 s'century knowledge-based economy by creating the foundation of a 21s'century knowledge-based community. Now is the time to begin improving our fiscal position for the future so that, when winter inevitably comes again, we are more resilient than ever. Now is the time when we can and should work together in the best interests of the City, as one commUNITY. Let us mark this time when the world stood six feet apart as a time when we made it through this by standing together as one Rancho Cucamonga. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 78 G GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award PRESENTED TO City of Rancho Cucamonga California For the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2019 Executive Director The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada(GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2019. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document,operations guide,financial plan,and communications device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements and will be submitted to GFOA to determine its eligibility for _ another award. Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 79 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 8o J RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA GENERAL INFORMATION Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 81 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 82 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget City Officials City Council Name Term Expires L. Dennis Michael Mayor 2022 Lynne Kennedy Mayor Pro-Tern 2020 Ryan Hutchison Council Member 2022 Kristine Scott Council Member 2022 Sam Spagnolo Council Member 2020 Administration and Department Heads City Manager John R. Gillison Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services Lori Sassoon Deputy City Manager/Civic and Cultural Services Elisa C. Cox Deputy City Manager/Economic and Community Development Matt Burris City Attorney James L. Markman City Clerk Janice C. Reynolds City Treasurer Jim Harrington Animal Services Director Veronica Fincher City Clerk Services Director Linda Troyan Community Services Director Jennifer Hunt-Gracia Engineering Services Director/City Engineer Jason Welday Finance Director Tamara L. Layne Fire Chief Ivan Rojer Human Resources Director Robert Neiuber Innovation and Technology Director Darryl Polk Library Director Julie Sowles Planning Director Anne McIntosh Police Chief Donny Mahoney Public Works Services Director Bill Wittkopf Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 83 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 84 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Organization Chart Citizens of Rancho Cucamonga City Clerk City Council City Treasurer City Attorney City Manager Administrative Civic and Police Economic and Services Cultural Services Department Community Development Finance Community Fire Services District Human Library Animal Care Resources Services and Services Innovation and Records Community TechnologyManagement Improvement Building and Engineering Planning Public Works Safety Services Services Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 85 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 86 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Functional Units by Fund Type Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budget $224,576,730 $901104400 $108.629.440 $1,590 Govemance AD 82-1 6th St.Industrial Police AB2766 Air Quality lmprcvanent AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello Animal Care and Services AD 91-2 Redemption-Day Canyon CFD 2001-01 Administrative Services AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center CFD 2003-Ot Project Fund Finance Assessment Distrieh Admin Human Itaa s A,ed Seizure-State and Federal Eoanomicand Comm,Dev. Beautification EISy60,110 Building and Seely CA Recyclerl.itter Reduction Grant sports Complex Engineering Services CA State Library Municipal utility Planning CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance Utility Public Benefit Public Works Services CFD 2017-01 No.Etievanda RCMU Capital Replacement Fund Community Services CFD 2018-01 Empire Lakes Fiber Optic Ndwork Citywide Infrastructure Imprv. Community Dev.Block Grant 58,215,360 Community/Rce Center Developmeut $1,665,730 Governance COPS Program Grant-Stare Equipment Nehide Replacement Contra Dev Technical Services Dept of Homeland Security Grant Computer EWip Tech Replacement Police Drainage Facilities Reimb S✓County Parking Ch Emergency Mgt Performance Grant Law Enforcement Reserve Etiwanda No.Equestrian Facility Traffic Safety Fire Protection District Administrative Services General City Street Lights We Technology-Developmrnt Housing Successor Agency City Technology Fee Integrated Waste Management Capital Reserve Leaches,Maintenance Dimids Finance Library Capitol Fund Benefits Contingency Library Fund Human Resources Library Services&Tech.Act Capital Reserve LMD HI Capital Replacement Economic and Comm.Dev. Measure 1 Comm Dev Technical Smicee MSRC An Pollution Reduce Grant City Technology Fee Park Devdopment Building mud Safety Park Improvement Corm Dev Technical Services Park Land Acquisition City Technology Fee PD 85 Capital Replacement Mobile Home Park Program PD 85 Redemption Fond SB1186 Cat Access Special Program Pedestrian Gmen/Art3 Engineering Screw. Proposition IN State Funding Comm Dev Technical Services Public Rearce Gmnt,/H Wlhy RC City Technology Fee Road Mainz&Rehab Acd Capital Reserve Safe Roues to School Program Planning Sit 1-TCEP Comm Dev Technical Services Staff lonovation(CA ST LB) City Technology Fee State Gas T. Public World Services Stare Grants Fund CV WD Reimbursements Street Light Maintenance Districts County of S.B.Reimbursements Transportation Capital Rrsme Underground Utilities Community Services Used Oil Recycling Capital San. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 87 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 88 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga General Information: The City of Rancho Cucamonga currently has an estimated population of 175,522 and encompasses approximately 40.2 square miles. It is located between the cities of Upland to the west, Ontario to the south, Fontana to the east and is in the western section of San Bernardino County which is in the southern part of the State of California. The local economy includes a diverse business base of office, light manufacturing and distribution, and retail which emphasizes the City's efforts at attracting and retaining sales tax generating businesses to help provide a stable _ financial base. Government: The City of Rancho Cucamonga(the City) was incorporated in 1977 m a general law city under the provisions of the Government Code of the State of California, and it operates under the Council-Manager form of city government. The •�;,, .. .._ ,,,. , City officials elected at large include a Mayor, a ' ` d. City Clerk and a City Treasurer. Effective December 7, 2016, the four Council members are elected by geographic districts. Districts 2 and 3 held elections in November 2018. Districts 1 and ; 4 will hold elections in 2020. The Mayor and Council members are elected on a staggered basis for a tern of four years. There is no limit on the _ -- number of terns an individual can serve as Mayor or as Council members. The Mayor and City \ "' Council appoint the City Manager and City Attorney. Population by Calendar Year (per California State Department of Finance): 2008-175,627 2012-171,058 2016-177,324 2009-177,051 2013-172,299 2017-176,671 2010-178,904 2014-174,064 2018-179,412 2011-169,498 2015-175,251 2019-175,522 Number of Registered Voters (per San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters): 96,373 Capital Asset Statistics (per June 30, 2019 CAFR): Police: Fire: Stations: 1 Fire Stations: 7 Patrol units: 67 Public Works: Parks and Recreation: Streets(miles): 533 Parks: 30 Streetlights: 16,950 Acreage: 346 Traffic signals: 238 Community centers: 6 Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 89 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Population by Age 2010 (Census), 2020(est), and 2025 (est) 2010 Population by Age Total 165,282 0- 4 6.2% 5 - 9 6.8% 10- 14 7.7% 15 -24 15.6% 25 - 34 14.4% 35 -44 15.0% 45 - 54 15.7% 55 -64 10.8% 65 -74 4.7% 75 - 84 2.3% 85 + 0.9° 2020 Population ba Age Total 177,047 0-4 5.7% 5 - 9 6.0% 10 - 14 6.2% 15 -24 12.8% 25 - 34 17.0% 35 -44 14.1% 45 - 54 13.3% 55 - 64 12.6% 65 - 74 8.0% 75 - 84 3.0% 85 + 2025 Population Dy Age Total 182,894 0-4 5.8% 5 -9 5.8% 10 - 14 6.0% 15 -24 11.2% 25 -34 16.4% 35 -44 16.6% 45 - 54 12.2% 55 - 64 11.6% 65 - 74 9.0% 75 - 84 4.2% 85 + 1.2% Source: Esri Community Profile(U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2020 and 2025. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page go CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Educational Attainment Current Year WMEWHonal Atta Total 122,414 Less than 9th Grade 3.1% 9th- 12th Grade,No Diploma 5.0% High School Graduate 17.7% GED/Alternative Credential 2.4% Some College,No Degree 25.7% Associate Degree 10.4% Bachelor's Degree 21.5% Graduate/Professional Degree 14.1% Source: Esri Community Profile (U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2020. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 91 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA Principal Employers Current Year and Nine Years Ago- 2019 2010 Percent of Percent of Number of Total Number of Total Employer Employees, Rank Employment Employees, Rank Employment Eflwanda School District 2,387 1 2.55% n/a n/a n/a Chaffey Community College 2,120 2 2.27% 871 3 1.24% Inland Empire Health Plan 2,078 3 2.22% n/a n/a n/a Mission Foods 950 4 1.02% n/a n/a n/a Alta Loma School District 940 5 1.01% 690 5 0.98% City of Rancho Cucamonga 761 6 0.81% 874 2 1.24% Amphastar Pharmaceutical 657 7 0.70% 880 I 1.25% Mercury Insurance Company 640 8 0.68% 606 6 0.86% Mwy+s 625 9 0.67% n/a n/a n/a Central School District 608 10 0.65% da n/a n/a Bass Pro Shop 500 11 0.53% 500 10 0.71% Coca Cola Bottling Co. 400 12 0.43% n/a Wa n/a ADECCO 360 13 0.39% n/a n/a n/a Now: "Total Employment'as used above represents the total employment of all employers located within City limits. r Includes full-time and part-time employees. *Only the top ten employers for each year presented have data displayed If a company did not rank in the top ten employers for both years presented,then one of the two years will state"n/a". Source: June 30,2019 Comprehensive Aral Financial Report Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 92 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA Principal Sales Tax Remitters Current Year and Nine Years Ago 2019 2010 Business Name Business Cate eory Business Name Business Cateeary Anker Electronim/Appliance Stores Albertsons Grocery Stores Liquor Apple Electronics/Appliance Stores American Building Supply Contractors Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Sporting Goods/Bike Stores Ameron International Contractors Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Apple Computer Electronics/Appliance Stores Chevron Service Stations Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Sporting Goods/Bike Stores Circle K Service Stations Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Casten Discount Department Stores Chevron Service Stations Home Depot Building Materials Circle K Service Station ICL Performance Products Drug/Chemicals Costco Discount Department Stores Jeromes Home Furnishings Home Depot Lumber/Building Materials Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings JC Penney Department Stores Lowes Building Materials Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings Macys Department Stores Lowes LumborBuilding Materials Monoprice Fulfillment Centers Macys Department Stores My Goods Market Service Stations Nic Partners Electrical Equipment Parallon Supplies Chain Solution Medical Biotech Novartis Animal Health Health/Medical Ralphs Grocery Stores Orchard Supply Hardware Hardware Stores Ross Family Apparel Ralphs Grocery Stores Liquor Schwarz Paper Company Light Industrial/Printers Rancho Mobil Service Stations Shell Service Stations Sears Grand Department Stores Southwire Energy/Utilities Southwire Company Light Industrial/Printers Stater Bros Grocery Stores Liquor Stater Bros. Grocery Stores Liquor Target Discount Department Stores Tamco Heavy Industrial Walmart Discount Department Stores Target Discount Department Stores Walrus Wholesale Electric Plumbing/Electrical Supplies Wal Mart Discount Department Stores •Firms listed alphabetically Source: June 30,2019 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 93 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 94 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Budget Guide The purpose of the City of Rancho Cucamonga's budget is to serve as a "blueprint" for providing City services and as a working financial plan for the fiscal year. It also represents the official organization plan, by which, City policies, priorities, and programs are implemented. It provides the means to communicate to the residents, businesses, and employees how the City's financial sources are used to provide services to the community. The budget includes both the operating costs to manage the City and the capital improvement projects that the City plans to undertake during the fiscal year. The budget is organized by fund,by department, and by account. A fund is defined as a fiscal accounting entity with a self-balancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources,together with all related liabilities and balances, which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. A department (e.g., Public Works Services) is an organizational unit with divisions (e.g., City Facilities Maintenance). "Line" accounts provide the details of the type of expenditure that each department/division spends—e.g.,salaries,benefits, supplies, and so forth. The budget document can be broken down into the following sections: Introduction: This section includes the City Manager's executive summary to the City Council and describes what is in the budget, including budget issues and policies that lead to the development of the budget. It also includes the City's GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award. General Information: This section includes a listing of City Officials; a City-wide Organization Chart; a Functional Units by Fund Type chart; various demographic and economic data for the City; a Budget Guide; and a description of the Budget Process. Summaries of Financial Data: This section provides a variety of financial analyses such as multi-year revenue comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; multi-year expenditure comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; and the beginning and ending fund balances for each fund. Departmental Budget Details: This section divides the document by department. It starts with the City Council. The reader will find a narrative of the department describing each division and each program within that department;current year budget highlights;multi-year comparisons of expenditures by funding source and category;multi-year summaries of budgeted full-and part-time staffing;performance statistics; and services to the community. Capital Improvement Program: This section provides a summary of the capital improvement projects planned for the year including their descriptions, funding sources, and the estimated cost of each project. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 95 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Budget Process The City's budget process begins in January. The City Manager outlines the goals and directives for the development of the coming year's budget based on the results of the semi-annual Council goal setting workshops. Finance distributes the budget calendar, instructions, forms, and budget worksheets to the departments. Public Works Services coordinates the departmental building modification and vehicle replacement requests. Engineering coordinates the capital improvement project requests. After the departments have input their budget requests, Finance compiles the data and calculates the total amount requested including estimated revenues and projected fund balances. The City Manager and Finance Director hold departmental budget meetings. Subsequently, the City Manager makes his recommendations and Finance prepares the proposed budget document. The City Manager submits the proposed budget to City Council. The Council conducts a budget study session; sets a public hearing; and adopts the budget prior to the beginning of the fiscal year. After the budget is adopted, staff integrates the budgetary data into the City's accounting system. Month-end reports are distributed to the departments to monitor budget performance throughout the year. Capital Improvement Projects Budget Process: The City maintains a rolling Five-Year Capital Improvement Program(CIP). In February each year,the Engineering Services Department solicits proposals from the other City departments for inclusion in the coming year's capital improvement projects budget. Around the same time, the Finance Department provides Engineering Services the estimated fund balances available for appropriation for CIP. These fund balances usually come from Special Revenue Funds and Capital Projects Funds. Both these fund types are earmarked for specific uses. Engineering Services staff then prepares the Capital Improvement Project form, which provides detailed information about the proposed capital improvement project. Typically, a project costing $5,000 or more(with some exceptions depending on the type of project)is categorized as a capital improvement project. During the departmental budget meetings, the City Manager and staff conduct a"walkthrough"of the various proposed projects. After the City Manager's evaluation of what will be included in the proposed budget, the CIP is submitted to the Planning Commission to determine if the projects conform to the General Plan. Budget amendments: Supplemental appropriations,when required during the fiscal year,require approval by the City Council. Although supplemental appropriations can occur throughout the fiscal year, a comprehensive update to budgeted figures occurs once per year as part of the Amended Budget process which is presented to the City Council in May each fiscal year. Budget changes within each department or between accounts are approved by the City Manager and/or the respective department head depending on the dollar threshold of the budget change. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 96 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Budget Process Basis of budgeting: The City uses the modified accrual basis in budgeting governmental funds. This means that obligations of the City, including outstanding purchase orders, me budgeted as expenses and revenues are recognized when they are both measurable and available to fund current expenditures. For proprietary funds, the budget is prepared on a full accrual basis. This means expenses are recognized when incurred and revenues are recognized when due the City. Depreciation expense is not included in budgeting for proprietary funds, but the full purchase price of equipment is included in the budget. Basis of accounting: The City uses the modified accrual basis of accounting for governmental funds. Revenues are recorded when measurable and available to fund current expenditures. Expenditures are recorded when the services are substantially performed or the goods have been received and the liabilities have been incurred. The City's proprietary funds use the full accrual basis of accounting;revenues are recorded when earned and expenses we recorded when incurred. Budgetary control is maintained at the department level within each fund. The City also maintains an encumbrance accounting system budgetary control. Estimated purchase amounts are encumbered prior to the release of purchase orders to vendors. At fiscal year end, all operating budget appropriations lapse. Open encumbrances are reported as reservations of fund balances at fiscal year end. Budgetary Data: Annual budgets are legally adopted for all funds on a basis consistent with generally accepted accounting principles, except for the following funds for which no budget is proposed for FY 2020/21: Other General Funds: County of S.B. Reimbursements Special Revenue Funds: Public Art Trust Fund Drug Abatement Act SB 140 CFD 2018-01 Capital Reserve AB 2928 Traffic Congestion Relief Library, Animal Center and Police Foothill Blvd. Maintenance Impact Fee Funds Various Grant Funds Capital Projects Funds: AD 86-2 CFDs 2000-01,2003-01, 2004-01, 2006-01,2006-02 The following Flow Chart describes the City's annual budget process. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 97 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Budget Process FLOW CHART January February FINANCE DEPARTMENTS Analyze and Project Early January Submit Budget Revenue Estimates Requests to Finance Department _F BUDGET KICK-OFF February/March February FINANCE FINANCE Present Mid-Year Review and Analyze Budget Review Budget Requests/ Finalize Revenue Projections March/April April/May May CITY MANAGER/ FINANCE ENGINEERING/ FINANCE DIRECTOR PUBLIC WORKS Prepare Proposed Budget Meetings with Budget CIP presented to Departments Planning Commission May June June CITY MANAGER CITY COUNCIL/ CITY COUNCIL CITY MANAGER Submit Proposed Hold Public Hearing Budget to City Council Conduct Budget and Adopt Budget Study Session Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 98 J RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 99 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY-OPERATING BUDGET Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budget 201920 202021 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Description Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $110,106,629 $111,461,650 $111,199,810 Licenses&Permits 4,679,191 4,364,620 4,657,080 Fines&Forfeitures 1,641,020 1,367,420 1,143,320 Use ofMoney&Property 2,891,132 1,047,040 2,544,630 Charges for Services 4,969,838 3,992,960 7,242,270 Intergovernmental 283,555 169,080 216,130 Other 5,503,699 5,265,250 5,980,790 Transfer In 2,961,851 3,757,480 3,854,480 Total Revenues $133,036,915 $131,425.500 $136,838,510 Expenditures By Department: Governance: City Council $ 117,720 $ 118,110 $ 132,470 City Clerk 1,970 1,960 1,940 City Treasurer 10,928 12,420 12,300 City Management 2,280,789 2,616,920 2,959,390 Total Governance $ 2,411A07 $ 2,749,310 $ 3,106,100 Public Safety: Fire District $ 32,927,026 $ 37,144,160 $ 41,928,890 Police 39,321,195 42,327,060 44,869,070 Animal Care Services 3,254,794 3,416,210 3,161,730 Tml Public Safety $ 75,403,015 $ 82,887,430 $ 89,959,690 Civic and Cultural Services: Records Management $ 432,922 $ 505,450 $ 1,279,650 Community Services 4,739.453 5,562,050 8,119,410 Library Services 4,566,717 5,771,450 5,750,160 Tam]Civic and Cultural Services $ 9,739,092 $ 11,838,950 $ 15,149,220 Administrative Services: AdministmtioNGeneral Government $ 8,821,095 $ 7,791,390 $ 6,169,330 Finance 1,710,397 1,877,380 1,890,790 Human Resources 977,512 1,017,550 900,570 Innovation and Technology 3,709,118 4,067,690 3,784,170 Tom[Administrative Services $ 15,218,122 $ 14,754,010 S 12,744,860 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 667,945 $ 805,350 $ 802,270 Building and Safety Services 1,750,623 1,916,950 1,766,050 Engineering Services 2,321,398 2,780,770 2,353,300 Planning 2,385,472 1,810,830 1,633,770 Public Works Services 9,200,931 11,662,280 10,268,290 Tom[Economic and Community Development $ 16,326,369 $ 18,976,180 $ 16,823,680 Total Expenditures $119,098,005 $131,205,880 $137,783,550 Excess of Revenues Over(Under)Expenditures $ 13,938,910 $ 219,620 $ (945,040) See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page too CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY-ALL FUNDS Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $135,191,971 $137,631,770 $135,930,110 Licenses&Permits 4,915,473 4,623,380 4,909,400 Fines&Forfeitures 1,837,718 1,613,680 1,269,200 Use of Money&Property 17,917,317 8.140,200 8,865,720 Charges for Services 21,808,918 23,516,770 22,264,640 Intergovernmental 16,450,611 67.939,860 28,291,160 Development Fees 14,036,500 4,457,340 5,104,910 Other 9,850,880 7,013,190 7,355,080 Transfer In 10,927,050 11,258,700 9,782,700 Total Revenues $232,936,438 $266,194,890 $223,772,920 Expenditures By Department: Governance: City Council $ I17,720 $ 118,110 $ 132,470 City Clerk 1,970 1,960 1,940 City Treasurer 10,928 12,420 12,300 City Management 2,289,291 2,626,550 2,969,130 Total Governance $ 2,419,909 $ 2,759,040 $ 3,115,840 Public Safety: Police $ 40,401,969 $ 44,016,280 $ 45,983,570 Fire District 36,230,691 41,768,390 48,008,860 Animal Care Services 3,254,794 3,416,930 3,161,730 Total Public Safety $ 79,887,454 S 89,201,600 $ 97,154,160 Civic and Cultural Services: Records Management $ 432,922 $ 505,450 $ 1,279,650 Community Services 9,650,129 11,407,490 11,232,050 Library Services 4,617,076 6,379,910 6,701,910 Total Civic and Cultural Services $ 14,700,127 $ 18,292,850 $ 19,213,610 Administrative Services: Administration/General Government $ 20,618,840 $ 17,512,910 $ 13,521,720 Finance 5,024,349 6,004,110 6,023,580 Human Resources 977,512 1,017,550 900,570 Innovation and Technology 6,328,463 5,362,380 5,804,760 Total Administrative Services $ 32,949,164 S 29,896,950 $ 26,250,630 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 1,093,290 $ 1,464,010 $ 954,150 Building and Safety Services 1,759,151 1,959,190 1,814,530 Engineering Services 31,670,559 89,264,070 41,561,260 Planning 3,996,889 3,763,230 6,896,260 Public Works Services 23,407,541 31,987,460 27,616,290 Total Economic and Community Development $ 61,927,430 $128,437,960 $ 78,842,490 Total Expenditures S 191,984,084 S 268,588,400 $224,576,730 Excess of Revenues Over(Under)Expenditures $ 41,052,354 $ (2,393,510) $ (803,810) See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page tot CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Notes to Financial Summary The accompanying Financial Summary reports provide a snapshot of the City of Rancho .. Cucamonga, California's operating budget as well as the organization as a whole. The City's operating budget is comprised of the General Fund(Fund 001),the Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and the City Library Fund(Fund 290). Financial Summary—Operatine Budget: 2018/19 Actual: Overall,revenues for the Operating Budget were slightly higher than anticipated and expenditures were less than anticipated. Revenues exceeded budget in the areas of sales tax, development fees, and non-abated reimbursements. The net change in unrealized gain/loss on investments from the prior year to the current year also resulted in a positive budget variance. The primary cause of operating expenditures overall being less than anticipated/budgeted was the differences in budgetary accounting verses GAAP accounting methods. Certain transactions were budgeted to authorize the spending(e.g.,debt service payments);however,in the final accounting, these transactions only affected the balance sheet not the statement of revenues and expenditures. Other positive variances were due to less than anticipated expenditures for public safety contract, contract services, and labor costs. Additional costs to fund the City's Computer Equipment Replacement Fund partially offset these positive variances. 2019/20 Adopted and 2020/21 Adopted: The City's goal is to adopt a balanced Operating Budget, which can include the use of available fund balance. For FY 2019/20,the CFD 85-1 Fund budget included the planned use of reserves in the amount of$77,720 to fund operations. All other Fire District Operational Funds, the City General Fund, and the City Library Fund were balanced without the usage of reserves for the FY 2019/20 Adopted Budget. However, it should be noted that the Amended FY 2019/20 Budget, approved by the City Council on May 6, 2020, included the anticipated usage of$417,860 from the Changes in Economic Circumstances Reserve due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Stay-at-home orders and business closures, along with record levels of unemployment, caused a massive decrease in spending on certain goods and services,resulting in a significant decrease to the City's sales tax revenues of approximately $3 million for FY 2019/20. Sales tax is the City's primary revenue. Hotel occupancy rates also plummeted resulting in decreased revenue of approximately $1.5 million from transient occupancy taxes. Transient Occupancy Tax is one of the City's top five revenue sources. Other revenues that are contact-based decreased as well. Overall, the FY 2019/20 Amended Budget reflected a $3,578,680, or 4.05% net decrease in General Fund revenues,due to offsetting non-recurring surges in development fee and non-abated reimbursement revenues. This decline all occurred since late February 2020. Revenues for Community Services programs as well as scheduled events at the Lewis Family Playhouse also decreased significantly due to the cancellation of programming to be in compliance with social distancing and stay-at-home orders. On the expenditure side, proactive cost reductions were implemented through continued attrition management as well as significant reductions in part-time staffing. The impact of these actions on the General Fund was a total cost savings (salaries and related fringe benefits) of$2,755,060. Areas hit particularly hard by the part-time staffing reductions were those programs that are Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 102 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Notes to Financial Summary normally supported by charges for services; however, as noted above, the services had to be _ cancelled to comply with imposed restrictions. Due to the uncertainty as to when these services will be able to start-up again,these part-time reductions will continue into next fiscal year's budget. Attrition management will also continue into the next fiscal year due to the anticipated continuing impacts of the Pandemic on the local economy. Actual usage of reserves for FY 2019/20 will be - determined once the fiscal year has been closed and audited. For FY 2020/21,the General Fund budget includes the planned use of$700,000 from the Changes in Economic Circumstances Reserve to offset the continuing economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. An additional $10,000 of the Animal Center Operations Reserve will be used to fund medical equipment for the Center. The CFD 85-1 Fund will utilize$476,580 of reserves to offset the additional costs associated with the six Firefighters that were added during FY 2019/20. Future years'costs will be funded with recurring District revenues. There is no planned usage of reserves for the Library Fund. Financial Summary—AB Funds: 2018/19 Actual: Revenues increased overall by $30,491,001, with $4,708,568 of this increase resulting from growth in taxes (sales tax- $1,325,077; property tax in-lieu of VLF - $1,066,592; property tax payments related to the former Redevelopment Agency - $1,283,844; and general property tax increases from an overall increase in the City's assessed valuation and additional parcels being added on to the tax roll). Additionally, use of money and property increased $13,675,236 due to the net change in the unrealized gain/loss on investments from the prior year to the current year which resulted in a positive impact of$8,274,425 and the conveyance of land held for resale in exchange for a note receivable pertaining to a low-income housing project in the amount of $3,700,000. Intergovernmental revenues increased $2,942,393 primarily due to increased grant revenue for the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project and CDBG. Development fees increased $3,752,510 as a result of a surge in development activity. Expenditures decreased $25,097,538 primarily due to the prior year increase in spending for capital projects throughout the City, including the Fire District's new All-Risk Training Center and the City's purchase and acquisition of streetlights from Southern California Edison. 2019/20 Adopted and 2020/21 Adopted: The Operating Budget is incorporated into this schedule. In addition to the discussion noted above regarding the Operating Budget, many of the other City funds have capital outlay expenditures budgeted which are funded by resources accumulated over a period of time. This can result in overall expenditures exceeding revenues in a given year, depending on the level of capital improvement activity. The FY 2019/20 Adopted Budget included funding for the Etiwanda Grade Separation project in the amount of$52,175,000. Funding for this project is $11,000,000 for FY 2020/21. The Capital Improvement Program(CIP) section of this document details out the projects budgeted for FY 2020/21 and includes the funding sources. Some of the other larger items included in the CIP include: Central Park Dog Park($2,888,520); Foothill Boulevard Pavement Rehabilitation($1,850,000);HVAC Plan Replacement at the Civic Center($1,500,000); and design of Fire Station 178—Towne Center Station($2,900,000). Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 103 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page too (n n CITY OF RANCHO BUDGET NGA,CALBnORN1A BUD �G BUDCEi SUMMARY Fiscal Year 202021 Adapted Budget Np Fire District Operating OOier Special Capital Internal N General Operating Library Budget•• General Bane. Projects Enterprise Service NFrmd• FYP4S End Subtotal Furls EU& Fwds Finals Fps Total Esturated Spenable Fend Balances. I- I" July 1,2020 $ 27,566,198 S 32,019,968 $ 7,5M,433 $ 67,170,599 $ 67,201,307 $ 199,044,550 $ 2,073,034 $ 33,728,167 $ 4,115,879 $373,333,536 O 'd Estimated Revenues: C Taxes bJ Property Tax•*• $ 31,162,130 $ 37,092,410 S 4,914,770 $ 73,169,310 $ - $ 2?977,4I0 $ - $ - $ - $ 96,146,720 G Sales Tax 28,744,580 - - 28,744,580 - - - - - 28,744,580 09 Transient Occupre3,Tex 1,835,530 - - 1,835,530 - - - - - 1,835,530 Admis imrs Tex 5,320 - - 5,320 - - - 90,000 - 95,320 Franehise Fees 7,445,070 7,445,070 1,M2,890 9,107,960 Subtotal-Taxes 69,192,630 37,092,410 4,914,770 111,199,810 24,640,300 90,000 135,930,110 L,.s&Permits 4,640,580 16,500 - 4,657,080 31,620 220,700 - - - 4,909,400 Fines&Forfeitures 1,025,3M 118,000 - 1,143,320 125,880 - - - - 1;269,200 Use ofMcm,&Property 1,809,650 620,540 114,440 2,544,630 1,530,700 3,662,940 87,780 964,130 75,540 8865,72E Charges far Services 7,056,870 I'm 183,600 7,242,270 569,650 93,080 - 18245,450 1,114,190 22,264,640 lntergoverr aml 216.130 - - 216,130 443,900 27,206,130 - 425,000 - 28,291,160 Development Fees - - - - - 4,884,910 - 220,000 - 5,104,910 Other 3,635,770 1,566,130 778,990 5,980,790 213510 t,152,830 - 7,950 - 7,355,080 Transfer In 1,817,550 2,036,930 3,854,480 735,270 2,016,800 2,336,610 839,540 9,782,700 Total Estimated Revenues S. 89,394,500 $ 41,452.310 $ 5,991,700 $ 136,838510 $ 3,650,530 $ 63,877,6% $ 87,780 S 17�28%140 $ 2,029,270 S 223,77?920 Estimated ExpereJall . persowel Services $ 2%819270 S 30,807,730 $ 3,681,450 $ 64,308,450 S 1,165,830 S 8,077,300 $ - $ 1,859,260 S - S 75,410,840 Operatiore&Maimerenee 63,329,620 8,684,240 1,563,710 73,576,570 2,426,310 17$71= 1590 11,10./,990 409,390 104,793,100 Capital Outlay 210,OW - 5,000 215,000 2,876,OW 33,932,660 - 406,800 729,000 38,059,460 Debt Service 106,450 399,990 - 506,440 - 7M,510 - 1,07,410 527,340 2,895,700 Cost Allocation (6,365,070) - - (6,365,070) - - - - - (6,365,070) Trarefar Out 3,005,230 2,036,930 500,000 5,542,160 1.747,220 984,670 1,508,650 9,792,700 Total E.cirrmted Experulitures $ %,104,500 $ 41,928,890 S 5,750,160 $ 137,783,550 $ 8,215,360 $ 6 ,950,390 $ 1,590 $ 15,W,110 $ 1,665,730 $224,576,730 Budgeted Ineresse,(➢¢cream)in Spedable Fund Balarces 1 (7100)0) $ (476,580) $ 241,540 $ (945,0G) $ (4,564,830) S 2,927,300 $ 86,190 $ 1,329,030 $ 363,540 $ (803,910) Estinatet Spendable Ford Rmace, J.30,2021 1 26,956,199 $ 31,543,388 $ 7,825,973 $ 66,225,559 S 62,636,47r $201,971,950 $ 2,15%224 $ 35,057,191 $ 4479419 $$372,529,726 •The Grneral Fund's Adopted FY202021 Budgetincludestheplawedageof$700,000fromthe Chw in Ewr eCitcwislarxs Remrveduetotheecommicimpactsofthe COVID-19pmdemic; additionally,the budget inelu les the=o£capiral reserves in the amowt of$1O000 far medical equipment for the Animal Center. ••The Operating Budget is comprised ofthe City General Fu 1(Fwd WI),Fire District Operrtiorel Fwds(Fwds 281,282,and 283),argil City Library Ford(Final 290). 10 w '••tndudes Property Tax lrmLteuof VLF in the amowt of$21,079,930 for the City General Final(1"001), N O N CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Special Districts Summary The City of Rancho Cucamonga has.eleven Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), eight Street Lighting Maintenance Districts (SLDs), as well as, several other Special Districts, including one Benefit Assessment District(AD),various Community Facilities Districts(CFDs),and one Park and Recreation District (PD). Five of these other Special Districts provide funding for maintenance of specific public improvements within the City — AD 91-2, PD-85, CFD 2000-03, CFD 2017-01, and CFD 2018-01. Additionally,certain Special Districts have corresponding capital replacement funds, which account for funds that are set-aside for large capital projects. All of the Special Districts, along with the LMDs and SLDs, me summarized below and in the following schedule. Some of the Districts receive funds from the General Fund and have long-term fiscal sustainability issues that will need to be addressed in future years. These are classified as either "General Benefit Contributions" or"General Benefit Equivalent Contributions." A General Benefit Contribution quantifies the dollar value of a general benefit to parcels within a district as required by law to be funded from sources other than special assessments. A General Benefit Equivalent Contribution is not required by law,but is authorized by the City Council to support a district that is operating at a deficit, lacks the resources for necessary maintenance, or maintains insufficient operating reserves. Per City policy, the amount of the General Benefit Equivalent will not exceed 11% of the adjusted total budget. The following table identifies which districts receive a General Benefit Contribution or General Benefit Equivalent Contribution,and the amount budgeted for Fiscal Year 2020/21: General Benefit General Benefit Contribution Equivalent Contribution LMD #2 Victoria- $314,280 LMD#1 General City- $36,300 LMD#6R Caryn Community - $39,010 SLD#2 Residential- $317,330 SLD#7 North Etiwanda- $89,100 PD 85 Redemption Fund- $72,170 When the LMDs were established, they were created in conjunction with new development coming into the City. They were intentionally designed to ensure that each District bore the costs of the maintenance of the infrastructure that provides a special benefit to the property owners. The assessments received for LM )s are utilized only for the maintenance and operations of parks and other landscaping within the boundaries of each District. Maintenance and operations include, but are not limited to, turf, ground cover, planter beds, shrubs, plants and trees, landscape lighting, irrigation systems, electrical energy for irrigation controllers, insect/disease control,graffiti removal, hardscapes, entry signs, sound walls, and all appurtenant facilities. The City utilizes current year assessment revenues,prior year carryovers,and(in some cases)contributions from the General Fund to meet each District's annual expenses. The SLDs provide street light coverage throughout the general City and planned communities. Each year the assessments received are earmarked for the maintenance and operations of street lights,traffic signals, and appurtenant facilities. This maintenance and operations include the cost and supervision .Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page ro6 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Special Districts Summary of street lighting maintenance, including repair, removal, or replacement of all or any part of any improvement providing for lighting within these Districts. In Fiscal Year 2017/18, the SLDs purchased virtually all of the streetlights throughout the City from Southern California Edison,which significantly reduced annual utility costs. PD-85 was initially created to provide funds to finance the cost of construction, maintenance, operation, and debt service payments for Heritage Community Park and Red Hill Community Park. Heritage Community Park is a 40-acre facility located on the southwest comer of Hillside Road and Beryl Street. Red Hill Community Park is 42 acres and is located on the southwest comer of Base Line Road and Vineyard Avenue. The boundary of PD-85 includes all of the City of Rancho Cucamonga with the general exception of land east of the Deer Creek Channel and the Victoria, Caryn, and Terra Vista Planned Communities. The annual assessments levied and collected are dedicated to the ongoing maintenance and operations and periodic capital improvement expenditures for the parks. AD 91-2 was formed for the protection of certain properties with the construction of a 27+acre-foot desilting basin and a 1,460+ linear foot concrete drainage channel. Annual assessments provide funding for the annual maintenance of these basins. CFD 2000-03 was formed to build public facilities in the Rancho Summit housing tracts within the City. Annual assessments from Special Tax B provide for the maintenance of these public facilities, which include parks and parkways. The special taxes have increased by 6.0%for Fiscal Year 2020/21 to keep up with rising costs for maintenance and operations. CFD 2017-01 and CFD 2018-01 were both formed to provide for the maintenance and operations of public facilities for new developments. While the development for CFD 2018-01 at the previous Empire Lakes Golf Course is currently underway,the development for CFD 2017-01 located in North Etiwanda has had no development yet. These CFDs will provide for the maintenance and operations of the public facilities, including parkways, street improvements, and other critical infrastructure. Additionally,the CFDs will provide funding to the LMDs and SLDs, which overlap the boundaries of the CFDs,to account for each development's use and received benefits. Lastly, it should be noted that rate increases are only recommended when necessary to maintain a structurally balanced budget for those Districts. Increases, when needed, provide financial stability and help to avoid the structural imbalances down the road that affect other Districts that have no mechanism for regular rate adjustments. Several factors, such as increasing costs of maintenance and essential utilities when out-paced by assessment revenues,lead to these imbalances. Following is a summary of changes in fund balances for each of the Districts mentioned above. The summary includes prior years' actuals for revenues and expenditures, with a break out of support from the General Fund,along with budgeted revenues and expenditures for Fiscal Years 2019/20 and 2020/21. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 107 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS,STREET LIGHTING MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS, AND OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FY 2018/19 Fund Balance Actual Support From Actual Fund Balance Fund# Fund Name 6/30/2019 Revenues General Fund Emenditures 6/30/2019 LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 130 LMD#1 GENERAL CITY 1,403,195 1,340,837 135,820 1,339,949 1,539,903 131 LMD#2 VICTORIA 3,691,489 3,684,190 299,540 3,427,251 4,247,968 132 LMD#3AHYSSOP 35,009 5,163 4,812 35,360 133 LMD#313 MEDIANS 2,067,093 1,122,150 805,402 2,383,841 134 LMD#4R TERRA VISTA 5,654,713 2,956,638 2,011,278 6,600,073 135 LMD#5ANDOVER 34,547 3,589 6,077 32,059 136 LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY 550,533 532,195 60,370 464,859 678,239 137 LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,262,011 1,082,622 950,267 1,394,366 138 LMD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 68,926 38,037 26,327 80,636 139 LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,292,005 562,943 546,428 1,308,520 140 LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,226,134 661,376 552,983 1,334,527 141 LMD#1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 168,384 96,657 5,621 259,420 STREET LIGHTING DISTRICTS 151 SLD#1 ARTERIAL (3,431,003) 1,120,148 724,370 (3,035,225) 152 SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL (3,362,537) 604,767 188,420 376,010 (2,945,360) 153 SLD#3 VICTORIA (231,404) 495,172 228,061 35.707 154 SLD#4 TERRA VISTA (156,950) 231,896 145,594 (70,648) 155 SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY (444.277) 64,623 42,330 (421,984) 156 SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA (133263) 178,161 100,223 (55.325) 157 SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA (1,006,484) 188281 62,590 150,323 (905,936) 158 SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 1,720,609 161,406 70,352 1,811,663 OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 838 AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 47,519 36,946 26,797 57,668 847 PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 204,425 125,015 11,398 318,042 848 PD 85 RED HILL AND HERITAGE PARKS 1,682,736 1,376,465 214,250 1,125,687 2,147,764 868 CID 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 486,785 487,914 439,767 534,932 875 CFD 2017-01 NORTH ETIWANDA 0 876 CID 201M I EMPIRE LAKES 1,399 45,289 46,669 19 877 CFD 2018-01 CAPITAL RESERVE 0 (A) On August 16,2017,the City Council authorized an advance of$14,400,340 from the General Fund to the Lighting Districts Funds In provide funding for the purchase and acquisition of Southern California Edison owned streetlights and the installation of LED lighting to streetlighq intersections,and bridges. The advance is payable in monthly installments and the fund payment will occur in August 2037. Due to the outstanding advances to the General Fund,the fund balance for a majority of the Street Lighting Districts will be negative until the advances are repaid in August 2037. Each of these districts receives annual assessments to pay for annual operating expenses, including the debt service for the advances. These current resources are identified as Spendable Fund Balance and are detailed in the Fund Balance Summaries section of this document. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 1o8 FY 201920 Estimated FY 2020/21 Estimated Estimated Support From Estimated Fund Balance Budgeted Support From Budgeted Fund Balance Revenues General Fund Expenditures 6/30/2020 Revenues General Fund Expenditures 6/30/2021 1,330,500 136,000 1,760,260 1,246,143 1,323,020 36,300 1,366,550 1,238,913 3,636,910 323,730 4,561,110. 3,647,498 3,793,680 314,280 4,528,540 3.226,918 4,390 11,000 29,750 4,320 10,700 22,370 1,081,390 1,293,590 2,171,641 1,083,800 1,095,590 2,159,851 2,919,140 3,017,500 6,501,713 2,913,070 2,986,970 6,427,813 3,080 7,470 27,669 3,020 7,490 23,199 537,190 43,680 666,100 593,009 554,350 39,010 601,460 584,909 1,007,420 1,153,870 1,247,916 1,027,510 1,178,370 1,097,056 35,800 38,530 77,906 35,700 39,880 73,726 696,230 693,370 1,31080 964,560 824,450 1.451,490 629,210 678,780 1,284,957 653,710 751,670 1,186,997 95,470 40,620 314.270 96,810 40.550 370,530 833,930 1,040,570 (3,241,865) 840,970 1,013,220 (3,414,115) 376,450 363,500 739,950 (2,945,360) 378,330 317,330 693,760 (2,943,460) 388,670 339,550 84,827 410,230 329,480 165,577 178,820 301,900 (193,729) 177,820 181,510 (197,418) 44,220 95,560 (473,324) 44,240 77,820 (506,904) 142,520 142,900 (55,705) 144,220 143,850 (55,335) 133,060 94,400 227,460 (905,936) 133,660 89,100 222,760 (905,936) 112,800 98,470 1,825,993 112,400 100,750 1,837,643 34,790 25,470 66,988 34,760 25,850 75,898 123,510 115,670 325,882 125,260 40,600 410,542 1,357,440 217,060 1,554,700 2,167,564 1,347,360 72,170 1,323,050 2.264,044 508,150 649,090 393,992 536,950 657,570 273,372 0 3,020 1,220 1,800 244,890 234,800 10,109 123,180 123,180 10,109 0 80,180 80,180 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page tog THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page no RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Revenue Summaries Fiscal Year 2o2o/21 Adopted Budget Page ill THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 112 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates Revenue projections in the Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget are estimated using historical information, expert analysis, data collected from the State Controller, the State Department of Finance,the League of California Cities, the San Bernardino County Auditor-Controller's Office, and numerous financial indicators. Utilizing historical revenue data, a general sense of the economic status of the local community,and other indicators noted above,the City's budget staff produce a financially conservative picture of the near future. Concurrent with the near-term revenue projections, City budget staff, using the same data and historical data noted above,keep a running five-year forward projection that we use in conjunction with our near-term estimates to help guide the agency's medium and long-term planning for expenditures. Maior Revenues of Funds ,Operating Budget The City's Operating Budget, which is comprised of the City General Fund, Fire District Operational Funds, and City Library Fund, is primarily supported by seven key revenue sources. These key revenue sources include: sales tax, vehicle license fees (VLF and property tax in-lieu of VLF),franchise fees,property tax,development fees,business licenses,and transient occupancy tax. Sales tax. California sales tax is imposed on the total retail price of any tangible personal property (excluding a variety of state mandated exemptions),while use tax is imposed on the purchaser for eligible transactions when sales tax has not been collected. The sales and use tax rate in San Bernardino County is currently 7.75%, of which Rancho Cucamonga receives 1% from the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration(CDTFA)for transactions occurring within the City. The City is also allocated a share of the countywide use tax pool based on its proportionate share of the sales tax generated in the county. This portion of the City's sales tax revenue has recently been boosted by higher receipts from online shopping as a result of the Wayfair decision and implementation of the marketplace facilitator provision that required additional out of state companies to collect sales tax. The City also receives its share of the Proposition 172 half-cent public safety sales tax from the County of San Bernardino in addition to the amount distributed directly by the State and through the countywide pool. The City works closely with its sales tax consultant, HdL Companies, in projecting sales tax revenue. Based on HDL's analysis of the trend in year-to-date tax receipts, macroeconomic conditions(done in collaboration with its partner Beacon Economics),and an examination of local business data, the consultant anticipates the City will receive sales tax revenue of$28.7 million for FY 2019/20, a $3.9 million or 11.9% decrease over the FY 2019/20 budget. This significant decrease is due to the projected economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. HdL will proactively update its revenue estimates during FY 2020/21 after it receives sales tax data from CDTFA for the second and third quarters of 2020. Management will review the information in conjunction with other economic and regulatory factors during the year and provide a quarterly update to the City Council for consideration of any budgetary action, if needed. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 113 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates Vehicle license fees(VLF and property tax in-lieu of VLF). The majority of this revenue source is property tax in-lieu of VLF and is a result of the VLF for property tax swap of 2004 which was part of the state-local budget agreement. Growth in this revenue source is based on the increase in the City's assessed valuation of the properties within the City. This was a change from the growth factor used for VLF which was the change in the City's population. The City works closely with its property tax consultant, HdL Coren& Cone, to project the growth in the City's assessed valuation. SB89 of 2011 eliminated, effective July 1, 2011, Vehicle License Fee (VLF) revenue allocated under California Revenue and Taxation Code 11005 to cities. As a part of the Legislature's efforts to solve the state's chronic budget problems, the bill shifted all city VLF revenues to fund law enforcement grants that previously had been paid by a temporary state tax and—prior to that—by the state general fund. The City receives a small amount of VLF in Excess from the State which is allocated under Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11001.5(b). Half of these revenues go to counties and half go to cities apportioned on a population basis. Overall revenues for vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in lieu of VLF) are projected to be $21,223,690 which is a $944,370 or 4.7%increase from the FY 2019/20 budget. Franchise fees. The City receives franchise fees for gas, electric, refuse, and cable service providers within the City as "rent" for the use of the streets and rights of way within our municipality. Revenues are projected based on estimated population increases(based on the State Department of Finance's population estimates adjusted for the impact of the projected date of build-out in the City),anticipated rate changes,and known changes in activities communicated by the respective service providers. Franchise fees are projected to be$7,445,070 which is a$793,000 or 11.9%increase from FY 2019/20. Property tax. Property tax is an ad valorem (value-based) tax imposed on real property such as land, buildings, and tangible personal property. Property tax revenue is collected by the County of San Bernardino and allocated according to State law among cities, counties, school districts, and special districts. Rancho Cucamonga property owners pay a basic tax equal to 1% of the assessed value on real property. The City's share of each property tax dollar is approximately $0.0511, or 5.11 cents, (shared between the City General Fund and City Library Fund) and the Fire District's share of this property tax dollar is approximately$0.1248,or 12.48 cents,for a total of$0.1759, or 17.59 cents, for the City's operating budget. The City works with its property tax consultant in projecting property tax revenue,an estimate made with four factors in mind: property turnover rate,pricing and appeals exposure,new construction activity,and Proposition 13's annual inflation adjustment. After considering these factors, the City's consultant has projected that Rancho Cucamonga's property tax revenue will increase 3.76%. Property tax revenues for the City General Fund(including post-RDA property tax revenue)have increased overall by$423,040 or 5.0%from FY 2019/20,with property transfer taxes projected to decrease by $13,600 or 1.2%. The Library's property tax has remained basically flat from FY Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 114 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates 2019/20 as the prior year's revenue estimate was slightly overstated due to a calculation error. This revenue source for the Library continues to include the statutory pass-through payment from the County of San Bernardino, formerly paid by the now dissolved Redevelopment Agency. The Fire District General Fund property tax revenue has increased by $4,030,320 or 15.2% from FY 2019/20, partially due to the County's annual inflation adjustment combined with a shift in the allocation of the post-RDA property tax revenue between the District's General Fund and its Capital Fund. A higher percentage of this revenue source is being allocated to the District's General Fund to support six new Firefighter positions that were added during FY 2019/20 as well as other increases in recurring operating costs. Property tax revenue for the Fire District's two Community Facilities Districts (CFDs) increased by $208,110 or 3.2% from FY 2019/20. Although the rates for the CFDs have remained consistent with the prior year, the number of parcels that the tax is applied to has increased due to the development of vacant land into condominiums. Development fees. Development fees are collected through the Community Development departments and are projected based upon known or anticipated development projects within the City. Depending on what phase a project is in for a given fiscal year,the corresponding Building and Safety,Engineering,or Planning Fees are adjusted accordingly. Based on input received from the Community Development departments, development fees are projected to increase by $712,500 (excluding special services fees)or 17.0%,from FY 2019/20. Business licenses. The City taxes businesses for the privilege of conducting business within the City. The amount of the tax is determined based on either gross receipts or gross payroll for the business. Business Licenses revenues are projected to remain steady from FY 2019/20. Transient Occupancy Tax(TOT). TOT is a 10%tax applied to the cost of hotel or other lodging stays of less than 30 days. Factors influencing TOT revenues include business and leisure travel, room rate increases, and new hotel development. Due to the COVID-19 Pandemic and the stay- at-home orders, the hotel industry has been significantly impacted and we expect to show sharp declines in TOT revenues. The Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) is projected to decrease $2,777,880 or 60.2%from FY 2019/20 due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic which has severely impacted occupancy rates in the City's various hotels. In addition to the key revenue sources discussed above, the following additional revenue source contributed to a significant increase in revenues for the Operating Budget. Charges for services — Community Services. Charges for services are received for various departments throughout the City. In prior years,the majority of charges for services revenues were derived from development related fees (discussed separately above). However, beginning with FY 2020/21,Community Services recreational and community activities have been combined with the General Fund;previously,they were accounted for in separate special revenue funds. Despite physical distancing guidelines and restrictions on large gatherings or events, this revenue has remained relatively unchanged from a budgetary perspective. This is because the City is still in Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 115 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates the process of determining what services might be offered in the new fiscal year as revised guidelines and plans are developed. These revenues and their directly-related expenditures will be reviewed on a quarterly basis to determine any adjustments that are needed to reflect actual services that the City is able to provide. Overall,these newly added revenues represent an increase of$2,860,690 and comprise approximately 39.5% of the total charges for services revenue in the Operating Budget. The revenues discussed above total $120,716,090 and represent 88.2% of the City's Operating Budget and 53.9%of the City's overall budget. Other Funds. Revenues for the other City funds are comprised of various taxes, assessments, charges for services, intergovernmental, and other sources. Special assessments or special taxes are collected for the City's various Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), Street Lighting Districts (SLDs), and various other special districts on individual property tax bills. These property tax revenues total$15,632,230, or 7.0%of the City's overall budget. The amounts of the special assessments and special taxes have been calculated in accordance with the governing regulations and are assessed on a per parcel or per dwelling unit basis. Certain special districts have a provision for an annual CPI increase, but most of the special districts do not have such a provision. All revenues collected are legally restricted for use in the respective special districts only. Additional property tax revenues are reflected in the Fire District Capital Fund in the amount of $7,345,180, or 3.3%, of the City's overall budget. These property tax revenues represent the tax increment that was collected by the Redevelopment Agency in prior years and allocated toward Fire District capital expenditures. These revenues are now distributed directly to the Fire District and will be primarily used for the same capital expenditure purposes. The revenues are allocated between the Fire District General Fund and the Fire Protection Capital Fund. As noted above, a larger share of this revenue source was allocated to the Fire District General Fund for FY 2020/21 than in the prior year to support additional staffing and increased operating costs. Charges for services are received for the City's Municipal Utility, in the amount of$12,870,320, which provides electrical service to a portion of the City and represents 5.7%of the City's overall budget. All charges for services are set by fee resolutions which are approved by the City Council and comply with all State laws regarding fees and taxes including Proposition 26. Intergovernmental revenues include the various State Gas Tax revenues as well as grant income received. The State provides revenue estimates during the City's budget process and grant income is projected based on the amount applied for. Intergovernmental revenues represent$28,291,160, or 12.6%, of the City's overall budget. Other sources of revenue include interest earnings,reimbursements from other funds,and transfers in. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 116 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 117 City of Rancho Cucamonga,California Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Intergovernmental Other Charges for Services 0.16% 4.37% 5.29% Transfer In 2.82 Use of Money&Prop 1.8fi% Fines&Forfeitures 0.84% Licenses&Permits 3.40% Taxes 81.26% Taxes: Property Tax** $ 73,169,310 Sales Tax 28,744,580 Franchise Fees 7,445,070 Transient Occupancy Tax 1,835,530 Admissions Tax 5,320 Subtotal-Taxes 111,199,810 - Licenses&Permits 4,657,080 Fines&Forfeitures 1,143,320 Use of Money& Property 2,544,630 Charges for Services 7,242,270 Intergovernmental 216,130 Other 5,980,790 Transfer In 3,854,480 Total Operating Budget $ 136,838,510 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001),Fire District Operational Funds(Funds 281, 282,and 283), and City Library Fund(Fund 290). **Includes Property Tax In-Lieu of VLF in the amount of$21,079,930 for the City General Fund (Fund 001). Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 118 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND TAXES $ 72,418,240 $ 73,689,370 $ 69,192,630 LICENSES&PERMITS 4,663,050 4,348,120 4,640,580 FINES&FORFEITURES 1,472,772 1,249,420 1,025,320 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 1,154,293 410,330 1,809,650 - CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4,725,687 3,785,440 7,056,870 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 208,152 159,080 216,130 OTHER 3,822,110 2,857,640 3,635,770 TRANSFER IN 11758,800 1,790,870 1,817,550 TOTAL 001-GENERAL FUND $ 90,223,104 $ 88,290,270 $ 89,394,500 _ 281-FIRE FUND TAXES $ 25,836,165 $ 26,438,580 $ 30,468,900 LICENSES&PERMITS 16,141 16,500 16,500 FINES&FORFEITURES 158,624 118,000 118,000 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 1,404,045 490,400 550,640 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 2,448 5,320 1,800 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 10,000 0 0 OTHER 1,503,421 1,572,060 1,566,130 TRANSFER IN 3,230 0 0 TOTAL 281-FIRE FUND $ 28,934,074 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST BSI TAXES $ 6,018,990 $ 5,987,200 $ 6,192,420 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 94,695 43,570 69,900 OTHER (34,630) 0 0 TOTAL 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,079,055 $ 6,030,770 $ 6,262,320 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES $ 1,250,595 $ 428,200 $ 431,090 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY (11) 0 0 TRANSFER IN 1,188,393 1,966,610 2,036,930 TOTAL 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,438,977 $ 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 290-LIBRARY FUND TAXES $ 4,582,639 $ 4,918,300 $ 4,914,770 FINES&FORFEITURES 9,624 0 0 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 238,110 102,740 114,440 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 241,703 202,200 183,600 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 65,403 10,000 0 OTHER 212,798 835,550 778,890 TRANSFER IN 11,428 0 0 TOTAL 290-LIBRARY FUND $ 5,361,705 $ 6,068,790 $ 5,991,700 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 133,036,915 $ 131,425,500 $ 136,838,510 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 119 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 4,607,874 $ 4,838,990 $ 5,190,970 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 171,786 171,880 0 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sac&Unsec 87,287 96,810 94,790 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 51,526 67,200 55,960 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 152,413 144,240 165,520 4106 Property Tmces-Unitary 869,558 863,570 875,930 4107 Property Transfer Tax 1,201,287 1,168,640 1,155,040 4111 Property Tax In-Lieu of VLF 19,347,973 20,193,480 21,079,930 4113 Property Tax-Post RDA Res Blc 2,407,464 2,321,430 2,543,990 4120 Sales and Use Tax 32,188,594 31,965,020 28,190,420 4121 Prop 172-Half Cent Sales Tax 614,778 587,460 554,160 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 4,054,058 4,613,410 1,835,530 4126 Admissions Tax 7,493 5,170 5,320 4130 Franchise Fee-Gas&Electric 2,473,854 2,530,760 2,571,250 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid.Refuse 1,042,374 921,260 1,226,790 4132 Franchise Fee-Comm.Refuse 1,643,901 1,749,060 2,098,990 4133 Franchise Fee-Cable 1,497,023 1,450,990 1,548,040 TOTAL TAXES $ 72,418,243 $ 73,689,370 $ 69,192,630 LICENSES& PERMITS 4201 Business Licenses $ 2,708,314 $ 2,670,440 $ 2,670,440 4207 Building Permits 1,561,294 1,200,000 1,500,000 4208 Bldg Pmt-Strong Motion Fees 167 9,110 0 4209 Mobile Home Permit 5,929 4,120 5,950 4210 Bldg Permits-SB 1473(90%to CA) 872 1,760 840 4215 Animal Licenses 261,469 351,740 351,740 4216 Parking Permits 660 710 400 4220 Other Licenses&Permits 1,135 990 1,960 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 7,860 11,560 11,560 4232 Business Licenses-Penalties 115,350 97,690 97,690 TOTAL LICENSES&PERMITS $ 4,663,050 $ 4,348,120 $ 4,640,580 FINES&FORFEITURES 4302 Parking Citations $ 602,374 $ 563,790 $ 459,470 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 235,585 266,700 135,010 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 6,255 6,840 4,990 4308 General Ordinance Fines 231,415 227,890 214,950 4309 False Alarm Fees 106,625 81,770 63,330 4313 Other Fines&Forfeitures 290,518 102,430 147,570 TOTAL FINES&FORFEITURES S 1,472,772 $ 1,249,420 $ 1,025,320 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 44011nterest Eamings $ 313,317 $ 332,400 $ 304,650 4402 Unrealized Gain 614,357 0 0 4403 Restricted-Interest Earnings 135,147 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 32,056 27,860 28,810 4431 Special Event Rental-ActiveNet 0 0 13,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 120 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019120 2020121 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc:ANet 0 0 1,413,120 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 59,417 50,070 50,070 TOTAL USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY $ 1,154,294 $ 410,330 $ 1,809,650 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees $ 1,031,535 $ 1,030,000 $ 1,287,500 4508 Planning Fees 623,279 750,000 825,000 - 4509 Planning-Special Services Fee 145,209 220,000 220,000 4510 Engineering Fees 2,362,933 1,200,000 1,280,000 4523 Web Sales Fees 0 0 87,080 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 174 0 0 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 514 300 0 4560 Fingerprint Fees 10,678 9,220 10,530 4564 Returned Item Charge 590 860 770 4570 Sale of Printed Material 8,754 9,060 11,380 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 1 0 0 4574 Animal Taxable Sales 6 0 0 4581 Ticket Sales 0 0 862,040 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 0 0 1,882,470 4592 Sale of Tax Items-ActiveNet 0 0 25,350 4596 Advertising Revenue-ActiveNet 0 0 3,750 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 147,057 130,000 130,000 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 13,914 17,000 17,000 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 6,803 9,000 7,000 4634 Animal Impound Fees 22,745 21,000 18,000 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 17,156 15,000 15,000 4638 Microchipping Fee 7,455 7,500 7,500 - 4640 Vaccination Services 6,883 6,500 6,500 4680 Towing Services Agreement Fees 320,000 360,000 360,000 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 4,725,686 $ 3,785,440 $ 7,056,870 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4701 Motor Vehicle In-Lieu Fees $ 84,803 $ 85,840 $ 143,760 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 72,349 73,240 72,370 4740 Grant Income-Other 51,000 0 0 TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL $ 208,152 $ 159,080 $ 216,130 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ 1,611,479 $ 908,230 $ 949,060 4903 Animal Center Contributions 0 0 65,000 4905 Contributions/Fundmising 124,459 125,160 44,000 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 521,848 964,640 1,066,890 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 119,850 42,710 74,900 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 395,834 366,090 376,090 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 810 0 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 848,640 250,000 250,000 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 200,000 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 0 0 226,940 4945 Contrib/Fundraising-ActiveNet 0 0 258,890 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 121 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018119 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet 0 0 124,000 TOTAL OTHER $ 3,822,110 $ 2,857,640 S 3,635,770 TRANSFERIN 8006 Transfer In-Fund 006 $ 71,850 $ 64,720 $ 90,510 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 108,270 0 0 8188 Transfer In-Fund 188 188,420 218,390 218,390 8705 Transfer In-Municipal Utility 1,390,260 1,507,760 1,508,650 TOTAL TRANSFER IN S 1,758,800 $ 1,790,870 $ 1,817,550 TOTAL 001-GENERAL FUND S 90,223,107 $ 88,290,270 $ 89,394,500 281 -FIRE FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec S 17,425,860 $ 18,305,650 S 18,925,460 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 649,653 650,210 705,560 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 337,542 366,430 366,590 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 105,033 144,340 114,070 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 570,117 529,260 619,180 4106 Property Taxes-Unitary 621,930 623,710 666,640 4110 Homeowners Exemption 168,285 168,280 165,690 4112 Property Tax-Post RDA 5,957,845 5,650,700 8,905,710 TOTAL TAXES S 25,836,165 $ 26,438,580 $ 30,468,900 LICENSES&PERMITS 4211 Fire Permits $ 16,141 $ 16,500 $ 16,500 TOTAL LICENSES&PERMITS $ 16,141 $ 16,500 $ 16,500 FINES&FORFEITURES 4309 False Alarm Fees $ 20,248 $ 20,000 $ 20,000 4313 Other Fines&Forfeitures 58,450 8,000 8,000 4316 Weed Abatement 79,926 90,000 90,000 TOTAL FINES& FORFEITURES $ 158,624 $ 118,000 S 118,000 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 435,614 $ 382,940 $ 444,870 4402 Unrealized Gain 460,562 0 0 4403 Restricted-Interest Earnings 378,740 0 0 4419 Other Rentat'Lease Income 127,809 107,460 105,770 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 1,321 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY $ 1,404,046 $ 490,400 $ 550,640 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees $ 0 $ 1,000 $ 100 4546 FSD Fees 0 140 0 4548 D.U.I.Recovery 0 280 100 4549 Hazmat Recovery 0 900 100 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees 2,448 3,000 1,500 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 122 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 2,448 $ 5,320 $ 1,800 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 10,000 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL $ 10,000 $ 0 $ 0 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ (115,899) $ 10,600 $ 8,800 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 5,691 0 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 860,923 706,800 570,000 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 749,647 851,260 981,290 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 3,733 3,400 6,040 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (674) 0 0 TOTAL OTHER $ 1,503,421 $ 1,572,060 $ 1,566,130 TRANSFERIN 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin $ 3,230 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 3,230 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 281-FIRE FUND $ 28,934,075 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 5,975,703 $ 5,959,650 $ 6,181,280 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 6,253 7,550 6,700 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 37,034 20,000 4,440 TOTAL TAXES $ 6,018,990 $ 5,987,200 $ 6,192,420 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 53,590 $ 43,570 $ 69,900 4402 Unrealized Gain 41,106 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY $ 94,696 $ 43,570 $ 69,900 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ (34,630) $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL OTHER $ (34,630) $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,079,056 $ 6,030,770 $ 6,262,320 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 1,230,620 $ 410,150 $ 410,700 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 14,774 13,420 16,050 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/int. 5,201 4,630 4,340 TOTAL TAXES $ 1,250,595 $ 429,200 $ 431,090 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 4402 Unrealized Gain $ (11) $ 0 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page I23 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY $ (11) $ 0 $ 0 TRANSFERIN 8281 Transfer In-Fire Fund $ 1,188,393 $ 1,966,610 $ 2,036,930 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 1,188,393 $ 1,966,610 $ 2,036,930 TOTAL 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,438,977 S 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 290-LIBRARY FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 4,216,415 $ 4,540,760 $ 4,529,110 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 94,301 98,730 102,420 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 47,916 55,610 52,040 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 83,666 82,860 90,860 4113 Property Tax-Post RDA Res Blc 140,340 140,340 140,340 TOTAL TAXES $ 4,582,639 $ 4,918,300 $ 4,914,770 FINES&FORFEITURES 4312 Library Fines and Fees $ 9,624 $ 0 $ 0 - TOTAL FINES&FORFEITURES $ 9,624 $ 0 $ 0 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings It 120,312 $ 92,740 $ 109,440 4402 Unrealized Gain 108,498 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 9,300 10,000 5,000 TOTAL USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY $ 238,110 $ 102,740 $ 114,440 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4512 Library Card&Merohndse Sales $ 4,748 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 4515 Interlibrary Loan(ILL) 126 100 0 4565 Passport Processing Fees 137,093 120,000 120,000 4567 Passport Photo Fees 23,594 20,000 20,000 4570 Sale of Printed Material 26,212 24,000 24,000 4575 Exhibit Sales 21,000 15,000 6,500 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 10,309 6,600 300 4690 Contract Classes-Library 15,343 10,000 5,000 4691 Program Revenue-Library, 3,279 1,500 2,800 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 241,704 $ 202,200 $ 183,600 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 65,403 $ 10,000 $ 0 TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL $ 65,403 $ 10,000 $ 0 DIRER 4901 Other Revenue $ 48,101 $ 125,940 $ 50,420 4907 Private Contributions Library 127,000 140,000 130,000 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 33,800 554,610 574,610 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 2 0 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 6,731 15,000 15,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 124 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 456 0 460 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (3,292) 0 8,400 TOTAL OTHER $ 212,798 $ 835,550 $ 778,890 TRANSFERIN 8291 Transfer In-CA State Library $ 11,428 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 11,428 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 290-LIBRARY FUND $ 5,361,705 $ 6,068,790 $ 5,991,700 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 133,036,920 $ 131,425,500 $ 136,838,510 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 125 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Revenue Summary by Category AB Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Development Fees Other 2.289% 3.29% Transfer In 4.3T% Intergovernmental 12.64 Charges for Services 9.95% Use of Money& Property 3.96% Fines&Forfeitures 0.57 Licenses&Permits 2.19% Taxes $ 135,930,110 Licenses &Permits 4,909,400 Fines &Forfeitures 1,269,200 Use of Money&Property 8,865,720 Charges for Services 22,264,640 Intergovernmental 28,291,160 Development Fees 5,104,910 Other 7,355,080 Transfer In 9,782,700 Total All Funds Budget $223,772,920 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 126 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA TAXES $ 93,191,078 $ 95,019,340 $ 91,492,520 LICENSES&PERMITS 4,899,332 4,606,880 4,892,900 FINES&FORFEITURES 1,679,094 1,495,680 1,151,200 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 15,541,344 7,067,570 7,575,930 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 21,806,178 23,510,950 22,262,340 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 16,440,611 67,939,860 28,291,160 DEVELOPMENTFEES 14,036,500 4,457,340 5,104,910 OTHER 8,252,072 5,424,130 5,771,950 TRANSFERIN 9,735,427 9,292,090 7,745,770 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 185,581,636 $ 218,813,840 $ 174,288,680 R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TAXES $ 42,000,893 $ 42,612,430 $ 44,437,590 LICENSES&PERMITS 16,141 16,500 16,500 FINES&FORFEITURES 158,624 118,000 118,000 USE OF MONEY&PROPERTY 2,375,973 1,072,630 1,289,790 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 2,740 5,820 2,300 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 10,000 0 0 OTHER 1,598,808 1,589,060 1,583,130 TRANSFER IN 1,191,623 1,966,610 2,036,930 TOTAL B.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 47,354,802 $ 47,381,050 S 49,484,240 TOTAL ALL FUNDS BUDGET $ 232,936,438 $ 266,194,890 $ 223,772,920 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 127 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001-GENERAL FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 4,607,874 $ 4,838,990 $ 5,190,970 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 171,786 171,880 0 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec& Unsec 87,287 96,810 94,790 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 51,526 67,200 55,960 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 152,413 144,240 165,520 4106 Property Taxes-Unitary 868,558 863,570 875,930 4107 Property Transfer Tax 1,201,287 1,168,640 1,155,040 41I t Property Tax In-Lieu of VLF 19,347,973 20,193,480 21,079,930 4113 Property Tax-Post RDA Res Blc 2,407,464 2,321,430 2,543,990 4120 Sales and Use Tax 32,188,594 31,965,020 28,190,420 4121 Prop 172-Half Cent Sales Tax 614,778 587,460 554,160 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 4,054,058 4,613,410 1,835,530 4126 Admissions Tax 7,493 5,170 5,320 4130 Franchise Fee-Gas&Electric 2,473,854 2,530,760 2,571,250 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid.Refuse 1,042,374 921,260 1,226,790 4132 Franchise Fee-Comm.Refuse 1,643,901 1,749,060 2,098,990 4133 Franchise Fee-Cable 1,497,023 1,450,990 1,548,040 4201 Business Licenses 2,708,314 2,670,440 2,670,440 4207 Building Permits 1,561,294 1,200,000 1,500,000 4208 Bldg Pmt-Strong Motion Fees 167 9,110 0 4209 Mobile Home Permit 5,929 4,120 5,950 4210 Bldg Permits-SB 1473(90%to CA) 872 1,760 840 4215 Animal Licenses 261,469 351,740 351,740 4216 Parking Permits 660 710 400 4220 Other Licenses&Permits 1,135 990 1,960 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 7,860 11,560 11,560 4232 Business Licenses-Penalties 115,350 97,690 97,690 4302 Parking Citations 602,374 563,790 459,470 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 235,585 266,700 135,010 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 6,255 6,840 4,990 4308 General Ordinance Fines 231,415 227,890 214,950 4309 False Alarm Fees 106,625 81,770 63,330 4313 Other Fines&Forfeitures 290,518 102,430 147,570 4401 Interest Earnings 313,317 332,400 304,650 4402 Unrealized Gain 614,357 0 0 4403 Restricted-Interest Earnings 135,147 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 32,056 27,860 28,810 4431 Special Event Rental-ActiveNet 0 0 13,000 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 0 0 1,413,120 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 59,417 50,070 50,070 4501 Plan Check Fees 1,031,535 1,030,000 1,287,500 4508 Planning Fees 623,279 750,000 825,000 4509 Planning-Special Services Fee 145,209 220,000 220,000 4510 Engineering Fees 2,362,933 1,200,000 1,280,000 4523 Web Sales Fees 0 0 87,080 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 174 0 0 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 514 300 0 Fiscal Year 202o/2i Adopted Budget Page 128 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4560 Fingerprint Fees 10,678 9,220 10,530 4564 Returned Item Charge 590 860 770 4570 Sale of Printed Material 8,754 9,060 11,380 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 1 0 0 4574 Animal Taxable Sales 6 0 0 4581 Ticket Sales 0 0 862,040 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 0 0 1,882,470 4592 Sale of Tax Items-ActiveNet 0 0 25,350 4596 Advertising Revenue-ActiveNet 0 0 3,750 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 147,057 130,000 130,000 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 13,914 17,000 17,000 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 6,803 9,000 7,000 4634 Animal Impound Fees 22,745 21,000 18,000 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 17,156 15,000 15,000 4638 Microchipping Fee 7,455 7,500 7,500 4640 Vaccination Services 6,883 6,500 6,500 4680 Towing Services Agreement Fees 320,000 360,000 360,000 4701 Motor Vehicle In-Lieu Fees 84,803 85,840 143,760 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 72,349 73,240 72,370 4740 Grant Income-Other 51,000 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 1,611,479 908,230 949,060 4903 Animal Center Contributions 0 0 65,000 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 124,459 125,160 44,000 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 521,948 964,640 1,066,890 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 119,850 42,710 74,900 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 395,834 366,090 376,090 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 810 0 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 848,640 250,000 250,000 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 200,000 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 0 0 226,940 4945 Contrib/Fundraising-ActiveNet 0 0 258,890 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet 0 0 124,000 8006 Transfer In-Fund 006 71,850 64,720 90,510 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 108,270 0 0 8188 Transfer In-Fund 188 188,420 218,390 218,390 8705 Transfer In-Municipal Utility 1,390,260 1,507,760 1,508,650 TOTAL 001-GENERAL FUND $ 90,223,107 $ 88,290,270 $ 89,394,500 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 4303 Parking Cit Surcharge-State $ 7,452 $ 12,020 $ 5,090 4304 Parking Cit Surchrge-County 5,074 9,100 5,130 4305 Parking Cit Surcharge-Cnty Crt 22,870 36,560 13,930 4402 Unrealized Gain 432 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 133,508 104,800 87,180 TOTAL 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 169,336 $ 162,480 $ 111,330 006-CV WD REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 15,231 $ 0 $ 0 4518 General Plan Update Fee (20) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2O2o/2i Adopted Budget Page 129 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 387,448 463,500 443,900 4901 Other Revenue (118) 0 0 - TOTAL 006-CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS S 402,541 $ 463,500 $ 443,900 008-CNTY OF S.B.REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain S 428 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 008-CNTY OF S.B.REIMEURSEMENTS S 428 $ 0 $ 0 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 49,190 $ 47,630 $ 100,220 4402 Unrealized Gain 36,274 0 0 4518 General Plan Update Fee 124,806 53,790 263,860 4901 Other Revenue (2,397) 0 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 156,432 0 0 TOTAL 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND $ 364,305 $ 101,420 $ 364,080 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 160,316 $ 150,930 $ 186,530 4402 Unrealized Gain 138,627 0 0 TOTAL 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE $ 298,943 $ 150,930 $ 186,530 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 4301 Vehicle Code Fines $ 161,302 $ 188,580 $ 101,730 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 210,460 220,160 10,270 TOTAL 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY $ 371,762 $ 408,740 $ 112,000 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT 4519 Information Technology Revenue 67,338 0 0 TOTAL 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT $ 67,338 S 0 $ 0 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 23,487 $ 24,700 $ 33,190 4402 Unrealized Gain 11,990 0 0 4517 Technology Fee-Permit 314,027 287,180 265,400 8019 Transfer In-Fund 019 1,063,222 0 0 TOTAL 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 1,412,726 $ 311,880 $ 298,590 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 4218 Mobile Home Lot Fees-City $ 14,916 $ 14,910 $ 14,910 4219 Mobile Home Lot Fees-State 3,150 3,150 16,710 4401 Interest Earnings 2,823 2,780 3,380 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,606 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 1,120 1,120 1,120 TOTAL 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM $ 24,615 $ 21,960 $ 36,120 023-SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,376 $ 1,390 $ 2,260 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,005 0 0 4650 SB1186 Cen Access Spec Prog 40,392 18,550 40,390 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 130 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019120 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 023-SB1196 CERT ACCESS SPEC FROG $ 42,773 $ 19,940 $ 42,650 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,091,074 $ 1,023,970 $ 1,155,040 4402 Unrealized Gain 736,060 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 276,535 0 50,210 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 0 0 75,000 4923 Misc.Other Financing Sources 234,483 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 1,140,000 1,175,000 725,000 8151 Transfer In-Fund 151 35,080 0 0 8152 Transfer In-Fund 152 42,100 0 0 8153 Transfer In-Fund 153 15,980 0 0 8154 Transfer In-Fund 154 10,090 0 0 8155 Transfer In-Fund 155 3,620 0 0 8156 Transfer In-Fund 156 5,720 0 0 8157 Transfer In-Fund 157 11,560 0 0 8158 Transfer In-Fund 158 850 0 0 TOTAL 025-CAPITAL RESERVE $ 3,603,152 $ 2,198,970 $ 2,005,250 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 58,046 $ 60,210 $ 50,080 4402 Unrealized Gain 33,478 0 0 TOTAL 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY $ 91,524 $ 60,210 $ 50,080 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 4401 Interest Earnings $ 15,861 $ 12,130 $ 9,920 4402 Unrealized Gain 13,792 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 879,833 1,007,120 1,009,520 TOTAL 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 909,486 $ 1,019,250 $ 1,019,440 101-AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 5,304 $ 210 $ 3,260 4402 Unrealized Gain 144 0 0 TOTAL 101-AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER $ 5,448 $ 210 $ 3,260 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 15,662 $ 16,610 $ 15,790 4402 Unrealized Gain 20,919 0 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 556,075 541,600 238,130 TOTAL 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT $ 592,656 $ 558,210 $ 253,920 106-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT 4740 Gram Income-Other $ 0 $ 0 $ 30,000 TOTAL 106-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT $ 0 $ 0 $ 30,000 109-PUBLIC ART TRUST FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,760 TOTAL 109-PUBLIC ART TRUST FUND $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,760 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 131 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 110-BEAUTIFICATION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 18,218 $ 16,560 $ 14,750 4402 Unrealized Gain 18,010 0 0 4801 Beautification Fees 10,963 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 93,407 0 0 TOTAL 110-BEAUTIFICATION $ 140,598 $ 16,560 $ 14,750 111-PARK LAND ACQUISITION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 39,035 $ 35,980 $ 70,940 4402 Unrealized Gain 25,178 0 0 4818 Park Land Acq Impact Fee 1,537,674 250,000 700,000 TOTAL 111-PARK LAND ACQUISITION $ 1,601,887 $ 285,980 $ 770,940 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 4401 Interest Earnings $ 57,911 $ 59,490 $ 73,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 53,230 0 0 4806 Storm Drain Fees 753,875 100,000 100,000 4901 Other Revenue 5,102 0 0 TOTAL 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL $ 870,118 $ 159,490 $ 173,000 113-COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 14,292 $ 15,440 $ 26,570 4402 Unrealized Gain 9,566 0 0 4822 Community/Rec Ctr Impact Fee 543,520 310,730 310,730 TOTAL113-COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT $ 567,378 $ 326,170 $ 337,300 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 6,184 $ 7,950 $ 5,280 4402 Unrealized Gain 6,833 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 16,848 0 0 TOTAL 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 29,865 $ 7,950 $ 5,280 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 16,643 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ 16,643 $ 0 $ 0 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 34,894 $ 37,250 $ 39,510 4402 Unrealized Gain 35,300 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 19,224 0 0 TOTAL 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 89,418 $ 37,250 $ 39,510 118-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 9,868 $ 10,700 $ 11,860 4402 Unrealized Gain 9,817 0 0 TOTAL IIS-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 19,685 $ 10,700 $ 11,860 119-PARK IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 20,949 $ 20,200 $ 36,330 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 132 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019120 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 14,015 0 0 4819 Park Improvement Impact Fee 796,949 200,000 200,000 TOTAL 119-PARK IMPROVEMENT $ 831,913 $ 220,200 $ 236,330 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 131,635 $ 145,780 $ 160,580 4402 Unrealized Gain 141,111 0 0 4800 Park Development Fees 97,438 0 0 TOTAL 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 370,184 $ 145,780 $ 160,580 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 16,575 $ 16,160 $ 21,650 4402 Unrealized Gain 15,089 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 188,100 0 0 TOTAL 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 219,764 $ 16,160 $ 21,650 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 9,977 S 10,720 $ 15,550 4402 Unrealized Gain 8,299 0 0 4814 Library Impact Fee 196,042 107,080 107,080 TOTAL 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE $ 214,318 $ 117,800 $ 122,630 124-TRANSPORTATION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 573,747 $ 492,590 $ 603,270 4402 Unrealized Gain 434,773 0 0 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 332,553 0 0 4820 Regional Transportation Fee 3,532,553 1,250,000 1,250,000 4821 Local Transportation Fee 5,788,167 2,000,000 2,000,000 4901 Other Revenue 9,175 0 0 TOTAL 124-TRANSPORTATION $ 10,670,968 $ 3,742,590 $ 3,853,270 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,023 $ 2,220 $ 3,050 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,669 0 0 4815 Animal Center Impact Fee 32,014 23,100 23,100 TOTAL 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE $ 35,706 $ 25,320 $. 26,150 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 10,450 $ 11,370 $ 12,600 4402 Unrealized Gain 10,440 0 0 TOTAL 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 20,890 $ 11,370 $ 12,600 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,903 $ 8,570 $ 11,930 4402 Unrealized Gain 6,135 0 0 4816 Police Impact Fee 152,816 102,000 102,000 TOTAL 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE $ 166,854 $ 110,570 $ 113,930 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACII.. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 133 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings $ 11,677 $ 12,690 $ 14,060 4402 Unrealized Gain 11,684 0 0 TOTAL 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACIL. $ 23,361 $ 12,690 $ 14,060 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 4401 Interest Earnings $ 201,952 $ 198,180 $ 219,590 4402 Unrealized Gain 182,728 0 0 4813 Underground Utilities Fee 145,322 90,000 90,000 TOTAL 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES $ 530,002 $ 288,180 $ 309,590 130-LMD#1 GENERAL CITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 1,236,255 $ 1,232,960 $ 1,235,240 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 8,309 11,900 10,200 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,462 2,000 2,870 4401 Interest Earnings 25,509 21,330 29,550 4402 Unrealized Gain 26,393 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 28,254 24,910 27,070 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 3,475 4,450 4,500 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 0 1,000 280 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 10,160 22,290 10,500 4901 Other Revenue (6,222) 100 100 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 20 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 135,820 135,830 36,300 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 2,710 TOTAL 130-LMD#1 GENERAL CITY $ 1,470,435 $ 1,456,770 $ 1,359,320 131-LMD#2 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 3,502,770 $ 3,522,770 $ 3,695,760 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 19,449 29,730 19,520 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,679 5,000 5,000 4401 Interest Earnings 68,615 52,770 71,600 4402 Unrealized Gain 11,981 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 820 2,000 1,800 4901 Other Revenue 1,526 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 299,540 324,860 314,280 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 15,350 0 0 TOTAL 131-LMD#2 VICTORIA $ 3,983,730 $ 3,937,130 $ 4,107,960 132-LMD 0A HYSSOP 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 3,724 $ 3,690 $ 3,690 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 207 0 0 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 30 0 0 4401 Interest Earnings 582 590 630 4402 Unrealized Gain 620 0 0 TOTAL 132-LMD 0A HYSSOP $ 5,163 $ 4,280 $ 4,320 133-LMD#311 MEDIANS 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 813,227 $ 805,860 $ 907,690 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 12,194 9,730 10,420 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 134 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020121 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,903 970 1,210 4216 Parking Permits 217,512 240,000 220,000 4401 Interest Earnings 37,312 36,580 44,140 4402 Unrealized Gain 37,172 0 0 4901 Other Revenue (4,044) 340 340 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 2,830 0 0 TOTAL 133-LMD#311 MEDIANS $ 1,118,106 $ 1,093,480 $ 1,083,800 134-LMD#4R TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 2,731,859 $ 2,779,600 $ 2,779,590 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 6,858 12,500 8,630 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,694 1,250 2,110 4401 Interest Earnings 104,827 93,040 121,820 4402 Unrealized Gain 100,855 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 419 2,080 770 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 26 500 150 4901 Other Revenue (973) 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 10,100 0 0 TOTAL 134-LMD#4R TERRA VISTA $ 2,955,665 $ 2,888,970 $ 2,913,070 135-LMD#5 ANDOVER 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 2,493 $ 2,470 $ 2,470 4401 Interest Earnings 528 550 550 4402 Unrealized Gain 568 0 0 TOTAL 135-LMD#5 ANDOVER $ 3,589 $ 3,020 $ 3,020 136-LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 505,767 $ 519,920 $ 535,960 4103 Property Taxes-PY See&Unsec 4,373 3,500 3,970 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,175 350 1,600 4401 Interest Earnings 10,639 9,430 12,820 4402 Unrealized Gain 10,241 0 0 4901 Other Revenue (553) 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 60,370 41,090 39,010 TOTAL 136-LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY $ 592,012 $ 574,290 $ 593,360 137-LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec[Unsec $ 937,414 $ 937,780 $ 937,780 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 10,142 9,610 10,300 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,150 2,250 2,640 4401 Interest Earnings 22,323 18,500 23,360 4402 Unrealized Gain 22,773 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 45,475 25,660 48,630 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 1,590 540 1,500 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 2,884 5,590 3,300 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 6,870 0 0 8868 Transfer In-Fund 868 30,000 0 0 TOTAL 137-LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 1,082,621 $ 999,930 $ 1,027,510 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 135 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adapted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 138-LMD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 34,109 $ 33,920 $ 33,920 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 607 350 310 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 478 30 20 4401 Interest Earnings 1,235 1,220 1,450 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,207 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 400 0 0 TOTAL 138-LMD#8 SOUTH ETFWANDA $ 38,036 $ 35,520 $ 35,700 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Umec $ 510,574 $ 668,730 $ 939,690 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 702 1,000 860 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 101 380 320 4401 Interest Earnings 21,741 16,940 20,640 4402 Unrealized Gain 22,695 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 3,088 2,000 2,900 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 3 500 150 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 4,040 0 0 TOTAL 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA $ 562,944 $ 689,550 $ 964,560 140.LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 575,667 $ 573,200 $ 590,390 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 5,796 5,500 5,000 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,410 1,250 2,070 4401 Interest Earnings 21,890 19,870 23,320 4402 Unrealized Gain 21,680 0 0 4419 Other Rentat/Lease Income 27,203 7,500 25,050 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 153 4,740 230 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 0 2,000 250 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 3,888 7,030 3,900 4901 Other Revenue 0 3,500 3,500 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 669 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 2,020 0 0 TOTAL 140-LMD 410 RANCHO ETIWANDA $ 661,376 $ 624,590 $ 653,710 141-LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 3,676 $ 3,890 $ 6,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,981 0 0 8130 Transfer In-Fund 130 90,000 90,000 90,000 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 810 TOTAL 141-LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 96,657 $ 93,890 $ 96,810 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 30 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,396 0 0 4923 Misc.Other Financing Sources 89,651 0 0 8151 Transfer In-Fund 151 40,536 112,200 113,200 8152 Transfer In-Fund 152 39,270 109,840 110,860 8153 Transfer In-Fund 153 15,201 43,550 43,960 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 136 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 8154 Transfer In-Fund 154 7,601 20,220 20,410 8155 Transfer In-Fund 155 3,800 9,600 9,690 8156 Transfer In-Fund 156 5,067 15,030 15,170 8157 Transfer In-Fund 157 11,401 30,430 30,720 8158 Transfer In-Fund 158 3,800 10,720 10,820 TOTAL 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS $ 217,723 $ 351,620 $ 354,830 151-SLD#1 ARTERIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 809,659 $ 811,300 $ 820,470 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 5,345 5,500 5,710 4104 Property Taxes-PenaltiesMt. 1,353 1,250 1,550 4401 Interest Earnings 14,165 11,530 13,240 4402 Unrealized Gain 9,123 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 25 1,000 0 4901 Other Revenue 210,179 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 70,300 0 0 TOTAL 151-SLD#1 ARTERIAL $ 1,120,149 $ 830,580 S 840,970 152-SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 372,060 $ 371,420 $ 372,410 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 2,778 3,480 3,050 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 851 550 970 4402 Unrealized Gain 13,654 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 0 1,000 0 4901 Other Revenue 198,864 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 188,420 284,250 317,330 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 16,560 0 0 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 1,900 TOTAL 152-SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL $ 793,187 $ 660,700 $ 695,660 153-SLD#3 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY SeclUnsec $ 353,702 $ 355,500 $ 377,600 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 1,922 3,510 2,040 4104 Property Taxes-PenaltiesMt. 366 350 530 4401 Interest Earnings 24,616 25,730 30,060 4402 Unrealized Gain 22,926 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 75,881 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 15,760 0 0 TOTAL 153-SLD#3 VICTORIA $ 495,173 $ 385,090 $ 410,230 154-SLD#4 TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 163,308 $ 164,740 $ 164,740 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 440 1,600 570 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Inn. 102 160 150 4401 Interest Earnings 11,452 17,770 12,360 4402 Unrealized Gain 10,759 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 35,736 0 0 9100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 10,100 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 137 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2019/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 154-SLD#4 TERRA VISTA $ 231,897 $ 184,270 $ 177,820 155-SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 43,696 $ 43,710 $ 43,710 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 384 440 370 4104 Properly Taxes-PenaltiesMt. 104 70 160 4901 Other Revenue 17,209 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 3,230 0 0 TOTAL 155-SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY $ 64,623 $ 44,220 $ 44,240 156-SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 133,130 $ 132,530 $ 133,100 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 1,875 750 1,600 4104 Property Taxes-PenaltiesMt 291 130 370 4401 Interest Earnings 7,792 8,020 9,150 4402 Unrealized Gain 7,636 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 71 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 24,945 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 2,420 0 0 TOTAL 156-SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA $ 178,160 $ 141,430 $ 144,220 157-SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Properly Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 128,637 $ 128,590 $ 128,590 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 1,395 1,300 1,890 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 469 400 410 4401 Interest Earnings 3,029 2,380 2,770 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,020 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 52,731 0 0 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 62,590 83,920 89,100 TOTAL 157-SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 250,871 $ 216,590 $ 222,760 158-SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 70,599 $ 70,490 $ 70,490 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 309 700 550 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 169 100 190 4401 Interest Earnings 34,792 37,340 41,170 4402 Unrealized Gain 34,583 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 0 430 0 4901 Other Revenue 16,913 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dig Admin 4,040 0 0 TOTAL 158-SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 161,405 $ 109,060 $ 112,400 174-STATE GAS TAX 4401 Interest Earnings $ 157,256 $ 151,370 $ 172,600 4402 Unrealized Gain 144,186 0 0 4720 Gas Tax 2105-Prop 111 969,327 981,180 950,990 4721 State Gas Tax-2106 616,515 608,380 587,830 4722 State Gas Tax-2107 1,219,035 1,281,500 1,144,040 4723 State Gas Tax-2107.5 10,000 10,000 10,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 138 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4725 Gas Tax R&T7360 590,212 1,521,640 1,515,890 4727 State GF Loan Repmt-HUTA 199,233 199,240 0 4745 Other IntergoVd Reimbursemnt 7,036 0 0 8006 Transfer In-Fund 006 0 150,000 0 TOTAL 174-STATE GAS TAX $ 3,912,800 $ 4,903,310 $ 4,381,350 176-MEASURE 11990-2010 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,683 $ 5,650 $ 5,520 4402 Unrealized Gain 7,881 0 0 TOTAL 176-MEASURE I 1990-2010 $ 15,564 $ 5,650 $ 5,520 177-MEASURE 12010-2040 4401 Interest Earnings $ 65,053 $ 44,720 $ 42,660 4402 Unrealized Gain 59,271 0 0 4715 Measure I Local St Allotment 3,072,750 3,016,420 2,617,900 4901 Other Revenue 124,040 0 0 TOTAL 177-MEASURE 12010-2040 $ 3,321,114 $ 3,061,140 $ 2,660,560 178-SB 140 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 576 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 178-SB 140 $ 576 $ 0 $ 0 179-ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 27,495 $ 14,770 $ 57,240 4402 Unrealized Gain 13,403 0 0 4726 Road Maint&Rehab Acct Rev 2,965,347 2,903,570 3,083,490 TOTAL 179-ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT $ 3,006,245 $ 2,918,340 $ 3,140,730 181-SR 1-TCEP 4740 Grant Income-Other 1,386,985 52,150,000 0 4760 Grant Income-State 0 0 11,000,650 TOTAL 181-SB 1-TCEP $ 1,386,985 $ 52,150,000 $ 11,000,650 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 4,975 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF $ 4,975 $ 0 $ 0 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 4134 Integrated Waste Mgmt Fee 1,343,239 1,335,170 1,662,890 4220 Other Licenses&Permits 704 700 700 4401 Interest Earnings 64,674 59,710 65,760 4402 Unrealized Gain 54,203 0 0 4590 Administrative Fee-C&D Program 25,650 40,000 40,000 4901 Other Revenue 57,159 100,000 100,000 TOTAL 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT $ 1,545,628 $ 1,535,580 $ 1,869,350 194-PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING 4401 Interest Earnings $ 4,162 $ 4,540 $ 5,030 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,167 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 139 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adapted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 194-PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING $ 8,329 $ 4,540 $ 5,030 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,146 $ 1,320 $ 950 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,188 0 0 TOTAL 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 2,334 $ 1,320 $ 950 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 4401 Interest Earnings $ 91 $ 60 $ 130 4402 Unrealized Gain 96 0 0 TOTAL 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 187 $ 60 $ 130 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 4401 Interest Earnings $ 439,654 $ 441,550 $ 458,200 4402 Unrealized Gain 418,795 0 0 4745 Other Intergov'd Reimbursemat 873,782 1,250,000 900,000 48091n Lieu Fees 188,292 0 0 4823 Traffic Mitigation Fee 0 2,000 2,000 4901 Other Revenue 1,565 0 0 TOTAL 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE E%1PRV $ 1,922,088 $ 1,693,550 $ 1,360,200 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 5,493 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 1,312,471 1,290,010 1,290,010 4741 Program Income 45,101 150,000 150,000 TOTAL 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRIST $ 1,363,065 $ 1,440,010 $ 1,440,010 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 4401 Interest Earnings $ 355 $ 0 $ 1,070 4402 Unrealized Gain 188 0 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 5,214 0 0 TOTAL 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 5,757 $ 0 $ 1,070 211-PROP IB-SLPP 4401 Interest Earnings $ 45 $ 0 $ 70 4402 Unrealized Gain 48 0 0 TOTAL 211-PROP 1B-SLPP $ 93 $ 0 $ 70 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 4740 Grant Income,Other $ 36,838 $ 451,000 $ 401,200 TOTAL 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANTART 3 $ 36,838 $ 451,000 $ 401,200 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 4 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 33,490 9,730 14,730 49010ther Revenue (1,000) 0 0 4905 Contributions/Fundmising 600 9,510 9,510 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 543 360 360 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 140 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020121 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC $ 33,637 $ 19,600 $ 24,600 225-CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 378 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 103,907 59,390 59,860 TOTAL 225-CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GENT $ 104,285 $ 59,390 $ 59,860 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 365 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT $ 365 $ 0 $ 0 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 4401 Interest Earnings $ 374 $ 600 $ 560 4402 Unrealized Gain 852 0 0 4740 Grad Income-Other 89,094 48,830 48,830 TOTAL 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM $ 90,320 $ 49,430 $ 49,390 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 38,062 $ 118,900 $ 90,800 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 65,000 0 0 TOTAL 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM $ 103,062 $ 118,900 $ 90,800 239-FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREEER 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 192 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 239-FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIER $ 192 $ 0 $ 0 250-RECREATION SERVICES 4401 Interest Earnings $ 43,387 $ 37,600 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 45,610 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 1,471 725,370 0 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 796,310 0 0 4520 Recreation Fees 49,545 1,816,400 0 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 0 28,000 0 4581 Ticket Sales 45,861 44,550 0 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 1,733,594 0 0 4592 Sale of Tax Items-ActiveNet 20,747 0 0 4901 Otter Revenue 12,507 183,060 0 4905 Contributions/Fundmising 122,211 130,880 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements (93) 0 0 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 119,662 0 0 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (28,409) 0 0 TOTAL 250-RECREATION SERVICES $ 2,962,403 $ 2,965,860 $ 0 255-VG CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 13,677 $ 13,960 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 11,742 0 0 4419 Other Remal/Lease Income 4,706 464,050 0 4439 Other Renud/Lease Inc:ANet 399,972 0 0 4520 Recreation Fees 0 41,550 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 141 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4522 Processing Fees 45,939 85,000 0 4523 Web Sales Fees 47,322 0 0 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 974 650 0 4581 Ticket Sales 871,146 835,890 0 4586 Advertising Revenue 2,400 5,000 0 4588 Theatre Rental Ticket Sales 73,495 0 0 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 36,350 0 0 4592 Sale of Tax Items-ActiveNet (224) 0 0 4596 Advertising Revenue-ActiveNet 5,250 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 54,831 42,500 0 4905 Contributions/Fundmising 75,667 126,700 0 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 35,460 0 0 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (4,315) 0 0 TOTAL 255-VG CULTURAL CENTER $ 1,674,392 $ 1,615,300 $ 0 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 40 $ 50 4740 Grant Income-Other 2,148 0 0 TOTAL 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS $ 2,148 $ 40 $ 50 274-STATE GRANTS FUND 4760 Grant Income-State 0 0 2,686,760 TOTAL 274-STATE GRANTS FUND $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,686,760 290-LIBRARY FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 4,216,415 $ 4,540,760 $ 4,529,110 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 94,301 98,730 102,420 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 47,916 55,610 52,040 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 83,666 82,860 90,860 4113 Property Tax-Post RDA Res Blc 140,340 140,340 140,340 4312 Library Fines and Fees 9,624 0 0 4401 Interest Earnings 120,312 92,740 109,440 4402 Unrealized Gain 108,498 0 0 4419 Other Remal/Lease Income 9,300 10,000 5,000 4512 Library Card&Merchndse Sales 4,748 5,000 5,000 4515 Interlibrary Loan(ILL) 126 100 0 4565 Passport Processing Fees 137,093 120,000 120,000 4567 Passport Photo Fees 23,594 20,000 20,000 4570 Sale of Printed Material 26,212 24,000 24,000 4575 Exhibit Sales 21,000 15,000 6,500 4591 Recreation Fees-ActiveNet 10,309 6,600 300 4690 Contract Classes-Library, 15,343 10,000 5,000 4691 Program Revenue-Library 3,279 1,500 2,800 4740 Grant Income-Other 65,403 10,000 0 4901 Other Revenue 48,101 125,940 50,420 4907 Private Contributions Library 127,000 140,000 130,000 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 33,800 554,610 574,610 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 2 0 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 6,731 15,000 15,000 Fiscal Year 202o/21 Adopted Budget Page 142 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2019/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 456 0 460 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (3,292) 0 8,400 8291 Transfer In-CA State Library 11,428 0 0 TOTAL 290-LIBRARY FUND $ 5,361,705 $ 6,068,790 $ 5,991,700 291-CA STATE LIBRARY 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 2,394 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 123,968 21,130 20,000 TOTAL 291-CA STATE LIBRARY $ 126,362 $ 21,130 $ 20,000 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) 4401 Interest Earnings $ 4,244 $ 4,610 $ 5,080 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,307 0 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 251,102 2,920 0 TOTAL 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) $ 259,653 $ 7,530 $ 5,080 301-THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 572 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other (522) 0 0 TOTAL 301-THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT $ 50 $ 0 $ 0 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 620 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT $ 620 $ 0 $ 0 310-PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 528 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 26,048 0 0 TOTAL 310-PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 $ 26,576 $ 0 $ 0 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 13,322 $ 14,180 $ 17,420 4402 Unrealized Gain 13,780 0 0 8290 Transfer In-Library Fund 0 500,000 500,000 TOTAL 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND $ 27,102 $ 514,180 $ 517,420 354-COP'S PROGRAM GRANT-STATE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 10,736 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 401,170 271,820 271,820 TOTAL 354-COP'S PROGRAM GRANT-STATE $ 411,906 $ 271,820 $ 271,820 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 88 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 758 0 0 TOTAL 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) $ 846 $ 0 $ 0 370-OTS-"DRINK,DRIVE,LOSE"GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 240 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other (240) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 143 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budge Budget 373-COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 192 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Incorn -Other (192) 0 0 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 480 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income-Other 30,639 0 0 TOTAL 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE $ 31,119 $ 0 $ 0 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 39,985 $ 68,290 $ 66,360 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 2,110 0 0 TOTAL 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE $ 42,095 $ 68,290 $ 66,360 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 4740 Grant Income-Other $ 26,732 $ 26,730 $ 26,840 TOTAL 393-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 26,732 $ 26,730 $ 26,840 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 231,515 $ 154,560 $ 46,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 136,419 0 0 4441 Sale of Land Held for Resale 3,700,000 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 340,437 12,000 12,000 TOTAL 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 4,408,371 $ 166,560 $ 58,000 600-AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 4401 Interest Earnings $ 227 $ 250 $ 280 4402 Unrealized Gain 192 0 0 TOTAL 600-AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 419 $ 250 $ 280 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 4401 Interest Earnings 19,365 21,020 23,300 4402 Unrealized Gain 19,345 0 0 TOTAL 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 38,710 $ 21,020 $ 23,300 612-CFD 2001-01 4401 Interest Earnings $ 57,806 $ 53,950 $ 59,790 4402 Unrealized Gain 49,662 0 0 TOTAL 612-CFD 2001-01 $ 107,468 $ 53,950 $ 59,790 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 3,027 $ 0 $ 1,760 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,679 0 0 TOTAL 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND $ 5,706 $ 0 $ 1,760 615-CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 3,301 $ 0 $ 1,920 TOTAL 615-CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER $ 3,301 $ 0 $ 1,920 617-CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 144 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings $ 819 $ 100 $ 560 4402 Unrealized Gain 48 0 0 TOTAL 617-CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES $ 867 $ 100 $ 560 680-CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 40 $ 40 TOTAL 680-CID 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE $ 0 $ 40 $ 40 691-CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 4401 Interest Earnings $ 91 $ 120 $ 130 4402 Unrealized Gain 96 0 0 TOTAL 681-CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 $ 187 $ 120 $ 130 700-SPORTS COMPLEX 4126 Admissions Taz $ 146,181 $ 105,000 $ 90,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,651 0 0 4411 Special Event Rental 0 13,000 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 133,947 183,400 0 4426 Stadium Lease-Minimum Rent 108,000 110,000 115,000 4431 Special Event Rental-ActiveNet 25,665 0 0 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc:ANet 19,103 42,500 133,090 4520 Recreation Fees 91,738 85,800 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 2,300 4,410 4,410 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 1,346 3,220 0 4562 Maintenance Fees 3,180 6,250 6,250 4580 Stadium Security Reimbursement 34,150 34,150 34,150 4583 Baseball Security Reimb. 42,871 47,320 30,320 4901 Other Revenue 75,720 3,500 0 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 2,952 0 3,000 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 1,770,941 2,166,750 1,401,770 TOTAL 700-SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,459,745 $ 2,805,300 $ 1,817,990 702-REGIS CONNECT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 1,310 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,105 0 0 4670 REGIS Connect Service Fees 25,470 50,000 0 TOTAL 702-REGIS CONNECT $ 26,575 $ 51,310 $ 0 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY 4401 Interest Earnings 329,577 314,010 351,190 4402 Unrealized Gain 236,069 0 0 4601 Monthly Srvc Fee-Electric Util 628,494 600,000 650,000 4602 Commodity Fee-Electric Util. 10,177,668 12,500,000 11,000,000 4603 New Srvc Activation Fee-Util. 10,680 15,000 15,000 4604 Dist Line Ext Fee-Elec Utility 619,474 500,000 500,000 4605 Wholesale Energy Sales&Cntrt 625,148 800,000 600,000 4608 Standby Demand Fee 91,320 91,320 91,320 4610 Late Fee-Electric Utility 11,409 14,000 14,000 4620 Low Income Disc(Contra Rev) (120) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 145 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4621 Med Supp Assist(Contra-Rev) (110) 0 0 4622 Economic Dev(Contra-Revenue) (74,481) 0 0 4735 ARB-Cap and Trade Revenue 414,619 325,000 425,000 4802 Developer Participation 36,606 20,000 220,000 4901 Other Revenue 1,294 0 0 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 472 0 0 4935 Contributed Capital 377,144 0 0 TOTAL 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 13,485,263 $ 15,179,330 $ 13,866,510 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 11,298 $ 8,290 $ 5,310 4402 Unrealized Gain 12,573 0 0 4609 Public Benefit Fund-Elec Util 271,912 300,000 300,000 TOTAL 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND $ 295,783 $ 308,290 $ 305,310 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 102,149 $ 100,570 $ 111,560 4402 Unrealized Gain 92,616 0 0 TOTAL 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 194,765 $ 100,570 $ 111,560 711-FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 4401 Interest Earnings $ 62,829 $ 141,570 $ 97,980 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 76,655 75,000 75,000 4446 Fiber License Revenue 0 275,000 75,000 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 4,950 4,950 4,950 4935 Contributed Capital 206,371 0 0 8025 Transfer In-Capital Ram Fund 0 960,360 934,840 TOTAL 711-FIBER OPTIC NETWORK $ 350,805 $ 1,456,890 $ 1,187,770 712-EQUD'NEHICLE REPLACEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 28,062 $ 28,210 $ 22,490 4402 Unrealized Gain 32,493 0 0 4540 Intragovernmental User Fees 300,000 530,000 530,000 4901 Other Revenue 93,772 0 0 8006 Transfer In-Fund 006 0 150,000 300,000 TOTAL 712-EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 454,327 $ 708,210 $ 952,490 714-COMP EQUIP/rECH REPLCMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 19,132 $ 21,050 $ 53,050 4402 Unrealized Gain 23,063 0 0 4540 Intragovernmental User Fees 421,550 584,190 584,190 8001 Transfer hi-General Fund 1,605,240 0 0 8025 Transfer In-Capital Rsm Fund 334,490 429,660 421,870 8288 Transfer In-Fund 288 158,630 107,420 117,670 TOTAL 714-COMP EQUIPITECH REPLCMENT FUND $ 2,562,105 $ 1,142,320 $ 1,176,780 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsm $ 33,227 $ 33,130 $ 33,130 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 740 500 360 Fiscal Year 202o/22 Adopted Budget Page 146 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget _ 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budge 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 440 150 170 4401 Interest Earnings 906 860 1,100 4402 Unrealized Gain 823 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 810 0 0 _ TOTAL 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON $ 36,946 $ 34,640 $ 34,760 947-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 4,580 $ 3,760 $ 7,510 4402 Unrealized Gain 3,635 0 0 8848 Transfer In-Fund 848 116,800 116,800 116,900 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 950 TOTAL 847-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 125,015 $ 120,560 $ 125,260 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 1,150,654 $ 1,147,500 S 1,147,930 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 10,279 11,500 10,860 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,383 2,500 3,710 4401 Interest Earnings 33,197 30,680 38,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 30,333 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 125,076 107,450 122,790 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4,814 6,500 4,800 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 0 650 150 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 18,838 39,220 17,400 4901 Other Revenue (109) 500 500 8001 Transfer In-General Fund 214,250 213,530 72,170 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 1,220 TOTAL 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND $ 1,590,715 $ 1,560,030 $ 1,419,530 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unscc $ 468,031 $ 494,600 $ 524,270 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 1,265 3,600 3,950 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 240 1,250 1,200 4401 Interest Earnings 8,551 5,710 7,530 4402 Unrealized Gain 8,976 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 40 0 0 8100 Transfer in-Spec Dist Admin 810 0 0 TOTAL 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE $ 487,913 $ 505,160 $ 536,950 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 0 $ 0 $ 3,020 TOTAL 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.ETIWANDA $ 0 $ 0 $ 3,020 876-CFD 2018-01 EMPIRE LAKES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 0 $ 0 $ 123,180 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,168 0 0 4901 0ther Revenue 44,121 0 0 TOTAL 876-CFD 2018-01 EMPIRE LAKES $ 45,289 $ 0 $ 123,180 877-CFD 2018-01 CAPITAL RESERVE Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 147 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 0 $ 790 8876 Transfer In-CFD Empire Lakes 0 0 79,390 TOTAL 877-CFD 2018-01 CAPITAL RESERVE $ 0 $ 0 $ 80,180 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 185,581,637 $ 218,813,840 $ 174,288,680 R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281-FIRE FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 17,425,860 $ 18,305,650 $ 18,925,460 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 649,653 650,210 705,560 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 337,542 366,430 366,590 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 105,033 144,340 114,070 4105 Property Taxes-Supplemental 570,117 529,260 619,180 4106 Property Taxes-Unitary 621,830 623,710 666,640 4110 Homeowners Exemption 168,285 168,280 165,690 4112 Property Tax-Post RDA 5,957,845 5,650,700 8,905,710 4211 Fire Permits 16,141 16,500 16,500 4309 False Alarm Fees 20,248 20,000 20,000 4313 Other Fines&Forfeitures 58,450 8,000 8,000 4316 Weed Abatement 79,926 90,000 90,000 4401 Interest Earnings 435,614 382,940 444,870 4402 Unrealized Gain 460,562 0 0 4403 Restricted-Interest Earnings 378,740 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 127,809 107,460 105,770 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 1,321 0 0 4501 Plan Check Fees 0 1,000 100 4546 FSD Fees 0 140 0 4549 D.U.I.Recovery 0 280 too 4549 Harman Recovery 0 900 too 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees 2,448 3,000 1,500 4740 Grant Income-Other 10,000 0 0 4901 Other Revenue (115,899) 10,600 8,800 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 5,691 0 0 4914 Non-Abated Reimbursements 860,923 706,800 570,000 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 749,647 851,260 981,290 4941 Other Revenue-ActiveNet 3,733 3,400 6,040 4946 Processing Fee-ActiveNet (674) 0 0 8100 Transfer In-Spec Dist Admin 3,230 0 0 TOTAL 281 -FIRE FUND $ 28,934,075 $ 28,640,960 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-I 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 5,975,703 $ 5,959,650 $ 6,181,280 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec&Unsec 6,253 7,550 6,700 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 37,034 20,000 4,440 4401 Interest Earnings 53,590 43,570 69,900 4402 Unrealized Gain 41,106 0 0 4901 Other Revenue (34,630) 0 0 TOTAL 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,079,056 $ 6,030,770 $ 6,262,320 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 148 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 20I9/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 293-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 89-1 4101 Property Taxes-CY Sec/Unsec $ 1,230,620 $ 410,150 $ 410,700 4103 Property Taxes-PY See&Unsec 14,774 13,420 16,050 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 5,201 4,630 4,340 4402 Unrealized Gain (11) 0 0 8281 Transfer In-Fire Fund 1,188,393 1,966,610 2,036,930 - TOTAL 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,438,977 $ 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 407 $ 400 $ 460 4402 Unrealized Gain 312 0 0 4517 Technology Fee-Permit 292 500 500 TOTAL 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 1,011 $ 900 $ %0 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 4112 Property Tax-Post RDA $ 8,895,143 $ 9,758,450 $ 7,345,180 4401 Interest Earnings 517,518 539,260 668,790 4402 Unrealized Gain 359,007 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 58,613 17,000 17,000 4923 Misc.Other Financing Sources 71,404 0 0 TOTAL 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND $ 9,901,685 $ 10,313,710 $ 8,030,970 TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 47,354,804 $ 47,381,050 $ 49,484,240 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 232,936,441 $ 266,194,890 $ 223,772,920 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 149 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 -GENERAL FUND $ 90,223,105 $ 88,290,270 $ 89,394,500 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 90,223,105 $ 89,290,270 $ 89,394,500 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 169,337 $ 162,480 $ 111,330 006-CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 402,541 463,500 443,900 008-CNTY OF S.B.REIMBURSEMENTS 428 0 0 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 364,305 101,420 364,080 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 298,943 150,930 186,530 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 371,762 408,740 112,000 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT 67,338 0 0 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 1,412,726 311,880 298,590 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 24,615 21,960 36,120 023-SBI186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 42,773 19,940 42,650 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 3,603,151 2,198,970 2,005,250 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 91,524 60,210 50,080 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 6,849,443 $ 3,900,030 $ 3,650,530 SPECIAL REVENUE 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 909,486 $ 1,019,250 $ 1,019,440 101 -AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 5,448 210 3,260 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 592,656 558,210 253,920 106-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT 0 0 30,000 109-PUBLIC ART TRUST FUND 0 0 2,760 110-BEAUTIFICATION 140,598 16,560 14,750 111 -PARK LAND ACQUISITION 1,601,888 285,980 770,940 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 870,119 159,490 173,000 113-COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 567,378 326,170 337,300 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 29,865 7,950 5,280 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 16,643 0 0 116-ETIWANDADRAINAGE 89,418 37,250 39,510 118-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 19,685 10,700 11,860 119-PARKIMPROVEMENT 831,912 220,200 236,330 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 370,185 145,780 160,580 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 219,764 16,160 21,650 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 214,319 117,800 122,630 124-TRANSPORTATION 10,670,968 3,742,590 3,853,270 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 35,706 25,320 26,150 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 20,891 11,370 12,600 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE 166,854 110,570 113,930 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACI.. 23,361 12,690 14,060 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 530,002 288,180 309,590 130-LMD#1 GENERAL CITY 1,470,436 1,456,770 1,359,320 131 -LMD#2 VICTORIA 3,983,730 3,937,130 4,107,960 132-LMD#3A HYSSOP 5,162 4,280 4,320 133-LMD#3B MEDIANS 1,118,106 1,093,480 1,083,800 134-LMD#4R TERRA VISTA 2,955,664 2,888,970 2,913,070 135-LMD#5 ANDOVER 3,589 3,020 3,020 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 150 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018119 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 136-LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY 592,012 574,290 593,360 137-LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,082,622 999,930 1,027,510 138-LMD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 38,037 35,520 35,700 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA 562,943 689,550 964,560 140-LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 661,376 624,590 653,710 141 -LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 96,657 93,890 96,810 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 217,724 351,620 354,830 151 -SLD 91 ARTERIAL 1,120,148 830,580 840,970 152-SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL 793,187 660,700 695,660 153-SLD 43 VICTORIA 495,172 385,090 410,230 154-SLD#4 TERRA VISTA 231,896 184,270 177,820 155-SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY 64,623 44,220 44,240 156-SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 178,161 141,430 144,220 157-SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 250,871 216,590 222,760 158-SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 161,406 109,060 112,400 174-STATE GAS TAX 3,912,800 4,903,310 4,381,350 176-MEASURE 11990-2010 15,564 5,650 5,520 177-MEASURE 12010-2040 3,321,114 3,061,140 2,660,560 178-SB 140 576 0 0 179-ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT 3,006,245 2,918,340 3,140,730 181-SB1 -TCEP 1,386,985 52,150,000 11,000,650 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 4,975 0 0 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 1,545,628 1,535,580 1,869,350 194-PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING 8,328 4,540 5,030 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE 2,334 1,320 950 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 187 60 130 199-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 1,922,088 1,693,550 1,360,200 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 1,363,065 1,440,010 1,440,010 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 5,757 0 1,070 211 -PROP 1B-SLPP 93 0 70 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 36,838 451,000 401,200 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 33,636 19,600 24,600 225-CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 104,285 59,390 59,860 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 365 0 0 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 90,320 49,430 49,390 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 103,062 118,900 90,800 239-FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIER 192 0 0 250-RECREATION SERVICES 2,962,405 2,965,860 0 255-VG CULTURAL.CENTER 1,674,392 1,615,300 0 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 2,148 40 50 274-STATE GRANTS FUND 0 0 2,686,760 290-LIBRARY FUND 5,361,704 6,068,790 5,991,700 291 -CA STATE LIBRARY 126,362 21,130 20,000 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) 259,653 7,530 5,080 301 -THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 50 0 0 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 620 0 0 310-PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 26,575 0 0 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 27,102 514,180 517,420 354-COP'S PROGRAM GRANT-STATE 411,906 271,820 271,820 361 -JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 846 0 0 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE 31,119 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 151 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Yew 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 381 -HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE 42,095 68,290 66,360 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 26,732 26,730 26,840 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 4,408,371 166,560 58,000 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 36,946 34,640 34,760 847-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 125,015 120,560 125,260 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,590,715 1,560,030 1,419,530 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 487,914 505,160 536,950 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.ETIWANDA 0 0 3,020 876-CFD 2018-01 EMPIRE LAKES 45,288 0 123,180 877-CFD 2018-01 CAPITAL RESERVE 0 0 80,180 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 68,523,063 $ 104,795,850 $ 61,837,460 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600-AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 419 $ 250 $ 280 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 38,710 21,020 23,300 612-CFD 2001-01 107,468 53,950 59,790 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 5,706 0 1,760 615-CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 3,301 0 1,920 617-CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 867 100 560 680-CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 0 40 40 681 -CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 187 120 130 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 156,658 $ 75,480 $ 87,780 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700-SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,459,745 $ 2,805,300 $ 1,817,990 702-REGIS CONNECT 26,575 51,310 0 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY 13,485,261 15,179,330 13,866,510 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 295,783 308,290 305,310 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 194,765 100,570 111,560 711 -FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 350,805 1,456,880 1,187,770 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 16,812,934 $ 19,901,680 $ 17,289,140 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712-EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 454,327 $ 708,210 $ 852,490 714-COMP EQUIPITECH REPLCMENT FUND 2,562,105 1,142,320 1,176,780 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 3,016,432 $ 1,850,530 $ 2,029,270 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 185,581,635 $ 218,813,840 $ 174,288,680 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 -FIRE FUND $ 28,934,074 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 6,079,056 6,030,770 6,262,320 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 2,438,978 2,394,810 2,468,020 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 1,011 900 960 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 9,901,684 10,313,710 8,030,970 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 47,354,803 $ 47,381,050 $ 49,484,240 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 152 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL R.C.FDiE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 47,354,803 $ 47,381,050 $ 49,484,240 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 232,936,438 $ 266,194,890 $ 223,772,920 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 153 - THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2o2o/2i Adopted Budget Page 154 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Expenditure Summaries Fiscal Year zozo/zt Adopted Budget Page 155 City of Rancho Cucamonga,California Expenditure Summary by Department Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Building&Safety Services Engineering Services 28% .71% Econ.and Coin. Dev. Public Works Services 0.58% Planning 745% Innovation& 1.19° Governance Technology 2.25% 2.75 Human Resources 0.65% Police Finance - 32.56% 37% Administrative Services 4.48% Library Services 4.17% Community Services Fire District 5.89% Animal Care and 30.43% Records Management Services 0.93% 2.29 Governance $ 3,106,100 Police 44,869,070 Fire District 41,928,890 Animal Care and Services 3,161,730 Records Management 1,279,650 Community Services 8,119,410 Library Services 5,750,160 Administrative Services 6,169,330 Finance 1,890,790 Human Resources 900,570 Innovation&Technology 3,784,170 Econ. and Comm.Dev. 802,270 Building& Safety Services 1,766,050 Engineering Services 2,353,300 Planning 1,633,770 Public Works Services 10,268,290 Total Operating Budget $ 137,783,550 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001),Fire District Operational Funds(Funds 281, 282,and 283), and City Library Fund(Fund 290). Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 156 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 26,426,624 $ 30,289,680 $ 29,819,270 - OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 55,013,564 58,846,590 63,328,620 CAPITAL OUTLAY 23,915 475,000 210,000 DEBT SERVICE 12,538 106,450 106,450 COST ALLOCATION (5,527,120) (6,072,840) (6,365,070) 7RANSFEROUT 5,754,741 4,645,390 3,005,230 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 81,704,262 $ 88,290,270 $ 90,104,500 281-FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 17,521,141 $ 19,432,400 $ 22,606,050 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 5,547,528 6,841,860 7,679,000 DEBT SERVICE 77,830 399,990 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 1,188,393 1,966,610 2,036,930 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,334,892 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 $ 5,978,580 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 728,983 720,960 760,320 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,052,713 $ 6,108,490 $ 6,738,900 283 COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 $ 2,223,100 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 222,141 229,950 244,920 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST MI $ 2,439,421 $ 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 290-LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 3,273,861 $ 3,751,760 $ 3,681,450 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 1,292,856 1,514,690 1,563,710 CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 5,000 5,000 DEBT SERVICE 0 0 0 TRANSFER OUT 0 500,000 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 4,566,717 $ 5,771,450 $ 5,750,160 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 119,098,005 $ 131,205,880 $ 137,783,550 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 157 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000-Regular Salaries $ 15,948,112 $ 18,381,960 $ 17,612,350 5005-Overtime Salaries 283,341 353,160 349,680 5010-Part Time Salaries 2,204,017 2,327,240 2,822,640 _ Fringe Benefits 7,905,874 9,137,900 8,907,170 5060-Tuition Reimbursement 27,157 26,000 26,000 5061 -Employee Development 91,213 101,040 86,540 5065-Coffee Fund 3,776 5,000 5,000 5070-Executive Reimbursement 15,962 10,000 18,000 5093-Other Funds-Salary Reimbursmnt (52,830) (52,620) (7,110) TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 26,426,622 $ 30,289,680 $ 29,819,270 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 346,974 $ 415,000 $ 333,970 5102-Training 239,888 322,890 262,130 5105-Mileage 7,003 7,730 6,630 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 190,070 226,060 222,310 5151 -Postage 75,225 98,410 98,440 5152-Computer Software 13,329 8,980 10,780 5160-Membership Dues 144,935 181,870 185,540 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 18,028 23,880 26,770 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 196,609 194,750 120,530 5200-Operations&Maintenance 1,262,423 1,680,950 1,893,510 5201 -0&M/Volunteer Program 19,781 20,000 20,000 5204-0&M/Facilities 390,199 468,000 448,880 5207-0&M/Capital Supplies 55,032 0 24,000 5210-O&M/Crime Prevention 20,659 29,000 29,000 5215-0&hi/Computer Equipment 20,036 23,500 29,430 5217-Technical Investigative Costs 117,950 200,780 168,580 5220-Cellular Technology 123,413 147,010 153,310 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 347,465 449,350 524,380 5251 -Depreciation-Vehicles 250,900 443,260 443,260 5252-Emergency Equipment&Vch Rml 23,070 37,000 37,000 5253-Vehicle Collision Repair 46,036 100,000 100,000 5255-Gasoline 548,818 546,000 540,610 5256-Diesel Fuel 15,000 15,000 12,470 5257-CNG Fuel 13,560 13,400 10,870 5260-O&M/Animal Care 115,776 116,630 117,630 5262-O&M/Community&Info Programs 2,171 4,000 2,000 5263-O&M/Field Services 5,252 5,000 4,000 5264-O&M/Veterinarian Services 174,552 139,000 139,000 5265-O&M/Kitten Nursery 33,058 20,090 10,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 25,350 30,480 30,690 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 158 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5281 -Depreciation-Equipment 49,100 86,740 86,740 5283-Depreciation-Computer Equip 421,550 584,190 584,190 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 40,711 46,000 46,000 5298-Operating Cntra Acct(FS only) 5,815 0 0 5300-Contract Services 44,360,841 46,367,680 51,236,710 5303-Contract Sem/Reimbursable 103,775 240,450 240,450 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 1,402,061 1,840,080 1,873,500 5310-Tree Maintenance 671,444 575,000 200,000 5312-Legal Services 678,468 656,250 576,250 5320-Hazardous Waste Removal 10,414 24,320 24,320 5360-Contract Serv/Animal Care 16,167 14,820 43,660 5362-Contract Serv/Comm&Info Prgm 540 2,490 1,030 5363-Contract Serv/Field Services 9,000 15,500 15,500 5364-Contract ServNet Services 63,604 56,400 66,400 5365-Cent Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 7,675 40,000 47,500 5400-Telephone Utilities 135,416 132,930 132,260 5401 -Gas Utilities 148,088 112,330 148,090 5402-Weer Utilities 384,998 470,620 434,830 5403-Electric Utilities 1,038,610 1,111,300 1,042,260 5405-Internet Services 118,337 130,000 117,940 5410-Property Insurance 245,979 270,110 316,110 5510-Property Tax Admin.Fee 82,167 101,360 89,160 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 30,772 0 0 5725-Other Expenditures 141,527 0 0 5999-Prior Period Adjustment 3,948 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE $ 55,013,569 $ 58,946,590 $ 63,328,620 CAPITAL OUTLAY 5601 -Capital Outlay-Building $ (100) $ 0 $ 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 24,015 0 10,000 5606-Capital Outlay-Fum/Fixtums 5,815 0 0 5650-Capital Project 0 475,000 200,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (5,815) 0 0 TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY $ 23,915 S 475,000 $ 210,000 DEBT SERVICE 5700-Interest Expense $ 12,538 $ 11,980 $ 8,200 5701 -Principal Repayments 408,123 94,470 98,250 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (408,123) 0 0 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 12,538 $ 106,450 $ 106,450 COST ALLOCATION 5990-Cost Allocation Plan Offset $ (5,527,120) $ (6,072,840) $ (6,365,070) Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 159 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL COST ALLOCATION $ (5,527,120) $ (6,072,840) $ (6,365,070) TRANSFER OUT 9018-Transfer Out-Traffic Safety $ 210,460 $ 220,160 $ 10,270 9025.Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 1,140,000 1,175,000 725,000 9130-Transfer Out-LMDI 135,820 135,830 36,300 9131 -Transfer Out-LMD2 299,540 324,860 314,280 9136-Transfer Out-LMD6R 60,370 41,090 39,010 9152-Transfer Out-SLD2 188,420 294,250 317,330 9157-Transfer Out-SLD7 62,590 83,920 89,100 9234-Transfer Out-Fund 234 SITS 65,000 0 0 9381 -Transfer Out-Fund 381 2,110 0 0 9700-Transfer Out-Sports Complex 1,770,941 2,166,750 1,401,770 9714-Transfer Our-Comptr Eq Rplc 1,605,240 0 0 9848-Transfer Out-Fund 848 214,250 213,530 72,170 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 5,754,741 $ 4,645,390 $ 3,005,230 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 81,704,265 $ 88,290,270 $ 90,104,500 281-FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000-Regular Salaries $ 12,948,022 $ 13,720,630 $ 15,040,040 5005-Overtime Salaries 3,492,792 3,979,510 4,291,190 5010-Part Time Salaries 119,716 176,450 159,790 Fringe Benefits 8,527,311 9,124,930 11,333,550 5060-Tuition Reimbursement 1,043 10,000 10,000 5082-Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (5,323,730) (5,387,530) (5,978,580) 5083-Reimb Personnel firm CFD 88-1 (2,217,280) (2,164,860) (2,223,100) 5093-Other Funds-Salary Reimbursmnt (26,732) (26,730) (26,840) TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 17,521,142 $ 19,432,400 $ 22,606,050 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 13,297 $ 27,160 $ 23,050 5102-Training 90,951 155,670 154,130 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 27,641 32,550 32,000 5151 -Postage 20 300 300 5152-Computer Software 2,040 640 0 5155-Public Relations/Educ Material 30,058 36,750 25,750 5160-Membership Dues 5,782 10,530 10,330 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 3,686 14,050 9,270 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 8,467 9,030 8,740 5200-Operations&Maintenance 266,530 339,420 342,520 5204-O&M/Facilities 42,764 98,000 70,000 5220-Cellular Technology 48,101 53,200 67,620 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 16o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5240-Operation of Acquired Property 0 0 10,500 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 145,372 209,930 210,600 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rntl 0 1,500 1,500 5255-Gasoline 30,459 54,520 41,200 5256-Diesel Fuel 125,997 132,420 136,400 5258-Propane 9,330 19,000 19,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 22,533 40,500 38,180 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 68,936 117,190 121,890 5290-Specialized Tools&Equipment 41,178 47,200 52,930 5291 -Equipment Supplies&Repairs 28,178 49,100 43,400 5300-Contract Services 963,593 1,216,610 1,395,660 5304-Contract Serv/Facilides 178,276 277,200 302,570 5312-Legal Services 31,497 50,000 50,000 5320-Hazardous Waste Removal 0 2,500 2,500 5321 -Fire Incident Costs 910 3,500 3,500 5400-Telephone Utilities 11,836 17,910 27,690 5401 -Gas Utilities 10,340 12,080 10,670 5402-Water Utilities 21,140 19,640 22,270 5403-Electric Utilities 77,259 95,010 84,390 5410-Property Insurance 95,246 95,250 123,090 5411 -Other Insurance 4,310 5,500 5,580 5416-General Liability Insurance 257,568 295,560 402,850 5417-General Liability Claims 4,027 0 0 5500-Assessment Administration 87,371 97,570 97,570 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 2,374,010 2,725,110 3,118,370 5510-Property Tax Admin.Fee 143,652 123,600 156,010 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 35,992 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 239,180 356,160 456,970 TOTAL OPERATIONS& MAINTENANCE $ 5,547,527 $ 6,841,860 $ 7,679,000 DEBT SERVICE 5700-Interest Expense $ 77,830 $ 63,200 $ 47,560 5701 -Principal Repayments 322,154 336,790 352,430 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (322,154) 0 0 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 77,830 $ 399,990 $ 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 9283-Transfer Out-CFD 88-1 $ 1,188,393 S 1,966,610 $ 2,036,930 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 1,188,393 $ 1,966,610 $ 2,036,930 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,334,892 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 161 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5081 -Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 $ 5,978,580 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530. $ 5,978,580 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees $ 2,866 $ 3,200 $ 3,110 5200-Operations&Maintenance 9,832 10,000 10,000 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 15,620 0 0 5300-Contract Services 365,188 375,330 367,860 5400-Telephone Utilities 4,045 4,270 4,490 5401 -Gas Utilities 6,139 5,930 7,360 5402-Water Utilities 16,620 13,710 13,240 5403-Electric Utilities 51,804 56,240 62,180 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 256,870 252,280 292,080 TOTAL OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE $ 728,984 $ 720,960 $ 760,320 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,052,714 $ 6,108,490 $ 6,738,900 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES 5081 -Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 $ 2,223,100 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 $ 2,223,100 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees $ 1,439 $ 1,410 $ 1,490 5200-Operations&Maintenance 3,606 4,000 4,000 5300-Contract Services 86,585 93,420 91,580 5400-Telephone Utilities 1,624 1,600 15,160 5401 -Gas Utilities 1,766 2,070 2,170 5402-Water Utilities 4,870 5,240 5,240 5403-Electric Utilities 13,712 15,180 14,520 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 108,540 107,030 110,760 TOTAL OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE $ 222,142 $ 229,950 $ 244,920 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,439,422 $ 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 290-LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000-Regular Salaries $ 1,632,898 $ 1,842,420 $ 1,767,140 5010-Part Time Salaries 765,649 928,810 985,220 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 2,398,547 $ 2,771,230 $ 2,752,360 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE Fringe Benefits 875,314 980,530 929,090 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 23,752 $ 31,740 $ 26,280 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 162 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5102-Training 5,551 0 2,500 5105-Mileage 537 1,000 900 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 7,582 20,750 19,000 5152-Computer Software 360 1,400 0 5160-Membership Dues 4,433 7,190 6,330 5200-Operations&Maintenance 759,653 799,700 769,950 5207-O& M/Capital Supplies 40,575 40,000 40,000 5215-O&M/Computer Equipment 5,209 20,240 78,330 5220-Cellular Technology 477 500 500 5298-Operating Cram Acct(FS only) 4,998 0 0 5300-Contract Services 190,740 352,830 312,880 5400-Telephone Utilities 6,487 10,500 2,650 5402-Water Utilities 5,715 5,040 6,010 5403-Electric Utilities 62,897 65,000 68,250 5405-Internet Services 70,225 54,930 57,480 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 95,100 103,870 114,250 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 8,566 0 0 5725-Other Expenditures 0 0 58,400 TOTAL OPERATIONS& MAINTENANCE $ 2,168,171 $ 2,495,220 $ 2,492,800 CAPITAL OUTLAY 5606-Capital Outlay-Fum/Flxtures $ 4,998 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (4,998) 0 0 TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY $ 0 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 TRANSFER OUT 9329-Transfer Out-Library Cap Fund $ 0 $ 500,000 $ 500,000 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 0 $ 000,000 $ 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 4,566,718 $ 5,771,450 $ 5,750,160 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 119,098,011 $ 131,205,880 $ 137,783,550 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 163 City of Rancho Cucamonga,California Expenditure Summary by Department AU Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Public Works Services r3mmmance 12.30% 1.39% Police Planning 20.48% 3.07% Engineering Services 8.51% Building and Safety Services 0.81% Econ.and Comm. Dev. Fire District 0.42% 21.38% Innovation and Animal Care and Technology Services 2.02% 1.41% Human Resoumes Records Management 0.57% 0.40 Finance Community Services 268% Administrative Library Serrices 5.00% Services 2.98% 6.59% Governance $ 3,115,840 Police 45,983,570 Fire District 48,008,860 Animal Care and Services 3,161,730 Records Management 1,279,650 Community Services 11,232,050 Library Services 6,701,910 Administrative Services 14,790,350 Finance 6,023,580 Human Resources 900,570 Innovation and Technology 4,536,130 Econ. and Comm. Dev. 954,150 Building and Safety Services 1,814,530 Engineering Services 41,561,260 Planning 6,896,260 Public Works Services 27,616,290 Total All Funds Budget $224,576,730 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 164 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018119 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 43,418,446 $ 48,766,250 $ 44,603,110 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 90,366,696 93,329,930 95,377,950 CAPITAL OUTLAY 17,082,058 79,121,470 32,854,910 DEBT SERVICE 663,877 2,517,260 2,495,710 COST ALLOCATION (5,527,120) (6,072,840) (6,365,070) TRANSFER OUT 9,707,287 9,184,670 7,628,100 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 155,711,244 $ 226,846,740 $ 176,594,710 R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 25,062,151 $ 26,984,790 $ 30,807,730 OPERATIONS&MAINTENANCE 7,144,238 8,322,350 9,415,150 CAPITAL OUTLAY 2,541,598 3,960,500 5,204,550 DEBT SERVICE 77,830 399,990 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 1,347,023 2,074,030 2,154,600 TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 36,172,840 $ 41,741,660 $ 47,982,020 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 191,884,084 $ 268,588,400 $ 224,576,730 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 165 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001GENERAL FUND 5000-Regular Salaries $ 15,948,112 $ 18,381,960 S 17,612,350 5005-Overtime Salaries 283,341 353,160 348,680 5010-Part Time Salaries 2,204,017 2,327,240 2,822,640 Fringe Benefits 7,905,874 9,137,900 8,907,170 5060-Tuition Reimbursement 27,157 26,000 26,000 5061 -Employee Development 91,213 101,040 86,540 5065-Coffee Fond 3,776 5,000 5,000 5070-Executive Reimbursement 15,962 10,000 18,000 5093-Other Funds-Salary Reimbursmnt (52,830) (52,620) (7,110) 5100-Travel and Meetings 346,974 415,000 333,970 5102-Training 239,888 322,890 262,130 5105-Mileage 7,003 7,730 6,630 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 190,070 226,060 222,310 5151 -Postage 75,225 98,410 98,440 5152-Computer Software 13,329 8,980 10,780 5160-Membership Dues 144,935 181,870 185,540 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 18,028 23,880 26,770 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 196,609 194,750 120,530 5200-Operations&Maintenance 1,262,423 1,680,950 1,893,510 5201 -O&MNolunteer Program 19,781 20,000 20,000 5204-0&M/Facilities 390,199 468,000 448,880 5207-0&NI/Capital Supplies 55,032 0 24,000 5210-0&M/Crime Prevention 20,659 29,000 29,000 5215-0& M/Computer Equipment 20,036 23,500 29,430 5217-Technical Investigative Costs 117,950 200,780 168,580 5220-Cellular Technology 123,413 147,010 153,310 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 347,465 449,350 524,380 5251 -Depreciation-Vehicles 250,900 443,260 443,260 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rod 23,070 37,000 37,000 5253-Vehicle Collision Repair 46,036 100,000 100,000 5255-Gasoline 548,818 546,000 540,610 5256-Diesel Fuel 15,000 15,000 12,470 5257-CNG Fuel 13,560 13,400 10,870 5260-O&M/Animal Care 115,776 116,630 117,630 5262-O&M/Community,&Info Programs 2,171 4,000 2,000 5263-O&M/Field Services 5,252 5,000 4,000 5264-O&M/Veterinarian Services 174,552 139,000 139,000 5265-O&M/Kitten Nursery 33,058 20,090 10,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 25,350 30,480 30,690 5281 -Depreciation-Equipment 49,100 86,740 86,740 5283-Depreciation-Computer Equip 421,550 584,190 584,190 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 40,711 46,000 46,000 5298-Operating Cmra Acct(FS only) 5,815 0 0 5300-Contract Services 44,360,941 46,367,680 51,236,710 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 166 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5303-Contract Serv/Reimbursable 103,775 240,450 240,450 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 1,402,061 1,840,080 1,873,500 5310-Tree Maintenance 671,444 575,000 200,000 5312-Legal Services 678,468 656,250 576,250 5320-Hazardous Waste Removal 10,414 24,320 24,320 5360-Contract Serv/Animal Care 16,167 14,820 43,660 5362-Contract Serv/Comm&Info Prgm 540 2,490 1,030 5363-Contract Serv/Field Services 9,000 15,500 15,500 5364-Contract ServNet Services 63,604 56,400 66,400 5365-Cent Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 7,675 40,000 47,500 5400-Telephone Utilities 135,416 132,930 132,260 5401 -Gas Utilities 148,088 112,330 148,090 5402-Water Utilities 384,998 470,620 434,830 5403-Electric Utilities 1,038,610 1,111,300 1,042,260 5405-Internet Services 118,337 130,000 117,940 5410-Property Insurance 245,979 270,110 316,110 5510-Property Tax Admin.Fee 82,167 101,360 89,160 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 30,772 0 0 5601 -Capital Outlay-Building (100) 0 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 24,015 0 10,000 5606-Capital Outlay-Fum/Fixtures 5,815 0 0 5650-Capital Project 0 475,000 200,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (5,815) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 12,538 11,980 8,200 5701 -Principal Repayments 408,123 94,470 98,250 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (408,123) 0 0 5725-Other Expenditures 141,527 0 0 5990-Cost Allocation Plan Offset (5,527,120) (6,072,840) (6,365,070) 9018-Transfer Out-Traffic Safety 210,460 220,160 10,270 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 1,140,000 1,175,000 725,000 9130-Transfer Out-LMDI 135,820 135,830 36,300 9131 -Transfer Out-LMD2 299,540 324,860 314,280 9136-Transfer Out-LMD6R 60,370 41,090 39,010 9152-Transfer Out-SLD2 188,420 284,250 317,330 9157-Transfer Out-SLD7 62,590 83,920 89,100 9234-Transfer Out-Fund 234 SETS 65,000 0 0 9381 -Transfer Out-Fund 381 2,110 0 0 9700-Transfer Out-Sports Complex 1,770,941 2,166,750 1,401,770 9714-Transfer Out-Comptr Eq Epic 1,605,240 0 0 9848-Transfer Out-Fund 848 214,250 213,530 72,170 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 81,700,317 $ 88,290,270 $ 90,104,500 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 168,905 $ 162,480 $ 111,330 TOTAL REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 168,905 $ 162,480 $ 111,330 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 167 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2019/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 006CV WD REIMBURSEMENTS 5000-Regular Salaries $ 91,773 $ 102,290 $ 65,370 Fringe Benefits 43,864 49,100 31,380 5200-Operations&Maintenance 62,243 86,500 62,500 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maim. 1,263 10,000 22,180 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Roll 0 1,000 1,000 5255-Gasoline 0 0 5,390 5256-Diesel Fuel 0 0 2,530 5257-CNG Fuel 0 0 2,530 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 493 500 500 9001-Transfer Out-General Fund 71,850 64,720 90,510 9174-Transfer Out-Fund 174 0 150,000 0 9712-T/O Equipment/Vehicle Replacem 0 150,000 300,000 TOTAL CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS $ 271,486 $ 614,110 $ 583,890 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SEWS FUND 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 0 $ 1,400 $ 0 5102-Training 0 500 500 5200-Operations&Maintenance 2,714 5,200 3,000 5207-0&M/Capital Supplies 12,039 0 0 5300-Contract Services 410,451 554,000 3,000 TOTAL COMM HEY TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND $ 425,204 $ 561,100 $ 6,500 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 0 $ 1,300 $ 1,300 5207-0&M/Capital Supplies 2,941 33,000 30,000 5300-Contract Services 26,000 198,000 78,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 5,580 2,420 10,200 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 11,755 0 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 158,647 415,000 359,000 TOTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE $ 204,923 $ 649,720 $ 478,500 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 5300-Contract Services $ 374,035 $ 405,000 $ 112,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 3,740 4,260 0 TOTAL TRAFFIC SAFETY $ 377,775 $ 409,260 $ 112,000 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 105,450 $ 0 $ 0 9020-Transfer Out-Fund 020 1,063,222 0 0 TOTAL INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT $ 1,168,672 $ 0 $ 0 020CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 140 $ 97,560 $ 145,380 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 168 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FOND $ 140 $ 97,560 $ 145,380 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 3,150 $ 3,150 $ 16,710 5300-Contract Services 0 31,000 15,500 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 390 2,360 3,430 5720-Misc Contributions to City 0 0 7,110 TOTAL MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM $ 3,540 $ 36,510 $ 42,750 023SBI186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 5102-Training $ 0 $ 780 $ 700 5160-Membership Dues 0 0 80 5200-Operations&Maintenance 3,459 3,600 3,600 5501 -Admin./Geneml Overhead 1,530 1,350 1,350 TOTAL SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG $ 4,989 $ 5,730 $ 5,730 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 5005-Overtime Salaries $ 0 $ 5,000 $ 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 244,144 74,000 0 5207-O&M/Capital Supplies 9,884 150,400 172,150 5298-Operating Conn Acct(FS only) 86,097 0 0 5300-Contract Services 62,278 416,900 367,400 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 0 70,000 0 5320-Hazardous Waste Removal 20,848 20,000 20,000 5411 -Other Insurance 29,172 34,910 33,220 5416-General Liability Insurance 367,111 424,690 675,270 5417-General Liability Claims 527,916 500,000 500,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 36,700 67,350 8,310 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 68,733 0 0 5600-Capital Outlay-Land 5,202,315 0 0 5602-Capital Outlay-Bldg&Imprvmnt 228,063 922,000 557,000 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 0 0 2,20,000 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 119,672 5,000 0 5650-Capital Project 100,540 2,155,000 1,740,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (86,097) 0 0 9711 -Transfer Out-Fund 711 0 960,360 934,840 9714-Transfer Out-Comptr Eq Rplc 334,490 429,660 421,870 TOTAL CAPITAL RESERVE $ 7,351,866 $ 6,235,270 $ 5,650,060 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 5000-Regular Salaries $ 1,682,765 $ 897,300 $ 1,069,080 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 9,270 9,460 10,140 TOTAL BENEFITS CONTINGENCY $ 1,692,035 $ 906,760 $ 1,079,220 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 169 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 5000-Regular Salaries $ 124,465 $ 159,430 $ 182,570 Fringe Benefits 59,894 75,950 87,060 5100-Travel and Meetings 3,444 7,350 6,280 5102-Training 2,420 3,000 1,000 5105-Mileage 247 300 300 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 0 1,500 500 5151 -Postage 0 10,000 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 15,960 29,240 29,240 5300-Contract Services 88,970 178,660 263,260 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 470,570 605,800 444,420 9001 -Transfer Out-General Fund 108,270 0 0 9131 -Transfer Out-LMD2 15,350 0 0 9133-Transfer Out-Fund 133 2,830 0 0 9134-Transfer Out-Fund 134 10,100 0 0 9137-Transfer Out-Fund 137 6,870 0 0 9138-Transfer Out-Fund 138 400 0 0 9139-Transfer Out-Fund 139 4,040 0 0 9140-Transfer Out-Fund 140 2,020 0 0 9151 -Transfer Out-Fund 151 70,300 0 0 9152-Transfer Out-SLD2 16,560 0 0 9153-Transfer Out-SLD3 15,760 0 0 9154-Transfer Out-SLD4 10,100 0 0 9155-Transfer Out-SLD5 3,230 0 0 9156-Transfer Out-SLD6 2,420 0 0 9158-Transfer Out-SLD6 4,040 0 0 9281 -Transfer Out-Fire Fund 3,230 0 0 9812-Transfer out to Fund 812 4,440 0 0 9820-Transfer out-CFD 2004-01 14,540 0 0 9838-Transfer Out-Fund 838 810 0 0 9841 -Transfer Out-AD 93-1 1,210 0 0 9842-Transfer out to Fund 842 4,040 0 0 9852-Transfer out to Fund 852 6,460 0 0 9854-Transfer Out to Fund 854 2,020 0 0 9856-Transfer out to Fund 856 17,780 0 0 9858-Transfer out to Fund 858 15,350 0 0 9860-Transfer out to Fund 860 22,220 0 0 9862-Transfer out to Fund 862 810 0 0 9864-Transfer out to Fund 864 16,970 0 0 9866-Transfer out to Fond 866 3,640 0 0 9868-Transfer Out-Fund 868 810 0 0 9869-Transfer Out-Fund 869 8,890 0 0 9871 -Transfer Out-Fund 871 8,890 0 0 TOTAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 1,170,370 $ 1,071,230 $ 1,014,630 101-AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 170 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 220 $ 210 $ 180 TOTAL AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER $ 220 $ 210 $ 180 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 15,227 $ 15,560 $ 13,650 5300-Contract Services 1,410 1,410 1,580 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 430 840 5,170 5604-Capitol Outlay-Vehicles 424,949 0 84,000 5607-Cap Ouday-hnpry Oth Than Bldg 0 160,000 0 5650-Capital Project 781,316 813,180 216,000 TOTAL AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT $ 1,223,232 $ 990,990 $ 320,400 I06-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT 5604-Capital Outlay-Vehicles $ 0 $ 0 $ 30,000 TOTAL MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT $ 0 $ 0 $ 30,000 110-BEAUTIFICATION 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 270 $ 440 $ 450 5650-Capital Project 126,195 410,000 0 TOTAL BEAUTIFICATION $ 126,465 $ 410,440 $ 450 111-PARK LAND ACQUISITION 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 30,350 $ 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 290 360 1,370 TOTAL PARK LAND ACQUISITION § 290 $ 30,710 $ 1,370 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 5000- Regular Salaries $ 23,570 $ 27,670 $ 29,030 Fringe Benefits 11,445 13,290 13,940 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 6,430 6,710 6,900 5650-Capital Project 323,397 100,000 100,000 TOTAL DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL $ 364,842 $ 147,670 $ 149,870 113-COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 10,000 $ 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 110 140 500 TOTAL COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT $ 110 $ 10,140 $ 500 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDAISAN SEVAINE 5298-Operating Coca Acct(FS only) $ 176,537 $ 0 $ 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 390 370 120 5650-Capita Project 176,537 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (176,537) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 171 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 176,927 $ 370 $ 120 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 250 $ 260 $ 360 TOTAL HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ 250 $ 260 $ 360 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5000-Regular Salaries $ 22,287 $ 23,930 $ 22,000 Fringe Benefits 10,821 11,490 10,560 5298-Operating Cntra Ala(FS only) 53,341 0 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 4,190 4,180 3,070 5650-Capital Project 53,341 100,000 100,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (53,341) 0 0 TOTAL ETIWANDA DRAINAGE S 90,639 $ 139,600 $ 135,630 118-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 380 $ 390 $ 220 TOTAL UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 380 $ 390 $ 220 119-PARK IMPROVEMENT 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 14,660 $ 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 0 0 150 TOTAL PARK IMPROVEMENT $ 0 $ 14,660 $ 150 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 5000-Regular Salaries $ 62,572 $ 67,540 $ 70,640 5010-Part Time Salaries 15,089 0 0 Fringe Benefits 30,601 32,420 33,910 5100-Travel and Meetings 0 2,300 2,500 5102-Training 80 500 500 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 187 200 200 5160-Membership Dues 235 240 240 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 144 0 150 5200-Operations&Maintenance 3,364 500 500 5300-Comma Services 2,375 50,000 50,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 15,680 15,020 15,220 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 12,464 0 0 5607-Cap Ouday-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 150,000 0 5650-Capital Project 63,021 450,000 250,000 TOTAL PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 205,812 $ 768,720 $ 423,860 122-SOUTH ETHVANDA DRAINAGE 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 160 $ 240 S 410 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 172 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2019/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 160 $ 240 $ 410 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 3,330 $ 0 TOTAL LIBRARY IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 3,330 $ 0 124-TRANSPORTATION 5000-Regular Salaries $ 376,141 $ 396,400 $ 379,230 Fringe Benefits 182,329 190,280 182,040 5298-Operating Cara Acct(FS only) 69,000 0 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 83,150 62,650 62,040 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 41,077 0 0 5650-Capital Project 3,127,511 7,747,500 1,440,650 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (69,000) 0 0 TOTAL TRANSPORTATION $ 3,810,208 $ 8,396,830 $ 2,063,960 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 720 $ 0 TOTAL ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 720 $ 0 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 390 $ 400 $ 230 TOTAL LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 390 $ 400 $ 230 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE 5309-Contract Srvc/Electric Utility $ 0 $ 960 $ 0 TOTAL POLICE IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 960 $ 0 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 170 $ 180 $ 260 TOTAL ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACIL. $ 170 $ 180 $ 260 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 3,180 $ 3,210 $ 4,060 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 14,911 0 0 5650-Capital Project 184,753 77,000 40,000 TOTAL UNDERGROUND UTILITIES $ 202,844 $ 80,210 $ 44,060 130-LMD#1 GENERAL CITY 5000-Regular Salaries $ 16,773 $ 17,820 $ 17,820 5010-Part Time Salaries 3,734 5,000 0 Fringe Benefits 8,392 9,560 8,560 5200-Operations&Maintenance 59,917 70,100 70,100 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 173 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 - Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5204-O&M/Facilities 0 2,300 2,300 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 1,864 2,000 2,000 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rod 269 5,800 5,800 5280-Equip Operations&Maim 0 2,000 2,000 5298-Operating Cntm Acct(FS only) 20,880 0 0 5300-Contract Services 538,602 649,360 550,850 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 5,057 7,630 7,410 5310-Tree Maintenance 52,500 52,500 52,500 5400-Telephone Utilities 1,663 2,000 2,000 5402-Water Utilities 320,210 342,760 342,760 5403-Electric Utilities 44,308 65,980 52,790 5500-Assessment Administration 56,230 62,850 62,850 5501-Admin./General Overhead 45,930 47,410 56,150 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 87,618 363,000 40,000 5650-Capital Project 0 50,000 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (20,880) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 660 660 660 9141 -Transfer Om-Fund 141 90,000 90,000 90,000 TOTAL LMD 01 GENERAL CITY $ 1,333,727 $ 1,848,730 $ 1,366,550 131-LMD#2 VICTORIA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 483,707 $ 555,760 $ 573,110 5005-Overtime Salaries 537 1,090 1,090 5010-Part Time Salaries 54,637 90,220 46,320 Fringe Benefits 235,499 284,810 286,550 5200-Operations&Maintenance 55,497 86,150 86,150 5220-Cellular Technology 0 0 690 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 4,936 5,000 5,000 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rail 0 200 200 5298-Operating Cntra Acct(FS only) 192,960 0 0 5300-Contract Services 999,135 1,627,240 1,533,420 5310-Tree Maintenance 163,192 163,340 163,340 5402-Water Utilities 709,298 801,940 801,940 5403-Electric Utilities 53,723 72,420 61,790 5500-Assessment Administration 31,390 35,080 35,080 5501 -AdminJGeneml Overhead 280,010 289,680 322,630 5504-Interfund Allocation 78,000 80,430 86,230 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 5,040 0 0 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 114,000 100,000 5650-Capital Project 272,651 642,550 425,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (192,960) 0 0 TOTAL LMD#2 VICTORIA $ 3,427,252 $ 4,849,910 $ 4,528,540 132-LMD#3A HYSSOP 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 159 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 5300-Contract Services 2,590 5,260 5,560 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 174 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5310-Tree Maintenance 0 900 900 5402-Water Utilities 911 1,320 1,320 5403-Electric Utilities 502 900 900 5500-Assessment Administration 50 50 50 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 600 1,320 720 TOTAL LMD#3A HYSSOP $ 4,812 $ 11,000 $ 10,700 133-LMD#311 MEDIANS 5000-Regular Salaries $ 63,673 $ 76,640 $ 78,020 5010-Pan Time Salaries 9,688 21,600 I1,010 Fringe Benefits 31,076 41,110 40,180 5152-Computer Software 495 500 500 5200-Operations&Maintenance 6,866 16,450 17,050 5204-O&M/Facilities 1,770 11,500 11,500 5300-Contract Services 371,343 694,300 527,950 5304-Contract Scrv/Facilities 118,952 210,480 168,760 5310-Tree Maintenance 16,824 26,210 26,210 5400-Telephone Utilities (36) 0 0 5402-Water Utilities 101,339 120,470 120,470 5403-Electric Utilities 36,618 44,480 44,480 5500-Assessment Administration 5,580 6,240 6,240 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 37,170 39,820 43,220 5650-Capital Project 0 90,000 0 TOTAL LMD#3B MEDIANS $ 801,358 $ 1,399,800 $ 1,095,590 134-LMD#41K TERRA VISTA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 574,252 $ 678,970 $ 683,180 5005-Overtime Salaries 1,354 1,050 1,050 5010-Part Time Salaries 38,995 47,230 26,140 Fringe Benefits 278,587 335,370 334,400 5200-Operations&Maintenance 54,978 99,750 99,750 5220-Cellular Technology 0 0 690 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 6,000 6,000 6,000 5252-Emergency Equipment&Vch Rntl 0 1,700 1,700 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 1,013 3,750 3,750 5300-Contract Services 365,620 664,110 680,320 5310-Tree Maintenance 74,970 74,970 74,970 5402-Water Utilities 319,290 382,810 371,420 5403-Electric Utilities 23,609 33,940 27,160 5500-Assessment Administration 18,770 20,980 20,980 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 228,600 235,870 255,460 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 5,052 0 0 5607-Cap Outlay-hnpry Oth Than Bldg 0 430,000 0 5650-Capital Project 19,217 400,000 400,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 175 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL LMD#4R TERRA VISTA $ 2,010,307 $ 3,416,550 $ 2,986,970 135-LMD#5 ANDOVER 5000-Regular Salaries $ 1,920 $ 1,910 $ 1,530 5010-Part Time Salaries 467 840 0 Fringe Benefits 959 1,090 740 5200-Operations&Maintenance 326 1,300 1,300 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 0 70 70 5300-Contract Services 431 1,580 1,640 5402-Water Utilities 619 800 650 5403-Electric Utilities 254 490 490 5500-Assessment Administration 220 240 240 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 880 I,350 830 TOTAL LMD#5 ANDOVER $ 6,076 $ 9,670 $ 7,490 136-LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY 5000-Regular Salaries $ 10,752 $ 13,230 $ 12,310 Fringe Benefits 5,221 6,360 5,910 5200-Operations&Maintenance 6,586 11,900 11,900 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rml 0 200 200 5300-Contract Services 226,392 330,830 325,980 5310-Tree Maintenance 34,850 34,850 34,850 5402-Water Utilities 135,424 182,300 155,760 5403-Electric Utilities 5,750 7,330 7,330 5500-Assessment Administration 5,980 6,680 6,680 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 33,350 35,510 40,540 TOTAL LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY $ 464,305 $ 629,190 $ 601,460 137-LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 120,198 $ 130,280 $ 135,720 50 10-Part Time Salaries 9,026 13,160 6,420 Fringe Benefits 58,106 65,170 66,740 5200-Operations&Maintenance 11,968 39,800 39,800 5204-O&M/Facilities 0 1,500 1,500 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rntl 2,635 2,200 3,200 5300-Contract Services 349,998 464,690 479,830 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 1,519 11,300 2,750 5310-Tree Maintenance 25,090 25,090 25,090 5400-Telephone Utilities (51) 0 0 5402-Water Utilities 247,478 364,960 272,800 - 5403-Electric Utilities 19,781 23,280 23,280 5500-Assessment Administration 14,430 16,130 16,130 5501 -AdminJGeneral Overhead 89,410 93,960 104,430 5720-Misc Contributions to City 680 680 680 Fiscal Year 2O20/21 Adopted Budget Page 176 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 202021 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA S 950,268 $ 1,252,200 $ 1,178,370 138-LMD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 2,846 $ 3,980 $ 3,550 Fringe Benefits 1,382 1,920 1,710 5200-Operations&Maintenance 999 2,250 2,250 5300-Contract Services 6,905 10,600 11,370 5310-Tree Maintenance 0 3,720 3,720 5402-Water Utilities 4,845 6,390 5,780 5403-Electric Utilities 769 1,160 1,160 5500-Assessment Administration 950 1,060 1,060 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 7,630 8,880 9,280 TOTAL LMD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 26,326 $ 39,960 $ 39,880 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 194,806 $ 207,990 $ 213,970 5010-Pan Time Salaries 14,369 21,200 11,470 Fringe Benefits 94,099 104,030 105,540 5200-Operations&Maintenance 10,195 30,510 30,510 5220-Cellular Technology 2,618 2,740 690 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rod 0 1,200 1,200 5300-Contract Services 82,602 167,230 249,870 5310-Tree Maintenance 28,880 33,930 33,930 5402-Water Utilities 52,162 62,780 62,780 5403-Electric Utilities 5,307 7,680 7,680 5500-Assessment Administration 6,890 7,700 7,700 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 53,500 57,960 59,110 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 1,000 0 0 5650-Capital Project 0 500,000 40,000 TOTAL LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA $ 546.428 $ 1,204,850 $ 824,450 140-LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 151,837 $ 162,200. $ 166,340 5005-Overtime Salaries 0 1,050 1,050 5010-Part Time Salaries 15,086 31,110 16,510 Fringe Benefits 73,916 84,080 83,950 5200-Operations&Maintenance 11,715 21,400 21,400 5204-O&M/Facilities 0 1,500 1,500 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rntl 2,179 2,000 3,300 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 0 500 500 5300-Contract Services 101,240 206,910 163,020 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 2,011 12,540 3,770 5310-Tree Maintenance 11,500 11,800 11,800 5402-Water Utilities 92,481 109,590 109,590 5403-Electric Utilities 14,469 17,560 17,560 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 177 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5500-Assessment Administration 4,120 4,120 4,120 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 69,780 73,330 81,610 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 2,000 0 0 5607-Cap Ouday-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 65,000 5720-Misc Contributions to City 650 650 650 TOTAL LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA $ 552,984 $ 740,340 $ 751,670 141-LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 1,261 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 5300-Contract Services 3,920 30,000 30,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 440 620 550 TOTAL LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 5,621 $ 40,620 $ 40,550 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 95,559 $ 100,000 $ 100,000 5300-Contract Services 210,521 250,000 250,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 20 1,620 4,830 TOTAL GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS $ 306,100 $ 351,620 $ 354,830 151-SLD#1 ARTERIAL 5000-Regular Salaries $ 14,630 $ 14,560 $ 15,360 5005-Overtime Salaries 9 0 0 Fringe Benefits 7,014 6,990 7,380 5102-Training 180 180 I80 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 7,864 7,990 7,990 5220-Cellular Technology 0 2,000 2,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 48 500 500 5298-Operating Cntm Acct(FS only) 34,994 0 0 5300-Contract Services 17,136 47,750 47,750 5400-Telephone Utilities 1,296 1,500 1,500 5403-Electric Utilities 339,284 358,160 358,160 5500-Assessment Administration 136,890 152,990 152,990 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 50,230 51,220 58,710 5650-Capital Project 34,994 0 0 5699-Capital Pmj Contra Acct(FS) (34,994) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 39,129 37,540 35,320 5701 -Principal Repayments 209,921 212,130 212,130 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (209,921) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 35,080 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 40,536 112,200 113,200 TOTAL SLD#1 ARTERIAL $ 724,370 $ 1,005,760 $ 1,013,220 152SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL 5298-Operating Cntra Aca(FS only) $ 9,293 S 0 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 178 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5300-Contract Services 2,937 20,980 20,980 5403-Electric Utilities 204,416 235,930 269,740 5500-Assessment Administration 34,070 38,080 38,080 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 2,540 1,900 1,920 5650-Capital Project 10,413 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (9,293) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 40,264 38,260 35,990 5701 -Principal Repayments 215,938 216,190 216,190 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (215,938) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 42,100 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 39,270 109,840 110,860 TOTAL SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL $ 376,010 $ 661,180 $ 693,760 153SLD#3 VICTORIA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 19,802 $ 19,640 $ 21,270 5005-Overtime Salaries 9 0 0 Fringe Benefits 9,482 9,430 10,210 5102-Training 180 180 180 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 9,863 9,940 9,940 5298-Operating Coma Acct(FS only) 4,762 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 8,050 8,050 5403-Electric Utilities 100,047 100,150 100,150 5500-Assessment Administration 30,640 34,240 34,240 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 6,930 8,010 6,740 5650-Capital Project 4,762 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (4,762) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 15,115 14,370 13,520 5701 -Principal Repayments 81,063 81,170 81,170 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (81,063) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 15,980 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 15,201 43,550 43,%0 TOTAL SLD#3 VICTORIA $ 228,061 $ 328,780 $ 329,480 154SLD#4 TERRA VISTA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 19,764 $ 19,640 $ 21,270 5005-Overtime Salaries 437 600 0 Fringe Benefits 9,464 9,430 10,210 5102-Training 190 190 190 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 4,940 4,940 4,940 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 706 1,000 1,000 5298-Operating Cmra Acct(FS only) 3,096 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 3,730 3,730 5403-Electric Utilities 37,825 43,280 45,730 5500-Assessment Administration 18,750 20,950 20,950 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 179 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2019/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 4,960 6,020 5,250 5650-Capital Project 23,195 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (3,096) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 7,624 7,250 6,820 5701 -Principal Repayments 40,886 40,960 40,960 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (40,886) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 10,090 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 7,601 20,220 20,410 T0TAL SLD#4 TERRA VISTA $ 145,596 $ 178,260 $ 181,510 155-SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY 5000-Regular Salaries $ 4,604 $ 4,590 $ 4,840 5005-Overtime Salaries 3 0 0 Fringe Benefits 2,207 2,210 2,330 5102-Training 177 180 180 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 6,332 8,990 8,990 5298-Operating Cntra Acct(FS only) 2,170 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 1,770 1,770 5403-Electric Utilities 8,438 19,400 20,320 5500-Assessment Administration 5,970 6,670 6,670 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 1,540 2,090 1,510 5650-Capital Project 2,170 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (2,170) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 3,421 3,260 3,070 5701 -Principal Repayments 18,345 18,400 18,400 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (18,345) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 3,620 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 3,800 9,600 9,690 TOTAL SUB#5 CARYN COMMUNITY $ 42,332 $ 77,210 $ 77,820 156SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 19,764 $ 19,640 $ 21,270 5005-Overtime Salaries 9 0 0 Fringe Benefits 9,464 9,430 10,210 5102-Training 0 180 180 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 6,916 6,940 6,940 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 562 800 800 5298-Operating Cntra Acct(FS only) 5,366 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 2,780 2,780 5403-Electric Utilities 31,845 36,090 40,830 5500-Assessment Administration 5,020 5,610 5,610 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 4,920 6,090 5,330 5650-Capital Project 5,366 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (5,366) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 18o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 202021 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5700-Interest Expense 5,520 5,260 4,950 5701 -Principal Repayments 29,604 29,730 29,730 5704-Long Tenn Debt Repymt Contra (29,604) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 5,720 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 5,067 15,030 15,170 TOTAL SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA $ 100,223 $ 137,630 $ 143,850 I57SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 14,630 $ 14,560 $ 15,360 5005-Overtime Salaries 9 0 0 Fringe Benefits 7,014 6,990 7,380 5102-Training 0 180 180 5160-Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200-Operations&Maintenance 4,553 4,940 4,940 5298-Operating Calm Acct(FS only) 6,313 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 5,630 5,630 5403-Electric Utilities 61,980 60,780 66,090 5500-Assessment Administration 18,230 20,370 20,370 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 3,700 3,920 3,770 5650-Capital Project 6,313 0 0 5699-Capital Frog Contra Acct(FS) (6,313) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 10,884 10,360 9,750 5701 -Principal Repayments 58,372 58,520 58,520 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (58,372) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 11,560 0 0 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 11,401 30,430 30,720 TOTAL SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 150,324 $ 216,730 $ 222,760 158-SLD 08 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000-Regular Salaries $ 18,229 $ 18,110 $ 19,660 5005-Overtime Salaries 8 0 0 Fringe Benefits 8,728 8,700 9,440 5102-Training 0 180 180 5160-Membership Dues 40 40 40 5200-Operations&Maintenance 3,022 4,940 4,940 5298-Operating Cntra Acct(FS only) 1,968 0 0 5300-Contract Services 0 1,980 1,980 5403-Electric Utilities 19,157 21,660 22,490 5500-Assessment Administration 7,420 8,290 8,290 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 4,270 5,350 4,920 5650-Capital Project 1,968 0 0 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (1,968) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 2,860 2,730 2,570 5701 -Principal Repayments 15,354 15,420 15,420 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (15,354) 0 0 9025-Transfer Out-Capital Reserve 850 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 181 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 9150-Transfer Out-Fund 150 3,800 10,720 10,820 TOTAL SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 70,352 $ 98,120 $ 100,750 174STATE GAS TAX 5000-Regular Salaries $ 1,027,911 $ 1,195,000 $ 1,120,900 5005-Overtime Salaries 11,226 12,000 12,000 5010-Part Time Salaries 54,588 88.340 36,680 Fringe Benefits 493,271 590,110 546,120 5102-Training 2,741 2,780 2,780 5200-Operations&Maintenance 0 620 620 5250-Vehicle Operations&Main. 6,036 6,110 6,110 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 1,200 1,200 1,200 5298-Operating Cana Aca(FS only) 843,032 0 0 5300-Contract Services 211,456 292,860 277,290 5403-Electric Utilities 96,325 168,000 168,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 228,740 230,510 239,410 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 11,441 0 0 5650-Capital Project 1,858,205 560,000 1,455,260 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(PS) (843,032) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 8,940 8,940 0 TOTAL STATE GAS TAX $ 4,012,080 $ 3,156,470 $ 3,866,370 176-MEASURE 11990-2010 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 120 $ 210 $ 300 5650-Capital Project 209,367 200,000 0 TOTAL MEASURE 1 1990-2010 $ 209,487 $ 200,210 $ 300 177-MEASURE I 2010-2040 5000-Regular Salaries $ 187,066 $ 260,160 $ 267,070 5005-Overtime Salaries 13,615 14,300 14,300 Fringe Benefits 90,179 124,440 127,970 5298-Operating Cams Aca(FS only) 933,944 0 0 5300-Contract Services 1,052,265 1,194,780 1,152,380 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 42,720 45,780 50,170 5650-Capital Project 1,645,229 2,125,000 1,290,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Aca(FS) (933,944) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 19,910 20,050 0 TOTAL MEASURE 12010-2040 $ 3,050,984 $ 3,784,510 $ 2,901,890 179-ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT 5298-Operating Cram Aca(FS only) $ 404,900 $ 0 $ 0 5650-Capital Project 1,404,900 1,866,000 2,400,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Aca(FS) (404,900) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 182 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT $ 1,404,900 $ 1,866,000 $ 2,400,000 181SB 1-TCEP 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 0 S 0 $ 650 5650-Capital Project 1,386,985 52,150,000 11,000,000 TOTAL SB I-TCEP $ 1,386,985 $ 52,150,000 $ 11,000,650 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 5501 -AdmindGeneral Overhead $ 70 $ 80 $ 0 TOTAL AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF $ 70 $ 80 $ 0 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 5000-Regular Salaries $ 606,566 $ 676,010 $ 671,520 5005-Overtime Salaries 44,103 50,000 50,000 5010-Part Time Salaries 8,778 0 0 Fringe Benefits 291,224 322,760 321,320 5100-Travel and Meetings 1,141 1,500 1,500 5102-Training 675 500 500 5105-Mileage 0 100 100 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 563 1,000 1,000 5160-Membership Dues 600 920 890 5200-Operations&Maintenance 13,400 25,500 25,500 5204-0&M/Facilities 0 500 500 5220-Cellular Technology 1,887 1,940 1,940 5256-Diesel Fuel 4,316 0 0 - 5300-Contract Services 122,495 93,300 148,300 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 0 2,000 3,480 5310-Tree Maintenance 31,441 0 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 140,980 126,590 123,520 9001 -Transfer Out-General Fund 188,420 218,390 218,390 TOTAL INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT $ 1,456,589 $ 1,521,010 $ 1,568,460 194-PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 60 $ 70 $ 100 TOTAL PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING $ 60 $ 70 $ 100 195STATE ASSET SEIZURE 5300-Contract Services $ 6,000 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 930 180 440 TOTAL STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 6,930 $ 40,180 $ 40,440 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 6,000 $ 0 Fiscal Year 202o/21 Adopted Budget Page 183 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 -AdmindGeneml Overhead 30 10 70 TOTAL CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 30 $ 6,010 $ 70 198CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 5000-Regular Salaries $ 14,109 $ 14,170 $ 14,000 Fringe Benefits 6,849 6,810 6,720 5298-Operating Curia Ara(FS only) 468,562 0 0 5300-Contract Services 19,852 0 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 12,910 13,530 12,130 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 32,747 0 0 5650-Capital Project 1,357,449 290,890 266,890 5699-Capital Proj Contra Aca(FS) (468,562) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 23,980 23,630 0 TOTAL CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE UMPRV $ 1,467,896 $ 349,030 $ 299,740 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 5000-Regular Salaries $ 210,409 $ 184,640 $ 181,970 5005-Overtime Salaries 8 0 0 5010-Part Time Salaries 16,975 39,140 0 Fringe Benefits 103,534 98,650 87,060 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 48,380 50,940 35,290 5650-Capital Project 855,917 916,640 962,210 TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT $ 1,235,223 $ 1,290,010 $ 1,266,530 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 150 $ 310 $ 0 5650-Capital Project 5,607 0 0 TOTAL FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 5,757 $ 310 $ 0 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 5650-Capital Project $ 36,838 $ 451,000 $ 401,200 TOTAL PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART3 $ 36,838 $ 451,000 $ 401,200 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 8,502 $ 9,730 $ 9,730 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 0 0 10 TOTAL PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTSIHEALTHY RC $ 8,502 $ 9,730 $ 9,740 225CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 5005-Overtime Salaries $ 3,253 $ 4,600 $ 4,600 5100-Travel and Meetings 934 1,600 2,000 5102-Training 1,350 1,350 1,350 5200-Operations&Maintenance 31,776 37,660 37,660 5300-Contract Services 12,900 13,000 13,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 184 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 1,030 1,180 1,010 TOTAL CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT $ 51,243 $ 59,390 $ 59,620 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM t 5005-Overtime Salaries $ 26,978 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 5100-Travel and Meetings 314 150 150 5102-Training 700 0 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 21,957 24,000 24,000 5501-Admin./General Overhead 1,210 650 660 TOTAL USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM $ 51,159 $ 49,800 $ 49,810 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 5010-Part Time Salaries $ 18,639 $ 11,700 $ 0 Fringe Benefits 1,040 2,630 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 8,366 7,500 0 5300-Contract Services 0 6,270 0 5650-Capital Project 0 90,800 90,800 TOTAL SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM $ 28,045 $ 118,900 $ 90,800 250-RECREATION SERVICES 5000-Regular Salaries $ 534,661 $ 552,010 $ 0 5005-Overtime Salaries 0 1,000 0 5010-Part Time Salaries 1,220,860 1,357,650 0 Fringe Benefits 334,968 373,480 0 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 2,966 2,900 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 212,079 259,820 0 5207-O&M/Capital Supplies 18,160 15,000 0 5300-Contract Services 622,348 642,350 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 41,010 41,010 0 5650-Capital Project 23,129 0 0 TOTAL RECREATION SERVICES $ 3,010,181 $ 3,245,220 $ 0 255-VG CULTURAL CENTER 5000-Regular Salaries $ 120,896 $ 127,720 $ 0 5005-Overtime Salaries 84 1,000 0 5010-Part Time Salaries 306,142 321,800 0 Fringe Benefits 76,546 78,930 0 5152-Computer Software 350 0 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 138,023 119,420 0 5300-Contract Services 887,859 869,430 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 7,350 7,640 0 5605-Capital Outlay-Computer Equip 5,731 0 0 TOTAL VG CULTURAL CENTER $ 1,542,981 $ 1,525,940 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 185 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 5204-0&M/Facilities $ 0 $ 2,150 $ 0 TOTAL FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS $ 0 $ 2,150 $ 0 274-STATE GRANTS FUND 5650-Capital Project $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,686,760 TOTAL STATE GRANTS FUND $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,686,760 290-LUIRARY FUND 5000-Regular Salaries $ 1,632,898 $ 1,842,420 $ 1,767,140 5010-Part Time Salaries 765,649 928,810 985,220 Fringe Benefits 875,314 980,530 929,090 5 100-Travel and Meetings 23,752 31,740 26,280 5102-Training 5,551 0 2,500 5105-Mileage 537 1,000 900 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 7,582 20,750 19,000 5152-Computer Software 360 1,400 0 5160-Membership Dues 4,433 7,190 6,330 5200-Operations&Maintenance 759,653 799,700 769,950 5207-O&M/Capital Supplies 40,575 40,000 40,000 5215-O&M/Computer Equipment 5,209 20,240 78,330 5220-Cellular Technology 477 500 500 5298-Operating Cara Aca(FS only) 4,998 0 0 5300-Contract Services 190,740 352,830 312,880 5400-Telephone Utilities 6,487 10,500 2,650 5402-Water Utilities 5,715 5,040 6,010 5403-Electric Utilities 62,897 65,000 68,250 5405-Internet Services 70,225 54,930 57,480 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 95,100 103,870 114,250 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 8,566 0 0 5606-Capital Outlay-Fum/Fixtures 4,998 5,000 5,000 5699-Capital Frail Contra Aca(FS) (4,998) 0 0 5725-Other Expenditures 0 0 58,400 9329-Transfer Out-Library Cap Fund 0 500,000 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 4,566,718 $ 5,771,450 $ 5,750,160 291-CA STATE LIBRARY 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 32,683 $ 20,600 $ 20,000 5501 -AdminJGeaeral Overhead 400 530 530 9290-Transfer Out-Library Fund 11,428 0 0 TOTAL CA STATE LIBRARY $ 44,511 $ 21,130 $ 20,530 292STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 727 $ 5,750 $ 5,750 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 186 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 1,780 80 150 TOTAL STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) $ 2,507 $ 5,830 $ 5,900 301-THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 5501 -AdminJGeneral Overhead $ 50 $ 50 $ 0 TOTAL THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT $ 50 $ 50 $ 0 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 5501 -Admin./Geneml Overhead $ 0 $ 0 $ 20 TOTAL LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT $ 0 $ 0 $ 20 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 3,290 $ 3,120 $ 300 5650-Capital Project 0 575,000 925,000 TOTAL LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND $ 3,290 $ 578,120 $ 925,300 354-COP'S PROGRAM GRANT-STATE 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 7,615 $ 9,200 $ 2,500 5300-Contract Services 258,374 300,000 300,000 5501-Admin./General Overhead 11,220 4,930 3,520 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 0 38,000 0 TOTAL COP'S PROGRAM GRANT-STATE $ 277,209 $ 352,130 $ 306,020 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 70 $ 0 $ 0 5215-O&M/Computer Equipment 3,081 0 0 TOTAL JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) $ 3,151 $ 0 $ 0 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE 5207-O&M/Capital Supplies $ 31,119 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE $ 31,119 $ 0 $ 0 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE 5207-O&M/Capital Supplies $ 14,102 $ 0 $ 0 5300-Contract Services 1,232 0 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 30 220 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 26,488 68,260 66,140 TOTAL HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE $ 41,852 $ 68,480 $ 66,140 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 5723-Misc Contributions to Fire $ 26,732 $ 26,730 $ 26,840 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 187 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 26,732 $ 26,730 $ 26,840 3%-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 8 $ 0 $ 0 5245-Subsidies To Low/Mad Housing 48,047 48,000 40,500 5300-Contract Services 127,970 214,210 250,000 5620-Project Improvement Costs 8,261,190 200,000 3,505,200 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (8,261,190) 0 0 5720.Misc Contributions to City 200,000 200,000 200,000 TOTAL HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 376,025 $ 662,210 $ 3,995,700 600-AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 5501 -Admin./Geneml Overhead $ 0 $ 0 $ 10 TOTAL AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 0 $ 0 $ 10 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 280 $ 300 $ 430 TOTAL AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 280 $ 300 $ 430 612CFD 2001-01 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 120 $ 910 $ 1,090 TOTAL CFD 2001-01 S 120 $ 910 $ 1,090 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 0 $ 60 TOTAL CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND $ 0 $ 0 $ 60 700SPORTS COMPLEX 5000-Regular Salaries $ 822,823 $ 913,880 $ 710,890 5005-Overtime Salaries 39,025 37,280 14,280 5010-Part Time Salaries 179,832 251,540 18,340 Fringe Benefits 406,929 485,630 345,970 5080-Pension Expense 237 0 0 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 0 0 250 5200-Operations&Maintenance 78,443 98,200 59,200 5204-0&M/Facilities 45,136 52,760 29,300 5206-O&M/Recreation Programs 211 200 0 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 0 1,500 1,500 5252-Emergency Equipment&Veh Rntl 2,110 17,000 4,500 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 14,837 16,000 8,000 5299-Depreciation Expense 560,032 0 0 5300-Contract Services 85,283 124,920 78,170 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 179,132 270,670 138,110 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 188 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 20202l 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5305-Contact Serv/Recreation Prgs 1,400 3,500 0 5400-Telephone Utilities 1,286 3,000 1,500 5401 -Gas Utilities 7,911 7,200 7,200 5402-Water Utilities 85,847 127,130 88,210 5403-Electric Utilities 191,437 212,320 150,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 25,000 25,000 20,000 5602-Capital Outlay-Bldg& Imprvmnt 0 15,000 0 5700-Interest Expense 20,500 19,200 17,910 5701 -Principal Repayments 197,672 123,370 124,660 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (197,672) 0 0 TOTAL SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,746,411 $ 2,905,300 $ 1,817,990 702-REGIS CONNECT 5300-Contract Services $ 0 $ 1,140 $ 0 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 3,350 270 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 15,934 25,000 0 TOTAL REGIS CONNECT $ 19,284 $ 26,410 $ 0 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY 5000-Regular Salaries $ 261,406 $ 346,290 $ 343,790 5010-Part Time Salaries 40,527 48,080 50,320 Fringe Benefits 129,852 172,860 173,730 5080-Pension Expense 1,690 0 0 5 100-Travel and Meetings 634 7,250 5,250 5102-Training 0 42,000 41,000 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 1,000 1,000 2,500 5152-Computer Software 22,800 4,000 14,000 5160-Membership Dues 15,875 19,450 20,140 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 2,020 1,620 1,680 5209-0&M/Electric Utility 5,995,667 6,675,800 8,195,370 5215-0&M/Computer Equipment 7,603 5,070 1,200 5220-Cellular Technology 45,822 73,300 81,300 5299-Depreciation Expense 979,082 0 0 5309-Contact Srvc/ElecMc Utility 1,094,329 864,360 891,350 5312-Legal Services 74,272 30,000 230,000 5400-Telephone Utilities 579 7,500 7,500 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 235,190 239,270 195,080 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 29,196 0 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 79,002 70,000 100,000 5650-Capital Project 1,627,485 1,000,000 259,500 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (1,706,487) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 0 0 5,000 5899-Clearing Acct-Electric Utility (2,139) 0 0 5900-Bad Debt Expense-Electric Util 70,733 0 0 9001 -Transfer Out-General Fund 1,390,260 1,507,760 1,508,650 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 189 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 202021 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 10,396,398 $ 11,115,610 $ 12,127,360 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 5000-Regular Salaries $ 109,395 $ 137,250 $ 136,640 Fringe Benefits 52,310 65,590 65,300 5160-Membership Dues 1,203 2,210 2,220 5161 -Publications&Subscriptions 0 200 200 5209-0&M/Elecuic Utility 213,970 460,000 342,000 5300-Contract Services 7,011 10,000 25,000 5501 -AdminJGeneral Overhead 16,410 18,000 20,170 TOTAL UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND $ 400,299 $ 693,250 $ 591,530 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5501-Admin./General Overhead $ 1,130 $ 1,410 $ 2,020 TOTAL RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 1,130 $ 1,410 $ 2,020 711-FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 5100-Travel and Meetings $ 104 $ 1,000 $ 0 5102-Training 0 1,000 0 5105-Mileage 53 0 0 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 0 1,000 0 5152-Computer Soflwarc 22,000 0 0 5160-Membership Dues 0 0 550 5200-Operations&Maintenance 1,675 126,200 126,200 5299-Depreciation Expense 157,758 0 0 5300-Contract Services 216 270,000 292,510 5330-Payment to Trustee 0 0 5,500 5501-Admin./General Overhead 950 4,820 14,310 5650-Capital Project 1,126,775 445,000 47,300 5699-Capital Proj Contra Acct(FS) (1,169,547) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 203,312 629,610 509,840 5701 -Principal Repayments 0 310,000 425,000 5710-Bond Issuance Costs 272,439 0 0 TOTAL FIBER OPTIC NETWORK $ 615,735 $ 1,788,630 $ 1,421,210 712-EOUIPNERICLE REPLACEMENT 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 95,594 $ 165,350 $ 265,350 5298-Operating Cram Acct(FS only) 18,273 0 0 5299-Depreciation Expense 935,171 0 0 5300-Contract Services 14,646 13,500 13,500 5501 -AdminJGeneral Overhead 37,330 28,980 21,920 5602-Capital Outay-Bldg&Imprvmnt 20,690 0 0 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 463,796 336,000 252,000 5604-Capital Outlay-Vehicles 291,616 169,000 131,000 5605-Capital Outlay-Computer Equip 0 60,000 80,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 190 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5650-Capital Project 0 150,000 150,000 5699-Capital Pmj Contra Acct(FS) (782,323) 0 0 TOTAL EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 1,094,793 $ 922,830 $ 913,770 714-COMP EOUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 5005-Overtime Salaries $ 2,826 $ 52,000 $ 0 5152-Computer Software 77,876 4,000 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 27,070 11,500 5,000 5215-O&M/Computer Equipment 364,173 342,300 43,800 5298-Operating Cnha Acct(FS only) 22,016 0 0 5299-Depreciation Expense 515,742 0 0 5300-Contract Services 382,923 27,530 47,530 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 8,490 8,520 12,290 5605-Capital Outlay-Computer Equip 65,842 285,350 116,000 5699-Capital Proj Contra Ara(FS) (65,842) 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 30,272 0 0 5703-Capital Lease Payment 527,330 537,080 527,340 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (527,330) 0 0 TOTAL COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND $ 1,431,388 $ 1,268,280 $ 751,960 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 5000-Regular Salaries $ 14,599 $ 14,060 S 14,450 Fringe Benefits 7,008 6,750 6,940 5500-Assessment Administration 1,700 1,900 1,900 5501 -AdminJGeneral Overhead 3,490 2,400 2,560 TOTAL AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON $ 26,797 $ 25,110 $ 25,850 947-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 0 $ 15,000 $ 15,000 5252-Emergency Equipment& Veh Rod 0 2,000 2,000 5300-Contract Services 10,058 23,000 23,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 1,340 670 600 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 125,000 0 TOTAL PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 11,398 $ 165,670 $ 40,600 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 5000-Regular Salaries $ 122,636 $ 142,150 $ 147,710 5005-Overtime Salaries 96 3,680 3,680 Fringe Benefits 58,347 68,240 70,970 5200-Operations&Maintenance 45,403 103,910 36,410 5204-0&NI/Facilities 0 2,500 2,500 5252-Emergency Equipment& Veh Rod 777 6,500 6,500 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 1,435 4,500 1,000 5300-Contract Services 270,458 306,790 269,440 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 23,857 12,870 13,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 191 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5310-Tree Maintenance 3,167 19,120 26,210 5400-Telephone Utilities 3,925 6,700 4,500 5402-Water Utilities 173,463 196,160 186,070 5403-Electric Utilities 98,582 120,320 136,650 5500-Assessment Administration 129,370 144,590 144,590 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 44,550 51,980 54,060 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 210,300 0 5650-Capital Project 29,860 0 100,000 5720-Misc Contributions to City 2,960 2,960 2,960 9847-Transfer Out-Fund 847 116,800 116,800 116,800 TOTAL PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND $ 1,125,686 $ 1,520,070 $ 1,323,050 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 5000-Regular Salaries $ 121,174 $ 136,770 $ 137,030 5010-Part Time Salaries 5,888 8,890 12,390 Fringe Benefits 58,093 67,430 68,840 5200-Operations&Maintenance 10,902 25,000 25,000 5204-O&M/Facilities 50 1,000 1,000 5220-Cellular Technology 0 0 690 5300-Contract Services 40,725 98,800 81,610 5310-Tree Maintenance 0 5,000 5,000 5400-Telephone Utilities (132) 0 0 5402-Water Utilities 94,119 103,720 103,720 5403-Electric Utilities 3,051 3,920 3,920 5500-Assessment Administration 1,690 1,890 1,890 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 59,940 63,250 68,480 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 150,000 148,000 5650-Capital Project 14,268 0 0 9137-Transfer Out-Fund 137 30,000 0 0 TOTAL CFO 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE $ 439,768 $ 665,670 $ 657,570 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.ETI WANDA 5500-Assessment Administration $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,200 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 0 0 20 TOTAL CFD 2017-01 NO.ETIWANDA $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,220 876-CFD 201"1 EMPIRE LAKES 5200-Operations&Maintenance $ 1,455 $ 0 $ 0 5300-Contract Services 45,214 0 30,000 5403-Electric Utilities 0 0 5,000 5500-Assessment Administration 0 0 1,200 9130-Transfer Out-LMD1 0 0 2,710 9141 -Transfer Out-Fund 141 0 0 810 9152-Transfer Out-SLD2 0 0 1,900 9847-Transfer Om-Fund 847 0 0 950 Fiscal Year 202O/21 Adopted Budget Page 192 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 9848-Transfer Out-Fund 848 0 0 1,220 9877-Transfers Out-CID Emp Lak 0 0 79,390 TOTAL CID 2018-01 EMPIRE LAKES $ 46,669 $ 0 $ 123,180 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 155,711,253 $ 226,846,740 $ 176,594,710 R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281-FIRE FUND 5000-Regular Salaries $ 12,948,022 $ 13,720,630 $ 15,040,040 5005-Overtime Salaries 3,492,792 3,979,510 4,291,190 5010-Part Time Salaries 119,716 176,450 159,790 Fringe Benefits 8,527,311 9,124,930 11,333,550 5060-Tuition Reimbursement 1,043 10,000 10,000 5082-Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (5,323,730) (5,387,530) (5,978,580) 5083-Reimb Personnel from CID 88-1 (2,217,280) (2,164,860) (2,223,100) 5093-Other Funds-Salary Reimbursmnt (26,732) (26,730) (26,840) 5100-Travel and Meetings 13,297 27,160 23,050 5102-Training 90,951 155,670 154,130 5150-Office Supplies&Equipment 27,641 32,550 32,000 5151 -Postage 20 300 300 5152-Computer Software 2,040 640 0 5155-Public Relations/Educ Material 30,058 36,750 25,750 5160-Membership Dues 5,782 10,530 10,330 5161-Publications&Subscriptions 3,686 14,050 9,270 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 8,467 9,030 8,740 5200-Operations&Maintenance 266,530 339,420 342,520 5204-0&M/Facilities 42,764 98,000 70,000 5220-Cellular Technology 48,101 53,200 67,620 5240-Operation of Acquired Property 0 0 10,500 5250-Vehicle Operations&Maint. 145,372 209,930 210,600 . 5252-Emergency Equipment&Vch Rntl 0 1,500 1,500 5255-Gasoline 30,459 54,520 41,200 5256-Diesel Fuel 125,997 132,420 136,400 5258-Propane 9,330 19,000 19,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 22,533 40,500 38,180 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 68,936 117,190 121,890 5290-Specialized Tools&Equipment 41,178 47,200 52,930 5291 -Equipment Supplies&Repairs 28,178 49,100 43,400 5300-Contract Services 963,593 1,216,610 1,395,660 5304-Contract Serv/Facilities 178,276 277,200 302,570 5312-Legal Services 31,497 50,000 50,000 5320-Hazardous Waste Removal 0 2,500 2,500 5321 -Fire Incident Costs 910 3,500 3,500 5400-Telephone Utilities 11,836 17,910 27,690 5401 -Gas Utilities 10,340 12,080 10,670 5402-Water Utilities 21,140 19,640 22,270 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 193 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5403-Electric Utilities 77,259 95,010 84,390 5410-Property Insurance 95,246 95,250 123,090 5411 -Other Insurance 4,310 5,500 5,580 5416-General Liability Insurance 257,568 295,560 402,850 5417-General Liability Claims 4,027 0 0 5500-Assessment Administration 87,371 97,570 97,570 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 2,374,010 2,725,110 3,118,370 5510-Property Tax Admin.Fee 143,652 123,600 156,010 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 35,992 0 0 5700-Interest Expense 77,830 63,200 47,560 5701 -Principal Repayments 322,154 336,790 352,430 5704-Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (322,154) 0 0 5720-Misc Contributions to City 239,180 356,160 456,970 9283-Transfer Out-CFD 88-1 1,188,393 1,966,610 2,036,930 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,334,892 $ 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85.1 5081 -Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 $ 5,978,580 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 2,866 3,200 3,110 5200-Operations&Maintenance 9,832 10,000 10,000 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 15,620 0 0 5300-Contract Services 365,188 375,330 367,860 5400-Telephone Utilities 4,045 4,270 4,490 5401 -Gas Utilities 6,139 5,930 7,360 5402-Water Utilities 16,620 13,710 13,240 5403-Electric Utilities 51,804 56,240 62,180 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 256,870 252,280 292,080 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,052,714 $ 6,108,490 $ 6,738,900 283COMMUNM FACILITIES DIST 88-1 5081 -Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 $ 2,223,100 5165-Licenses,Permits&Fees 1,439 1,410 1,490 5200-Operations&Maintenance 3,606 4,000 4,000 5300-Contract Services 86,585 93,420 91,580 5400-Telephone Utilities 1,624 1,600 15,160 5401-Gas Utilities 1,766 2,070 2,170 5402-Water Utilities 4,870 5,240 5,240 5403-Electric Utilities 13,712 15,180 14,520 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 108,540 107,030 110,760 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,439,422 $ 2,394,810 $ 2,468,020 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 5501 -Admin./General Overhead $ 90 $ 200 $ 210 TOTAL FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 90 $ 200 $ 210 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 194 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 5152-Computer Software $ 22,810 $ 0 $ 0 5200-Operations&Maintenance 82,905 110,000 180,000 5207-0&M/Capital Supplies 89,123 63,000 165,000 5215-O&M/Computer Equipment 60,602 78,920 2,000 5240-Operation of Acquired Property 1,000 1,000 0 5250-Vehicle Operations&Main. 29,481 50,000 50,000 5280-Equip Operations&Maint 1,017 3,000 3,000 5285-Safety Gear&Equipment 15,690 0 0 5290-Specialized Tools&Equipment 1,769 38,000 3,000 5291-Equipment Supplies&Repairs 12,498 1,300 0 5298-Operating Cons Acct(FS only) 143,370 0 0 5300-Contract Services 109,340 135,000 276,000 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 33,780 49,160 51,700 5530-Banking Fees Allocation 42,113 0 0 5602-Capital Outlay-Bldg&Imprvmn 46,103 0 300,000 5603-Capital Outlay-Equipment 15,227 44,500 26,000 5604-Capital Outlay-Vehicles 108,662 1,826,000 1,365,000 5605-Capitol Outlay-Computer Equip 1,053,560 0 0 5606-Capital Outlay-Fum/Fixtures 28,422 500,000 0 5607-Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 1,140,000 0 5650-Capital Project 1,432,994 450,000 3,513,550 5699-Capital Prcj Contra Acct(FS) (143,370) 0 0 9714-Transfer Out-Comptr Eq Rplc 158,630 107,420 117,670 TOTAL FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND $ 3,345,726 $ 4,597,300 $ 6,052,920 TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 36,172,844 $ 41,741,660 $ 47,982,020 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 191,884,097 $ 268,588,400 $ 224,576,730 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 195 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERALFUND DIVISION 001 -NON-DEPARTMENTAL GENERAL $ 7,189,490 $ 6,047,620 $ 4,531,930 002-NON-DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 119,778 129,310 182,240 101 -CITY COUNCIL 117,720 118,110 132,470 102-CITY MANAGEMENT 902,829 991,920 1,016,030 103-CITY CLERK 1,970 1,960 1,940 104-ANIMAL CARE AND SERVICES 3,254,794 3,416,210 3,161,730 106-RECORDS MANAGEMENT 432,923 505,450 1,279,650 107-HEALTHY RC PROGRAM 580,009 628,910 633,230 108-COMMUNICATIONS 176,795 236,420 528,120 201 -ADMIN SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 278,492 277,430 186,530 204-BUSINESS LICENSING 317,803 369,680 369,880 205-CITY FACILITIES 967,928 1,062,520 1,021,620 206-FINANCE 1,392,594 1,507,700 1,520,910 209-INNOVATION&TECHNOLOGY SRVCS 3,470,844 3,955,130 3,524,740 210-PERSONNEL 747,737 735,110 651,090 211 -PROCUREMENT 261,559 274,510 247,010 212-RISK MANAGEMENT 229,775 282,440 249,480 213-TREASURY MANAGEMENT 10,928 12,420 12,300 217-CITY TELECOMMUNICATIONS 238,274 212,560 259,430 301 -ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DVLPMNT 667,945 805,350 802,270 302-BUILDING AND SAFETY 1,750,622 1,916,950 1,766,050 303-ENGINEERING-ADMINISTRATION 410,656 433,040 301,100 305-ENGINEERING-DEVELOPMENT MGT 861,673 1,106,870 963,370 306-ENGINEERING-NPDES 371,617 381,340 303,650 307-ENGINEERING-PROJECT MGT 484,523 603,800 529,590 308-ENGINEERING-TRAFFIC MGT 192,929 255,720 255,590 311 -FIRE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 231,866 356,160 456,970 312-CITY FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 3,247,430 3,997,670 3,610,070 314-PLANNING 2,367,996 1,793,550 1,618,600 315-PLANNING COMMISSION 17,476 17,280 15,170 317-VEHICLE AND EQUIP.MAINT. 943,164 1,127,540 1,068,040 318-STREET MAINTENANCE 2,051,884 2,889,140 2,404,740 319-PARK MAINTENANCE 2,726,587 3,291,770 2,728,470 322-COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT 621,156 759,570 782,010 401 -COMMUNITY SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 4,739,453 5,562,050 1,579,750 402-CSD-CENTRAL PARK OPERATIONS 0 0 1,383,370 403-CSD-LIONS CENTER 0 0 885,410 404-CSD-RC FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER 0 0 175,810 405-CSD-RC SPORTS CENTER 0 0 663,220 406-CSD-SPECIAL EVENTS 0 0 246,780 407-CSD-VICTORIA GARDENS CULT CTR 0 0 2,404,260 408-CSD-CONTRAC1`CLASSES 0 0 592,420 409-CSD-PARK SERVICES 0 0 188,390 701 -POLICE-ADMINISTRATION 39,321,195 42,327,060 44,869,070 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 196 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 81,700,314 $ 88,290,270 $ 90,104,500 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 168,905 $ 162,480 $ 111,330 006-CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 271,486 614,110 583,890 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 425,205 561,100 6,500 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 204,922 649,720 478,500 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 377,775 409,260 112,000 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY-DEVELOPMENT 1,168,672 0 0 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 140 97,560 145,380 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 3,540 36,510 42,750 023-SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 4,989 5,730 5,730 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 7,351,866 6,235,270 5,650,060 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 1,692,035 906,760 1,079,220 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 11,669,535 $ 9,678,500 $ 8,215,360 SPECIAL REVENUE 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 1,170,369 $ 1,071,230 $ 1,014,630 101 -AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 220 210 180 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 1,223,231 990,990 320,400 106-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT 0 0 30,000 110-BEAUTIFICATION 126,465 410,440 450 111 -PARK LAND ACQUISITION 290 30,710 1,370 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 364,842 147,670 149,870 113-COMMUNI3Y/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 110 10,140 500 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 176,927 370 120 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 250 260 360 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 90,639 139,600 135,630 118-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 380 390 220 119-PARK IMPROVEMENT 0 14,660 150 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 205,812 768,720 423,860 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 160 240 410 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 0 3,330 0 124-TRANSPORTATION 3,810,209 8,396,830 2,063,960 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 0 720 0 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 390 400 230 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE 0 960 0 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 170 180 260 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 202,844 80,210 44,060 130-LMD#1 GENERAL CITY 1,333,727 1,848,730 1,366,550 131 -LMD#2 VICTORIA 3,427,251 4,849,910 4,528,540 132-LMD#3A HYSSOP 4,812 11,000 10,700 133-LMD#3B MEDIANS 801,358 1,399,800 1,095,590 134-LMD#4R TERRA VISTA 2,010,305 3,416,550 2,986,970 135-LMD#S ANDOVER 6,077 9,670 7,490 136-LMD#6R CARYN COMMUNITY 464,306 629,190 601,460 137-LMD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 950,267 1,252,200 1,178,370 138-LMD,#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 26,327 39,960 39,880 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETIWANDA 546,428 1,204,950 824,450 140-LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 552,983 740,340 751,670 141 -LMD I CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5,621 40,620 40,550 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 197 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 201920 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 306,100 351,620 354,830 151 -SLD#1 ARTERIAL 724,370 1,005,760 1,013,220 152-SLD 42 RESIDENTIAL 376,009 661,180 693,760 153-SLD#3 VICTORIA 228,061 328,780 329,480 154-SLD#4 TERRA VISTA 145,594 178,260 181,510 155-SLD#5 CARYN COMMUNITY 42,331 77,210 77,820 156-SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 100,223 137,630 143,850 157-SLD#7 NORTH ETIWANDA 150,323 216,730 222,760 158-SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 70,352 98,120 100,750 174-STATE GAS TAX 4,012,079 3,156,470 3,866,370 176-MEASURE 11990-2010 209,487 200,210 300 177-MEASURE 12010-2040 3,050,984 3,784,510 2,901,890 179-ROAD MAINT&REHAB ACCT 1,404,900 1,866,000 2,400,000 181 -SB I-TCEP 1,386,985 52,150,000 11,000,650 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 70 80 0 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 1,456,589 1,521,010 1,568,460 194-PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING 60 70 100 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE 6,930 40,180 40,440 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 30 6,010 70 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 1,467,896 349,030 299,740 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 1,235,223 1,290,010 1,266,530 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 5,757 310 0 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART3 36,838 451,000 401,200 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/FEALTHY RC 8,502 9,730 9,740 225-CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 51,242 59,390 59,620 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 51,159 49,800 49,810 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 28,046 118,900 90,800 250-RECREATION SERVICES 3,010,181 3,245,220 0 255-VG CULTURAL CENTER 1,542,982 1,525,940 0 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 0 2,150 0 274-STATE GRANTS FUND 0 0 2,686,760 290-LIBRARY FUND 4,566,717 5,771,450 5,750,160 291 -CA STATE LIBRARY 44,511 21,130 20,530 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) 2,507 5,830 5,900 301 -THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 50 50 0 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 0 0 20 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 3,290 578,120 925,300 354-COPS PROGRAM GRANT-STATE 277,209 352,130 306,020 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(SAG) 3,152 0 0 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-FIRE 31,119 0 0 . 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE 41,851 68,480 66,140 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 26,732 26,730 26,840 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 376,025 662,210 3,995,700 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 26,797 25,110 25,850 847-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 11,398 165,670 40,600 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,125,687 1,520,070 1,323,050 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 439,767 665,670 657,570 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.ETIWANDA 0 0 1,220 876-CFD 2018-01 EMPIRE LAKES 46,669 0 123,180 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 45,635,554 $ 110,255,040 $ 60,647,420 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 198 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget 2019/20 2020/21 2018/19 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CAPITAL PROJECTS 600-AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 0 $ 0 $ 10 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 280 300 430 612-CFD 2001-01 120 910 1,090 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 0 0 60 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 400 $ 1,210 $ 1,590 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700-SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,746,413 $ 2,805,300 $ 1,817,990 702-REGIS CONNECT 19,284 26,410 0 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY 10,396,398 11,115,610 12,127,360 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 400,300 693,250 591,530 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 1,130 1,410 2,020 711 -FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 615,735 1,788,630 1,421,210 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 14,179,260 $ 16,430,610 $ 15,960,110 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712-EQUIPIVERICLE REPLACEMENT $ 1,094,793 $ 922,830 $ 913,770 714-COMP EQUEP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 1,431,389 1,268,280 751,960 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 2,526,182 $ 2,191,110 $ 1,665,730 TOTAL CTTY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 155,711,245 $ 226,846,740 $ 176,594,710 RC.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 -FIRE FUND $ 24,334,892 S 28,640,860 $ 32,721,970 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 6,052,713 6,108,490 6,738,900 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 2,439,421 2,394,810 2,468,020 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 90 200 210 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 3,345,725 4,597,300 6,052,920 TOTALSPECIALREVENUE $ 36,172,941 $ 41,741,660 $ 47,982,020 TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 36,172,841 $ 41,741,660 $ 47,982,020 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 191,884,086 $ 268,588,400 $ 224,576,730 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page i99 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 200 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-SUMMARY ADOPTED DEPARTMENT 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 GOVERNANCE City Council 5.0 5.0 5.0 City Clerk 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Treasurer 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Management 19.0 19.0 22.0 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 26.0 26.0 29.0 PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District 115.0 115.0 121.0 Animal Care and Services 22.0 22.0 19.0 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 137.0 137.0 140.0 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management 5.0 5.0 5.0 Community Services 46.5 45.5 29.0 Library Services 28.5 27.5 26.0 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 80.0 78.0 60.0 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Administration/Procurement 5.0 5.0 1.0 Finance 21.0 23.0 23.0 Human Resources 9.0 9.0 8.0 Innovation and Technology 23.0 23.0 24.0 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 58.0 60.0 56.0 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration 3..0 3.0 3.0 Building and Safety Services 16.0 16.0 15.0 Engineering Services 37.0 39.0 35.0 Planning 14.0 13.0 11.0 Public Works Services 129.0 130.0 122.0 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 199.0 201.0 186.0 TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 500.0 502.0 471.0 Fiscal Yeu 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 201 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020121 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 2020121 GOVERNANCE Elected Officials Mayor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Councilmember 4.0 4.0 4.0 City Clerk 1.0 1.0 LO City Treasurer 1.0 LO LO Total Elected Officials 7.0 7.0 7.0 City Management Administrative Assistant 1.0 1.0 LO City Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Communicationsand Marketing Officer 1.0 0.0 0.0 Community Affairs Coordinator'(1) 0.0 0.0 2.0 Community Affairs Officer 0.0 1.0 1.0 Community Affairs Senior Coordinator(1) 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Affairs Technicum(1) 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Improvement Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Improvement Officer 1(2) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Improvement Officer II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Community Programs Coordinator-- 2.0 2.0 1.0 DCM/Civic&Cultural Services 1,0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant I(3) 1.0 1.0 0.0 Executive Assistant 11. 0.0 0.0 1.0 Management Aide 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst 1 1.0 1.0 LO Management Analyst 11 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst 111 1.0 1.0 1.0 Principal Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Community Improvement Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Executive Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total City Management 19.0 19.0 22.0 TOTALGOVERNANCE 26.0 26.0 29.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 202 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT- DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 - PUBLIC SAFETY - Fire District Administrative Assistant' 0.0 0.0 3.0 Business Manager' 0.0 0.0 1.0 Captain Specialist 3.0 3.0 3.0 Community Affairs Senior Coordinator 0.0 1.0 1.0 Emergency Management Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 EMS Administrator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant l* 0.0 0.0 LO Executive Assistant IT* OA 0.0 1.0 Field Training Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Battalion Chief 4.0 4.0 4.0 Fire Captain 27.0 27.0 27.0 Fire Chief 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Deputy Chief 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Engineer 27.0 27.0 27.0 Fire Equipment Apprentice Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Equipment Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Equipment Lead Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Marshall 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Prevention Specialist 1 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Prevention Specialist II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Prevention Supervisor 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Shop Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Firefighter' 27.0 27.0 33.0 Management Aide 1.0 0.0 0.0 Management Analyst I 2.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst It 0.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst❑1** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Office Specialist 11'* 3.0 3.0 0.0 Secretary** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Swim Administrative Secretary** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Total Fire District 115.0 115.0 121.0 Fiscal Year 2o2o/21 Adopted Budget Page 203 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018119 2019120 2020/21 Animal Care and Services Administrative Assistant** 3.0 3.0 2.0 Animal Behavior Specialist** 0.0 2.0 1.0 Animal Care Supervisor 2.0 2.0 2.0 Animal Caretaker** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Animal Center Manager 1.0 1.0 LO Animal Handler 3.0 0.0 0.0 Animal Rescue Specialist 0.0 1.0 LO Animal Services Director 1.0 1.0 LO Animal Services Dispatcher 1.0 1.0 LO Animal Services Officer 3.0 3.0 3.0 Community Programs Specialist 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Animal Services Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Veterinary Technician 1.0 1.0 LO Veterinarian 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Technician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Animal Care and Services 22.0 22.0 19.0 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 137.0 137.0 140.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 204 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 201920 2020121 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Administrative Assistant 2.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant City Clerk 1.0 0.0 0.0 City Clerk Records Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Clerk Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Deputy Director of City Clerk Services 0.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant 1 0.0 1.0 1.0 Total Records Management 5.0 5.0 5.0 Community Services Administrative Assistant** 6.0 3.0 1.0 Artistic PmduccrMam Street Theatre** 0.0 1.0 0.0 Box Office Coordinator 0.0 1.0 1.0 Community Affairs Coordinator(1) 0.0 1.0 0.0 Community Affairs Senior Coordinator(1) 0.0 1.0 0.0 Community Affairs Technician,(1) 0.0 1.0 0.0 Community Services Coordinator** 18.0 12.0 10.0 Community Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Services Manager** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Community Services Marketing Coordinator 1.0 0.0 0.0 Community Services Superintendent** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Community Services Supervisor 6.0 4.0 4.0 Community Services Technician 0.0 1.0 1.0 Community Theater Producer** 0.0 1.0 0.0 Cultural Center Manager** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Deputy Community Services Director 0.0 1.0 1.0 Event&Rental Semces Coordinator 0.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant Il(4) 1.0 1.0 1.0 From of House Coordinator 0.0 1.0 1.0 Fund Development Coordinator 0.5 0.0 0.0 Management Aide 2.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst l 1.0 1.0 LO Management Analyst 11** 2.0 2.5 2.0 Patron and Events Supervisor 0.0 1.0 1.0 Theater Productions Supervisor 0.0 1.0 1.0 Theatre Technician 111** 4.0 4.0 0.0 Total Community Services 46.5 45.5 29.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 205 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 2020121 Library Services Assistant Library Director 1.0 0.0 0.0 Deputy Director of Library Services 0.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant 11 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fund Development Coordinator 0.5 0.0 0.0 Librarian 1(5) 10.0 7.0 7.0 Librarian ll• 1.0 3.0 4.0 Library Assistant 11 2.0 2.0 2.0 Library Clerk 3.0 3.0 3.0 Library Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Services Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Technician*' 5.0 5.0 4.0 Management Analyst Il" 0.0 0.5 0.0 Senior Librarian-- 3.0 3.0 2.0 Total Library Services 28.5 27.5 26.0 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 80.0 78.0 60.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 2o6 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019120 2020/21 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Administration/Pumbasing DCM/Adminisvativc Services LO 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant l** LO 1.0 0.0 Procurement Manager(6) 1.0 1.0 0.0 Procurement Technician(6) 2.0 2.0 0.0 Total Admin/Purchasing 5.0 5.0 1.0 Finance Account Clerk** 5.0 5.0 4.0 AccountTechnician** 1.0 3.0 2.0 Accounts Payable Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Budget Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Business License Clerk** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Business License Program Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Business License Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Customer Services Representative* 0.0 0.0 2.0 Executive Assistant 1(3) 0.0 0.0 1.0 Finance Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Finance Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide 0.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst 111 2.0 0.0 0.0 Payroll Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Principal Accountant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Revenue Manager 0.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Accountant 2.0 2.0 2.0 Special Districts Analyst 0.0 1.0 1.0 Special Districts Technician 1.0 0.0 0.0 Total Finance 21.0 23.0 23.0 Human Resources Administrative Assistant** LO 1.0 0.0 Deputy Human Resources Director 0.0 1.0 1.0 Human Resources Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Human Resources Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 Human Resources Technician 3.0 3.0 3.0 Management Analyst 1 1.0 1.0 1.0 Risk Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Risk Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Human Resources 9.0 9.0 8.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 207 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Innovation and Technology Administrative Assistant 2.0 2.0 2.0 Deputy Director of Innovation and Technology 1.0 1.0 1.0 GIS Analyst 2.0 2.0 2.0 GIS Specialist" 0.0 4.0 2.0 GIS Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Information Technology Analyst 1(7) 3.0 3.0 3.0 Information Technology Analyst II(8) 3.0 3.0 3.0 Information Technology Specialist 11 2.0 2.0 2.0 Information Technology Technician" 1.0 1.0 0.0 Innovation and Technology Direetor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Procurement Manager(6) 0.0 0.0 1.0 Procurement Technician(6) 0.0 0.0 2.0 Senior GIS Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior GIS Technician 4.0 0.0 0.0 Senior information Technology Analyst 2.0 2.0 2.0 Senior Information Technology Specialist' 0.0 0.0 1.0 Total Innovation and Technology 23.0 23.0 24.0 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 58.0 60.0 56.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 208 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration DCM/Economic&Community Development 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst 11 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Administration 3.0 3.0 3.0 Building and Safety Services Administrative Assistant** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Building Inspection Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Building Inspector 5.0 4.0 4.0 Building Safety Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant l LO 0.0 0.0 Executive Assistant It 0.0 1.0 1.0 Plans Examiner I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Plans Examiner If 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician 111 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Building Inspector 0.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Plans Examiner 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Building and Safety Services 16.0 16.0 15.0 Engineering Services Administrative Assistant** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Assistant City Engineer 1.0 0.0 0.0 Assistant Engineer 5.0 5.0 5.0 Associate Engineer(9) 6.0 6.0 6.0 Deputy Director of Engineering/Assistant City Engineer 0.0 1.0 1.0 Deputy Director of Engineering/Utilities&Environmental Services 0.0 1.0 1.0 Engineering Services Director/City Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Engineering Technician** 4.0 4.0 3.0 Environments]Programs Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Environmental Programs Inspector 2.0 2.0 2.0 Environmental Programs Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant l** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Management Aide 1.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst 1 2.0 2.0 2.0 Principal Engineer(10) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Services Technician 111 2.0 2.0 2.0 Public Works Inspector 1 2.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Inspector ll**(11) 1.0 2.0 1.0 Senior Civil Engineer(12) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Supervising Public Works Inspector 1.0 1.0 1.0 Traffic Engineer(10) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Utilities Division Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 Utilities Operations Supervisor 0.0 1.0 1.0 Total Engineering Services 37.0 39.0 35.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 209 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA. FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT -DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 202021 Planning Administrative Assistant-- 2.0 1.0 0.0 Assistant Planner 4.0 2.0 2.0 Associate Planner 3.0 2.0 2.0 Executive Assistant 11 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst 11 0.0 1.0 1.0 Planning Director 0.0 1.0 1.0 Planning Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 Planning Technician" 1.0 2.0 1.0 Principal Planner 0.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Planner 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Planning 14.0 13.0 11.0 Public Works Services Administrative Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Deputy Director of Public Works 1.0 1.0 LO Electrician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Equipment Operator 5.0 5.0 5.0 Executive Assistant I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Facilities Superintendent 1.0 1.0 LO Fleet Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Inventory Specialist Equipment/Materials 1.0 1.0 1.0 Lead Maintenance Worker**(13) 15.0 16.0 15.0 Lead Mechanic LO 1.0 1.0 Maintenance Coordinator 9.0 9.0 9.0 Maintenance Supervisor 10.0 10.0 10.0 Maintenance Worker'"(14) 57.0 57.0 50.0 Management Analyst l 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst Di 1.0 1.0 1.0 Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Parks/Landscape Maintenance Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Safety Coordinator 1.0 1.0 LO Public Works Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Maintenance Worker 11.0 11.0 11.0 Signal&Lighting Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Signal&Lighting Technician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Streets/Stonn Drain Maintenance Superintendent Lo 1.0 1.0 Total Public Works Services 129.0 130.0 122.0 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 199.0 201.0 186.0 TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 500.0 502.0 471.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 210 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2020/21 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT-DETAIL ADOPTED DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2018/19 2019/20 202021 PART TIME EMPLOYEES FTEs(FULL TIME EQUIVALENTS) GOVERNANCE City Management 0.4 0.8 0.0 TOTAL CITY MANAGEMENT 0.4 0.8 0.0 PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District 3.5 3.5 3.5 Animal Care and Services 12.8 15.9 14.9 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 16.3 19.4 18.4 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management 0.5 0.5 0.0 Community Services 102.9 93.6 63o Library Services 27.6 28.1 28.6 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 131.0 122.2 91.6 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Procurement(6) 1.0 1.4 0.0 Innovation and Technology(6) 0.0 0.0 0.7 Human Resources 0.5 0.5 0.0 Finance 2.3 1.2 0.3 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 3.8 3.1 1.0 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Building and Safety Services 0.5 0.5 0.5 Engineering Services 1.9 1.2 0.8 Planning 0.8 0.8 0.0 Public Works Services 34.1 34.1 13.2 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 37.3 36.6 14.5 TOTAL PART TIME POSITIONS 188.8 182.1 125.5 Chances in smffine levels for Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budeet "Position(s)handed for FY 202021 --Position(s)defended for FY 202021 (1)One position transferred from Community Services to City Management (2)One positive overfilled by Community Improvement Officer H (3)Position transferred from City Management to Finance (4)Posinoe underfilled by Executive Assistant 1 (5)One position underffl d by Library Technician (6)Procurement Division transferred from Adeamoration to Innovation and Technology (7)One position underfilled by Infonaazivn Technology Specialist II (8)One position undeKlled by Information Technology Analyst 1 (9)One position underfilled by Assistant Engineer (10)Position underfilled by Senior Civil Engineer (11)Position uederfilled by Public Works Inspector I (12)Position anderfilled by Associate Engineer (13)One possum funded for halfthe Fiscal Year (14)Pwitioa overfilled by Senior Maintenance Worker Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 211 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 212 J RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fund Balance Summaries Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 213 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 214 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Spendable Fund Balances As indicated in the Glossary of Budget Terms, fund balance is essentially the difference between the assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund. There are five separate components of fund balance, each of which identifies the extent to which the City is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts can be spent. • Nonspendable fund balance(inherently nonspendable) • Restricted fund balance(e termdty enforceable limitations on use) • Committed fund balance (self-imposed limitations on use) • Assigned fund balance (limitation resulting from intended use) • Unassigned fund balance (residual net resources) The first two components listed above are not included in the Spendable Fund Balances report on the following pages due to the nature of their restrictions, with the exception of Special Revenue and Capital Projects Funds. These two fund types have restricted funding sources; however, the budgets presented represent qualifying expenditures that are in line with the restrictions. Therefore, the respective fund balances are presented. The last three components are incorporated into the report for all fund types. For the City's Operating Budget,following are the main components of the committed fund balance included in the fund balance roll forward: Fund 001 —General Fund: Changes in Economic Circumstances $17,588,316 Working Capital $ 4,505,225 Funds 281-283—Fire District Operating Funds: Working Capital $20,964,445 Changes in Economic Circumstances $ 9,128,022 Employee Leave Payouts $ 4,082,530 All other fund balances in the City's Operating Budget are either committed or assigned. The Operating Budget has no unassigned fund balances. For descriptions of the City's committed fund balance categories, please refer to the City's Financial Policies included in the Appendix to this budget document. The City adopts a balanced Operating Budget each year. As indicated in the Glossary of Budget Terms, a balanced budget is a budget in which the amount of budgeted expenditures is equal to or less than the amount of budgeted revenues plus available fund balance. For FY 2020/21, the City General Fund (Fund 001) has planned for the use of $700,000 from the Changes in Economic Circumstances Reserve to offset the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. An additional $10,000 of the Animal Center Operations Reserve will be used to fund medical equipment for the Center. In the Other Funds, increases or decreases are dependent upon general fluctuations in recurring revenues, such as gas tax;the receipt of new grant funding; or the usage of funding received in prior years for capital expenditures. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 215 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Estimated Eati.a Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1,2020 Revenues Transfers) Tra rs Out Expenditures June 30,2021 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001-GENERALFUND $ 27,566,198 S 87,576,950 $ 1,817,550 $ 3,005,230 S 87,099270 $ 26,856,198 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 27566198 $ 87576950 $ 1817550 $ 3,005230 $ 87,099270 $ 26,856,198 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS W3-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 4257 $ 11030 S - S - $ 111,330 $ 4,257 006-CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 96g273 443,W9 - 3W,510 193,380 SM,283 W8-CNTY OF S.B.REIMBURSEMENTS 33,944 - - - - 33,944 016-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 2,302,W8 364,080 - - 6,500 2,659,588 017-LAWENFORCEMENTRESERVE 4,051,918 1S6,530 - - 478,500 3,759,948 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 40290 101,730 10270 - 112,000 40,290 020-CITYTECHNOLOGYFEEFUND 1,778,479 298,590 - - 145,380 1,931,689 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM I W,335 36,120 - - 42,750 183,705 023-SBI I M CERT ACCESS SPEC FROG 136,516 42,650 - - 5,730 173,436 025-CAPITALRESERVE 54,025,914 1280,250 725,000 1,356,710 4,293,350 50,381,104 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 3,673,373 50,080 1,079,220 2,644233 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 67201,307 $ 2,915,260 $ 735270 $ 1,747220 $ 6,468,140 $ 62,636477 SPECWL REVENUE 1 W-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMAN $ 632,849 $ 1,019,440 $ - $ - $ 1,014,630 $ 637,659 101-AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 312,393 3,260 - - 180 315,473 105-AB2766 A@ QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 793,631 253,920 - - 320,0) 727,151 1W-MSRC AM POLLUTION REDUCE GRIST - 30,OW - - 30,000 - 109-PUBLIC ART TRUST FUND 138,679 2,760 - - - 141439 110-BEAUTIFICATION 629,692 14,750 - - 450 643,992 111-PARK LAND ACQUISITION 4,077,3W 770,940 - - 1,370 4,S46,872 112-DRAINAGE FACAMNERAL 4237,007 173,OW - - 149,870 4,260,137 113-COMMUNTY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 1,470,IW 337,300 - - SW 1,806,9% 114-DRAINAGE-EETWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 269,570 5280 - - 120 274,730 Its-HENDERSONWARDMAN DRAINAGE 990,550 - - - 360 990,1% 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 2,089,923 39,510 - - 135,630 1,993,803 118-UPPERETDVANDADMINAGE 608,955 11,860 - - 220 620,595 119-PARKIMPROVEMENT 2,170,085 236,330 - - 150 2,406,265 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 8,198,436 160,580 - - 423,MO 7,935,156 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 1,114,382 21,650 - - 410 1,135,622 123-LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 844,966 122,630 - - - 9675% 124-TRANSPORTATION 36,856,195 3,853,270 - - 2,063,960 38,M5,505 125-ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 164,216 26,150 - - - 190,366 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRANAGE 70,155 12,6W - - 230 719,525 127-POLICEI.MPACTFEE 635,130 113,930 - - - 749,060 129-EMANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACT. ]22,4W 14,060 - - 260 736297 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 11,362,096 309,590 - - 44,060 11,627,616 130-LMD 9 I GENERAL CITY 1,464,826 1,320,310 39,010 90,WO 1,276,550 1,457596 131-LMD#2 VICTORIA 4,551,412 3,793,680 314280 - 4,528,540 4,130,832 132-LMD#3A HYSSOP 32,454 4,320 - - 10)00 26,074 133-LMD#3B MEDIANS 2,439,535 1,083,8W - - 1,095,590 2,427,745 134-LAID#4R TERRA VISTA 7,328,155 2,913,070 - - 2,986.970 7254,255 135-LMD#5 ANDOVER 30,3W 3,020 - - 7,490 25,832 136-LMD 06R CAR"COMMUNITY 771,170 554,350 39,010 - 601,460 763,070 137-LMD#]NORTH ETHVANDA 1,420,389 1,027,510 - - II78,370 1269,529 138-LMD#8 SOUTH ETDVANDA 79,002 35,7W - - 39,880 74,822 139-LMD#9 LOWER ETDVANDA 1,444,383 9K560 - - $24,450 1,584,493 - 140-LMD#10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,442,120 653,710 - - 751,670 1,344.160 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 216 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Ertimsted Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Opanatmg Fund Balance July 1,2020 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expendit June 30,2021 VU-LMD I CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 357,509 6,000 90,810 - 40,550 413,769 150-GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 157 - 354,830 - 354,830 157 151-SLD#1 ARTERIAL 720,641 840,970 - 113,200 90Q020 548,391 152-SLD#2 RESIDENTIAL 1,042,7% 376,430 319,230 110,860 582,900 1,044,696 153-SLD#3 VICTORIA 1,604,6(D 410.230 - 43,960 285,520 1,685,352 154-SLD#4 TERRA VISTA 572,874 177,820 - 20,410 161,100 569,184 155-SW#5 CAR"COMMUNITY (131,217) 4 ,240 - 9,690 68,130 UM,797) 156-SLD#6 INDUSTRIAL.AREA 496,135 144,220 - 15,170 128,680 496,505 157-SLD#7 NORTH ET6VANDA 178,552 133,660 89,1M 30,720 192,040 178,552 158-SLD#8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,130,114 112,400 - IQ820 89,930 2,141,764 ❑4-STATE GAS TAX 10,436,012 438050 - - 3,865,370 10,950,992 176-MEASURE 11990-2010 245,068 5520 - - 300 250,288 177-MEASURE I2010-2040 4,11 LM4 2,W,560 - - 2,W1,890 3,870314 178-SB 140 36,979 - - - - 36,978 179-ROA0 MAWT&REHAB ACCT 4,927261 3,140,730 - - 2,400,000 5,667,991 181-SBI-TCEP - 11,000,650 - - 11,000,650 - 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 2%,380 - - - - 2%380 186-FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1,433) - - - - (1433) 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 4,123,399 1,869,350 - 218,390 1,350,070 4,4N,279 194-PROPOSITION I B STATE FUNDING 258,477 5,030 - - 100 263,407 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE 68,986 950 - - 40,440 29,496 1%-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 405 130 - - 70 465 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE DdPRV 26,245345 1,3W,200. - - 299,740 27,305,705 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 642,254 1440,010 - - 1,2fi6,530 815,734 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 185,658 1,070 - - - 186,728 211-MOP IB-SLPP 3,230 70 - - - 33W 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART3 (1,739) 401,200 - - 401200 (1,739) 215-ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GENT (96) - - - - (%) 2 18-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC (5,560) 24,600 - - 9,740 9,300 220-S.B.CO.MEASURE I COMM SAM 120 - - - - 120 225-CA RECYGLITTER REDUCTION GRNT 66,462 59,860 - - 59,620 66,702 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 365 - - - - 365 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 49,151 49,3W - - 49,810 48,731 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM - 90,800 - - 90,800 - 239-FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIBR 105 - - - - 105 258-SEMOR OUTREACH GRANT (5267) - - - - (5,267) 272-FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 49 50 - - - 99 274-STATE GRANTS FUND - 2,686,760 - - 2,686,760 - 275-FEDERAL GRANTS FUND 170,687 - - - - 170,697 290-LIBRARY FUND 7,581433 5,991,7M - 50Q000 5,250,160 7,825,W3 291-CA STATE LIBRARY 109,858 20,000 - - 20,530 108,328 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD(CA ST LB) 264,024 5,080 - - 5,900 263,2N 302-LIBRARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 37,374 - - - 20 3735,1 3 10-PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 32,W3 - - - - 32,923 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 1,359,212 17,420 50Q000 - 925,300 951,332 340-DRUGABATEMENTACT 29,740 - - - - 29,740 354-COPS PROGRAM GRANT-STATE 872,910 271,820 - - 306,020 838,710 356-JUSTICE ASSIST GRNT(JAG)AREA 33 - - - - 33 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE - 66,360 - - 66,140 220 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT - 26,840 - - 26,84() - 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 2,975,633 58,000 - - 3,995,700 (962,067) 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON 66526 34,760 - - 25,850 75,436 847-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENTN FUND 436943 7.510 117,750 - 40,606 521,603 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 2,417,225 1,346,140 73,390 116,800 1206250 2,513,705 869-CID 2MM3 PARK MAINTENANCE 431,896 536,950 - - 657,570 311266 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 217 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Estimated Eaimated Spendable Budget Sp deble Fund Belanee Operating Or-ting Fund Balance Jalyi 2020 Revenues Tmns&rsN Tre 0sf Om Exce ditures June 30,2021 875-CFD 2017-01 NO.UITWANDA - 3.020 - - 1,220 L800 876-CFO 201"1 EMPIRE LAKES 228,099 123,180 - 86,980 36,200 228,098 877-CFD 2018-01 CAPITAL RESERVE 790 79,390 80,180 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 175701453 $ 59,920660 $ 2016,8W $ 1367,000 $ 59.280,420 S 176.891493 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600-AD 82-16TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 14,010 $ 280 $ - $ - $ 10 $ 14,280 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 1,]W,230 23,300 - - 430 1,22Q100 606-AD 86-2 R/ DRAMAGE DISTRICT (41,128) - - - - (41.128) W7-CFD 2000-01 SOUTH ETRVANDA 63 - - - - 63 612-CFO 200141 649,309 59.790 - - 1,090 708,W9 614-CFO=B0 1PROTECT FUND 182,797 1,760 - - 60 184,497 615-CFO 2003A I CULTURAL CENTER 12,192 1,920 - - - 14,112 617-CFO 2004-0 I RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 50,267 560 - - - 50,827 680-CFO 2006-01 VINTNERS GROVE 1,848 40 - - - 1,888 681-CFO 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 6,446 130 6,576 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 2,073,034 $ 87,780 $ $ $ 1,590 $ 2,159,224 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700-SPORTS COMPLEX $ - $ 416,220 S 1,401,770 $ - $ 1,817,990 $ - 705-MUNICIPAL UTDJTY 16,700,355 ILM6,510 - 1,508,650 10,618,710 18439,505 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 579,750 305310. - - 591,530 293,530 708-REMO CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5,685,231 111,560 - - 2,020 5,794,771 711-FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 30762,831 252,930 934840 1,421,210 10,52%391 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS S 33728,167 S 14,952,530 $ 2,336,610 $ 1,508650 $ 14,451,460 $ 35,057,1W INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712-EQUIPNEHICLEREPLACEMENT $ 1,426,758 $ 552,4% $ 300,M $ - S 913,770 S 1,365,479 714-COMP EQUPnECH REPLCMENT FUND 2,689,121 637)40 539,540 751,960 3,113,941 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 4,115,879 $ 1,189,730 $ 839,540 S $ 1,665,730 $ 4,479,419 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 310,386038 $ 166542,910 $ 7,745,770 $ 7,628,100 $ 168,966,610 S 308,080008 R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIALREVENUE 281-FIRE FUND S 28,253,799 $ 32,721,970 $ - $ 2.036,930 S 30,685,040 S 28,253,799 282-COMMUNITY FACHJTIES DLST 85-1 3,755,482 6,262,320 - - 6,738,9W 3,279,902 293-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 10,687 431,090 2,036,930 - 2,468,020 10,687 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 25,195 960 - - 210 25,945 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPTAL FUND 30,902,335 8,030,970 117,670 5,935,250 32,880,385 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 62,W7,498 $ 47,447,310 S 2,036,930 S 2,154,600 S 45,827,420 $ 6Q449,718 TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 62,947,498 $ 47,447,310 $ 2,036,930 $ 2,154,600 $ 45,827,420 $ 64,449,718 TOTALALLFUNDS $ 373,333,536 $ 21399Q220 S 9,782,7 $$ 9,782,7W $ 214,7M,030 $ 372,529,726 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 218 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than$500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budget Eatimmed E9imated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fond Balance $ % T.W 12020 June 302021 Clone, Ch. Reawo hor Clunre,4500000 and 10% CITY OF RANCHO CIICAMONGA GENERAL FUND Use of Changes in Economic CircumsWcea Rererve in the amount of$]00000 due to COSm 19 prodemic; uae ofeapital rerenrc in the amount of$I0,000 for MI-GENERAL FUND $ 27S66,198 $ 26,8M,198 S (7I0,000) -2.58%medial ocuipmem for Animal Center TOTALGENERALFUND $ 27,566.198 $ 26,856,198 S (710,000) -2.59% OTHERGENERALEIINDS W3-RE0.16 STICOIINTY PARKING CIE $ 4,251 S 4.257 S - 000% 006-CVWD REQ.BURSEWNTS 964,273 824283 (139,990) -14.52% 008-CNTY OF S.B.REIMBURSENRIM 33,944 33,944 - 000% 016-CO4MDEVTECH,IICALSRVCSFUND 1,302,008 2,659,588 357,390 15,53% OU-LAWENFORCESMETRESERVE 4,051,918 3,759,948 (291WO) -7,11% 018-TRAF1ICSAFEfY 40290 40;ZW - 0M% 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY ERE FUND 1,"sV9 1,931,689 153,210 8,61% On-MOBR,E HOP@ PARK PROGRAM 190,335 183,905 (6,630) -348% On. SBI IM CERT ACCESS SPEC FROG 136,516 I73,436 36,920 27.04% 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 54,025914 50,381,104 (3,644,810) -605%UwoffundsaccumWatWd raperiadoftime 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 3673,373 2,64Q233 (1,029,140) -29,02%Ure offends eccumWatedome frond oftime TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS S 67201,301 $ 62,636,477 (4,564,830) fi.79% SPECIALREVENUE 100-ASSESSPIEWDISTRICTSADSUN $ 632,849 $ 637,659 4,810 076% 101-AD 93-1 MASI COPU4ERCE CENTER 312,393 315,473 3.090 0.99% 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEPIENT 793,631 Y27,151 (66,480) 4.38% 106-MSRC AIR POLLUTION REDUCT GRNT - - - 0.00% IN-PUBLIC ART TRUST FUND 13K629 141,439 2,760 L99% 110-BEAUTIFICATION 629,692 643,992 143N 2,M 111-PARK LAND ACQUISITION 4,077.302 4,846,872 769,570 1&M Results ofoperations for use,.fmure period 112-DRAINAGE FACIGENERAL 4,237,009 470,137 23,130 0.55% 113-COMMUNITYIKEC CENTER DEVELPPB4T 1,470,194 1,8M,994 336,8W nRIK, 114-1,11AD4AGH-ETIWANDA SEVAWE M9,510 274730 5,IW 1.91% 115-HENDERSONIWARDMAN DRAINAGE WO,550 MIN (360) A.04% 116-ETDV N ADRAINAGE 2,089,923 1993,803 (96,120) -TOOK, 118-LP1`EREPVANDADRANAGE 608,955 620,595 ❑,640 1.91% 119-PARKIMPROVEKO:W 2,1/0,085 2,406,265 236,180 10.88% 120-PARKDEVELOPMEW 8,198,436 7,935,156 (263,280) d.21% 122-SOUTHETIWANDADRAfRAGE 1,114,382 I,135,622 21,240 1.91% 123-1,I13RARYIPIPACTPRE 844,%6 967,5% 122,630 1451% 124-TRANSPORTATION 36,856,195 38,645,505 1789,310 4,85% 125-ANIMAL CENTER UNPACI FEE IM,216 190;366 26,150 1592% 126-IAWERETIWANDADRAWAGE 70,155 719,525 12,370 175% 127-POLICE IMPACT FEE 635.130 749,(M0 113,930 17 94% 128-ETIWANDA NO.EQUESTRIAN FACU,, 922,491 736,297 13,800 191% 129-UNDERGROUNDUTTLT'lES 11,362OM 11,627,616 265$30 2.34% 130-LPOJ#I GENERAL CITY 1,464,826 1,457,596 (7230) 449% 131-LAID#2 VICTORIA 4,551412 4,130,832 (420,580) -924% 132-LPm43A HYSSOP 32,454 26,094 (6,380) -19.66% 133-LI.fl)#3B P03DIANS 2439.515 2,427,745 (11790) A.4W.. 134-LPID#4RTERRAVISTA 7,328,155 7X4,255 (73,900) -1.01% 135-LMD#5ANT)OVER 30.302 25,832 (4,420) -1475% 136-Lh4D06RCARYNCOMMUNErY 77I,170 263090 (KIW) -1.05% 137-LMD 0 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,420,389 1,269,529 (150,860) -10.62% 138-LMD 08 SOUTH ETIWANDA 99,002 74,822 (4,180) -5.29% 139-LMD 0 LOWER ETIWANDA L444,383 L586J93 140,110 9.70% 140-LMD#IORANCHOETIWAI0A 1,42,120 L344,IW (99,960) -6.79% Fiscal Year 2020/21.Adopted Budget Page 219. City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than$500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget EiG,n.N ENuNWd Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balanm S % JWv 1.2020 J-302021 ClonIe CCU Reaaw for Chwea>SSOO OOO aM 10°h 141-LAAD I CAPTAL REPLACEMENT FUND 357,509 413,769 56,260 15.74% 150.GENERAL CRY STREET LIGHTS 157 157 - ON% 151-OLD 91 ARTERIAL 720,641 548,391 NM 50) -23,90% 152-OLD 92 RESIDENTIAL 1,042,796 1044,6% LWO 0,18% 153-OLD 93 VICTORIA 1,604,60E 1,685,352 80,950 5.03% 154-SW k4 TERRA VISTA 5n,874 5S,184 (3,690) _R"% 155-RED g5 CARYN COMMUNITY (131212) NU,799) (33,580) 2559% 156-SW N6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 496,135 4%,505 370 002% 157-SLD 42 NORTH ETRVANDA 178,552 178,552 - 0.00% 158-SLD N8 SOUTH ERWANDA 2.130,114 2,141,764 11,650 0.55% 194-STATE GAS TAX 10436,012 10,950,992 514,980 493% 176-MEASUREI IM-2010 245,069 250,288 5220 2,13% 1])-MEASURE12010-2040 4.111644 3,870,314 (241,330) -589% 1798 SB 140 36928 M,9 8 - 0.00% F/9-ROAD MAMT&REHAB ACCT 4,927,261 5,667"1 W,230 15.03%Ruuls ofopemons,for use in fwuc pedW 181-SoI-TCEP - - - 0.00% 182-AN 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 296,30 296,380 - 000%. 186-FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1433) (1,433) - 000% I89-MTEGRATED WASTE MANAGE NT 4,123,389 4,424.2N 300,890 730%. 194-PROPOSITION IB STATE FUNDING 258,41E 26340E 4,930 191% 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE 68,9w 29496 (39.490) -52240A 196-CA ASSET SEZURE 15% 405 465 60 1481% 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 26,M5,245 27,305,705 1,060460 404% 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ELK GRNT 642,2M 815.734 173,480 27,01% 209-FEDERALSAFETEA-LU 195,658 186,728 1,020 058% 211-PROP IB-SLPP 3,230 3,300 20 2.ITA 214-PEDESTRIANGRANVART3 (1,739) 009) - 000% 215-ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GRNT (96) (96) - 0.00% 218-PUBLICRESRCEGRNIS/IIEALTHYRC (5560) 9,300 14,860 -267.27%. no-S.B.CO.MEASURE I COW RAIL 120 120 - ON% 225-CARECYG11T1'ER REDUCTION GRNT 66,462 66,702 No 0.36% 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 365 365 - ON% 229-USED OB,RECYCLING PROGRAM 49,151 48,931 (420) -085% 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PRCGRAM - - - ON% 239-FEDERAL GRANTPUNDSDREIER 105 105 - 0.00% 258-SEMOROUTREACHGRANT (%267) (5,267) - 0.00% 2T2-FREEDOM COURTYARDRSRC GRANTS 49 99 50 102.04% 274-STATE GRANTS FAND - - - 0.00% 295-FEDERAL GRANTS FUND 170,687 170.687 - Oo0% 290-LIBRARY FUND 7,584,433 2825923 241,540 3.18°A 291-CA STATE LIBRARY 108,858 108,328 (530) -0.49% 292-STAFF INNOVATION ED(CA ST NO) 2UON 263.2w (920) -031% 302-LUSHARY SERVICES&TECH.ACT 37,394 39}54 (20) -005% 3 10-PUBLIC LIBRARY SEND ACT-2000 32,923 32923 - 000%. 329-I.BRARYCAPITALFUND 1,359,212 95032 (407,880) .3001% 340-DRUGABATEAEENTACT 29,740 29,740 - 000%. 354-COPS PROGRAM GRANTSTATE RM,910 838,710 (34,200) -392% 356-JUSTICE ASSIST ORNT(JAG)ARRA 33 33 - EOWA 381-HOUELAND SECURITY GRANT-POLICE - 220 220 0.00% 383-EUERGENCY MOW PERFORMNCE GRIN - - - 0.00% 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 2.475,633 (962,067) (3,937,700) -132.33%Fwding ofeffordeble housing oca 939-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION-DAY CANYON M6 26 75,436 8,910 13.391/. 647-PD 85 CAPITAL REPfACE0.IENT FUND 436,943 M1 03 M,660 19.38%. 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 2,417,225 2,513,705 96,480 3.99% 868-DED 2000A3 PARKMAINTENANCE 431,886 311,M6 NN,620) -27.93% 825-CED 201E-01 NO.ETIWANDA - I.Wo iwo ON% 876 CFD 2018.01E IRE LAKES 228.098 228098 - 0.00% 8Y/-M)20184i1 CAPTAL RESERVE - W.180 80,180 0.00% Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 220 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than$500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budget Fstimakd Ealimated Scendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % Jul11.2020 Luce 302021 Chanae Chance Reawnf°r Chances>5500000 and 10% TOTAL SPEC4ll.REVENUE $ 175,701.453 S 176,991493 S 1190,040 068% CAPITAL PROJECTS 600-AD 8246TH ST INDUSTRIAL S 14.010 $ 14,280 $ 270 193% 602-AD 841 DAY CREEEMffiAA 1,19T,230 1,220,100 M,870 191% 606-AD 862 RX DRAINAGE DISTRICT (41,129) (41,128) - 0.00% fi0'2-CFI)20M.01 SOUTH 13TDVANDA 63 63 - 0.0m 612-CFD 2001A1 649309 709,009 58,700 9.04% 614-CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 182,M 184,497 1,700 0.93% 615-CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 12,192 14,112 U20 I5.75% 617-CFD 20N-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 50,260 50829 560 1.11% 680-CFD 2006-01 Va4 Ws GROVE 1,848 1.888 40 2.16-A 681-CFD 2006-M AMADOR ON ROUTE M 6,M6 6,576 130 202% TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 2p93,034 $ 2,159,224 S 86,190 4A61A ENTERPRISE FUNDS V00-SPORTS COMPLEX $ - $ - S - 0.00 M5-MUIuC7AL UTR.ITY 16,700,355 18,439,505 3,739,150 1041%R°sWtsofoperanony foruu in fl Mepwiod 706-UIILITYPUBLICBENEFITFUND SL9,950 293,530 (28Q220) 4937% 708-RUM CAPITAL REPLACEMENT]FUND 5,685,231 5,794,771 109,540 193% TIl-FIRER OPTIC NETWORK 10,762,831 10,529,391 (D3,440) -2.17% TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS S 33,928,167 S 35,057,197 $ 1,329,030 3.94% INTERNAL SER V ICE FUNDS 712-EQUTN CLE REPLACEMENT S 1,426,759 S 1,365,478 $ (61,280) 4.30% 714-COW EQUVIURCH REPLCMENT FUND 2,689,121 3,113941 424,820 15.80% TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS S 4,115,819 S 4479,419 363,540 8.83% TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA S 310386038 S 30808()008 $ (2306,030) -174% R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281-FIRE FUND $ 28,253,799 $ 28,253,T99 S - 010% 282-COMMUNITY FACMITMS DIST 85-1 3,755,482 3,278,W2 (476,580) -12.0% 283-COMMUNffY FAMITIES DIST 88-1 10,687 10,687 - 0W% 285-FRtETECIINOLDJYFEEFUND 25,195 25,945 750 2.98% 288-FIREPROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 30,W2,335 32,880385 1979,050 6.40% TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 62,949,498 $ 64,449,718 $ 1,502,220 239% TOTAL R.C.FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT S 62.947.498 $ 64,449,718 $ 1,502,220 2.39% TOTAL ALL FUNDS S 373333536 S 372,529T26 S (803,810) -022% Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 221 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 222 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 223 City Council Department Budget Summary Overview of Department As a body of elected officials, the separately elected Mayor and four-member City Council establish local laws,set policy, approve programs, adopt the annual budget,and appropriate funds. As elected representatives of the citizens, the City Council is responsible to all of the people and, as such,devotes its energies to making decisions which are in the best interest of the public welfare. The City Council is elected by geographic districts with the Mayor being elected at large. They each serve staggered four-year terms. The City Council also serves as the Board of Directors for the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District(a subsidiary district of the City). The City Council meets the first and third Wednesday of the month at City Hall to discuss and vote on pertinent issues facing the City and its residents. In addition, the City Council is responsible for appointing the City Manager, City Attorney, and members of boards and commissions. Mission Statement The Mission of the City Council of Rancho Cucamonga is to: • Ensure and advance the quality of life for the community through inclusive decision making. Core Values • Providing and nurturing a high quality of life for all • Promoting and enhancing a safe and healthy community for all • Building and preserving a family-oriented atmosphere • Intentionally embracing and anticipating the future • Equitable prosperity for all • Working together cooperatively and respectfully with each other, staff and all stakeholders • Continuous improvement • Actively seeking and respectfully considering all public input All is used in its most inclusive sense- residents, businesses, non profits,faith-based, educational, etc. Vision Statement • Our vision is to build on our success as a world class community to create an equitable, sustainable, vibrant city rich in opportunity for all to thrive. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 224 City Council Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 148,361 $ 144,670 $ 148,330 Operations and Maintenance 21,939 24,800 25,700 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (52,580) (51,360) (41,560) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 117,720 118,110 132,470 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal - - All Funds Personnel Services 148,361 144,670 148,330 Operations and Maintenance 21,939 24,800 25,700 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (52,580) (51,360) (41,560) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 117,720 $ 118,110 $ 132,470 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 5.0 5.0 5.0 Total Staffing 5.0 5.0 5.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 225 City Clerk Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Clerk is an elected official charged with the responsibility of maintaining records of City Council actions,recordation of minutes for all meetings of the City Council, and verification of all Resolutions and Ordinances. In addition,the City Clerk is responsible for all documents and duties associated with municipal elections. The statutes of the State of California prescribe the basic functions and duties of the City Clerk, and the Government Code and Election Code provide precise and specific responsibilities and procedures to follow. This position works with the City Clerk Services Director,who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the office. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiehliehts • Maintain an accurate record of City Council proceedings and official City documents • Administer the November 2020 Presidential Municipal Election following all Federal, State, and local statutes and policies, including Filing Official/Officer responsibilities related to Fair Political Practices Commission(FPPC)filings • Administer the Oath of Office Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 226 City Clerk Depamnent Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,790 $ 2,810 $ 2,830 Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (820) (850) (890) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 1,970 1,960 1,940 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Opemtions and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 2,790 2,810 2,830 Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (820) (850) (890) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Tota!Cost $ 1,970 $ 1,960 $ 1,940 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 227 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Treasurer is an elected official charged with the responsibility for the custody and investment of all City funds. The Treasurer is the City's official "signature" for all financial transactions made. The Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services has been appointed as Deputy City Treasurer and has the authority to assign Finance staff to handle treasury functions needing daily attention. FY 2020/21 Budget Hidithts • Maintain funds in secure and liquid investments • Structure maturities to meet City cash flow needs throughout the year • Present the City's investment policy to the City Council for annual approval • Maintain CMTA Investment Policy Certification which certifies the City's investment policy complies with the current State statutes goveming the investment practices of local government entities located within the State of California California Municipal Treasurers Association Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 228 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,764 $ 2,810 $ 2,830 Operations and Maintenance 13,304 15,010 15,120 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (5,140) (5,400) (5,650) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 10,928 12,420 12,300 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - AB Funds Personnel Services 2,764 2,810 2,830 Operations and Maintenance 13,304 15,010 15,120 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (5,140) (5,400) (5,650) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 10,928 $ 12,420 $ 12,300 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 229 City Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Manager is appointed by the City Council to oversee the enforcement of municipal laws, direct daily operations of the City,make recommendations to the City Council,prepare and administer the municipal budget, appoint and supervise all City department heads and employees, and supervise the operation of all City departments. The City Manager's Office oversees a variety of interdepartmental activities and programs and provides direct support for the City Council. One such effort is the Healthy RC initiative, which encourages a healthy and environmentally sustainable lifestyle for those who live, work, and play in Rancho Cucamonga.Healthy RC initiatives include the Safe Routes to School program,CASA healthy cooking classes, mental health symposiums, electric vehicle charging station network, and the implementation of policies that encourage access to healthy food and physical activity, including farmers' markets, community gardens, and walkable neighborhoods. The City Manager's Office provides management of the City's award-winning Community Affairs Program including -- v publication of the Rancho Reporter newsletter, media relations, community outreach and engagement, social media platforms, special projects, and other public information efforts. Staff also responds to and follows-up on citizen inquiries and concerns regarding City programs and services and operates and is involved with original programming on the government access channel RCTV-3. The Community Affairs Program utilizes a creative mix of innovative communication tools and technology, along with traditional outreach methods,to enhance community engagement. The City Manager's Office also manages the Legislative Advocacy Program to ensure that Rancho Cucamonga's interests are heard at the state and federal level. These efforts are governed by our Legislative Platform,which promotes the principle of local control and protection of local revenue. The Community Improvement Division provides enforcement services in response to nuisance conditions and other violations of the Municipal Code, providing for a safer and more beautiful community. Training is essential, and three of the four staff members have received the designation of Certified Code Enforcement Officer from the state organization. This emphasis on training creates more successful efforts to gain compliance,more effective use of staff time, and reduces liability. FY 2020/21 Budget flUddiehts • Continue development of Public Art Strategic Plan • Take an organizational approach to data collection and performance measurement • Evaluate the most recent Quality of Life Survey data in order to understand new and continuing programming and service needs of our community • Communicate with our Community effectively and equitably, especially during the COVID- 19 pandemic Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 23o City Management Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,379,375 $ 2,652,130 $ 3,034,820 Operations and Maintenance 411,694 497,550 495,960 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (510,280) (532,860) (571,390) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 2,280,789 2,616,820 2,959,390 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 8,502 9,730 9,740 Capital Outlay - - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 8,502 9,730 9,740 All Funds Personnel Services 2,379,375 2,652,130 3,034,820 Operations and Maintenance 420,196 507,280 505,700 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (510,280) (532,860) (571,390) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 2,289,291 $ 2,626,550 $ 2,969,130 Staff-mg Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 19.0 19.0 22.0 Part Time 0.4 0.8 - Total Staffing 19.4 19.8 22.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 231 City Management Performance Statistics H Healthy RC • Healthy RC hosted four Mental Health Symposiums and reached over 300 attendees. • Healthy RC's Mental Health Subcommittee hosted five virtual communi- ty check-ins with over 50 community members tuning in to share their feel- ings,thoughts and emotions with a mental health professional. • Healthy RC's Bringing Health Home Program provided access to fresh fruits and vegetables to 193 community members. The CASA program, educated over 300 community members on how to prepare culturally appropriate,healthy meals. • The Healthy RC Sustainability Program completed the installation of an Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Station at City Hall. It is a DC Fast Charger which supports the goals in the regional EV Readiness Plan. • The City received the Gold Level Beacon Spotlight Award for Municipal Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Reduc- tion from the Institute of Local Government. This award was earned by reducing our GHG emissions by 10%annually. • A Helen Putnam Award was received for Excellence in Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics, & Community In- volvement for Healthy RC's resident empowerment group Campeones para La Comunidad Legislative Advocacy In 2019,the City tracked 36 state legislative bills. From these bills,the City supported seven and opposed ten. This year, our advocacy success rate was 37%, which measures the ultimate outcome of a legislative bill in comparison with the City's official position. Compared to 2018, the City tracked ten additional bills and sent ten additional advocacy letters this year although our advocacy success rate decreased by 6%in 2019. Community Affairs Instagrann Audience GroMh • In an effort to increase the percentage of AUDIENCE GROWTH BY MONTH followers ages 18-24 demographic, Community Affairs increased the use of Instagram Stories and other published content by 50.5%, as a tool to easily share information and engage with those previ- ously umeached. The increase in publish- ing on Instagram resulted in a .2% increase in followers ages 18-24 and an increase """"`" `• "" n 'eu of 50.6%in overall followers. .W. Communitylmprovement .m „a. • Utilizing civil processes to abate nuisance or neglected properties. In 2019, two properties were addressed under the California Drug Abatement Act, forcing the properties to be sold, rehabilitated, and all City costs recovered. • Addressing nuisance conditions in residential neighborhoods by amending codes in response to state law and current challenges, such as sidewalk vending or short-term rental of residential property. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 232 City Management Services to the Community Healthy RC Community Affairs Fiscal Year City Management Legislative Affairs Administration Community Improvement 2o2o/21 Adopted Budget Page 233 Police (Contract) Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The San Bernardino County Sheriffs Department has been a proud partner with the City of Rancho Cucamonga since its incorporation in 1977. Throughout the course of this partnership, the City continues to be one of the safest cities in California. This is a continued effort by the dedicated men and women of the Police Department. Services provided by the Department include the following: Patrol. This division provides basic emergency response services to the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga, which includes the use of three K9 units to assist with tracking suspects or missing persons, as well as identifying the presence of narcotics. Traffic Safety. This division investigates traffic collisions, provides proactive enforcement to reduce collisions,and performs dedicated DUI enforcement. The traffic division also presents the DUI education program"Every 15 Minutes"to local high schools. Investigations. This division works in conjunction with patrol and performs felony case follow- up, tracks sex registrants and emerging crime trends. Victoria Gardens. The Department's satellite station is located at the Victoria Gardens Regional Mall. Personnel assigned to the mall conduct retail theft investigations and work proactively with the various retail establishments to prevent crime. Crime Prevention. This division works to educate the public on various crime trends, and coordinates programs and events such as Neighborhood Watch, Citizen Advisory Group and National Night Out. Specialized Units. Included in this division are the Multiple �. ; Enforcement Team (MET), Solution Oriented Policing (SOP) Team, and School Resource Officers (SROs). The SOP team ,, works to address quality of life issues, and also provides active shooter training to the community and local public safety agencies. FY 2020/21 Budget l3ighlights • Completion of the West Side Public Safety Facility which includes both Police and Fire personnel • Continue interaction with the homeless and transient population to limit quality of life crimes such as loitering,panhandling,and trespassing • Continue to host events educating the public on human trafficking, teen self-defense and intemet safety through the Crime Prevention Unit • Add additional ALPR cameras to the intersections of Archibald Avenue and 19'h Street; Etiwanda Avenue and Arrow Route; and Milliken Avenue and Kenyon Way Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 234 Police (Contract) Deparhnent Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 - Operating Budget Personnel Services $ - $ - $ _ Operations and Maintenance 39,110,735 42,106,900 44,858,800 Capital Outlay - - _ Cost Allocation Debt Service - - _ Transfer Out 210,460 220,160 10,270 Subtotal 39,321,195 42,327,060 44,869,070 Other Funds Personnel Services - - _ Operations and Maintenance 895,639 1,167,960 689,360 Capital Outlay 185,135 521,260 425,140 Cost Allocation - - _ Debt Service Transfer Out _ _ - Subtotal 1,080,774 1,689,220 1,114,500 All Funds Personnel Services - - _ Operations and Maintenance 40,006,374 43,274,860 45,548,160 Capital Outlay 185,135 521,260 425,140 Cost Allocation - - _ Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 210,460 220,160 10,270 Total Cost $ 40,401,969 $ 44,016,280 $ 45,983,570 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Safety Personnel 139.0 141.0 141.0 Non-Safety Personnel 41.0 41.0 41.0 Total Staffing 180.0 182.0 182.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 235 Police (Contract) Performance Statistics 2019 Performance Highlights * 155,929 Calls for Service—2.6%Decrease * Average Response Time for Emergency Calls was 4.16 minutes in 2019 compared to 4.25 minutes in 2018 * Part I Crimes down 3.3% * Part 2 Crimes up 1.9% a, • PARTI* PART II" rS RVIC FOR REPORTS TAKEN ARRESTS COLLISIONS 1017 5,037 5,958 107,452 17,427 5,022 1,652 2018 4,710 5,533 160,059 17,818 4,818 1,498 2019 4,553 5,639 155,929 17,187 4,928 1,623 *Part I Crimes- Murder, Rape, Robbery,Aggravated Assault, Burglary, etc. **Part II Crimes- Forgery, Counterfeit, Fraud, Stolen Property,Vandalism,etc. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 236 Pofice (Contract) Services to the Communit.N Emergency Response Fiscal YeU 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 237 Patrol �I 3 K9's Volunteers Citizen Advisory Crime Prevention PIO Neighborhood Watch Targeted Proactive Enforcement to Reduce Collisions Traffic Safety Bicycle Safety Classes Police (Contract) Dedicated DUI Enforcement Felony Case Follow-up Investigations Crime Analyst Pawn Shop Liason Victoria Gardens Retail Theft Investigations Multiple Enforcement Team CFS/APS Crime Free Multi-Housing Special Units Solution Oriented Policing Team Active Shooter Program School Resource Officers Fire District Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Fire District is a subsidiary district of the City and has its own statutory funding with the City Council serving as the Fire District Board of Directors. Our mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting and demonstrating a readiness to respond to, and reduce, threats to life and property through the delivery of emergency and non-emergency services and programs in an efficient and effective manner. The foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services is focused on three premier services: Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Response and Emergency Management. The Prevention Bureau reduces risk and eliminates hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction and public education/community outreach. Additionally, firefighters deliver an efficient and effective emergency response through structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services,hazardous materials response,technical rescue and tactical response.The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness and response programs. The Fire District provides emergency and non-emergency services through progressive leadership, personnel management, professional development through high level training, advanced planning, financial administration and logistical support which includes apparatus and facilities maintenance, communications and information technology. Our emergency response and incident mitigation capabilities remain cutting edge through innovative, passionate and fiscally responsible program management, which further enhances the quality of fife for those we serve. The Fire District's goal is to deliver these services in an effective, efficient and professional manner while maintaining financial stability. FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Complete the West Side Public Safety Facility. • Continue the design-build process for the future Fire Station 178 to be located on Town Center Drive,east of Haven Avenue. • Retrofit Fire Station 177 on Hellman Avenue with solar panels. • Update the Local Hazard Mitigation Plan. • Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan. • Complete an Emergency Evacuation Plan. • Update the CalFire Wildland Agreement. • Procure a mass notification system to improve the District's ability to communicate emergency information to the public. • Replace the 1997 Type 1 Heavy Rescue apparatus. • Continue to fund proposed operations and capital projects while holding Community Facilities District(CFD) assessment levels. • For the eighth consecutive year, Fire Prevention Permit and Inspection Fees continue to be suspended. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 238 Fire District Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 25,062,151 $ 26,984,790 $ 30,807,730 Operations and Maintenance 6,498,652 7,792,770 8,684,240 Capital Outlay - - Cost Allocation - - _ Debt Service 77,830 399,990 399,990 Transfer Out 1,188,393 1,966,610 2,036,930 Subtotal 32,827,026 37,144,160 41,928,890 Other Funds Personnel Services - - _ Operations and Maintenance 703,437 556,310 757,750 Capital Outlay 2,541,598 3,960,500 5,204,550 Cost Allocation - - _ Debt Service - - _ Transfer Out 158,630 107,420 117,670 Subtotal 3,403,665 4,624,230 6,079,970 All Funds Personnel Services 25,062,151 26,984,790 30,807,730 Operations and Maintenance 7,202,089 8,349,080 9,441,990 Capital Outlay 2,541,598 3,960,500 5,204,550 Cost Allocation - - _ Debt Service 77,830 399,990 399,990 Transfer Out 1,347,023 2,074,030 2,154,600 Total Cost $ 36,230,691 $ 41,768,390 $ 48,008,860 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 115.0 115.0 121.0 Part Time 3.5 3.5 3.5 Total Staffing 118.5 118.5 124.5 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 239 Fire District Performance Statistics Incident Summary 16,624 Total Incidents 0.16% decrease • 11,699 - Emergency Medical / Rescue incidents • 2,932 - Good Intent& False Alarm • 1,458 - Public Service, Unreported & Special incident • 328 -Working fires • 184- Hazardous Condition without fire • 12 - Overpressure Rupture without fire 11 - Severe Weather& Natural Disaster 2019 Inspections Inspection Summary 4,785 Total Inspections 24% increase • 1,052-Vacant parcels for weed abatement • 990 - Restaurants, theaters, gyms, religious buildings �131 and other places of gathering . 785 - General service requests and incident follow-ups • 691 - Emergency access gates S • 2 - Other business inspections 39 • 392 -Apartments and hotels • 131 - Schools, pre-schools and day care providers n • 72 - Special events Employee Development Highlights Community Engagement Highlights 22,448 Total Training Hours • 3,255,644 - People reached on social media • 11,471 - Community members reached with public • Battalion Chief Academy and Test education events • Captain Academy and Test • 331 -Trained in emergency preparedness with Rookie Test BERT, CERT, ReadyRC Academy and more . 67 - Public education events and station tours . 455 - Trained in Hands Only CPR t Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 240 F,rase�tes Front CouMr Fire Investigations Emergency Response Emergency Medical services II 'TF.[IIIIIG2rH2SGDEfiafTrtaTTattTt2t Response Response Planning Ready RC Mitigation Preparedness Emergency - - Response Management _ _ Recovery Community and Business Emergents Res onse Trainin Fire District Volunteer Coordination Prevention Inspections COmmUnity RISiC Vyeed Abatement/Brush Clearance Reduction Public Education New Contru<tion Plan Review Public Information Community Affairs Special Events �BMmDPnty D uT14JP.Mr'dlld� Engagement P2Y367117EIYOIan2g2fflEllT'a11R— Development — -- Planning/Finance Administration ApparatesanaE�uipment— Maintenance Facilit Facility Maintenance Fiscal YeaT 2020/21 rr . r Budget Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an innovative Animal Services Department cwhose mission is Creating PAWsitive impact by enriching the lives of animalsixuww � ANIMAL and people. The Animal Services Department cares for more than 5,000CENTER homeless pets annually and responds to more than 6,000 calls for service related eewatxkq d to stray animals,rescues, and animal welfare. The Department oversees the following program areas: Animal Care: General animal care, adoptions, reuniting lost pets with owners and promoting responsible pet ownership. Community and Information Programs: Volunteer programs, foster care, neonatal kitten nursery, fundraising, community outreach, social media and community information/education. Kf[4dN `, Field Services: Animal pickup, rescues, investigations, rabies control, animal licensing,enforcement of animal regulations,co-exiting with wildlife and community education. Veterinarian Services: Veterinary treatment for animals housed at the Center, contracts for outside veterinary services for emergency and after hour cue and specialized care; teaching hospital for Veterinary and Veterinary Assistant students, and low and no cost spay and neuter clinics. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • Manage the effects of COVID-19 by: o reducing public hours to visit with the animals o reducing labor cost by defunding three vacant full-time positions and several vacant part-time positions • Enhance programs while being fiscally prudent through efforts such as: o streamlining the adoption process o increasing foster homes and 501(c)(3)rescue partnerships o piloting office pets for the day programs o continuing partnerships with Western University College of Veterinary Medicine and other community organizations .. • Update five-year strategic plan Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 242 Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Sunmary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,769,291 $ 2,970,860 $ 2,684,950 Operations and Maintenance 461,488 445,350 466,780 Capital Outlay 24,015 - 10,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 3,254,794 3,416,210 3,161,730 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - 720 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - 720 - All Funds Personnel Services 2,769,291 2,970,860 2,684,950 Operations and Maintenance 461,488 446,070 466,780 Capital Outlay 24,015 - 10,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 3,254,794 $ 3,416,930 $ 3,161,730 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 22.0 22.0 19.0 Part Time 12.8 15.9 14.9 Total Staffing 34.8 37.9 33.9 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 243 Animal Care and Services Performance Statistics 2019Hiehiiehfs • The Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care Foundation hosted a `` variety of creative fundraisers to help offset the cost of pro- grams and services. Fundraisers included Beer Kitty Kitty, t -shirt sales, Adopt-a-Plant, CatoberFest, Dog Bingo, and Paint Your Pet. • The Animal Center continued to enhance its community partnerships. Eagle Scout groups and elementary schools L el held donation drives for the animals and donated service projects such as toys for the animals, veterinary supplies, and a Little Free Library. Additionally, volunteer Linda__ Facer held a large fee-waived adoption event. • The Animal Center was the recipient of an CDFA Animal Homelessness Cruelty Fund grant in the amount of $7,500 for public spay and neuter. • The Animal Center was an active participant in forming the San Bernardino County Animal Control Directors Coalition. J.' .,,A; Collectively, the group hosted Countywide vaccine clinics, adoption events, and spay and neuter clinics. Intake and Outcome Comparison Animal Center Field Service Calls ,NNN 5000 �N 4000 Iwo . . 4WN 3000 3000 zaoa 2000 rea 5ervke bNs 02018 6301N 1000 0 2018 2019 2018 2019 2018 2019 2018 2019 2018 2019 2018 2019 2018 2019 Totallntake Adoption Retumedto Rescued TNR/SNR Euthanized Died Owner ■Cats ■Dogs Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 244 Animal Services to the Community Administration Administrative Services . Reuniting Lost Pets with Owners Fiscal YeW Community Cat Programs Community Outreach Volunteers Community Programs and Information Foster Care Kitten Nursery �itial a-C re aricT Animal Spay and Neuter Services Programs Veterinary Services Animal Health and Wellness Animal Care Anima Care an Adoptions Adoptions Field Service Officers Field Services Dispatcher Animal Licensing Animal Care Foundation 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 245 Records Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department As a partner in democracy, the Records Management Department promotes community involvement and awareness and supports the City Council, staff and the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga by coordinating the legislative process and administering City elections. Governed by provisions of state,election,and municipal codes,the Department serves to preserve and protect the legislative history of the City. As a service department,staff assists the public,elected officials, and the City organization with a number of important activities, including accurately preparing and processing agendas, and administering the Citywide records management program including records storage and destruction. The City Clerk's Office administers the coordination of City elections, including the filing of Candidate Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interests as required by law. FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Defund one part-time position due to the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic • Implement a new electronic agenda management system (PrimeGov) for City Council, Planning Commission, and various other City committee meetings • Increase the capacity, utilization, and training of the City's document imaging system (Laserfiche) by departments for imaging current, vital, permanent records, ensuring preservation and accessibility of records by staff and the public • Continue providing secure storage of active and inactive records in accordance with Department Records Manual and state law and guidelines • Conduct the bi-annual review of the City and Fire District's Conflict of Interest Codes as required by law and adopt updates if necessary we Ih i 1 :r I A Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 246 Records Management Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 533,535 $ 602,410 $ 603,360 Operations and Maintenance 140,227 122,840 897,340 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (240,840) (219,800) (221,050) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 432,922 505,450 1,279,650 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - -Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 533,535 602,410 603,360 Operations and Maintenance 140,227 122,840 897,340 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (240,840) (219,800) (221,050) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 432,922 $ 505,450 $ 1,279,650 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 5.0 5.0 5.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 - Total Staff-mg 5.5 5.5 5.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 247 Records Management Performance Statistics Public Records Requests By Year 120 kx un 6° ° �I I �I PUBLIC ° RECORDS �r+`s �` �� •°� 3' >°e4F`r da¢ t REQUESTS 5.83 ■2017 52019 52019 58 r 5.7 � 5.6 45.M44 5.5 5.4 a 5.3 — 5.2 111 2018 2019 ■Average Days to �i Respond I4?- City Council Agenda Items By Fiscal Year 800 735 760 04 ]00 600 500 _ 400 300 200 100 0 Fv 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 248 Records Services to i Preservation Retention Disposition Records Public Records Requests Recorded Documents Maintenan-ceoflVlunicipT Code Agenda an i�lA nuts Preparation Legal Notices Bond Releases _ Contracts Records Legislation Claims su poenas Management Bid Openings Appeals Conflict of Interest Code oa n :ss Recruitments Administration Legal Noticing Nomination Filing Candidate Handbook Election Munpal Elections Ballot Measures Receive PetIY1005 Fiscal Year 202o/2i Disclosure of Campaign Finances and Economic Interests .. . . Budget Community Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Community Services Department's mission is to serve the community by creating opportunities to play, celebrate, �✓. connect,explore,and be entertained through quality programs, safe parks, and well-maintained facilities. The Department coordinates programs and services through seven divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Arts/Playhouse Operations, Senior Services, and Human Services. The Department also oversees park development activities including the planning, design, and renovation of parks and facilities, as well as advocating for open space,thus helping to enhance the quality of life for individuals of all ages. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiphtiahts • In response to the economic impacts of COVID-19, reduce operating costs through the closure of Lions East, Lions West, RC Family Resource Center, RC Sports Center and Victoria Garden's Cultural Center • Continue to operate the James L.Brolte Senior Center,located at Central Park • Continue to provide the community with Wi-Fi access, computers,restrooms,and other services at Central Park while adhering to CDC guidelines • Virtual classes and services, such as the "Virtual Recreation Center", will continue to be offered to allow safe connection with our residents • Complete minor Capital Improvement Projects while facilities me closed • Expand Volunteer Program to solicit, train and retain community resources to offset expenses and expand service delivery Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 250 Community Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 3,954,490 $ 4,738,150 $ 5,361,190 Operations and Maintenance 784,963 823,900 2,758,220 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 4,739,453 5,562,050 8,119,410 Other Funds - Personnel Services 2,847,111 3,152,750 104,550 Operations and Maintenance 1,959,220 2,092,690 71,330 Capital Outlay 104,345 600,000 2,936,760 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - Subtotal 4,910,676 5,845,440 3,112,640 All Funds Personnel Services 6,801,601 7,890,900 5,465,740 Operations and Maintenance 2,744,183 2,916,590 2,829,550 Capital Outlay 104,345 600,000 2,936,760 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 9,650,129 $ 11,407,490 $ 11,232,050 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 46.5 45.5 29.0 Part Time 102.9 93.6 63.0 Total Staffing 149.4 139.1 92.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 251 Community Services Performance Statistics • Over 51,000 registrations were processed, 86%of which were Rancho Cucamonga residents. • Over 550 summer camp spots were filled in Summer 2019. • The Nutrition Meal Program provided over 18,000 meals to seniors at Central Park and delivered over 14,000 meals to homebound seniors in 2019. • The Department's volunteers provided nearly 29,000 hours of quality services to the community. Registrations S1,U5 _ 43,760 37,895 32880 A OBf 7,506 12.#34 2Z.219 4.985 15,011 TOTAL RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT WALK-IN ON-ONE �'�. REGISTRATIONSREGISTRATIONSREGISTRATIONSREGISTRATIONSREGISTRATIONS. - 2018=37,845 2019=51,275 j • Based on surveys,the 18/19 Season was well received by the public. • While the same number of productions were retained for Rancho Cucamonga Community Theatre, the number of performances were decreased to meet customer needs and reduce expenses. • Theatre for Young Audiences strategically selected performances and productions that highlighted specific cultural demographics to provide education,awareness and connections within the youth community. • Theatre Arts Academy classes were not meeting minimum registrations therefore decreasing the number of classes provided,allowing more availability for weekday rental revenue. • Overall,the 18/19 Season was full of head liners including Brian McKnight,The Zombies, John Tesh,Don McLean,Jane Lynch,Herb Alpert,and concluded with legendary songwriter Burt Bacharach! Lewis Family Playhouse Ticket Sales vae9 u.m TOTAL#OF RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT TICKETS SOLD TICKETS SOLD TICKETS SOLD TICKET SALES TICKET SALES ON-ONE WALK-IN/MAIL •S�wn 12-(20 1 7/2 0181 Sffi0n 13-(2019/2019) Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 252 Community Services to the i Administration Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 253 Central Park Lions Centers RC Family Resource Center Community Services RC Sports Center Special Events VG Cultural Center • Contract Classes Park Services Library Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Library Services Department's mission is to: • Ignite Curiosity • Transform Lives • Create Community The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable,service-oriented staff. Programs and services being offered at the Archibald Library and Paul A. Biane Library include: • Curbside Pickup Services • Public access to computers and printers(Biane Library) A • Virtual Storytimes and Bookclubs V v • Delivery of materials for homebound residents • Robust digital collections including books, audiobooks, and magazines • Virtual Library providing 24/7 access to research databases, online homework tutoring, language teaming software and local history information Beloved services that will be returning when the Library is able: • Programs and information services for all ages, including weekly and special event programs, performing and cultural arts programs, Homework Center and Reading Enrichment Center. • Adult and family literacy services. • Enhanced interactive activities highlighting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM, art and early learning development. FY 2020/21 Budget Hi2hli2hts • Add two new modules to the existing Integrated Library System(BS):Acquisitions and Analytics. The Acquisitions module will provide streamlined,digital workflows for acquiring new titles in all forruns. The Analytics module will provide enhanced system analytics with more accurate and granular reporting on the use of the Library's physical collection that will inform data-driven collection development decisions. • Further development of the Second Story and Beyond®interactive discovery space and expansion of programming. • Add a new streaming video service to its Virtual Library via Hoopla. • Add a laptop dispensing kiosk to the Archibald Library's digital device lineup. • Add additional RC Kits and launch the Library of Things,circulating materials to assist with household DIY projects(hammers, screwdrivers,levels,etc.),provide popular hobby equipment, and more. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 254 Library Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 3,273,861 $ 3,751,760 $ 3,681,450 Operations and Maintenance 1,292,856 1,514,690 1,563,710 Capital Outlay - 5,000 5,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Trawler Out - 500,000 500,000 Subtotal 4,566,717 5,771,450 5,750,160 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 38,931 33,460 26,750 Capital Outlay - 575,000 925,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - Transfer Out 11,428 - - Subtotal 50,359 608,460 951,750 All Funds Personnel Services 3,273,861 3,751,760 3,681,450 Operations and Maintenance 1,331,787 1,548,150 1,590,460 Capital Outlay - 580,000 930,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 11,428 500,000 500,000 Total Cost $ 4,617,076 $ 6,379,910 $ 6,701,910 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 28.5 27.5 26.0 Part Time 27.6 28.1 28.6 Total Staffing 56.1 55.6 54.6 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 255 Library Services Performance Statistics Library Use Statistics 900000 856,959 800,000 744,068 700,000 600,000 514,653 500,000 400,000 333,399 300,000 ■ 200,000 300,000 � 0 LIBRARY VISITORS REMSORCULATED ■2018 a 2019 1 . f s 4h loo,aoo Library Use Statistics 82,878 80,000 _ 60,000 41,246 40,000 r ON 20,000 31,254 6,943 t� 0 — �_ NEW LIBRARY CARDS EBOOKS DOWNLOADED ■2038 ■2019 Library Use Statistics 2,000 1,695 1,736 1,5W 1,474 1,000 600 466 0 - March April May June CURBSIDE PICKUPSERVICE62020 Fiscal Year 202o/2t Adopted Budget Page 256 Programming Information Services Adult/Teen Services Collection Grants Special ProjeMs Programming Information Services Children's Services Collection Grants Special Projects Adult Literacy LibraryServices Literacy Services �illll Back 2 Basics Second Story Finance Administration Staff Development Personnel Technology Centers Website Technology Services Social Media Library Services Services to the Communio Outreach Services Digital Collection Passport Services Fiscal Year .20/21 Adopted B Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Administrative Services Group's mission is to support the functions of the City's line departments. While line departments typically provide service primarily to the public, the Administrative Services Group's departments and divisions, while providing some direct public services, primarily provide extensive services and support to internal staff of the various City departments. The Administrative Services Group includes the Finance, Human Resources, and Innovation and Technology Departments, as well as Administration and Procurement, under the oversight of the Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiahtiahts • Facilitate and support several key technology projects that will modernize work practices in Administrative Services and throughout the various City departments o Upgrade the City's financial software to an HTML-based platform o Implement electronic routing of accounts payable invoices and credit card reconciliations for approval o Continue implementation of the Performance Management System and Learning Management System in Human Resources • Provide administrative support for the Community Parks and Landscape Citizens' Oversight Committee • Continue to conduct procurement tasks in accordance with public procurement best practices 10 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 258 Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adapted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 201920 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 892,233 $ 915,000 $ 526,150 Operations and Maintenance 3,642,983 3,764,030 2,149,230 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (1,270,940) (1,419,320) (876,090) Debt Service 12,538 106,450 106,450 Transfer Out 5,544,281 4,425,230 2,994,960 Subtotal 8,821,095 7,791,390 4,900,700 Other Funds Personnel Services 1,867,920 1,115,390 1,287,340 Operations and Maintenance 2,786,731 2,295,930 2,398,970 Capital Outlay 6,778,604 4,920,180 3,578,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 364,490 1,390,020 1,356,710 Subtotal 11,797,745 9,721,520 8,621,020 All Funds Personnel Services 2,760,153 2,030,390 1,813,490 Operations and Maintenance 6,429,714 6,059,960 4,548,200 Capital Outlay 6,778,604 4,920,180 3,578,000 Cost Allocation (1,270,940) (1,419,320) (876,090) Debt Service 12,538 106,450 106,450 Transfer Out 5,908,771 5,815,250 4,351,670 Total Cost $ 20,618,840 $ 17,512,910 $ 13,521,720 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 5.0 5.0 1.0 Part Time 1.0 1.4 - Total Staffing 6.0 6.4 1.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 259 Administrative Services Performance Statistics Please see Performance Statistics for Procurement in the following department section: Innovation and Technology Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 26o Administrative Services Services to the Community, Administrative • . . � . Services and Human Resources Departments i Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 261 Finance Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The overall mission of the Finance Department is to provide excellent service to both our internal and external customers with the highest degree of reliability and timeliness, while maintaining appropriate financial control of City resources. The Finance Department is responsible for managing the financial operations of the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles,as well as applicable laws,regulations and City policies. The Department consists of five divisions to accomplish its mission: • Accounting and Financial Reporting: Comprised of the following sections: Accounts Payable,Accounts Receivable,Debt Management, Fixed Assets,General Ledger,and Payroll. In addition, this Division is responsible for preparing the City's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report(CAFR). • Budget Management: Responsible for coordinating the City's.annual budget and monitoring each department's compliance with the annual budget. • Business Licensing: Responsible for the issuance and annual renewal of Business Licenses to all persons transacting and carrying on business within the City. This section also ensures compliance with the City's Transient Occupancy Tax(TOT)and Admissions Tax Ordinances which requires monthly reporting and remittances by the City's various hotels and businesses. • Revenue Management: The Revenue Management Division works with the City Treasurer and the Deputy City Treasurer,and it is responsible for daily cash management and investment of funds for the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. The Section is also responsible for the daily transferring and settling of depository funds,investing excess funds,and reporting investments in accordance with all applicable State and Federal laws and the City's Investment Policy. Other responsibilities of the Division include coordinating and managing business licensing, revenue collection, and cashiering functions for the City. • Special Districts: Responsible for placing special assessments for City parcels on the county tax rolls, tracking and paying debt service on the City's special obligations payable from the special assessments and assisting with special district formations. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • In response to the economic downturn from the COVID-19 pandemic,defend a vacant Account Technician position. • In conjunction with DoIT, facilitate the update of the City's financial system to an HTML- based platform,increasing user access and overall functionality. • Transition to electronic accounts payable to improve the workflow of cash disbursements and significantly reduce the number of physical records. • Continue to audit the City's hotels,on a rotating basis over four years, for compliance with the City's Transient Occupancy Tax(TOT) Ordinance. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 262 Finance Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,219,642 $ 2,470,960 $ 2,531,240 Operations and Maintenance 101,495 62,070 67,600 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (610,740) (655,650) (708,050) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,710,397 1,877,380 1,890,790 Other Funds Personnel Services 349,638 399,900 445,820 Operations and Maintenance 2,162,203 2,583,690 2,547,630 Capital Outlay 21,219 - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 124,816 791,550 784,510 Transfer Out 656,076 351,590 354,830 Subtotal 3,313,952 4,126,730 4,132,790 All Funds Personnel Services 2,569,280 2,870,860 2,977,060 Operations and Maintenance 2,263,698 2,645,760 2,615,230 Capital Outlay 21,219 - - Cost Allocation (610,740) (655,650) (708,050) Debt Service 124,816 791,550 784,510 Transfer Out 656,076 351,590 354,830 Total Cost $ 5,024,349 $ 6,004,110 $ 6,023,580 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 21.0 23.0 23.0 Part Time 2.3 1.2 0.3 Total Staffmg 23.3 24.2 23.3 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 263 Finance Performance Statistics Finance Highlights 2019 • $3,050,511 received in Business License revenue; 10.4%increase over 2018 • $3,929,637 received in Transient Occupancy Tax revenue; 1.1%increase over 2018 Bushes Lkense Summary' BusinessClosures BusinessUcense-Befrewals Business License-New 1.000 2,000 3,000 0,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 12019 ■2018 "Data excludes vendors and contractors located outside of Rancho Cucamonga Special Districts Highlights 2019 • $28,122,732 received in Special Districts tax revenue; 1.41%decrease City of Rancho Cucamonga 136,441 parcels submitted to the tax rolls Investment Effective Rate of Return Comparison for 35 special assessment districts with January 2019-December 2019 nno% 100%accuracy uo% 17 Community Facility Districts (CFDs) 2.00% — delinquency letters sent; a decrease of 58% 1.50% '�- compared to the previous year 140% • Our Annual Newsletters for LMD 1, 2, a30% 4-R, 5, 6-R, 7, 8, 9, 10 and PD-85 were ono% published on our City website 1$ Fffi �'$ PQa �d1 +JP 1`Y P"0 Y oy ?px P _Oly Poal Aymge —B fAMa ll Ly ch U.S.Treaswi6/Agadtl 1-5Ym Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 264 Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Cashiering Accounting and Fixed Assets Financial Reporting _ General Ledger Payroll Prepare ompre ensure nnua Financial Report (CAFR) Coordinate City's Annual Budge Budget Management --��erate4uarter?y Budget -- Updates for City Council --issue andltenewl3usiness _ Finance _ -- - LICen5e5 Business Licensing Ensure Compliance with City's TOT and Admissions Tax Ordinances -Adm iriisfer 3TSpecial"Di`stncts in the City Special Districts Manage Speciai District Formations _ _ Daily Cash Management Revenue Management Investment of Excess Funds Investment Reporting Human Resources Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Human Resources Department oversees the City's Human Resources and Risk Management functions. The mission of the Human Resources Department is to recruit, develop, and retain a diverse, engaged, well-qualified and professional workforce that reflects the world-class standards of the community we serve, and to lead City Departments in positive employee relations, talent acquisition, succession planning, and employee engagement. The Human Resources Team provides a wide range of services to City staff in the areas of Total Compensation,Employee and Labor Relations,Training and Organizational Development,Talent Acquisition, Risk Management, Safety, Workers Compensation, and Employee Wellness. FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Teamed up with The Counseling Team International to offer TeleHealth, an employee assistance program, to provide employees access to mental health professionals using videoconferencing as a result of COVID-19 • Continue to manage the City's volunteer intern program,which provides work experience for students and helps City departments manage projects to enhance City programs and services • Continue revisions and management of the new onboarding program to ensure a more meaningful onboarding experience and provide training to supervisors and managers on using the new onboarding software • Initiate innovative advertising,sourcing,and applicant tracking tools to improve the City's talent acquisition strategies • Rolled out NEOGOV's LEARN platform, a learning management system that will track staff certifications and training, as well as conferences attended • Continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs • Through a partnership with Kaiser, continue to expand the City's current health and wellness program as a result of a Citywide employee wellness survey • Continue to administer and proactively track legislative changes to the Affordable Care Act(ACA) and CARES Act Fiscal Year zozo/zr Adopted Budget Page z66 Human Resources Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,052,850 $ 1,098,970 $ 1,025,910 Operations and Maintenance 332,282 361,080 323,780 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (407,620) (442,500) (449,120) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 977,512 1,017,550 900,570 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 1,052,850 1,098,970 1,025,910 Operations and Maintenance 332,282 361,080 323,780 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (407,620) (442,500) (449,120) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 977,512 $ 1,017,550 $ 900,570 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 9.0 9.0 8.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 - Total Staffing 9.5 9.5 8.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 267 Human Resources Performance Statistics Human Resources Highlights Recruitments: The total number of recruitments decreased from FY 2018/19 to FY 2019/20 as depicted by the summary and chart below: Recruitments • Full-Time recruitments increased by 44% • Part-Time recruitments decreased by 48% • Total Number of recruitments decreased by 1s0160 16% 140 • In-House recruitments increased by 8% 120 100 • The COVID-19 pandemic impacted City ser- 80 vices and programs which resulted in freezing 60 recruitments for the period of March 2020 40 through June 2020, thereby impacting total 20 number of recruitments for FY 19120. 0 ■2 r1" ' 9 =ull-Time RecruRments °art-Time Rettuftments Int9ndl RewRments Total Applications Received: 6,917 Applications. The total number of applications decreased 13%from FY 2018/19 to FY 2019/20. New Hires: The total number of new hires decreased from FY 2018/19 to FY 2019/20 and the total number of promotions increased as indicated in the summary and chart below: • Full-Time new hires increased by 18% New Hires • Part-Time new hires decreased by 18% • Full-Time promotions increased by 88% Full-Time New Hires • Part-Time promotions decreased by 40% cart-Time New X'res Full-Time Promotbns Part-Time Pmmatiom 0 20 40 60 80 100 •2018/19 ■2019/20 Social Media Outreach: The total number of social media followers increased by 2% and engagement increased by 1%from FY 2018/29 to FY 2019/20. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 268 Human Resources Services to the CommuniO Talent Management ;,il Attract Develop/Motivate Fiscal YesT Retain Benefits Management Policies and Procedures Culture Employee Experience Diversity Enhance Employee Lifecycle Organizational Human Development Resources Labor Relations MOU/Negotiations Liability Risk Management Workers' Compensation Safety/Loss Control Insurance Employee Wellness 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page269 Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT)facilitates the impactful use of technology across all City Departments, allowing for increased I efficiency, improved transparency, and overall enhanced service to the community. The Department is comprised of four divisions including Systems and Network, Enterprise �.:• Applications, Geographic Information Services, and Operations. The Department also oversees the City's centralized Procurement Division. Procurement ensures that each Department has the materials and equipment it needs to serve the community. It is also responsible for ensuring that the City procures a variety of services,pays appropriate amounts for goods and services received, and at the same time, receives a product of the required quality. FY 2020/21 Budget Highliehts • In response to the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, defund two vacant positions, one Information Technology Technician and one GIS Specialist • Investment of over $100,000 in enhanced cybersecurity measures, including multi-factor authentication for all City user accounts using Okta identity services and the application of machine learning and AI tools,to provide holistic threat detection and mitigation in the data center using VMWare App Defense • Continue to keep Citywide user training and awareness at the forefront of cybersecurity by requiring all users to complete security training using the SANS Secure the Human platfomt • Expand the City's use of drones to assist with community development, construction inspection,hazard mitigation,and public safety response • Implement improved business practices to enhance the secure handling of personal identifying information (PII) and Payment Card Information (PCI), potentially lowering future payment card processing fees • Continue to support the expansion of municipal fiber optic network services in cooperation with the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility • Replacement of legacy physical servers to ensure operational continuity and take full advantage of the City's dual data center architecture • Continue development of workforce automation tools, including work order management and reporting, using ESRI GIS and Microsoft Office 365 platforms already in use Citywide • Publication of an updated Procurement Manual reflecting modernized procedures and adopted policies since the last version issued in 2014 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 270 Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 - Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,761,272 $ 2,977,060 $ 3,193,650 Operations and Maintenance 2,536,196 2,859,570 4,334,680 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (1,588,350) (1,768,940) (2,475,530) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 3,709,118 4,067,690 5,052,800 Other Funds Personnel Services 2,826 52,000 - Operations and Maintenance 1,523,025 420,260 108,620 Capital Outlay - 285,350 116,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 30,272 537,080 527,340 Transfer Out 1,063,222 - Subtotal 2,619,345 1,294,690 751,960 All Funds Personnel Services 2,764,098 3,029,060 3,193,650 Operations and Maintenance 4,059,221 3,279,830 4,443,300 Capital Outlay - 285,350 116,000 Cost Allocation (1,588,350) (1,768,940) (2,475,530) Debt Service 30,272 537,080 527,340 Transfer Out 1,063,222 - - Total Cost $ 6,328,463 $ 5,362,380 $ 5,804,760 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 23.0 23.0 24.0 Part Time - - 0.7 Total Staffing 23.0 23.0 24.7 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 271 Innovation and Technology Performance Statistics Information Technology Procurement Division Highlights FY 19120 Maintained by the IS Division Desktop&Notebook Computers; P 643 Purchase Orders issued; 40% increase from FY 18/19 iPads; Central Computer Services; P 29 Request for Proposals (RFP) processed; 45% in- Printers; crease from FY 18/19 Enterprise Applications; Office Productivity Programs; P 21 Request for Bids (RFB) processed; 17/o increase Multi-Function Photocopiers; from FY 18/19 Wired&Wireless Networks; 16 Request for Quotes (RFQ) processed; 33% increase Help Desk Tickets Completed: from FY 18/19 2018: 1,932 $95,752.61 revenue received from on-line surplus auc- 2019: 2,738 tion; 60.5% increase from FY 18/19 COMPLETED WORK ORDERS ■2018 ■2019 ,AN FEB MAR APRIL MAY DUNE JULV AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC COMPLETED WORK ORDERS BY TYPE .m a .No g p „ e qm P�' ?,� f: +4 f t5 ?` PP •.� ,!y P�' PE• P�� 'o d0� Q'�P 4JJ 1\PP 41P DPP PJ` tPU „YO `\P �Y�P i1P 43P P'lO fPP P\ PPy, PG Ofl �PJ O44 Pye. 1Wb ��. O 4 ,pP 1p4 P.\4• p4 1�nE JP y it PJ ti 0 J V P Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 272 - Innovation i i Technology Services to the Community Enterprise Application Management Applications User Interface Development Data Hosting Solutions Network Security and Management Systems Data Center Management Information Security Practices _ Spatial Data Visualization Geographic Information Innovation and Services (GIS) Businesslntelligence Development Technology Enterprise GIS Help Desk Requests Operations End User Support Hardware Implementation Procurement o Goods an Services Procurement Bid Management Disposal of City Assets (surplus) Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Department encompasses all Economic and Community Development activities including Economic Development, Building and Safety, Engineering, Planning, and Public Works Departments. The Department coordinates the activities, work products, and processes of these areas with the City Manager's Office and other City Departments. In addition, the Department coordinates implementation of the City's Economic and Community Development goals and objectives and capital projects planning programs. FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Deliver services of Building and Safety,Engineering, Planning,and Public Works under a common philosophy of innovation and excellent customer service • Support the City Manager's Office in monitoring and ensuring efficient and timely implementation of key capital projects • Provide effective coordination and monitoring of all Economic and Community Development programs and budgets that cross-over department lines. • Continue to provide support to the business community through the City's Economic Development liaison and to partner with other agencies to provide business services such as workforce development, small business consultation, and education. • Continue to work with DoIT staff to assist in the use of technology to provide guidance to existing and startup businesses and residents in the community. • Coordinate,administer,and monitor Community Development Block Grant(CDBG)funds that promote decent, affordable housing and create jobs through the expansion and retention of businesses. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 274 Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 401,671 $ 401,010 $ 426,610 Operations and Maintenance 266,274 404,340 375,660 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 667,945 805,350 802,270 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 425,345 658,660 151,880 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 425,345 658,660 151,880 All Funds Personnel Services 401,671 401,010 426,610 Operations and Maintenance 691,619 1,063,000 527,540 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - Transfer Out - - Total Cost $ 1,093,290 $ 1,464,010 $ 954,150 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 3.0 3.0 3.0 Part Time Total Staffing 3.0 3.0 3.0 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 275 Economic and Community Development Performance Statistics Please see Performance Statistics for Economic and Community Development in each of the following department sections: Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 276 Oversee Services of: Building and Safety Engineering Planning ` Public Works Assist in Implementing Economic and City Council's Goals Community Development Oversight of Key Capital Projects Foster Economic Development through Housing Focused Programs that Promote the Quality of Works to ensure decent affordable housing and services are provided Life and Economic to families and residents of low to Health of the moderate income Community � Fiscal Year . ./21 Adopted Budget Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Building and Safety Services Department, in partnership with the community: • Supports the community's construction projects „ through plan check,permit and inspection servicesC t - to meet the requirements of building and construction codes, State mandated regulations and municipal codes; • Works with other City departments to develop regulations and conditions for construction projects through the entitlement process; • Coordinates and assists other City departments in managing building and structural capital improvement projects and enforcing accessibility regulations for City facilities; • Works closely with the Police Department in illegal business activity bringing uses and structures within safe standards; and • Provide emergency response and damage assessment during and after disaster events. Building and Safety Services enforces a series of nationally recognized standards and construction codes as well as mandates from the State regulatory agencies, in matters pertinent to building construction, site development, and the permit process. In addition, Building and Safety Services also enforces compliance to codes as it relates to energy, accessibility laws, places of assembly, and housing requirements. Field inspections and safety assessments are performed by building/fire inspectors. In-house plan review staff manage and review all building and fire plans utilizing assistance of contract experts when necessary. The Department continues to assist the Community Improvement Division in evaluation and enforcement of substandard construction or property use. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiehilehts • Continue to enhance online services and communication to the public • Continue to integrate Building and Safety,Planning, and Engineering to create a seamless flow of information and process in Community Development • Develop community outreach through informative videos about inspections, permits, and code requirements Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 278 Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,600,436 $ 1,796,340 $ 1,655,910 Operations and Maintenance 150,187 120,610 110,140 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 1,750,623 1,916,950 1,766,050 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 8,528 42,240 48,480 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 8,528 42,240 48,480 All Funds Personnel Services 1,600,436 1,796,340 1,655,910 Operations and Maintenance 158,715 162,850 158,620 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Total Cost $ 1,759,151 $ 1,959,190 $ 1,814,530 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 16.0 16.0 15.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 16.5 16.5 15.5 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 279 Building and Safety Services Performance Statistics Building and Safety Services Department Highlights of 2019 Over 1,974 electronic plans were submitted online _ fQ� u in our Accela software, more than tripling last years 560 online submittals. A Over 800 Photovoltaic (solar)permits were issued in 2019 with 51 Electric Vehicle charging stations permits issued. • All permit submittals went 100%digital and online as of January 1,2020. Building and Safety Services Revenue , Sa,000,wa $3,666,646 ., rf •• vSz,om,aoa Sl,soo,aoa ■ , �. � y �� 51,oao,00a Ssoo,oao `� Sa my zola zola Year Inspections Performed Permits Issued 14,200 13,964 ia.oao 46LL 4,613 i 3,eao 13,970 i x 13.fiW dALr. O i3,OW L la,zao o. il,aao 12,897 _ = 12,8ao 4,277 izfiW 'E+.;oc i4200 ■ • , 0.191 14200 Year 1111 2111 1111 Year Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 280 Damage Assessment Building and Fire Inspections Complaint Response Construction and Water Quality Management Building and Permit Services Plan (WQMP) Review Safety Services Building and Fire Plan Check Administrative Support Services Adopted Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Engineering Services Department in partnership with departments • citywide strives to build a City where the infrastructure supports a community that is a great place to live, work, and play through strategic design, well - i planned maintenance, and fiscal and environmental sustainability. There are four sections in the Engineering Services Department. The Capital Project Management Section plans, designs, and manages the construction of City-funded public improvement projects. The Environmental Programs Section is working collaboratively for an environmentally safe, healthy and sustainable community today and for future generations. The Land Development and Transportation Section provides services to residents, developers, businesses,and schools related to the development and redevelopment of land along with operation and planning for traffic and transportation needs. This section also provides administration and clerical support for the department. The Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) Section is dedicated to the operation and administration of the City's electrical distribution system, citywide streetlights and the fiber optic infrastructure network. This section also provides budget support for the department. FY 2020/21 Budget Highlights • Continue design and right-of-way phases of the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project. • Construction of Phases 1 and Design of Phase 2 of the Advanced Traffic Management System(ATMS). • Continue design and permitting phases for the replacement of the three independent bridges at the entrances to the equestrian center at Heritage Park with a single use-separated concrete bridge. • Build out and expansion of the RC Fiber Network. • Improvements planned for seven school crosswalk locations using Federal funding from the Community Development Block Grant Program. • Pavement rehabilitation, resurfacing, and slurry seal various roads and streets. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 282 Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,057,782 $ 2,464,020 $ 2,153,370 Operations and Maintenance 263,616 316,750 199,930 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - Subtotal 2,321,398 2,780,770 2,353,300 Other Funds Personnel Services 4,121,168 4,831,160 4,624,780 Operations and Maintenance 14,269,335 11,303,190 12,899,700 Capital Outlay 8,904,227 67,683,190 19,021,600 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 475,751 939,610 934,840 - Transfer Out 1,578,680 1,726,150 1,727,040 Subtotal 29,349,161 86,483,300 39,207,960 All Funds Personnel Services 6,178,950 7,295,180 6,778,150 Operations and Maintenance 14,532,951 11,619,940 13,099,630 Capital Outlay 8,904,227 67,683,190 19,021,600 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 475,751 939,610 934,840 Transfer Out 1,578,680 1,726,150 1,727,040 Total Cost $ 31,670,559 $ 89,264,070 $ 41,561,260 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 37.0 39.0 35.0 Part Time 1.9 1.2 0.8 Total Staffing 38.9 40.2 35.8 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 283 Engineering Services Performance Statistics Core Service Categories Public Infrastructure Improvements• Land Development•Transportation Development Municipal Utility(RCMU) • Storm Water Pollution Prevention• Solid Waste Management Recycling Programs • Household Hazardous Waste Management• Issuing Construction Permits Capital Improvements Highlights • 61 capital improvement projects identified in - i& FY 2019/20 Capital Improvement Program(CIP)-in all phases(conception, design and construction). a . 45 capital improvement projects approved for construc- tion in 2019 totaling$70 million in community investment. RCMU Revenue and Kilowatts Hours (kWh)Sold RCNW Facts and System Data 90•p ,NO • Year established-2001 W'W'mo M'W pop • Date began providing power-May a0'W.wo 2004 5gaoopop agpmpoo • Service area size-4 square miles M'00p'wo Number of transformers-208 m,pp0000 10'W'Wp • Distribution Lines -29(circuit miles) 0 "18/19 FV 19/4 • Number of customers- 1,379 (as of •Taal Annual Re nu (S) • TaaM.Mh.(Mh)add Dec 2019) Environmental Programs HHW Facility Highlights S • 7,219 participants served at the HHW Collection Facility • 440,336 lbs.total HHW waste collected • $18,707.30 generated in E-waste Revenue Permits Issued by Type •lane Omve •RpM-0FwaV •�avze Loaf Land Development Highlights 1p00 900 800 • 2,090 permits issued for work in the lop Public Right-of-Way. B00 sop • 19 customers assisted each day on aver- °0D age at the front counter. p0 100 0 2plfi ID1) 201a W19 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 284 Services to the Engineering Services Permit Processing -- Tract/Parcel Maps Land Development & Transportation 1 Publican Private Improvement Design Review TrafFc Signal Coordination Vehicle/Pedestrian Safety Transportation Planning Project Administration Capital Project CIP Budget Implementation Management Inspection Services Engineering Project Design Services Integrated Waste Environmental PFOgfamS Storm Water Household Hazardous Waste Billing/Payment Processing Program Administration Customer Outreach Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility clerical/Administration Budget/Finance Fiscal YeaT Streetlight Management RC Fiber Program . rAdopted Planning Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Planning Department's primary responsibilities are developing and implementing comprehensive plans that reflect the goals and policies of the City; - ensuring the long-term success of the community through effective management of the City's growth; conducting detailed analysis of all development proposals to verify consistency with the City's Goals and Policies; and working with other City Department's to build and maintain a high quality, balanced, and sustainable community for the Rancho Cucamonga residents,businesses, and visitors. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiehliehts • Due to the financial impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, two full-time staff positions have been defunded. • Assist our local economy to recover from the COVID-19 closures, and then thrive in the new environment. • Evaluate new ways to establish long-term and innovative development standards as a result of the changing post COVID business model. • Continue work on PlanRC,the comprehensive update to the General Plan. • Develop and execute a business assistance program utilizing$604,820 in CDBG funding provided by the CARES Act. • Continue evaluating regulations from the state regarding housing, including the 15 bills adopted into last year's state"Housing Package," to understand the impact of these bills and address changes needed to the development code or our development review process. • Develop a plan to address housing growth that meets our desire for high-quality development for the City. • Implement a new customer service system for Community Development services to provide an excellent customer service experience. • Invest in staff through training and innovation to reduce attrition and develop the Planning team to address development challenges as an infill city. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 286 Planning Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 964,708 $ 1,490,770 $ 1,334,860 Operations and Maintenance 1,420,764 320,060 298,910 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 2,385,472 1,810,830 1,633,770 Other Funds Personnel Services 330,925 322,430 269,030 Operations and Maintenance 424,575 513,330 526,050 Capital Outlay 855,917 1,116,640 4,467,410 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal 1,611,417 1,952,400 5,262,490 All Funds Personnel Services 1,295,633 1,813,200 1,603,890 Operations and Maintenance 1,845,339 833,390 824,960 Capital Outlay 855,917 1,116,640 4,467,410 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 3,996,889 $ 3,763,230 $ 6,896,260 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 14.0 13.0 11.0 Part Time 0.8 0.8 - Total Staffing 14.8 13.8 11.0 Fiscal Yen 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 287 Planning Performance Statistics New Development Highlights 2019 Notable developments taking shape: • Development of new housing at The Resort �^ • Haven City Market at Haven and a!` Arrow —I • The Row at Terra Vista on Haven and Church • New warehouses at 4th and Utica Planning Department Revenue Planning Counter Visits ]<o," $ri<.681 ]20.W0 list W,mo 69o,Boo 66o= 6 00W $623.2]9 620,= 6 ,mo 2mo S80,uW 1WJ 560.N0 0 FY 1617 FY]]-18 FY 1819 2017 2018 2019 �Mual —Wd el Planning Work Volume Y 1�p 5 2"1 E t - 1. LA W 1106 13K 1122 1pgg y� ]036 W SCO 0 FY 163] iY ll4B FY 1819 •Planm�y Apgdnlims •B.an.b,111.0.enew •Plan C6eds Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 288 Planning Services to the Community Ecomomic Development Fiscal YeM 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 289 Public Information Land Use Entitlements Planning Development Review Environmental Review (CECiA) Historic Preservation Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Public Works Services Department's mission is to ,,:� provide efficient stewardship of the City's public works ' infrastructure. The Department has 4 sections: Facilities: Serving 15 City facilities and 8 Fire District facilities (> 1 million sq. ft.); Parks and Landscape: Maintaining 31 parks, Adult Sports Park and baseball stadium, 125 street front miles of landscape, comprehensive inventory of trees, -- pascos and trails; Street/Fleet/Storm Drain: Care for 534 - roadway miles and 3,964 catch basins and 188 vehicles,over - -- 140 On and Off road equipment, graffiti removal, and 220 signal-controlled intersections/crossings; and Administration/Project Management: Manage departmental support services, contracts, safety and risk management, budget, and capital maintenance projects. FY 2020/21 Budget Hiahliahts • Absorb increased costs of approximately $106,000 due to minimum wage increases that impact contract labor services, such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services • Provide maintenance services to the Public Safety Facility serving the western part of the city anticipated to be completed in early 2021 • Take a holistic approach to water management and focus on the goal to reduce overall city water consumption by identifying areas where water consumption can be reduced through water audits • Replace the deteriorating rubberized playground surfaces at Rancho Summit Park in CFD 2000-03,meeting requirements of the National Playground Safety Standards • Install two additional signals at Hellman Avenue at 6th Street and East Avenue at Highland Avenue • Other projects include: traffic signal equipment replacements, Civic Center HVAC Plant Replacement, Animal Care and Adoption Center roof replacement, sports lighting structural upgrades at Old Town Park,and converting underutilized space in the fleet shop to rentable office space Fiscal Year 202o/2i Adopted Budget Page 290 Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 4,685,425 $ 5,561,710 $ 5,133,260 Operations and Maintenance 5,355,316 6,601,730 5,950,770 Capital Outlay - 475,000 200,000 Cost Allocation (839,810) (976,160) (1,015,740) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 9,200,931 11,662,280 10,268,290 Other Funds Personnel Services 4,198,372 4,851,180 4,370,870 Operations and Maintenance 9,500,491 11,820,060 10,980,270 Capital Outlay 208,597 2,939,850 1,170,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 20,500 142,570 142,570 Transfer Out 278,650 571,520 684,290 Subtotal 14,206,610 20,325,180 17,348,000 All Funds Personnel Services 8,883,797 10,412,890 9,504,130 Operations and Maintenance 14,855,807 18,421,790 16,931,040 Capital Outlay 208,597 3,414,850 1,370,000 Cost Allocation (839,810) (976,160) (1,015,740) Debt Service 20,500 142,570 142,570 Transfer Out 278,650 571,520 684,290 Total Cost $ 23,407,541 $ 31,987,460 $ 27,616,290 Staffing Summary(Budgeted) Full Time 129.0 130.0 121.5 Part Time 34.1 34.1 13.2 Total Staffing 163.1 164.1 134.7 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 291 Public Works Services Performance Statistics 2019 Highlights • 1,345 requests through RC2GO app; increased 261.6%over 2018. • 2 days on average to complete RC2GO requests. • 5,741 potholes repaired; increased 44.2%over 2018. 17,340 A of asphalt removed/replaced (113 locations); increased 1.1%over 2018. 16,276 A of asphalt overlays (69 locations); increased 128.4%over 2018. 16,906 A of concrete sidewalk removed/replaced (190 locations); decreased 6%slightly from 2018. 824 linear ft. of concrete curb &gutter removed/replaced (44 locations); increased 25%over 2018. 3,555 sf. of concrete drive approach removed/replaced (48 locations); increased 22.7%over 2018. • Annual Concrete Repair Project (Contract); 37.9°%decreased from 2018. • 31,019 square feet of sidewalk removed/replaced. Streets After-Hours Call Outs ■2018 2019 1u u' Tg 79 91 44 54 56 I A =■ ■■ �■ ■ ii ■■ ■i ■: Tree Trimming In-House Contractor ■2M8 =2019 02M8 a2M9 56] LI,b53 lzm 300 7AI 211NI 199 3 , bib b12 y 14 Im 0■■ ■- -- - Trm Trees Trees Treea Trees Trees Pruned Rammed Planted Pruned Removed Planted r Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 292 Public Services 1 the Communit) City Buildings Facilities Maintenance _ Fire Stations Sports Lighting Urban Forestry __ _ _ _ Water Management Parks and Landscape Maintenance Parkways, Medians and Trails Park Facilities and Amenities Park Landscape and Sports Turf Public Works Traffic Signals and Safety Lighting Fiscal YeaT 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 293 Services _ _ Street Sweeping Street Maintenance Graffiti Removal Storm Drain Maintenance City Fleet Maintenance Concrete and Asphalt CI erica)/Ad m i n istretion Safety/Training Administration Capital Projects Contracts Budget/Finance THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 294 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 295 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 296 CrFY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Department The City's Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Fiscal Year 2020/21 will provide needed infrastructure improvements city-wide. The CIP summarizes the projects planned for the upcoming fiscal year by Department. Following is the total budgeted by Department for Fiscal Year 2020/21: Community Services $ 3,638,520 Engineering Services 20,081,490 Fire District 3,334,500 Library Services 925,000 Public Works Services 3,913,500 Total Capital Improvement Program $31.893A10 Some of the more significant capital improvement projects for each Department are discussed below. Community Services projects include: • The Central Park AN Replacement project will replace existing audio/visual equipment at the two main banquet halls at Central Park. • The Central Park Dog Park project will add a new Dog Park to the City,an amenity determined through the City's Fiscal Year 2018/19 Central Park Master Plan Update, which included community workshops and surveys. • The Parks Master Plan represents the Citywide master plan of parks and recreational facilities. Engineering Services projects include: • The 0 Street Pavement Rehabilitation project should restore the existing road surface from Haven Avenue to Ontario Mills Drive to a substantially new condition, extending pavement life,use,and rideability. • The Day Creek Channel Bike Trail project from Jack Benny Drive to Baseline Road will provide a paved pathway for pedestrians and bicyclists for both recreational and commuting uses. • The Etiwanda Avenue Grade Separation project from Whittmm Avenue to Napa Street will provide an elevated four lane roadway crossing that should improve safety and traffic circulation. • The Foothill Boulevard Pavement Rehabilitation project should restore the existing road surface to a substantially new condition,extending pavement life, use,and rideability. • The Heritage Park Bridge Replacements project will replace the main three parallel bridges with one multi-use bridge (separated uses) that span the Demens Creek Channel at Heritage Community Park. • Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation at Various Locations. • School Crosswalk Improvements project should enhance school crosswalks at seven locations by modifying access curb ramps, installing solar powered flashing beacons (at specified locations), and installing high visibility crosswalks. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 297 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Department Fire District projects include: • Fire District Town Center Station 178 project will result in a station that serves the center of the Rancho Cucamonga community and will be the primary draw-down unit for each adjacent fire station.It will house an all-risk apparatus and crew that will work on a 24/7/365-day cycle. • Public Safety Facility Fiber Extension will connect the new Public Safety Facility to the existing Rancho Fiber backbone. • Fire District Solar Station 177 project will install a solar photovoltaic system at the Hellman Fire Station 177. Library Services projects include: • Paul A.Biane Library Second Story and Beyond Project will build out the second floor of the Paul A. Biane Library at Victoria Gardens. Second Story is envisioned as a interactive discovery space combined with traditional library services to create a new type of learning experience that will appeal to children and users of all ages. Public Works Services projects include: • Citywide Concrete Repair project should repair sections of concrete sidewalks, curb/gutters and drive approaches damaged by tree roots, etc. in the public right of way. Project Location is Area 1 between Hellman to Camelian and Highland to Banyan and Area 4 between Vineyard to Hellman and Arrow to Foothill. • Civic Center HVAC Plant Replacement project will install new interior and exterior lighting controls,along with HVAC controls,for all City buildings. • LMD 2 Water Conservation/Landscape Renovation project is a continuation ofprevious year's turf removals and replacement with drought tolerant landscaping to reduce water usage. • LMD 411 Water Conservation/Landscape Renovation project is a continuation of previous year's turf removals and replacement with drought tolerant landscaping to reduce water usage. • Roof Repair project will replace existing roof at the Animal Can and Adoption Center. Note: Funds for these projects come from a variety of sources including development impact fees, State gas taxes,grant funds,and special assessments. These funds are non-General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. The amounts budgeted will fluctuate annually. In addition to CIP project costs,future operational costs are identified in the CIP and will be included in the operational budget in future years, as appropriate. Details of the cost and funding source(s) for each project budgeted for Fiscal Year 2020/21 are included in the following pages. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 298 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Capitol Improvement Program Detail by Department Department/Project Description Fundine Source Arnoum Community Services Central Park AN Replacement Capitol Reserve S 220,000 Central Park-Dog Park Gas Tax R&T 7360 201,760 State Grant 2,686,760 2,888,520 Cultural Center Courtyard-Redesign Capital Reserve 190,000 Cultural Center-Lighting Control System Capital Reserve 50,000 Garcia Park-Ball Field Lights LMD 9 40,000 Parks Master Plan Park Development 250,000 Community Services Total: 3,638,520 Engineering Services 4th Street-Pavement Rehabilitation Gas Tax R&T 7360 450,000 Measure I 500,000 950,000 6th Street Cycle Track Infrastructure 170,690 9th Street Sidewalk Improvements from Baker Avenue to 700 feet Infrastructure 96,200 East of Baker Safe Route 90,800 187,000 ADA Ramps at Various Locations Measure I 100,000 Advance Traffic Management System-Phase 2 Transportation 612,000 Base Line Road Utility Underground Underground Utilities 40,000 Civic Center East Lot-Electric Line Extension Municipal Utility 197,000 Day Creek Channel Bike Trail from Jack Benny Drive to Base Line Road AB 2766 216,000 Ped Gmnt/Art 3 401,200 617,200 Etiwanda Avenue East Side Widening Transportation 152,000 Etiwanda Avenue from Foothill Boulevard to Wilson Avenue Measure 1 100,000 Etiwanda Avenue Grade Separation SB 1 -TCEP 11,000,000 Fire Station 3-SCE Exit to RCMU Municipal Utility 57,500 Foothill Boulevard Q Etiwanda Avenue-Traffic Signal Installation Gas Tax R&T 7360 100,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 299 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Department Department/Proiect Description Funding Source Annonaft Foothill Boulevard from Grove Avenue to San Bernardino Road Gas Tax R&T 7360 370,000 Foothill Boulevard-Pavement Rehabilitation Road Maintenance&Rehab 1,850,000 Grind and Patch Asphalt Pavement at Arterial Intersection Gas Tax R&T 7360 30,000 Hellman Avenue-Sidewalk Improvements Community Block Grant 72,200 Heritage Park Bridge Replacements PD 85 100,000 Fire Capital Projects 100,000 200,000 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation at Various Locations Measure 1 490,000 Road Maintenance&Rehab 550,000 1,040,000 Pecan Avenue from Whittram Avenue to Arrow Route-Street Community Block Grant 700,000 Improvements School Crosswalk Improvements Community Dev Block Grant 247,300 South East Comer at Foothill Boulevard and Etiwanda Avenue- Community Dev Block Grant 10,000 Sidewalk Survey Synchronization at 10 Traffic Signals Transportation 361,800 The Resort Parkway(North)-Distribution Municipal Utility 5,000 Vineyard Avenue®San Bernardino Road-Traffic Signal Modification Transportation 90,000 Fire Capital Projects 150,000 240,000 Whittmm Avenue from Etiwanda Creek to Hickory Avenue-Pavement Community Dev Block Grant 71,800 Rehabilitation Youngs Canyon Road-Extension from Koch Place to Cherry Avenue AD 88-2 600,000 Engineering Services Total: 20,081,490 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 300 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 202021 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Department Department/Protect Description Fundine Source Amount Fire District Fire District-Solar Station 177 Fire Capital Projects 137,500 Fire District-Towne Center Station- 178 Fire Capital Projects 2,900,000 Public Safety Facility Fiber Extension Fire Capital Projects 165,550 Fiber Optic Network 47,300 Transportation 23,650 236,500 Station 175-Fiber Fire Capital Projects 30,250 Station 176-Fiber Fire Capital Projects 30,250 Fire District Total: 3,334,500 Library Services Paul A.Biane Library-Second Story and Beyond Project Library Capital Fund 925,000 Library Services Total: 925,000 Public Works Services Biane Library-Carpet Replacement Capital Reserve 20,000 Central Park-Refurbished Design Capital Reserve 12,000 Citywide Concrete Repair General Fund 200,000 Measure I 100,000 300,000 Citywide HVAC&Lighting Controls Capital Reserve 50,000 Civic Center-HVAC Plant Replacement Capital Reserve 1,500,000 Fleet Shop-Rental Space Capital Reserve 150,000 LMD 2-Light Pole Replacements LMD 2 25,000 LMD 2-Water Conservation/Landscape Renovation LMD 2 400,000 LMD 411-Water Conservation Landscape Renovation LMD 4 400,000 Old Town Park-Sports Lighting Structural Retrofit LMD 1 40,000 Paseo Lighting Retrofits LMD 2 25,000 Replace Rubberized Playground Surface CFD 2000-03 148,000 Roof Repair Capital Reserve 250,000 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 301 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA,CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020121 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Department Department/Protect Description Funding Source Amount Tennis Court-LED Light Project DM 10 65,000 Traffic Signal Battery Backup System Replacement Gas Tax R&.T 7360 127,500 EquipNeh Replacment 150,000 277,500 Traffic Signal Modifications-Various Locations Gas Tax R&T 7360 176,000 Victoria Groves Park-RR Roof Replacement LMD 2 75,000 Public Works Services Total: 3,913,500 Total Capital Improvement Projects: $ 31,893,010 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 302 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA APPENDIX Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 303 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 304 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies BUDGETING POLICY • The City will adopt an annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 no later than June 30 of the same year. • The adopted budget will be balanced with current year operating expenditures fully funded by current year revenues and available fund balance. • Fund balance reserves of the Operating Budget will be used only for non-recurring expenditures such as capital projects and not for on-going operations,with the exception of the Reserve for Changes in Economic Circumstances. The usage of that specific reserve is governed by the City's Fund Balance Policy. • The City Manager is authorized to implement programs as approved in the adopted budget. • The City Manager may transfer appropriations between divisions, projects and programs within the same department and fund in order to implement the adopted budget. • Quarterly budget reports will be presented to the City Council to provide information on the status of the City's financial condition. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT POLICY • Capital projects involve the purchase or construction of major fixed assets such as land, building or permanent improvements including additions, replacements and major alterations having a life expectancy of more than one year and costing$5,000 or more. • Capital projects are funded by a variety of sources including Special Funds(such as developer impact fees and grants), Enterprise Funds,and Special Districts. These funds are non-General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. Prior to its inclusion in the annual budget, a determination must be made that the project is an appropriate use of the funds and that there is sufficient fund balance. • The City will identify the estimated costs and potential funding sources for each capital project prior to its submittal to the City County for approval. • The City will coordinate the development of the Five-Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP)with the development of the annual Operating Budget. REVENUE POLICY Recurring revenue growth (inflation) will be used to pay for recurring expenditures. Recurring expenditure increases should not be approved which exceed recurring revenue growth, unless the current economic climate has triggered the use of the Changes in Economic Circumstances Reserve. Any new or expanded programs will be required to identify new funding sources and/or offsetting reductions in expenditures. In addition: • The City shall use a conservative approach in projecting revenues. • One-time revenues may be used for one-time expenditures. The City shall update its user fees and charges periodically to recover costs of providing that service for which a fee is charged. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 305 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies PURCHASING POLICY Purchasing Limits: Less than$5,000 No bid necessary, may use P- Card $5,001 to$20,000 Purchase order required for vendor of choice; comparative shopping is strongly advised $20,001 up to$50,000 Request for Quote (RFQ) required with three (3) viable bids More than $50,000 Formal bid Public Works Bids: Up to $45,000 Force account Up to $175,000 Informal bids $175,000 and over Formal advertisement Contract Signing Limits: $50,000 or less City Manager will have full discretion on designating below his/her authority. Staff signature authority limits will be updated and reviewed on an annual basis. $75,000 or less Assistant City Manager and Deputy City Managers $100,000 or less City Manager Public Works Contracts: $175,000 or less City Manager $175,001 or more City Council FUND BALANCE/RESERVE POLICY Adequate fund balance,or reserve,levels are a necessary component of the City's overall financial management strategy. It is the responsibility of the City Council to maintain a sufficient level of reserve funds to provide for the orderly provision of services to the citizens of the City of Rancho - Cucamonga. The City Council has the authority to decide the circumstances under which the reserves can be used. The City Manager and the Finance Director may,from time to time, make recommendations as to the level of reserve funds necessary for prudent fiscal management. Reserve levels shall be reviewed at least annually during the budget process to ensure that they are consistent with the conditions faced by the City. Fund balance is essentially the difference between the assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund. There are five separate components of fund balance, each of which identifies Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 3o6 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies the extent to which the City/Fire District is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts can be spent. • Nonspendable fund balance (inherently nonspendable) • Restricted fund balance (externally enforceable limitations on use) • Committed fund balance(self-imposed limitations on use) • Assigned fund balance (limitation resultingfrom intended use) • Unassigned fund balance (residual net resources) The first two components listed above are not addressed in this policy due to the nature of their restrictions. An example of nonspendable fund balance is inventory. Restricted fund balance is either imposed by law or constrained by grantors, contributors, or laws or regulations of other governments. This policy is focused on financial reporting of unrestricted fund balance,or the last three components listed above. These three components me further defined below. Committed Fund Balance The City Council (which also acts as the Board of Directors for the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District), as the City's highest level of decision-making authority, may commit fund balance for specific purposes pursuant to constraints imposed by formal actions taken, such as an ordinance or resolution. These committed amounts cannot be used for any other purpose unless the City Council/Fire Board removes or changes the specified use through the same type of formal action taken to establish the commitment. City Council/Fire Board action to commit fond balance needs to occur within the fiscal reporting period; however, the amount can be determined subsequently. • Chanees in Economic Circumstances The City's General Fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine-month reserve, or 75% of the City General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine month reserve, or 75%of the Fire District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The specific uses of this commitment are 1) the declaration of a state or federal state of emergency or a local emergency as defined in Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code Section 2.36.020; or 2) a change in economic circumstances in a given fiscal year that results in revenues to the City/Fire District being insufficient to cover expenditures for one or more fiscal years. The City Council/Fire Board may, by the affirming vote of four members, change the amount of this commitment and/or the specific uses of these monies. • City Facilities' Capital Repair The City's General Fund balance committed for City facilities' capital repair is established at a minimum goal of 50% of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 307 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies (excluding infrastructure),building improvements, and improvements other than building for governmental activities, excluding assets owned by the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. • Fire District Facilities Capital Repair The Fire District's fund balance committed for the Fire District facilities capital repair is hereby committed to a minimum goal of 50%of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress (excluding infrastructure), building improvements, and improvements other than building for public safety-fire activities. • Working Capital The City's General Fund balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 5% of the City's General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's fund balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 50%of the District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. • Self-Insurance The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of Worker's Compensation, General Liability, and Employment Practices Liability claims is established at a minimum goal of eight times the City's and the District's total yearly SIRS for all types of insurance coverage. • PASIS Worker's Compensation Tail Claims The Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of outstanding Worker's Compensation claims remaining after the District's withdrawal from PASIS is established at a goal equal to the most recent fiscal year end Claims Cost Detail Report from the District's third-party administrator plus 15%. • Employee Leave Payouts The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for employee leave payouts as valued in accordance with the City's labor contracts as of the last day of the fiscal year. • Vehicle and Equipment Replacement The Fire District's fund balance committed for the replacement of fire safety vehicles and equipment as determined based on the District's replacement criteria is established at a minimum goal of 50%of District vehicle and equipment replacement value. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 3o8 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies • Law Enforcement The City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes, including operations, equipment, capital outlay, capital facilities,personnel,and booking fees. The fording goal for this reserve is the equivalent of 100%of the most recently approved Schedule A from the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. Assitmed Fund Balance Amounts that are constrained by the City/Fire District's intent to be used for specific purposes,but are neither restricted nor committed, should be reported as assigned fund balance. This policy hereby delegates the authority to assign amounts to be used for specific purposes to the City Manager and/or Finance Director for the purpose of reporting these amounts in the annual financial statements. The following are a few non-exclusive examples of assigned fund balance. • Economic and Community Development Special Services The City's General Fund balance assigned for contracts,special services,or projects associated with Economic and Community Development (ECD) special projects or ECD initiatives/Council goals(such as economic strategy and Development Code contract services) as well as a one-year value of staffing costs for Planning,Building and Safety,and Engineering (not including capital and project management). • Annexation,Habitat Mitigation and Sphere of Influence Issues Established to provide funds for a multi-year effort to analyze the physical constraints and opportunities within the sphere area,provide required environmental analysis, and plan for the eventual annexation of the remaining unincorporated areas within the City sphere of influence. This reserve also provides for ancillary costs related to annexation of the sphere area, including mitigation issues and legal challenges. Another area covered by this reserve is the creation of a multi-species habitat conservation plan as well as acquisition of habitat conservation land. Unassigned Fund Balance These are residual positive net resources of the General Fund and Fire District funds in excess of what can properly be classified in one of the other four categories. Fund Balance Classifrcadon The accounting policies of the City/Fire District consider restricted fund balance to have been spent first when an expenditure is incurred for purposes for which both restricted and unrestricted fond balance is available. Similarly, when an expenditure is incurred for purposes for which amounts in any of the unrestricted classifications of fund balance could be used, the City/Fire Fiscal Year 202o/2i Adopted Budget Page 309 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies District considers committed amounts to be reduced first, followed by assigned amounts and then unassigned amounts. This policy is in place to provide a measure of protection for the City/Fire District against unforeseen circumstances and to comply with GASB Statement No. 54. No other policy or procedure supersedes the authority and provisions of this policy. INVESTMENT POLICY The Statement of Investment Policy shall be reviewed annually to ensure its consistency with the overall objectives of the City and its relevance to Federal, State, and local law; prudent money management; and financial and economic trends, and submitted to the City Council for approval in December. The policy applies to all funds and investment activities under the direct authority of the City. Financial assets held and invested by trustees or fiscal agents are subject to the regulations established by the State of California pertaining to investments by local agencies as well as the related bond indentures. Cash management and investment transactions me the responsibility of the City Treasurer and/or his designee. Criteria for selecting investments in order of priority are safety,liquidity and yield. The City operates its pooled cash investments under the "Prudent Person Standards." Under the provisions of the City's investment policy and in accordance with Section 53601 of the California Government Code, the City may invest in the following types of investments: • Securities of the U.S. Government, or its agencies • Municipals(Warrants,Notes and Bonds) • Certificates of Deposit(or Time Deposits) • Negotiable Certificates of Deposit • Banker's Acceptances • Commercial Paper • Local Agency Investment Fund(State Pool) Demand Deposits • Joint Powers Authority(JPA)Investment Pool (Short-Term) • Deposit of Funds • Repurchase Agreements (Repos) • Medium Term Corporate Notes • Supranational Securities • Investment Agreements In order to minimize the impact of market risk, it is the intent that all investments will be held to maturity. The City Treasurer shall prepare and submit a monthly investment report to the City Council and City Manager. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 310 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the following objectives: A. Minimize debt service and issuance costs B. Provide a scheduling component(planning) C. Maintain access to cost-effective borrowing D. Achieve the highest practical credit rating E. Full and timely repayment of debt F. Balance use of pay-as-you-go and debt financing G. Maintain full and complete financial disclosure and reporting H. Ensure compliance with applicable State and Federal laws II. SCOPE This policy applies to debt issued by the City of Rancho Cucamonga and its related entities,as well as debt issued by the City of Rancho Cucamonga on behalf of other parties. III. GENERAL POLICIES A. Designated Managers of City Debt I. The Finance Department under the direction of the Finance Director issues and oversees the ongoing administration of all the General Fund and special fund debt programs.These include General Obligation Bonds,lease purchase obligations,tax allocation bonds, revenue obligations, Mello-Roos and special assessment obligations. Other programs are added from time to time as new debt instruments me developed. B. Method of Sale. The City may utilize any methods of sale identified below. 1. There are two methods of issuing debt obligations, a competitive sale and a negotiated sale. In a competitive sale, underwriters submit sealed bids and the underwriter or underwriting syndicate with the lowest True Interest Cost (TIC) is awarded the sale. In a negotiated sale,the underwriter or underwriting syndicate is selected through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process. The interest rate and underwriter's fee are negotiated prior to the sale,based on market conditions. 2. When determining whether to use a competitive or negotiated sale, the following criteria should be used by the Finance Director to evaluate issuer and financial characteristics: a. Market familiarity: The City can generally sell most issues through a competitive sale since investors and underwriters are familiar with its credit quality. The Finance Director should consider whether a successful sale will require extensive pre-marketing to investors. A negotiated sale may be appropriate if extensive pre-marketing to investors is advantageous. b. Credit strength: The higher the credit quality of the City, the less likely the need for a negotiated sale due to the demand for high quality municipal bonds. A competitive bidding may be appropriate with the credit rating above 'A". Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 311 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies c. Policy goals: If the City chooses a negotiated sale for a policy reason,the City should then clearly specify the rationale and criteria for the selection of the underwriters to avoid the appearance of favoritism. Generally, the City should make a policy decision to proceed with a negotiated sale when the composition and distribution of bonds for a particular financing would be advantageous. d. Tempe of Debt Instrument: Familiar debt instruments would be better suited to competitive sales. New types of instruments may require an education process that is mom;conducive to a negotiated sale. Thus, as the market becomes more familiar with the City's debt instruments, the need to educate the market diminishes. c. Issue Size: If the bond amount is too small or too large, then the City should consider a negotiated sale. A small bond sale may not attract market attention without significant sales effort while a large sale may be difficult for the market to absorb without the pre-sale activity offered by the negotiated sale process. f. Market Conditions: When the market has interest rate stability, flexibility in the timing of the sale is not critical. However, the timing of the sale is critical when there is a volatile market. If this is the case, then a negotiated sale could be more appropriate. g. Story Bonds: When bonds are unique or have a "story" associated with them, then the pre-marketing process is essential and suitable for a negotiated sale due to the additional explanation. 3. A variation of a negotiated sale, a private placement or direct placement, allows the City to sell bonds directly to a limited number of investors. Private placements are not subject to the same laws and regulations that apply to registered offerings. IV. DEBT CAPACITY A. Debt Affordability 1. The determination of how much indebtedness the City should incur will be based on the long-term financial plan. This plan should evaluate the long-term borrowing needs of the City and the impact of planned debt issuances on the long-term affordability of all outstanding debt. 2. The long-term financial plan should integrate with the City's Capital Improvement Program and include all presently known City financings to be repaid from the General Fund and relevant special funds. 3. The affordability of the incurrence of debt will be determined by calculating various debt ratios (itemized below) that would result after issuance of the debt and analyzing the trends over time. B. Ceilings for Debt Affordability 1. Debt Ratios. Direct debt includes all debt that is repaid from the General Fund or from any tax revenues deposited into special funds not supporting revenue bonds, such as General Obligation bonds and city-wide parcel tax bonds. "General Revenues" consist primarily of the General Fund, as well as the revenues to the special funds supporting direct debt. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 312 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies Ratio Ceiling Total Direct Debt Service m%of General Fund Revenues 10% a. The debt ceiling may be exceeded if there is a guaranteed new revenue source for the debt payments. Generally, this is common for Public Enterprise Revenue Bonds. 2. Rapidity of Debt Repayment. To prevent backloading debt service payments and provide additional debt capacity through relatively rapid retirement of outstanding debt,debt issuances will be structured to reach a target of 50%of debt being repaid within 15 years. a. Back loading of debt service will be considered acceptable when one or more events occur that make debt service payments in early years impracticable or prohibitive. The Finance Director may make findings for any of the following: 1. Natural disasters, extraordinary, or unanticipated external factors. 2. The benefits derived from the debt issuance can clearly be demonstrated to be greater in the future than in the present period. 3. Such structuring is beneficial to the City's aggregate overall debt payment schedule. 4. Such structuring will allow debt service to more closely match project revenues during the early years of the pmject's operation. C. Monitor Impact on City Taxpayer of All Fees and Taxes I. In addition to the analysis of the City's debt affordability,the Finance Director will review the impact of debt issuance on City taxpayers.This analysis will incorporate the City's tax levy, other jurisdictions' tax levies, additional taxes for voter- approved debt, and assessments and fees used by the City or related agencies to service revenue bonds. V. REFINANCING OUTSTANDING DEBT A. TTynes of Refundings(as applicable by Federal and state law): 1. Current Refunding: A refunding of bonds within 90 days of the bond's first optional redemption or call date. 2. Advance Refunding: A refunding that occurs more than 90 days in advance of the first optional redemption or call date of the refunded bonds. B. Monitor Potential Savings 1. Potential savings available by refinancing outstanding debt of the City should be evaluated on a present value basis by using either a percent of maximum call option value or percentage of the refunded par amount. All costs and benefits of the refinancing should be considered. C. Target Savings Amounts 1. A present value analysis must be prepared by the Finance Department or the City's general financial advisors to identify the economic effect of any proposed refunding.To proceed with a refinancing,either of two methodologies may be used to analyze the targeted savings: Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 313 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies a. The net present value savings as a percentage of the refunded par amount with a minimum average savings of 3%for any one refunding transaction. 1. For an advance refunding, the threshold goal will be 5% net present value savings. D. Other Considerations: 1. A refunding may be executed for other than economic purposes, such as to restructure debt,to change the type of debt instrument,or to retire a bond issue and indenture for more desirable covenants. The Finance Director may recommend this type of refunding. VI. DEBT USES AND LIMITATIONS A. Legal Restrictions 1. The City must adhere to Section 18 of article XVI of the California Constitution. 2. Exceptions to the terms of Section 18 of article XVI of the California Constitution include: a. Obligations of Special District Funds which me not legally enforceable against the City's General Fund or its tax revenues. The City has developed separate guidelines that serve as minimum requirements for the issuance of Mello-Roos Obligations. b. Obligations imposed by law,such as tort damages or state and federal mandates that may exceed current revenues. c. Certain property or equipment leases and service contracts. B. Long-Term Fixed-Rate Debt 1. Debt should be used to finance essential capital assets such as facilities, real property, and certain equipment where it is appropriate to spread the cost of the asset over more than one budget year.Projects that are not appropriate for spreading costs over future years will not be debt financed. 2. Under no circumstances will long-term debt be used to fund City operations or maintenance. 3. The uses of long-term debt include: a. Equipment Financing: Lease obligations are a routine and appropriate means of financing capital equipment. However, lease obligations also have the greatest impact on debt capacity and budget flexibility. Therefore, efforts will be made to fund capital equipment with pay-as-you-go financing where feasible, and only the highest priority equipment purchases will be funded with lease obligations. All equipment with a useful life of less than five (5) years shall be funded on a pay-as-you-go basis. b. Lease Financing of Real Property: Lease financing for facilities and real property is appropriate if the City desires to finance them from existing revenue sources, and not through voter-approved bonds secured by an increase in property taxes. Such financings will be structured in accordance with the above Other Lease Obligations paragraph. c. Identified Repayment Source: The City will, when feasible, issue debt with a defined revenue source to preserve the use of General Fund-supported debt for Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 314 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies projects with no stream of user-fee revenues. Examples of revenue sources include voter-approved taxes,user fees, and other appropriate revenues. d. Use of General Obligation Bonds: Voter-approved General Obligation Bonds provide the lowest cost of borrowing to finance the acquisition or improvement of real property and provide a new and dedicated revenue source in the form of additional ad valorem taxes to pay debt service. In recognition of the difficulty in achieving the required two-thirds voter-approval to issue General Obligation Bonds, such bonds will be generally limited to facilities that provide wide public benefit and that have generated broad public support. e. Use of Revenue Bonds: To preserve General Fund debt capacity and budget flexibility, revenue bonds will be preferred to General Fund-supported debt when a distinct and identifiable revenue stream can be identified to support the issuance of bonds. C. Variable Rate and Short-Term Debt 1. Generally, the City will not issue variable interest rate debt instruments. The Finance Director may decide to issue variable-rate debt when a synthetic fixed rate through a swap agreement is determined to be a viable and cost-effective alternative, subject to the provisions of the Derivatives section below. 2. Uses of short-term debt: a. Tax and Revenue Anticipation Notes: Borrowing for cash flow purposes using tax and revenue anticipation notes is often desirable to manage the timing mismatch between revenues and expenditures over the course of a fiscal year. b. Bond Anticipation Financing: In certain circumstances, it may be appropriate for the City to issue short-term obligations to finance a capital project,with this obligation refunded with a more conventional long-tern financing. c. Commercial Paper: Commercial Paper (CP) is a short-term obligation with maturities ranging from 1 to 270 days. It is often used as interim financing until a project is completed to take advantage of lower interest rates. Once a project is completed, the Finance Director may recommend refunding CP with a long- term financing obligation,if appropriate. VII. STRUCTURE OF CITY DEBT INSTRUMENTS A. General Obligation Bonds: 1. The final maturity of General Obligation bonds will be Invited to the shorter of the average useful life of the asset financed or 30 years. 2. Principal will be amortized in equal annual amounts or faster to meet the rapidity of debt repayment goals. The bonds should be callable in no later than 10 years. B. Other Lease-Purchase Obligations: 1. The final maturity of equipment obligations will be limited to the average useful life of the equipment to be financed. - 2. The final maturity of real property obligations will be determined by the size of the financing, 10 to 15 years for small issues, 20 to 25 years for large issues and 30 years for exceptional projects or those with a direct revenue component, such as a special tax. Fiscal Year 2o2o/21 Adopted Budget Page 315 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies 3. Principal will generally be amortized to result in level annual lease payments; however, more rapid principal amortization may occur where permissible to meet debt repayment goals. 4. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. C. Revenue Obligations: 1. The final maturity of bonds or other debt obligations secured by enterprise or other special revenues will be determined by the expected useful life of the financed project and the revenues available to repay the debt. 2. Principal amortization will be appropriate for the project cash flows, based on the useful life of the project and other revenue bonds outstanding. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. D. Special Tax Obligations(excluding Mello-Roos Special Taxes): 1. The final maturity of special tax obligations will be limited to 30 years. 2. Principal will be amortized as quickly as feasible, with a preference for equal annual principal payments. 3. The obligation should have optional redemption provisions that set out terms in the bond documents which give the City the right to call all or a portion of an outstanding issue of bonds,prior to their stated dates ofmaturity at a specified price. a. The City should include these terms in the event a property owner intends to make a prepayment of special taxes to reduce their overall tax burden. 4. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. E. Mello-Roos and Special Assessment Obligations: 1. These obligations, although repaid through special taxes levied on a specific group of taxpayers, constitute overlapping indebtedness of the City, and have an impact on the overall level of debt affordability. 2. The City has developed separate guidelines for the issuance of Mello-Roos and Special Assessment Obligations. F. Capitalized Interest: 1. Capitalized interest increases the amount of debt to be issued and, therefore, will be avoided unless deemed beneficial from a credit standpoint, as in the case of lease-purchase obligations. 2. Interest on General Obligation Bonds will not be capitalized. 3. Interest on lease-purchase obligations will be capitalized for a maximum of 18 months following a conservatively based estimate of project completion to provide a cushion for project slippage. G. Payment Dates: 1. It is preferable that new debt service payments occur in September and March to align with past debt issuances. VIII. INVESTMENT OF BOND PROCEEDS 1. All investments of bond proceeds shall adhere to the City's Investment Policy, approved periodically by the City Council. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 316 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies IX. CONDUIT DEBT 1. Conduit financing we securities issued by the City to finance a project of a non-governmental third party, such as a non-profit organization or other private entity. 2. The City may sponsor conduit financings for those activities that may have a public purpose and me consistent with the City's overall service and policy objectives. 3. The City will not in any way pledge the City's credit in any form. 4. No City funds shall be pledged to support the conduit debt and no appropriation will be made in the event of a default of conduit debt. X. DERIVATIVES A. Use of Derivatives I. The City may use derivative instruments to mitigate interest rate risk as specified in Section 5922(a) of the Government Code of the State of California. The Finance Director will recommend the use of these instruments only in a manner consistent with the Government Code and when the following findings can be made: a. The instrument reduces exposure to changes in interest rates in the context of a financing or the overall asset/liability management of the City; or b. The instrument achieves a lower net cost of borrowing with respect to the City's debt. 2. As required by the Government Code, the City Council must determine that the instrument will reduce the amount or duration of payment, result in a lower cost of borrowing, or enhance the relationship between risk and return. 3. Derivative instruments will not be used for speculative purposes. B. Methods of Procurement 1. The Finance Director will solicit and procure derivative instruments by competitive bid whenever feasible. 2. A negotiated transaction should only be used if the Finance Director determines that due to the size or complexity that a competitive bid is impractical and a negotiated transaction. Such findings will be based on advice from an independent financial advisor and with the assistance of the City Attorney. a. The independent financial advisor should make findings on the terms and conditions of the derivative instrument and the fair market value of such agreement. C. Asvects of Risk Exposure 1. Before entering into a derivative instrument, the Finance Director should evaluate the risk inherent to the transaction. The risks to be evaluated should include: a. Amortization Risk: The mismatch of the expiration of the underlying obligation and the derivative instrument. b. Basis Risk: The mismatch between the actual variable rate debt service and variable rate index used to determine the derivative instrument. c. Credit Risk: The occurrence of an event modifying the credit rating of the counterparty. d. Countervarty Risk: The failure of the counterparty to make its required payments. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 317 CrrY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies e. Rollover Risk: The potential need to find a replacement counterparty as part of the overall plan of finance if the derivative instrument does not extend to the final maturity of the underlying variable rate bonds. f. Tax Events Risk: The risk created by potential changes to Federal and State income tax codes on the interest rates to be paid by the City on its variable rate bonds. g. Termination Risk: The possibility that,upon a default by the counterparty,the City may be required to make a large payment to the counterparty if the derivative instrument is terminated prior to its scheduled maturity pursuant to its terns. D. Countemarty 1. A counterparty, or the entity who takes the other side of the derivative instrument, exists for every derivative agreement. The risk that the counterparty will default on its obligation must be mitigated. Therefore, a counterparty should meet the following standards: a. At least two of the counterparty's credit ratings are rated at least"AaY or"AA- ", or equivalent, by any two of the nationally recognized rating agencies (i.e. Moody's, Standard and Poor's, or Fitch); or b. The payment obligations of the counterparty are unconditionally guaranteed by an entity with such a credit rating. 2. A counterparty should be collateralized at levels and with securities acceptable to the Finance Director if the payment obligations are not unconditionally guaranteed. E. Termination 1. Prior to making any termination payment due to the default of a counterparty, the Finance Director will evaluate whether it is financially advantageous for the City to obtain a replacement coumerparty to avoid making such termination payment. F. Legality 1. The City Attorney must receive an opinion reasonably acceptable to the market from a nationally recognized law firm that any derivative instrument that the City enters,is a legal,valid and binding obligation of the City. XI. CONTINUING DISCLOSURE AND ADMINISTRATION A. Continuing Disclosure 1. The City will comply with Rule 15(c)2-12 of the Securities and Exchange Commission by filing an annual report that provides certain financial information and operating data relevant to investors in City obligations. a. The City will covenant to provide its annual disclosure report no later than 270 days following the end of the fiscal year to the Electronic Municipal Market Access (EMMA) site maintained by the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board(MSRB). b. The City will issue a material event notice in accordance with the provisions of Rule 15(c)2-12 of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prior to the issuance of any material event,the Finance Director may convene a meeting of Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 318 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies the Mayor, City Manager, City Attorney and policymakers or outside professionals as appropriate, to discuss the materiality of any event and the process for equal, timely and appropriate disclosure to the marketplace. B. Arbitrage Rebate Compliance 1. The City will comply with all of its tax certificates for tax-exempt financings by monitoring the arbitrage earned on bond proceeds and by rebating all positive arbitrage, pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 148. The Finance Director may choose to hire an arbitrage consultant to prepare the calculations required by the Internal Revenue Service. Contractor payments shall be made from either the General Fund or from the special fund for which the calculation was made. C. Ratings 1. The City will secure underlying ratings on all newly issued obligations from at least one national rating agency,if deemed beneficial for the financing. a. Some forms of debts,such as equipment leases and private placements,will not require ratings. 2. The Finance Director shall meet with a rating agency, either in person or via conference call as deemed appropriate by the financing team, that rates City debt issues. 3. The Finance Director shall ensure prompt delivery to a rating agencies of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and adopted budgets when requested. 4. Certificates of Substantial Completion on projects financed with long term obligations shall be delivered to the rating agencies and Bond Insurer, as relevant. 5. Any changes in ratings will be promptly noticed to the City Manager and the City Council. XIL FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS A. General 1. The Finance Director will be responsible for recommending the financial consultants and professionals based on prior experience, recommendations, or a Request for Proposals (RFP) or Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process, whichever is most appropriate given the circumstances. B. Independent Financial Advisors 1. The City will utilize an independent financial advisory team to assist in the structuring of its debt offerings,to conduct its competitive bond sales, and to assist with a negotiated bond sale to ensure that interest rates are appropriate. C. Bond Counsel Services 1. The City will select bond counsel teams for its current bond programs. 2. As-needed bond counsel teams will be selected for those issuances that do not fall into any other categories of City debt obligations. D. Underwriters 1. The City will select the underwriting firm to provide the City with market knowledge, assist with credit analysis and preparation, premarketing of bonds, pricing and sale of bonds, and trading of bonds, as applicable. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 319 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Financial Policies E. Trustee 1. The Finance Director shall have the discretion to select a commercial banking firm as trustee, either through a request for qualifications process or by relying on existing banking relationships. - Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 320 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Legal Debt Margin Pursuant to State of California Government Code Section 43605, the City's legal bonded indebtedness shall not exceed 15% of the assessed value of all real and personal property in the City. However, this provision was enacted when assessed valuation was based upon 25% of market value. Effective with the 1981/82 fiscal year, each parcel is now assessed at 100% of market value (as of the most recent change in ownership for that parcel). Although the statutory debt limit has not been amended by the State since this change,the percentages presented in the - computation below have been proportionately modified to 3.75% (25% of 15%) for the purposes of this calculation in order to be consistent with the computational effect of the debt limit at the time of the State's establishment of the limit. The City's debt limit for Fiscal Year 2019/20 is $1,036,588,356 while the City's debt subject to the limitation is$0. As a result,the City has not exceeded its legal debt limit. Legal Debt Margin Calculation for Fiscal Year 2019/20: Assessed value $27,642,356,156 Debt I'mt@(3.75%of assessed value) 1,036,588,356 Debt applicable to limit: General obligation bonds - Legal debt margin $ 1,036,588,356 Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 321 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Debt Service Obligations The following schedule summarizes the City's debt service obligations for Fiscal You 2020/21: FY 202021 Outstanding Issue Maturity Interest Principal at Fund Date Description Data Rates Principal Interest Total 06/302021 Fiber Optic 2019 Lease Enterprise Revenue Bonds, 3.000- Fund 2019 Series 2039 5.000% $ - $449,456 $ 449,456 $ 9,875,000 Fiber Optic 2019 Lease Enterprise Revenue Bonds, 2.850- Fund 2019 Series 2025 3.125% $425,000 $ 60,375 $ 485,375 1,585,000 Fiber Optic Enterprise Fund Total $4259000 $509,931 $ 934,831 $ 11,460,000 Internal Service Fund 2019 Capital Lease 2023 4.715% 470,310 57,020 527,330 995,689 Total $895,310 $566,851 $ 1,462,162 $ 12,455,689 Note:Amounts Unaudited Fiscal Year 202o/21 Adopted Budget Page 322 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Audit: An examination of systems,procedures,programs and financial data. The end product of an audit is a report issued by an independent auditor describing how well a local governments financial statements describe its financial condition and the results of its operations. Accrual Basis of Revenues are recognized when both measurable and available; Accounting: expenditures are recorded when services have been substantially performed or goods have been received and the liabilities incurred. Adopted Budget: The official budget as approved by the City Council at the start of each fiscal year. Ad Valorem Tax A state or local government tax based on the value of real property as "According to its determined by the county tax assessor. value": Amended Budget: The adopted budget as amended by the City Council through the course of a fiscal year. Appropriations: A legal authorization granted by a legislative body to make expenditures and to incur obligations for specific purposes. An appropriation is usually limited in amount and to the time when it may be expended. Assessed Valuation: A municipality's property tax base stated in dollars based on real estate and/or other taxable business property for the purposes of taxation, sometimes expressed as a percent of the full market value of the taxable property within a community. Balanced Budget: The amount of budgeted expenditures is equal to or less than the amount of budgeted revenues plus available fund balance. Bond: A security whereby an issuer borrows money from an investor and agrees and promises,by written contract,to pay a fixed principal sum on a specified date(maturity date)and at a specified rate of interest. Budget: A plan of financial operation comprised of estimated expenditures for a given period(usually a single fiscal year) and the proposed means of financing the expenditures(through revenues). Capital Budget: A budget which focuses on capital projects to implement the Capital Improvement Program. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 323 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Capital Expenditure: An acquisition or an improvement(as distinguished from a repair)that will have a life of more than one year and costs more than $5,000. Capital Improvement A plan for capital improvements to be implemented each year over a Program: number of years to meet capital needs arising from the assessment of long- term needs. It sets forth the estimated cost for each project and specifies the resources required to finance the projected expenditures. Capital Improvement The budget unit to group activities and costs necessary to implement a Project: specific capital improvement and/or acquisition. A project can include the construction, acquisition, expansion,replacement, or rehabilitation of a physical facility or improvement. Projects often include planning and design, land acquisition, and project management costs related to such facilities and improvements. Capital Projects Used to account for financial resources for the acquisition or construction Funds: of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust funds. Debt Service Funds: Account for the accumulation of resources set aside to meet current and future debt service requirements(payments)on general long-term debt. Department: A major organizational group of the City with overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. Depreciation: Expiration in the service life of capital assets attributable to wear and tear, deterioration,action of the physical elements, inadequacy or obsolescence. Division: An organizational subgroup of a department. Encumbrance: The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase goods,which have not yet been received,or services that have yet to be rendered. Enterprise Funds: Use to account for self-supporting operations such as the Municipal Utility. Expenditures: Decreases in net financial resources. Expenditures include current operating expenses which require the current or future use of net current assets,debt service and capital outlays. Expenses: Decreases in net total assets. Expenses represent the total cost of operations during a period regardless of the timing of related expenditures. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 324 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Fiscal Year: A 12-month period to which the annual operating budget applies and at the - end of which an entity determines its financial position,the results of its operations, and adopts a budget for the coming year. The City of Rancho Cucamonga's fiscal year is from July 1 to Jane 30. Fixed Assets: Equipment costing $5,000 or more, including tax,with a useful life longer than one year,and not qualifying as a capital improvement project. Includes automotive equipment,office equipment,office furniture, acquisitions, landscaping improvements,etc. Full-Time Equivalent The conversion of part-time employee hour to an equivalent of a full-time (FTE): position. For example: one person working 20 hours a week for a year would be 0.5 FTE. - Fund: An independent fiscal and accounting entity with a self-balancing set of accounts,recording resources,related liabilities,obligations,reserves and equities segregated for the purpose of carrying out specific activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions or limitations. Fund Balance: The equity(assets minus liabilities)of governmental fund and fiduciary fand types. Generally Accepted Uniform minimum standards of and guidelines for financial accounting Accounting Principles and reporting. They govem the form and content of the basic financial (GAAP): statements of an entity. GAAP encompasses the conventions,rules,and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practices at a particular time. They include not only broad guidelines of general application,but also detailed practices and procedures. GAAP provides a standard by which to measure financial presentations. GFOA: Government Finance Officers Association Governmental The independent organization that establishes and improves standards of Accounting Standards accounting and financial reporting for U.S. state and local governments. Board (GASB): Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 325 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Governmental Funds: Typically are used to account for tax-supported(governmental) activities. These include the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, Capital Projects Funds, and Debt Service Funds. Interfund Transfers: Defined as "flows of assets"(such as good or services)without equivalent flows of assets in return and without requirement for repayments. Internal Service Account for the goods or services provided by one fund and/or department Funds: to another fund and/or department on a cost reimbursement basis. Investment Grade: A rating issued by the three major bond rating agencies, Moody's, Standard& Poor's, and Fitch,rated BBB,Baa or Better. Many fiduciaries, trustees, and some mutual fund managers can only invest in securities with an investment grade rating. Modified Accrual The accrual basis of accounting where revenues are recognized when they Basis: become both"measurable" and "available"to finance expenditures of the current period. All governmental funds and agency funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Object Code: The classification of expenditures in terms of what is bought and paid for grouped into categories. Overlapping Debt: The proportionate share of the general obligation bonds of local governments located wholly or in part within the limits of the reporting unit of government,that must be borne by property owners within the unit. Personnel Expenses: Compensation paid to or on behalf of City employees for salaries and wages, overtime and benefits. Proprietary Funds: Account for records of operations similar to those found in a business, such as internal service funds and enterprise funds. Revenue: Moneys that the City receives as income such as tax payments,fees from specific services,receipts form other governments, fines, forfeitures, grants, shared revenues and interest income. Special Revenue Account for the revenue derived form specific taxes or other earmarked Funds: revenue sources (other than expendable trusts or for major capital projects) that are restricted by law or administrative action to expenditures for specified purposes. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 326 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Taxes: Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit. This term does not include specific charges made against particular persons or property for current or permanent benefits such as special assessments. Neither does the term include charges for services rendered only to those paying such charges as, for example,user charges. Undertdl: Filling an authorized position with a related classification that has a lower salary range. Reasons to consider an underfill include,but are not limited to: the department's internal promotional program would be enhanced; there are no qualified candidates to fill said vacant position; or a critical departmental reason exists. User Charges: Payments made by users or customers of publicly provided services that benefit specific individuals. These services exhibit"public good" characteristics. Examples of user charges are fees paid for recreational activities,building fees, etc. Working Capital: The cash available for day-to-day operations of an organization. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 327 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 328 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget List of Acronyms ADA Americans with Disabilities Act HdL Hinderliter de Llamas AQMD Air Quality Management District HHW Household Hazardous Waste BERT Business Emergency Response HR Human Resources Training HVAC Heating,Ventilating, and Air BYB2RC Bring Your Business 2 Rancho Conditioning Cucamonga 1AQ Indoor Air Quality C.AN.IN.E. Campus Awareness,Narcotic IESBDC Inland Empire Small Business Intervention,Narcotic Education Development Center CAFR Comprehensive Annual Financial IPM Integrated Pest Management Report KIDS Kids Interactive Discovery Space CAL-ID RAN California Identification System LED Light-Emitting Diode Remote Access Network LMD Landscape Maintenance District CDBG Community Development Block PCI Pavement Condition Index Grant ID Park District CDTFA California Department of Tax and PEPRA Public Employees'Pension Fee Administration Reform Act CERT Community Emergency Response PERS Public Employees Retirement Training System CID Community Facilities District PSVN Public Safety Video Network CIP Capital Improvement Program RCLS Rancho Cucamonga Library CNG Compressed Natural Gas Services CONFIRE Consolidated Fire Agencies, Joint RCMU Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Power Authority Utility CPI Consumer Price Index REGIS Rancho Enterprise Geographic CPR Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Information Systems CSD Community Services Department ROPS Recognized Obligation Payment CVWD Cucamonga Valley Water District Schedule EIR Environmental Impact Review SANBAG San Bernardino Associated ESRI Environmental Systems Research Governments Institute SBCERA San Bernardino County Employee FLSA Fair Labor Standards Act Retirement Association FTE Full Time Equivalent SBOE California State Board of FY Fiscal Year Equalization GFOA Government Finance Officers SCE Southern California Edison Association SLD Street Lighting District GIS Geographic Information Systems TOD Transit Oriented Development GOTMD Greater Ontario Tourism TOT Transient Occupancy Tax Marketing District VLF Vehicle License Fees Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 329 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description GENERALFUND 001 General Fund - The general operating fund of the City which accounts for all general tax receipts and fee revenue not allocated by law, Council policy or contractual agreement to other funds. General Fund expenditures include operations traditionally associated with activities which are not required to be accounted for or paid by another fund. OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 Reimb St/County Parking Cit - Established for the tracking of revenues and expenditures related to State and San Bernardino County surcharges on parking citations. 006 CV WD Reimbursements -Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed street repairs within the City on behalf of Cucamonga Valley Water District. 008 County of S.B. Reimbursements - Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed storm drain facility maintenance on behalf of the San Bernardino County Flood Control District. 016 Comm Dev Technical Services - Established to account for the City's General Plan Update Fee as well as funds that have been set aside for Economic and Community Development Special Services. 017 Law Enforcement Reserve-Established to account for the funding and use of the City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes. 018 Traffic Safety - Established to account for vehicle code fines collected to fund the City's contracted crossing guard services. 019 Info Technology-Development - Established to account for fees collected to fund the internal cost of providing information technology services for the Community Development Departments. 020 City Technology Fee - Established to account for fees collected to fund a future replacement of the City's land management system. 022 Mobile Home Park Program - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the City's mobile home park inspection program. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 330 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Descriptiou 023 SB1186 Cert Access Special Program - Established to account for the $1.00 State mandated fee imposed on any applicant for a business license, equivalent or renewal, including the payment to the State of 30% of the fee collected as well as expenditures to fund increased certified access specialist (CASp) services for the public and to facilitate compliance with construction-related accessibility requirements. 025 Capital Reserve - Established to account for key reserves of the General Fund including City infrastructure, City facilities capital repairs,and self-insurance. 073 Benefits Contingency - Established to account for the accumulation of resources for the future payment of employee leave benefits paid to employees upon separation from the City. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds account for revenues derived jram specific sources which are required by law or administrative regulation to be accounted far in a separated fund. Funds included are: 100 Assessment Districts Admin - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the management of all City assessment districts. 101 AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center - Established to acquire the necessary infrastructure from the developer after the completion and acceptance of the approved improvements. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds pursuant to the provisions of the Improvement Act of 1915. 105 AB2766 Air Quality Improvement - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2766 which imposed an additional registration fee on motor vehicles. These revenues are to be used to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles and for related planning, monitoring, enforcement, and technical studies (Vehicle Code Section 9250.17 and Health and Safety Code Chapter 7, Part 5 of Division 26, commencing with Section 44220). 106 MSRC Air Pollution Reduction Grant - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received from the Mobile Source Air Pollution Reduction Committee (MSRC). These revenues are to be used to fund projects that reduce air pollution from motor vehicles. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 331 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 110 Beautification - Established to account for fees collected to provide proper landscaping and irrigation systems after parkway and median improvements are made. ill Park Land Acquisition - Established to account for the park land acquisition development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park sites. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 112 Drainage Fac/General-Established to account for fees charged developers for purposes of defraying the actual or estimated costs of constructing planned drainage facilities. 113 Community/Rec Center Develpmnt - Established to account for community and recreation center impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 114 Drainage-Etiwanda/San Sevaine - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of regional and mainline flood control projects. 115 Henderson/Wardman Drainage - The Henderson/Wardman Drainage fund is a developer impact fee supported fiord for the construction of storm drain improvements in the Henderson/Wardman drainage area. 116 Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area North of Base Line Road for the construction of Master Plan Storm Drain projects. 118 Upper Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of secondary mainline flood control projects. 119 Park Improvement- Established to account for park improvement impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 120 Park Development - Established to account for the residential park development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park or recreational sites. 122 South Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for Development Impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south of Foothill Blvd for the construction of the Master Plan Storm Drain. 123 Library Impact Fee- Established to account for library impact fees charged to developers. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 332 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 124 Transportation - Established to account for fees charged for the construction and expansion of City streets and highways which provide additional capacity and safety. 125 Animal Center Impact Fee - Established to account for animal center impact fees charged to developers. 126 Lower Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south between Foothill Blvd. and Base Line Road for the construction of master plan storm drain projects. 127 Police Impact Fee - Established to account for police impact fees charged to developers. 128 Etiwanda No. Equestrian Facility - Established to account for in lieu fees collected for the Etiwanda North Specific Plan for the future construction of an equestrian facility. 129 Underground Utilities - Established to account for fees collected from developers for future undergrounding of overhead utilities. 130 LMD #1 General City - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 131 LMD #2 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 132 LMD #3A Hyssop - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 133 LMD #311 Medians - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 134 LMD #4R Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 135 LMD #5 Tot Lot - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 136 LMD#611 Caryn Community -Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 333 CrrY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 137 LMD#7 North Etiwanda-Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 138 LMD#8 South Etiwanda -Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 139 LMD #9 Lower Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 140 LMD #10 Rancho Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 141 LMD #1 Capital Replacement - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for LMD#1. 150 General City Streetlights - Established to account for installation and maintenance of City-owned street lights. 151 SLD #1 Arterial - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 152 SLD #2 Residential - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 153 SLD #3 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 154 SLD #4 Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 155 SLD #5 Caryn Community - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 156 SLD #6 Industrial Area -Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 157 SLD#7 North Etiwanda -Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 334 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 158 SLD #8 South Etiwanda -Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 174 State Gas Tax - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of State gasoline taxes provides the financing. 176 Measure I 1990-2010 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 177 Measure I 2010-2040 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 179 Road Maintenance and Rehab Acct - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road maintenance, rehabilitation, and critical safety projects of the City network system. The City's share of Road Maintenance and Rehabilitation Account funding provides the financing. 181 SB 1 - TCEP -Established to account for the receipts and disbursements of SB I Trade Corridor Enhancement Program (TCEP) funds which provide for the design and construction of the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project. 182 AB 2928 Traffic Congest Relief-Established fund to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2928. The purpose of the Traffic Congestion Program was to provide funding for transportation projects that would relieve congestion, connect transportation systems,and provide for better goods movement. 186 Foothill Blvd Maintenance - Established to account for funding provided by Cal Trans as part of their relinquishment of Foothill Boulevard to the City of Rancho Cucamonga. This limited funding source will be utilized to repair and maintain portions of Foothill Boulevard. 188 Integrated Waste Management- Established to account for AB939 recycling fee revenues from the City's refuse haulers and can only be used for the City's Household Hazardous Waste Disposal program. Assembly Bill 939 is a law that was passed by the State of California that mandates that all cities divert a specified percentage of their solid waste from their landfills inaccordance with established deadlines. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 335 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Descriotion 190 Prop 42-Traffic Congestion Mit-Established to account for gasoline sales tax revenue received from the State of California for transportation purposes, including city and county street and road repairs and maintenance. Proposition 42, a legislative constitutional amendment, permanently dedicated revenues from this sales tax on gasoline.to transportation infrastructure needs. 194 Proposition 1B State Funding - Proposition 113 (Prop 113) provides state funding to cities and counties to fund the maintenance and improvement of local transportation facilities. The funding is allocated based on population. 195 State Asset Seizure - Established to account for the funds received from the State for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 196 CA Asset Seizure 15% -Established to account for 15%of State Asset Seizure (Fund 195) designated for the sole purpose of funding programs designed to combat drug abuse and divert gang activity pursuant to the provisions of Health & Safety Code Section 11489(b)(2)(A)(i). 197 Federal Asset Seizure-Established to account for the funds received from the Federal government for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 198 Citywide Infrastructure Impry - This fund was established to account for reimbursement revenue received from various local, State and Federal agencies and utilities for capital improvement projects completed in the City. The accumulated funds will be used for future capital improvement projects as authorized by the City Council. 204 Community Development Blk Grant - Established to account for grants received from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. These revenues must be expended to accomplish one of the following objectives: elimination of slum or blight; or benefit to low and moderate income persons by providing loans and grants to owner-occupants and rental property owners to rehabilitate residential properties. 209 Federal SAFETEA-LU - Established to account for the Safe, Accountable, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Federal funding for surface transportation projects. 211 Prop 1B - SLPP - Established to account for the State-Local Partnership Program utilizing Proposition 1B bond proceeds to fund eligible transportation projects. Funds are allocated through formula and competitive sub-programs. Fiscal Year 202o/21 Adopted Budget Page 336 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 214 Pedestrian Grant/Art 3 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received for the construction of facilities provided for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicycles. 218 Public Resree Grots/Healthy RC- The City had received and will continue to receive from various funding sources for the Healthy Cities concept, which was adopted by the Council in March 2008, as a means of integrating health concerns into a holistic approach to improving the overall quality of life in the community. 225 CA Recycle/Litter Reduction Grant-Established to account for a grant from the State Department of Conservation. This grant will fund a program that will emphasize the collection and recycling of beverage containers at large venues, public areas,residential communities or schools. 226 Used Oil Recycling Grant - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. 227 Used Oil Recycling Program - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. 234 Safe Routes To School Program- The Safe Routes to School Program fund is a grant fund for monies provided by the State of California. The state funds are administered through Caltrans as part of the California Department of Health Services' "Safe Routes to School Program" and are available for transportation projects that increase the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists. 235 Prop 84 Park Bond Act - Prop 84 provides state funding, on a competitive basis, to local governments for the creation of new parks and recreation opportunities. The Statewide Park Program legislation requires projects to meet six eligibility requirements. The fund was established to account for the financial activities associated with the design and construction of the neighborhood park in southwest Rancho Cucamonga. 250 Recreation Services - Established to account for the wide variety of classes, special events, and activities sponsored by the Community Services Department. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 337 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 255 Victoria Gardens Cultural Center - Established to account for the various activities that the Community Services Department facilitates at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center. 258 Senior Outreach Grant - Established to account for funds passed through the San Bernardino County Department of Aging and Adult Services from the California Department of Aging to provide free recreation classes and programs for senior citizens in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. These recreation activities focused on physical, social, psychological, educational, and recreational needs of older persons. The City provided an in-kind match of $1,200 in the form of marketing,staff oversight,and supplies. 272 VG Cultural Freedom Courtyard RSRC Grant - Established to account for revenues and expenditures to support the operation and construction of the Freedom Courtyard. 274 State Grants - Established to account for the revenues and expenditures of State grants which are not required to have segregated funds. For Fiscal Year 2020/21, the State Grants Fund accounts for fiords from Proposition 68 for the construction of a dog park at Central Park. 281 Fire Fund - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received by the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in the course of that agency's fire protection services. The source of revenue is primarily from property taxes. 282 Community Facilities Dist 85-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 283 Community Facilities Dist 88-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 285 Fire Technology Fee Fund - Established to set aside finds for technology equipment replacement. 288 Fire Protection Capital Fund-Established to account for capital maintenance and repairs as well as purchases of fixed assets for the Fire District separate from the Fire District's Fire Fund which accounts for general maintenance and repairs. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 338 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 290 Library Fund - Established to account for services provided by the City of Rancho Cucamonga Library. Funding for this service is made possible through a transfer of San Bernardino County library tax revenues to the City of Rancho Cucamonga for library purposes. 291 CA State Library - This "Family Place" training grant from the California State Library provided funding for two Library staff to attend a one-week training that will enable them to develop special programs at the Biane Library and the Family Resource Center. This grant has no matching requirements. 292 Staff Innovation Fd (CA St Lb) - Established to account for the grant money awarded by California State Library. The purpose of the grant is to provide training for innovative writing skills for future grant writers. 299 Library Development Fund-Established to account for activities taking place in the newly developed second floor of the Biane Library, which is currently under construction. The second floor will serve as a dramatic programming space for the entire community, with a wide variety of programming geared toward science, art and early literacy. 301 The Big Read Library Grant - Established to account for the grant money receiving from the National Endowment for the Arts. The purpose of the grant is to emphasize a city wide media campaign through guest lectures, group discussions, film showings, and a community theater performance of a designated book. 302 Library Services & Tech.Act- Established to account for grant revenues and expenditures associated with funding provided by the federal Library Services and Technology Act,which is administered in California by the State Librarian. 329 Library Capital Fund - Established as the capital fund for the construction of the Biane Library second floor tenant improvement project. 340 Drug Abatement Act- Established to account for funds from the injunction to abate and prevent the continuance or reoccurrence of public nuisance as defined under the Drug Abatement Act in the California Health and Safety Code sections 11570 through 11587. 354 COPS Program Grant-State - Established to account for a grant awarded as the result of the approval of State Assembly Bill 3229. The grant is a one-year award with no matching fund requirements. 361 Justice Assistance Grant(JAG) - Established to account for the revenues and expenditures associated with Federal JAG grants. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 339 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund 4 Fund Description 370 OTS-"Drink, Drive, Lose" Grant - This grant was awarded by the State of California Office of Traffic Safety to provide supplementary funding for overtime costs incurred during sobriety checkpoints. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the number of victims killed and injured as a result of alcohol-involved crashes. 373 COPS Secure Our Schools Grant Fund—Established to account for the grant money use in partnership with public schools to improve school safety. 374 Cops Hiring Program Grant - This is a multi-year grant awarded by U.S. Department of Justice to provide partial supplementary funding to hire a new sworn officer. The grant must be used to enhance community policing activities. 380 Homeland Security Grant-Fire-This grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program is administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training cost funding for national security. There are no matching funds required for this grant. 381 Homeland Security Grant- Police - The grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMD's) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training costs funding for national security. There are no matching funds required for this grant. 383 Emergency Management Performance Grant - This grant from FEMA is used to fund a volunteer coordinator for the City's Community Emergency Response Team(CERT)program. 396 Housing Successor Agency - Established to account for assets of the former Redevelopment Agency's Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund. The source of revenue in the fund is primarily from interest received from the notes and loans receivable. 838 AD 91-2 Redemption-Day Canyon - Established to account for assessments received under the Improvement Bond Act of 1915. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 340 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 847 PD 85 Capital Replacement Fund - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for PD 85. 848 PD 85 Redemption Fund - Established to account for assessments received under the Refunding Act of 1984 for 1915 Improvement Act Bonds and Landscape/Lighting Act of 1972. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. 868 CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance - This fund is used for the maintenance of parks and parkways located within the Community Facilities District No. 2000- 03. The District is located south of Summit Avenue on the east and west sides of Wardman Bullock Road. 875 CFD 2017-01 No. Etiwanda - This fund accounts for special taxes related to the North Etiwanda Community Facilities District No. 2017-01 which provides for the maintenance of landscaped areas, parkways, medians, park and recreation improvements, and other public infrastructure and improvements through the boundary of the North Etiwanda CFD. 876 CFD 2018-01 Empire Lakes -This fund accounts for the special taxes related to the Empire Lakes Community Facilities District No. 2018-01 which provides for the maintenance of landscaped areas, parkways, medians, park and recreation improvements, and other public infrastructure and improvements through the boundary of the Empire Lakes CFD. 877 CFD 2018-01 Capital Reserve - This fund accounts for the capital reserves of the Empire Lakes Community Facilities District No. 2018-01 to be used for the future replacement and construction of public infrastructure and improvements through the boundary of the Empire Lakes CFD. CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Projects Funds are used to account for financial resources for the acquis ion or construction of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust funds. 600 AD 82-1 6th Street Industrial - Established to account for revenues and expenditures used in the construction of streets, storm drainage, and utility improvements within the AD 82-1 project area. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 341 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description 602 AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello - Established to account for the receipt and disbursement of funds used in the construction and installation of public capital drainage facilities, together with appurtenant work and incidental expenses, to serve and provide drainage protection to property located within Assessment District No. 84-1 (Day Creek Drainage System). Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 612 CFD 2001-01 - This CFD was established to fund the necessary infrastructure (streets, storm drains, sewer, water, landscaping, and traffic signals) integral to the proposed mall located at Foothill Blvd. and the I-15 Freeway. The improvements are located south of Base Line Rd., primarily north of Foothill Blvd., primarily east of Day Creek Channel, and west of Etiwanda Ave. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 614 CFD 2003-01 Project Fund -Established to account for the funds to construct integral to development of the Victoria Gardens Mall along Church Street,East of Interstate 15, South on Arrow Route, and Day Creek Boulevard. 615 CFD 2003-01 Cultural Center- Established to account for the portion of the costs associated with the development of the City's Cultural Arts Center that is being funded by Community Facilities District (CFD) 2003-01. Financing for the CFD will be provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 617 CFD 2004-01 Rancho Etiwanda Es - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to the proposed public financing district. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello-Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 680 CFD 2006-01 Vintner's Grove - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. 681 CFD 2006-02 Amador On Route 66 - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 342 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund# Fund Description ENTERPRISE FUNDS Enterprise Funds are used primarily to account for "business-like" activities that are primarily financed through user charges 700 Sports Complex - Established to account for personnel and operating costs directly associated with the operation of the baseball facility, which is the home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. 702 REGIS Connect - Established to account for costs associated with the development of the Rancho Cucamonga Enterprise GIS Connect Program which provides services to the City and agency partners that are in need of their expertise. 705 Municipal Utility - Established to account for the costs of labor and materials used in the operation, maintenance, construction and consumption of electric services to certain major commercial/industrial developments within the City. 706 Utility Public Benefit Fund-Established to account for 2.85%of electric retail revenues to fund qualifying energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, research and demonstration projects and services to low income electricity customers. 708 RCMU Capital Replacement Fund - Established to account for the capital replacement of RCMU infrastructure and improvements in future years. 711 Fiber Optic Network Fund - Established to account for costs associated with the City's existing utility, information technology and traffic fiber conduits, and leases for fiber access. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Internal service funds are used to account for the financing ofgoods or services provided by one department or agency to other departments or agencies of the government and to other government units, on a cost reimbursement basis. 712 EquipfVehicle Replacement - Established to account for the accumulation of user charges to various City departments and the costs associated with replacing the City's vehicles and equipment. 714 Comp Equip/Tech Replcment Fund - Established to account for the accumulation of resources and the costs associated with replacing and maintaining the City's computer equipment and technology. Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 343 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2020/21 Adopted Budget Page 344