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Budget 2019-20 (Preliminary)City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Table of Contents Page Introduction 1 City Manager's Executive Summary 3 GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award 75 General Information 77 City Officials 79 Organization Chart 81 Functional Units by Fund Type 83 Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga 85 Population by Age 86 Educational Attainment 87 Principal Employers 88 Principal Sales Tax Remitters 89 Budget Guide 91 Budget Process 92 Budget Process Flow Chart 94 Summaries of Financial Data 95 Financial Summary — Operating Budget 96 Financial Summary — All Funds 97 Notes to Financial Summary 98 Budget Summary 99 Special District Summary 100 Landscape Maintenance Districts, Street Lighting Maintenance Districts, and Other Maintenance Districts — Changes in Fund Balance 102 Revenue Summaries 105 Revenue and Resource Estimates 107 Revenue Summary by Category — Operating Budget 112 Revenue Detail — Operating Budget 114 Revenue Summary by Category — All Funds 120 Revenue Detail — All Funds 122 Revenues by Fund 143 Expenditure Summaries 147 Expenditure Summary by Department — Operating Budget 148 Expenditure Summary by Category — Operating Budget 149 Expenditure Detail — Operating Budget 150 Expenditure Summary by Department — All Funds 158 Expenditure Summary by Category — All Funds 159 Expenditure Detail — All Funds 160 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Table of Contents Page Summaries of Financial Data (continued) Expenditures by Fund 189 Funded Positions by Department — Summary 193 Funded Positions by Department — Detail 194 Fund Balance Summaries 203 Spendable Fund Balances 205 Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances 209 Departmental Budget Details 213 Governance City Council Overview of Department 214 FY 2019/20 City Council Priorities 214 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 215 Three -Year Staffing Summary 215 City Clerk Overview of Department 216 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 216 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 217 Three -Year Staffing Summary 217 City Treasurer Overview of Department 218 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 218 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 219 Three -Year Staffing Summary 219 City Management Overview of Department 220 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 220 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 221 Three -Year Staffing Summary 221 Performance Statistics 222 Services to the Community 223 Police Overview of Department 224 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 224 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 225 Three -Year Staffing Summary 225 Performance Statistics 226 Services to the Community 227 Fire District Overview of Department 228 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 228 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Table of Contents Page Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 229 Three -Year Staffing Summary 229 Performance Statistics 230 Services to the Community 231 Animal Care and Services Overview of Department 232 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 232 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 233 Three -Year Staffing Summary 233 Performance Statistics 234 Services to the Community 235 Civic and Cultural Services Records Management Overview of Department 236 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 236 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 237 Three -Year Staffing Summary 237 Performance Statistics 238 Services to the Community 239 Community Services Overview of Department 240 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 240 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 241 Three -Year Staffing Summary 241 Performance Statistics 242 Services to the Community 243 Library Services Overview of Department 244 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 244 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 245 Three -Year Staffing Summary 245 Performance Statistics 246 Services to the Community 247 Administrative Services Administration/Procurement Overview of Department 248 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 248 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 249 Three -Year Staffing Summary 249 Performance Statistics 250 Services to the Community 251 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Table of Contents Page Finance Overview of Department 252 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 252 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 253 Three -Year Staffing Summary 253 Performance Statistics 254 Services to the Community 255 Human Resources Overview of Department 256 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 256 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 257 Three -Year Staffing Summary 257 Performance Statistics 258 Services to the Community 259 Innovation and Technology Overview of Department 260 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 260 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 261 Three -Year Staffing Summary 261 Performance Statistics 262 Services to the Community 263 Economic and Community Development Administration Overview of Department 264 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 264 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 265 Three -Year Staffing Summary 265 Performance Statistics 266 Services to the Community 267 Building and Safety Overview of Department 268 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 268 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 269 Three -Year Staffing Summary 269 Performance Statistics 270 Services to the Community 271 Engineering Services Overview of Department 272 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 272 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 273 Three -Year Staffing Summary 273 Performance Statistics 274 Services to the Community 275 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA.) CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Table of Contents Planning Page Overview of Department 276 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 276 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 277 Three -Year Staffing Summary 277 Performance Statistics 278 Services to the Community 279 Public Works Services Overview of Department 280 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights 280 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 281 Three -Year Staffing Summary 281 Performance Statistics 282 Services to the Community 283 Capital Improvement Program 285 Summary by Category 286 Detail by Category with Funding Source(s) 289 Appendix 295 Financial Policies 297 Legal Debt Margin 310 Glossary of Budget Terms 311 List of Acronyms 316 Description of Funds by Fund Type 317 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 1 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 2 MEMORANDUM City Manager's Office Date: May 30, 2019 To: Mayor and Members of the City Council By: John R. Gillison, City Manager Subject: AT THE END OF A CYCLE; PREPARING FOR A WORLD CLASS 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY "You know what the best thing is about the end of the day? Tomorrow it starts all over again." Douglas Copeland Local Economic Forecast An important part of every well-rounded budget message is a concise and timely discussion on the current state of the local economy and the prospects for the next 12-18 months. Economic cycles are a fact of life. To recap, economic cycle refers to economy wide fluctuations in production, trade and general economic activity. The economic cycle is the periods of expansion and contraction of the businesses in the economy, generally oriented around a long-term growth trend. Cycles start with expansion which is characterized by increasing employment, economic growth and increasing prices. When the expansion reaches its highest point, that is the peak of the business cycle, with full employment, maximum output and increasing signs of inflation. After the peak, the economy typically enters into a correction/contraction where growth slows, unemployment increases and prices stop moving up. This contraction cycle ends at the trough, the lowest point of correction, which is simultaneously the point at which the next expansion cycle begins. Overall, I see the likelihood of an economic contraction/correction as modest over the next twelve (12) months but growing significantly in the 18-24 month time frame. Based on the information available and looking at various economic projections by independent economists, it appears that the most likely time period for a local adjustment will be in FY 2020/21. Primary factors include economic GDP growth between 2 and 3% nationally in CY 2018; modest inflation in the 1-3% range; steady interest rates in the 2-4% range; low unemployment around 3-4% nationally and 4- 4.5% in California; and good growth in business investment. Overall consumer confidence remains strong if somewhat volatile and real wages are finally growing at a rate slightly exceeding that of inflation. The consensus is that these factors will outweigh the impacts of labor shortages, local housing shortages, market volatility, FHA housing limits on loans, growing wealth disparity for those in poverty, government deficits and global trade worries. In the prior cycle, the 2007-08 time period was considered the peak, which was followed by a severe correction/contraction in 2008-10 (the Great Recession). After hitting the trough in late 2009 or early 2010, the economy slowly moved into an expansion cycle beginning in 2011. As we move into 2019-20, we are seeing the 9th year of steady and continuous economic growth. There is some dispute about whether we are still in an expansion or nearing the peak. This current expansion has been quite long, much more so than normal. Full employment is typical at Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 3 a peak and our economy (locally and elsewhere) is definitely at full employment (under 4% unemployment). Commercial Permits On the other hand, upward price pressure on goods and (2018, products and services is somewhat spotty. Prices for Rancho Cucamonga $79.8 $25.3 services are increasing due to labor shortages and victorviiie $38.0 $24.0 rising wages, while goods are being unevenly affected Fontana $15.5 $12.4 by tariffs and other external factors, and inflation Ontario $14.9 $-11.4 remains dormant. Either way, we know there will be a Rialto $12.7 $11.5 peak and following that a contraction or correction of some amount and duration, before the next growth cycle San Bernardino $10.9 $-25.9 begins. Redlands $4.4 $-7.0 Hesperia $3.3 $-8.3 Locally, the economic forecast contains similarly mixed Chino Hills $2.3 $-3.4 signals. Pricing pressures on real estate, particularly for industrial/manufacturing/logistics land, are intense and prices are reaching new all-time peaks. Construction of all types is more difficult than it should be because of rising wages and labor shortages and certain raw materials like lumber and steel and aluminum are being adversely impacted by tariffs. Unemployment is at all-time lows. In fact, during the 2013-18 time period, total nonfarm employment growth in San Bernardino County was very strong and among the top 3 counties in the State of California. Generally Rancho Cucamonga is around .5 - 2.5% lower than the County as a whole, reflecting our status as a major jobs producer. Comparison of Unemployment Rates 12% 10.00% 100 o 8.80% 8% 7.50% 6.60% 6.70% 5.80% 6% 5.00% 5.20% 4.30% 4.00% 4.10% 4.30% 4% 20% 3.20% 2% 0% March 2013 March 2014 March 2015 March 2016 March 2017 March 2018 March 2019 ■ County Unemployment City Unemployment Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 4 5 Year Payroll Employment Rk State # Ann Gr Share US 1 Nevada 211.2 3.4% 1.7% 2 Utah 218.3 3.2% 1.7% 3 Florida 1238.2 3.1% 9.8% 4 Oregon 252.1 2.9% 2.0% 5 Idaho 92.1 2.8% 0.7% 6 Colorado 328.7 2.7% 2.6% 7 Washington 413.1 2.7% 3.3% 8 California 2051 2.6% 16.3% 9 Georgia 537.9 2.6% 4.3% 10 South Carolina 237.6 2.4% 1.9% 80.000 60.000 09 40.000 20,000 0 The Inland Empire is the jobs engine for California, and California is the jobs engine for the United States. On average, the Inland Empire adds nearly 50,000 jobs a year, many of which are middle class jobs. Rancho Cucamonga in the western portion of San Bernardino County is itself a jobs center. Employment in the City is at new peak levels (about 78,000) and is expected to grow between about 1,500 - 2,000 or so jobs a year over the next five to seven years. CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA: RECENT/EXPECTED LEVELS OF EMPLOYMENT BY FIRMS LOCATED IN THE CITY aal�vv r � o fJ W N b M t Y O+ N H L O O C7 .. t.Y.. p �..... �. �.. O •w N m a �n .D n w u.. +a. u b O O C7 O O q b 40 d'C6 S N A M N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N � N tlN N N N N N tl tl N The largest core sectors are Restaurants/Hotels at 12.6%, Manufacturing at 12.5% and Administrative Support at 10.6%. Retail Trade at 10.8% and Health Care at 7.7% are key economic support sectors with significant employment share also. Health Care employment shows signs of continuing strong growth, along with Restaurants/Hotels and Manufacturing. Payroll growth per employee has been solid and increasing in Manufacturing, Professional Services, Management Services, and Finance/Insurance. Taken together, our strongest sectors for employment and payroll growth are Manufacturing and Professional Services along with Finance and Insurance. With median household incomes in Rancho Cucamonga in the low $90K range, and slowly increasing, this bodes well for the future. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 5 San Bernardino County $60,400 7.1% Rancho Cucamonga $90,000 11.8% Chino $72,400 2.8% Fontana $67,100 9.6% Moreno Valley $62,200 11.8% Ontario $60,000 5.2% Vicdorville $51,000 5.9% San Bernardino City $46,500 11.4% As the western end of San Bernardino County continues to mature, Ontario and Rancho will continue to exemplify job densification, development and expansion of key job clusters, enhanced workforce and training, greater connections to the global economy and continued infrastructure investment to facilitate economic growth. "Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." Winston Churchill Office Class A and Class B office spaces are being absorbed at increasing amounts, and we are beginning to see the first signs of some new office projects being entitled without signed tenants prior to construction. Industrial/Logistics/Manufacturing sites remain at a premium. Sites of all sizes are being purchased at prices ranging from $25 - $35 per square foot, and buildings of all sizes from 50,000 SF to 5,000,000 SF or larger are being entitled and built, often on spec. With the multiple freeway access points in the City, Rancho Cucamonga remains a prime location. So much so, we are now seeing large projects involving old/obsolescent buildings or structures which are being torn down to construct new, state-of-the-art buildings and facilities. The City's focus is on e-commerce businesses which will increase both jobs and revenue, or similarly producing high-tech manufacturing or manufacturing/sales opportunities, particularly in the key growth sectors noted earlier. Hospitality The hospitality sector also remains strong. Rancho Cucamonga added a 108 room Fairfield Inn & Suites (Marriott) last year and a 126 room Residence Inn (Marriott) this year. Another 100+ room hotel is entitled for Foothill Boulevard, although construction has not yet begun, and there are proposals for additional hotels. Generally, the City has seen strong growth in the upscale and upper midscale price category, usually in the Extended Stay/Focused Service/All Suites categories for business and leisure travel. The 2019 forecast by the Greater Ontario Tourism and Marketing District, in conjunction with CBRE, is for occupancy to tick up slightly almost to 75%, with Average Daily Rates continuing to rise by 5-7%. In Rancho Cucamonga specifically, the first several months of the year have seen decreases in occupancy and average daily rate for rooms, neither good signs, although some of that may be due to the very narrow band of hotel offerings in the City, which are now beginning to scavenge customers from each other. Overall, it appears demand will continue to grow and the hotel chains are responding with increasing market segmentation and new entitlements to grow the local room supply. All of this is positive for this economic sector, although as Rancho Cucamonga builds out, there are fewer and fewer remaining premium sites in the City. This is why it is critical for the City to remain committed to moving its hospitality market upward into the upper upscale price category with new offerings in the luxury and full service sectors. Along those lines, Rancho Cucamonga will have a ±75 room Tapestry Hotel (Hilton) under construction before Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 6 the end of 2019, which is a luxury hotel in the upscale price category to be located at Base Line and Day Creek just a block from Victoria Gardens. The City is similarly working on refining its zoning to increase the likelihood of hitting its long-term market target. With appropriate local segmentation, we expect the hotel sector to remain strong, and occupancy and daily rate to ultimately begin climbing. Artist's renaderina; ofthe nw)i 7apestny Hotel to be conasdvcted (it Buse Line.lDaY Creek Restaurant growth is similarly strong with recent openings of Black Bear Diner and Shogun restaurants. Before the end of 2019, the Haven City Market location will open, which will feature 20+ food providers in a fully renovated former department store. In addition, the City entitled multiple sit-down restaurants at Base Line and Day Creek, adjacent to the Tapestry hotel. Further, initial anecdotal evidence from new mixed-use projects indicates strong demand by local startups for small format commercial space for restaurant and coffee shop as well as winery/brewery locations. "Millennials aspire to marry the blue skies thinking of the Baby Boomers with the grass- roots mindset of GenX" Mal Fletcher Housing The Inland Empire contains 4.6 million people, a population larger than 25 states in a land area equal to South Carolina. It is a younger population, with half under 35 years old. Demographers predict nearly 1.5 million more people by 2045. With more people comes more jobs and with more jobs comes a demand for local housing. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 7 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA: RECENT/EXPECTED CUMULATIVE CHANGES IN EMPLOYMENT AND HOUSING DEMAND SINCE 2000 60,000 I W000 40,000 30,000 i 20,000 10,000 0 -*-Employment Growth by Firms Located in the City -s-Housing Demand by Employed Households Residing in the City One of the drivers for that growth is housing, which is relatively affordable in the Inland Empire, compared to Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Housing prices continue to appreciate, but at an ever -slowing rate, particularly in the $350,000 — $650,000 part of the market. Homes between $700,000 and $1,000,000, meanwhile, have softened considerably, however, with minimal price appreciation and extended sale periods. Accelerating this softening is that the prices of attached and detached single family homes have finally returned to their pre -recession peak levels from 2006, primarily because the lack of new supply continues to ensure the supply is insufficient to meet the market demand. Prices continue to appreciate with the median house price in California now exceeding $500,000, and as foreign investors continue to decline, the unsold inventory of new homes builds up. Developers and builders will moderate this demand side factor by reducing their supply side production of homes to maintain prices and profits accordingly. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 8 RANCHO CUCAMONGA: SINGLE FAMILY DETACHED AND ATTACHED HOUSING PRICES $700,000 3 $600,000 v' x i $500,000 ......�. =' _ _ ......_... $400,000 o .. .. „,._.... .... ........ i , . _...d P N CJ G H > j N N QP N Q` 5300,040 i ti ti .L J; � N p v* N tan $200,000 C v .N ✓ $100,000 $0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 ■ Prices - Single Family Detached a Prices - Attached Rancho Cucamonga has entitled well over 3,000 new single-family homes and apartments at multiple locations (Empire Lakes, Haven and Church, Base Line and Day Creek and Wilson/Etiwanda). Despite approved entitlements, actual permit issuance has been modest with just under 175 single family building permits and approximately 250 multi -family building permits issued since the beginning of 2018. Certainly, the changes in federal income tax law have hurt California and Rancho Cucamonga with the capping of the State and Local Tax (SALT) write-off. Material tariffs on lumber and persistent labor shortages compound supply issues. Additionally, with new home builders facing minimal internal rate of return on larger (1/2 acre and up) lot Cost of Rent Vacancy Rate parcels which were the bread and butter staple ®®®® of much of Rancho Cucamonga's growth for many years, fewer new projects of this type are S. Ontario 1,715 3.8 4.4 0.0 being entitled and even fewer are being built. Those that are built are slow sellers. Rancho Cucamonga 1,660 2.0 2.3 -0.1 Apartments remain a strong market segment, N. Ontario 1,472 2.9 3.8 0.1 with newer more amenitized luxury apartments aimed at young millennials and others who Colton 1,428 4.1 2,6 -0.6 desire a more urban, resort style of living, and cannot afford the down payment for a inland Empire 1,365 4.4 3.1 42 traditional for sale single family product, in particular demand. As the millennial Fontana 1,167 2.7 2.1 0.1 generation reaches workforce age, there is an San Bernardino City 1,021 4.2 2.7 -0.1 increasing need to find housing options for this group. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 9 Millennial Changes "If you want something you never had, you have to do something you've never done. " Thomas Jefferson As the millennial generation begins to hit its stride in the workforce, their impacts on changing market dynamics are already being felt, particularly in the housing sector. Millennials prefer to rent versus own at this stage in their career, but although only 13% actually are homeowners, 81 % expect to be homeowners one day. HOUSi\ G MARKET MAJOR PARADIGM SIFT MILLE-NNIALS: AGES 22-37 MIiE ENNLALS ARE TIM MOST SIGNIFIC.kN-1 FACTOR DD1iIIING STRUCTURAL SHEFT 5TRUCTLILU SHIFT REINFORCED BY S11010TIC REL:LTIONSHW BET"EEN bf1LLENNLAL.S & FIRMS NELLENN14LS PREFERENCE FOR URB-VNIZED RLALS • D't"Kkb.IIC CULTL-RE .A�vD fihPLOT3IENT OPTIGNS • ST'4CE X410, I-M.A i=TECH T-ME.k C 2,TEP,S H.--Lt'E C.3PT[7F_ED -2°i OF US ENJPLQ c-l�fl 'T CrRts-,kTH METRO FIFIM PFOVICE DESHLABLE BE'=TS—FREE NMALLS, CHILDCARE ON-SITE HEALTH CARE MILLENNI. LS FAKE CHAILEN GES IN BECOMING I•IOMEO'4l NTM - S AST TG F3R A DOWN P_kY?%1 'TI - QUALIFMZ FOR A MOR.TG-kGE. - STMINT DEBT & L.ACKOF CREDIT MTORY" - PELTTCT.-U7T TOILIO }E TO A SUBL,TRE N RUR-kL.AREA Millennials clearly have a strong preference for a more urban style of living, and a shorter commute. Millennials look for strong job markets (like RC), areas that are affordable in the median range (Rancho Cucamonga slightly high but close) and areas that are livable with good weather, access to parks, community activities and nightlife, low crime and a safe, green environment (like RC). Interestingly, at this stage, one of the ways they solve their housing affordability challenge is to rent in a more luxurious environment until they can one day afford to own. Rancho Cucamonga is working to meet this demand, and round out our housing market, with new offerings on Foothill and areas south of Foothill which have a more typical urban feel than much of the rest of the City. Why is Rancho Cucamonga looking to meet the demand for millennial housing? Because the future of the workforce lies with these very same tech savvy millennials. Morley Safer said "the workplace has become a psychological battlefield and the millennials have the upper hand, because they are tech savvy, with every gadget imaginable almost becoming an extension of their bodies. They multitask, talk, walk, listen and type and text." Rancho Cucamonga aspires to, and desires to, attract these new tech jobs. In the future, companies will be attracted to larger metro areas with greater access to top end digital infrastructure (like RC Fiber) and a concentration of highly educated workers who reside and work in close nearby proximity. To that end, the City is looking to create housing types which appeal to millennials, at price points which are affordable to that same group, in a community which contains the types of amenities that are attractive to millennials. This is not an effort to replace Gen Kers or Baby Boomers, or Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page to change the City, rather it is an evolutionary adaptation which recognizes and accounts for changing demographics, and embraces those differences to help create a complete community for all ages, all races, all incomes and all groups. It is that "community environment" which has been a hallmark of Rancho Cucamonga since its incorporation over 40 years ago. Beyond housing, the City has also committed to providing reliable and scalable high-speed internet services to promote economic growth and to meet rising consumer demands. In 2018, the Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network (RC Fiber) was launched to construct a high-speed broadband network throughout the City. Initial buildout will focus first on servicing major business corridors and industrial areas, providing a gateway to develop and attract tech -centric companies that will ensure high -wage job opportunities and continued economic growth. Later development will include residential communities and areas of the City underserved by commercial providers, helping to bridge the digital divide for our entire population. To mitigate risk and maximize value, Rancho Cucamonga entered into a unique public-private relationship with Inyo Networks, a proven partner in providing municipal broadband services in the region. Under this strategy, bonds were sold in the amount of $12.195 million to build and connect over 50 miles of citywide conduit and fiber optic cabling under a five-year master plan, providing not only municipal broadband services but also connecting the City's core facilities and infrastructure. Capital costs of the project will be recovered using revenue from municipal broadband customers managed by Inyo Networks to minimize operating overhead costs for the City. As you are reading this, 4,000 feet of new fiber have already been laid and crews are working on hooking up our first customers in FY 2019/20. RC Fiber is a perfect companion to the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU), our local utility which began in 2004 providing electricity to business and residential customers in the southeast areas of the City at a lower cost than Southern California Edison. RCMU has also recently acquired all the City street lights from SCE, reducing operating costs while improving service. Combined with RC Fiber, these investments provide the foundation to support internet- of-things (IoT) based technology, transportation autonomy, 5G wireless services and other smart city initiatives well into the 21 st century. What good is the warmth of summer, without the cold of winter to give it sweetness. "John Steinbeck To conclude, it appears that the likelihood of an economic contraction/correction is modest at best for FY 2019/20. But in FY 2020/21, however, there is a much higher chance of an economic adjustment. With this in mind, the City continues to prudently save funds for equipment and infrastructure replacement with $1,175,000 going into Capital Reserves for FY 2019/20. Additionally, the City is placing several hundred thousand dollars of additional funds into vehicle and equipment depreciation as well as computer equipment depreciation. Although we may not know exactly when, we do know winter is coming, and prudent fiscal management dictates saving resources for that winter. "World class communities come in all shapes and sizes, they are not determined by geography, and/or natural resources so much as by the mindset of their local leadership." Don Allen Holbrook Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 11 Economic Development Initiatives "Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure.... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory or defeat." Theodore Roosevelt Rancho Cucamonga's history is one of outsize accomplishments using modest resource levels of funding and staffing. Unlike our larger neighbors with greater resources at their disposal, the City has become adept at focusing our efforts in key leverage points. Economic Development is the best example of that leverage thinking. In a relatively short 20 -year time frame, the City has developed one of the most successful regional malls in the country, along with a key logistics area and world class housing choices. Even with the elimination of our once mighty Redevelopment Agency, our efforts continue to reap dividends today. For example, at the present time, Rancho Cucamonga has a modest 3.9% retail vacancy rate. Some of the recent projects which have helped bring about that low rate include: • H & M new two-story building at Victoria Gardens (open) • Zara new two-story building at Victoria Gardens (open) ���,. ,� 1!t • Longhorn Steakhouse, 5,800 sf, Day Creek and Foothill (open Q4 2019). • Black Bear Diner, Foothill and Spruce (open) • Shogun Teppan Steakhouse, Foothill and Rochester (open) • Haven City Market, Haven and Civic Center Drive, (open Q3 2019) • Residence Inn by Marriott, Haven and 6th, 126 rooms (open) • Tapestry Hotel by Hilton, Base Line and Day Creek, 74 rooms, (open Q3 2020) The Industrial/Logistics/Manufacturing market is also extremely strong in Rancho Cucamonga. Vacancy is about 6% or less and there is nearly 1,000,000 square feet under construction with another 1-2,000,000 likely to be entitled or come available in the next 12 months. Some of the major projects include: • 12400 Arrow Route, 611,573 sf Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 12 • 9168 Hermosa Avenue, 102,530 sf • 9595 Utica Avenue, 227,729 sf • 10650 4th Street, 120,169 sf�'' • GenOn power plant, 8996 Etiwanda Avenue, ij� currently on market for purchase ELM', T • Big Lots, 12322 4th Street, currently on market for purchase Rancho Cucamonga is also the location of significant interest for residential and mixed-use projects. With greater access to amenities than many surrounding communities, and the strongest schools in the Inland Empire, for rent and for sale properties remain relatively affordable by Orange County or San Gabriel Valley standards and are desirable locations to set down roots or raise a family. The airport is close by and we are freeway close to large parts of Southern California. Some of the key projects include: • Hermosa and Foothill, Arte mixed use, residential/retail, 182 units for rent market rate • Base Line and Day Creek, Day Creek Villas, 140 units senior for rent • Haven and Church, Cadence, 97 units senior assisted living • Haven and Church, Rows & Bungalows, 214 for sale attached and detached units • Base Line and Day Creek, Solstice at Day Creek Square, 380 units, for sale attached and detached units • Empire Lakes, Nova at The Resort, 135 units, for sale attached and detached units (New Home Co) • Empire Lakes, Tempo at The Resort, 80 units, for sale attached and detached units (Tri Pointe) • Empire Lakes, Enliven at The Resort, 296 units, for sale attached and detached units (Van Daele) • Haven and Arrow, mixed use, office/retail • Discussions under way, but no entitlements yet, for mixed use at Haven and 26th, also Haven and Civic Center Drive "A man's mind, stretched by new ideas, may never return to its original dimensions." Oliver Wendell Holmes One of the big economic development challenges for the Inland Empire (IE) is a marginally educated population. 79.5% of the IE population have less than a four-year college degree, which is then reflected in per capita incomes. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 13 Income by Educational As a result, the pathway to middle class Attainment stability is a challenging one. Overall, the area needs to focus on college degrees as pathways to success and a career. Right LA OC Rv SB now, the west end of the county is the focus for those with higher education, but that < HS $21,901 $23,328 $25,340 $23,642 focus needs to be broadened to the entire county. Rancho Cucamonga is well HS $28,882 $31,311 $30,829 $30,663 positioned to lead the way with strong elementary school districts including Etiwanda, Cucamonga, Central and Alta SC or Asso $36,535 $40,499 $36,943 $36,977 Loma School Districts as well as an exceptionally strong high school district in Bachelor's $54,442 $61,202 $55,461 $53,264 Chaffey Joint Union. Many of these districts have among the highest rated Graduate $77,200 $87,277 $80,064 $75,241 schools in the State of California. The City also has a close Community Schools Pilot with Cucamonga School District with an intentional, enhanced and supported academic, social and emotional health focused experience to address barriers. Last year, the City partnered with Chaffey Joint Union High School District to fund two (2) additional School Resource Officer positions to ensure dedicated positions for each high school while still meeting the needs of our middle and elementary school districts. Meanwhile, we continue to work with Chaffey College. In 2017, the College was a top 10 Aspen Prize finalists, recognizing its singular focus on student success. Although in 2018 Chaffey College suffered some competitive challenges due to staffing turnover and budget difficulties, we remain hopeful they will return to their former levels of excellence in 2019. The challenge for the Inland Empire is to focus on jobs pathways to the economic security of the middle class. About half the jobs in the IE are neither good nor offer promising career paths. They are minimum wage jobs with little to no career progression. Healthcare is one growth area for the IE as we have fewer healthcare workers per capita than other counties. Logistics, a long -held area of strength in the IE because of land availability, remains a promising growth area also considering our availability of land and increasing amounts of automation. Manufacturing could be a big growth area as well, but electricity is a huge cost driver that puts California at nearly a 30% disadvantage compared to Arizona and Nevada as well as other western states. This is one of the key premises behind RCMU which aims to reduce that price differential by 1/3 to 1/2 and improve the City's competitiveness for modern manufacturing. The Inland Empire needs to also focus on finance, information and professional services to diversify its economy. This will not be easy. We will need to invest in innovative education and training initiatives as well as counseling workers on the career opportunities available to them. This will require the involvement and coordination of higher education, local government and employers. We must advance the competitiveness of our traditional industries that have powered growth and prosperity, like logistics, to centralize knowledge and expertise that firms can use to grow. Diversifying into new industries that have some ecological relationship to existing industries will improve the resiliency of our economy and protect our assets. We need to embrace technology not to replace our valuable employees but as an asset to help leverage them into 21 st century knowledge workers for a stronger economic future. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 14 Infrastructure and Major Capital Improvement Program Projects "Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity-" George S. Patton The entire Capital Improvement Program for Fiscal Year 2019/20 is nearly 100 pages; however, this section highlights some of the more noteworthy (size, cost, multi-year, or unique) capital improvement and infrastructure projects in this upcoming budget. Landscaping Despite a wet winter, California remains a dry place, particularly inland California. Following the extreme drought which ended a few years ago, the City has invested in several landscape conversion projects to continue to reduce costs. FY 2019/20 is no exception, as LIVID 2R and LIVID 4R are both funding, out of their reserves, $400,000 water conservation projects including turf removals and replacement with drought tolerant landscaping. Complementing these efforts will be a $385,000 project in LIVID 4R to replace, remove or repair existing wrought iron fencing in paseos and access trails which has fallen into disrepair. Facilities There are three noteworthy CIP/Infrastructure projects in this category to highlight. The Fire District is proposing to spend $1.1 million on water conservation landscape conversion and Americans with Disability Act compliance (access and parking) and improved emergency vehicle circulation at the Banyan Fire Station. This project comprises three smaller projects which were parsed off from other station remodeling and improvement projects to provide for better coordination of the final project at the station. On the City side, the Library Capital Fund and Library Foundation are budgeting nearly $575,000 in funds to begin design of the interactive children's museum exhibits for the second floor of the Biane Library. This is a multi-year project which will take several more fiscal years to complete, with the major construction, fabrication and installation expenses hitting in FY 2020/21 and FY 2021/22. Meanwhile, the City Capital Reserve is proposing to spend $2.1 million to construct second 24,500 sf warehouse building, with a mezzanine, located at the Public Works Services Yard. This facility will provide for an indoor workshop for Facilities staff for the first time, eliminate leased and unsecure outside storage containers, provide a permanent home for the Animal Center Kitten Nursery, and provide additional solar power to help offset energy use for the entire Corporate Yard. It was originally planned to complement a partnership with Chaffey College to also convert the former administrative offices next to the vehicle shop into a maker space for classes using federal and local funds, which would particularly benefit southwest Rancho Cucamonga. Recently, the City was notified that due to budget difficulties at Chaffey College, the maker space project has been placed on hold. We remain optimistic that with the recently voter approved bond obtained by Chaffey College in the 2018 local elections, this project will be able to resume in the near future. Miscellaneous The current ADA Transition Plan was prepared in 1998 and has become outdated. Since that time, a number of changes have occurred in the standards and regulations related to the implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act along with changes that have occurred within the City's Public Right -of -Way, Public Facilities, Parks, and Trails. In order to address these changes and maintain compliance with State and Federal law, the City will need to prepare a complete update to the ADA Transition Plan. This update will include identifying barriers to access along with anticipated costs to implement the plan. The plan will also plot a course to address the highest priority locations over a period of three to five years. Plan preparation is Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 15 anticipated to cost between $800,000 and $1,000,000. Based on the work required and cost to prepare the plan, it is anticipated to be phased over a three-year period. In order to keep the plan up to date, the City should anticipate doing minor updates every three to five years after the plan is completed. Similar to the ADA Transition Plan efforts, the City is proposing to continue our historic expenditures in the area of Tree Maintenance and Concrete Repair, with budgeted amounts of $1,026,430 ($575,000 General Fund and $451,430 Landscape Maintenance Districts) and $575,000 ($475,000 General Fund and $100,000 Measure 1), respectively. A $1.7 million Class IV protected bike lane on 6th Street is planned to improve accessibility to the Rancho Cucamonga Metrolink Station. The City has been able to leverage $340,000 in Citywide Infrastructure Improvements Funds to obtain 80% of the funding for the project, $171,000 of which is included in the FY 2019/20 budget, through an ATP Cycle 4 Grant funded in partnership with SBCTA. Similarly, the City will be spending AB 2766 funds (AQMD) and Pedestrian Grant/Article 3 TDA funds in the combined amount of $620,000 to provide a paved pathway for pedestrian and bicycle access along existing Flood Control access roads with a connection to the new Rancho Cucamonga Sports Complex, across SCE right-of-way. Lastly, in the Traffic category, the City will be spending $596,000 in AB 2766 AQMD funds for 2.4 miles of Class 1 bicycle shared -use path improvements along the Cucamonga Creek Channel from Foothill Boulevard to 411 Street as well as 1.8 miles along the Deer Creek channel shared use path from Church Street to 4th Street. RCMU & Fiber Optic Network The Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility and the Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Enterprise will have a busy 2019/20 with several key projects. RCMU will construct an electric and fiber line extension along 7th Street from west of Haven Avenue to the railroad tracks to serve new development occurring in the area. This project is $275,000. There is another $300,000 project to install electric and fiber line extensions on Arrow Route to the new Etiwanda Grade Separation project. Ultimately, this will also serve undeveloped/redeveloped parcels on or near Etiwanda Avenue. Lastly, work continues on the $12.7 million Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network using the bonds which were sold in 2019. This key project will utilize existing fiber optic conduit, dark fiber, and traffic conduit to build a completely new network to "tie in" existing segments in order to provide high speed broadband service to selected commercial, industrial and residential areas throughout the City, initially focusing on the eastern and southern portions of the City. As this message is being written, the City is finishing up the final conduit and connection to bring Victoria Gardens on line by the new fiscal year and initiating public service. Parks Rancho Cucamonga is known throughout the region for the quality and quantity of its parks. Although the growth in the City has largely leveled out compared to the 1990's and early 2000's, parks remain a key focus. FY 2019/20 is no exception. Some of the ongoing projects include the design of the Etiwanda Creek Park Phase II expansion at $450,000 (developer fees) and the design and construction of LED field lighting for Garcia Park in the amount of $500,000 (LMD funded). Finally, some $832,000 in funding from various landscape maintenance and community facility districts has been designated to replace deteriorated rubberized playground surfacing at Kenyon Park, Windrows Park, Milliken Park, Red Hill Park, Heritage Park, Church Park, Bear Gulch Park, Hermosa Park, Old Town Park, West Beryl Park, Legacy Park and Olive Grove Park. Streets In terms of infrastructure, the single largest infrastructure component the City is responsible for is the network of streets inside our incorporated boundaries. Traditionally, these streets have been largely maintained by all local governments using gas tax revenues. Over the last 10 years, the State has taken already complicated formulas regarding Gas Tax revenues and added more complexity by diverting and rebalancing what monies went to whom, when and for what. The net Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 16 result of all these changes has been the continual gradual decline of gas tax revenues to all local agencies. With the passage of Senate Bill 1 (SB1), the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017, the City anticipated an influx of new "Gas Tax" revenue to address deferred maintenance of our streets and roadways. Based on estimates prepared by the State Department of Finance and the League of California Cities in May 2018, an additional $1.3 Million in the first year and approximately $3.1 Million annually thereafter for Road Rehabilitation Maintenance Account and Loan Repayment. For a number of reasons, including low gas prices over the past couple of years, increased hybrid and electric vehicle sales, and processing changes at the state level, revenue has been coming in at a slower than anticipated rate. Actual SB1 revenue for Fiscal Year 2017/18 was $1 Million and estimated for Fiscal Year 2018/19 is $2.8 Million, approximately $600,000 (or 14%) less than anticipated for these two years. In addition to the lower than anticipated revenue, upgrades required when roads are rehabilitated like upgrades to curb ramps to meet current standards (averaging about $1,000,000 per year) reduce the City's ability to stretch pavement maintenance dollars. ongoing sustainability of the pavement maintenance program are proposals by the Governor and Legislature to tie meeting housing production goals to eligibility to receive SB1 funding. This could be devastating as both the establishment of these goals and timing for production of housing is outside of the control of the City. In order to address all of these concerns, the proposed Capital Improvement Program has been planned to be relatively conservative while attempting to address the highest needs first. If these trends continue resulting in long term reduced revenue for pavement maintenance, the City may want to consider alternative funding measures such as a Transaction and Use Tax or Local Infrastructure Sales Tax to preserve its largest asset. PCI Thresholds & Treatments Assigned 9i) Pavement Condition Index Trend 85 . 80 v c 75 a 70 0 v 65 w E W 60 a 55 PCI By Fiscal Year and Street Classification 50 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 —4—Citywide 79 79 77 77 76 73 72 70 —♦ Arterial 86 86 83 81 81 77 78 76 Secondary 86 86 85 83 82 79 80 77 collector 82 82 80 79 79 73 76 75 —W -Industrial 78 78 75 74 74 64 63 65 a Local 75 75 73 73 72 71 70 66 For FY 2019/20, Rancho Cucamonga will be utilizing $2.2 million in estimated Gas Tax revenues and fund balance, along with $2.2 million in estimated Measure I revenues, $52.1 million in Trade Corridor Enhancement Program funds, $170,000 in Community Development Block Grant Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 17 revenues, and $25,000 in estimated Citywide Infrastructure Improvement Fund revenues and fund balance for street overlay and slurry seal programs as well as a major grade separation project. Some of the projects in this $57 million plus total include: • Church Street from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue pavement rehabilitation • Etiwanda Avenue east side widening from Whittram Avenue to Arrow Route • Etiwanda Avenue/Railroad Grade Separation Project • Hermosa Avenue from Foothill to Church Street widening • Highland Avenue from Archibald to Haven pavement rehabilitation • Over $1.9 million in various local street pavement rehabilitation projects throughout the City Traffic `7f you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude. " Maya Angelou The last major category of highlighted improvements is in a category we frequently hear concerns from long-time residents (15+ years) about, specifically traffic. Projects in this area are typically those that will promote safe and efficient traffic circulation per State and local design standards. Traffic projects are typically funded from developer fees, Measure I, Gas Tax funds, AB 2766 funds, Street Lighting District funds and some grant funding. Leading off is a major initiative known as the Advance Traffic Management System (ATMS) Phase I which will install closed circuit television cameras, video detection system, fiber optic cable and conduit, communication networking equipment including hubs and upgrade (and future proof for connected vehicle to infrastructure initiatives) for over 30 traffic signals into the Traffic Management Center located at City Hall, including adaptive signal timing. This project should improve timing and coordination of the City's traffic signal system and maximize efficiency and community mobility on Haven Avenue from 4th Street to Wilson Avenue, Vineyard Avenue from Foothill Boulevard to Red Hill Country Club Drive and Foothill Boulevard from Grove Avenue to East Avenue. These streets are some of the busiest in the City and also have older infrastructure that will most benefit from upgrade and replacement. The City is proposing to spend over $4.0 million on Phase I of the ATMS system from our Transportation reserve. We are also beginning work on a $2.8 million Phase II, using the same funding source, to improve signal coordination timing on Milliken Avenue from 4th Street to Grizzly Drive, 19th Street from Sapphire Street to Haven Avenue, Arrow Route from Grove Avenue to East Avenue, Rochester Avenue from Base Line Road to Banyan Street and Day Creek Boulevard from Base Line Road to Wilson Avenue. In close coordination with ATMS Phase I and Phase II will be a $329,000 improvement project, funded by Transportation reserves and Gas Tax, to install flashing yellow arrow left turn phasing along Day Creek Boulevard between Church and Banyan. Long Range Initiatives Cyber Security "Don't confront me with my failures, I had not forgotten them. " Jackson Browne Cyber security remains a top priority for the City. Cities continue to fall victim to cyber -attacks that paralyze operations and risk the loss or disclosure of thousands of digital records. Despite the Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 18 severity of these attacks, many are believed to be indiscriminate opportunities rather than deliberate orchestrated attacks. A predominant threat in the digital landscape are variants of ransomware that can infect an organization's IT infrastructure and spread undetected until they are able to encrypt enterprise servers or databases, triggering the dreaded message demanding a bitcoin ransom for the city's data. They are spread through compromised e-mail accounts and less -than -vigilant users who are tricked into activating malware through infected attachments or internet links. In response to this, the Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) has developed a multi- faceted and layered approach to security that centers around building a culture of digital vigilance. We developed a technology roadmap that incrementally builds the City's cyber defenses by using the technology and resources we have in place effectively, including but not limited to: • Separating public, business, and internet-of-things (IoT) network traffic • Employing identity management and advanced threat protection on firewalls • Ensuring data center infrastructure remains state -of -the art, including adding a fully - redundant data center at the Fire Training Center • Maintaining backups of enterprise systems • Annually training users on detecting and avoiding cyber threats and phishing e-mails • Limiting privileged user accounts and limiting administrative access to core digital systems Future security enhancements will include implementing multi -factor authentication for remote access, adding application level security tools that can apply machine learning and artificial intelligence to identifying not just known threats but suspicious activity, and zero -trust network management that will prevent unverified devices from joining the city's data network. Thanks to the proliferation of intelligence -grade malware on the dark web and the rise of state- sponsored hacking, dealing with an attack after the fact can become extraordinarily costly with no guarantee of success. The situation is known as the "Defender's Dilemma," in which an attacker only needs one breach on one occasion with any system while a city must defend every encounter involving every application and database, every minute of every day, in order to be successful. This is why cyber security is an all -in effort for the entire organization and will remain a priority for the City for the foreseeable future. General Plan "To succeed, one needs a plan that is achievable, but not believable."Anonymous One of the cornerstones to Rancho's success has been its strong vision for the future. The General Plan is a key piece of that success because it is one of the primary tools we have for translating our vision for the future into action. Part of preparing for a world class 21st Century Community is updating our General Plan with a focus on the essential elements that make Rancho Cucamonga a special community, changing laws and the regulatory environment, and changing desires and needs of a 21 st century populace. Our current General Plan was adopted after a modest update in 2010. After ten years of guiding the City, it is coming due for a more thorough and comprehensive update. In part, this update is needed because of the incredible slew of new legislation that affects the content and status of the General Plan and in particular the Housing Element. In the last ten years, the State has passed new laws that require closer coordination between the Housing, Safety, Land Use, and Circulation Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 19 Elements, as well as the inclusion of new topics such as environmental justice, economic feasibility, and climate adaptation. Much has changed within the City over the last decade, as well. We have transitioned from a fast-growing greenfield city to an infill city. The community and the region are also undergoing demographic and market shifts, resulting in broader interests for ranges of shopping, transportation, entertainment, and housing opportunities. All of these trends, laws and the passage of time have combined into an undeniable need for a thorough update to our General Plan. This year, we will initiate a comprehensive update to the General Plan, working with the community to define how the vision for a World Class Community will be realized over the next two decades. With this update, every element of the General Plan will be updated and the General Plan will be brought current with mandatory State requirements. While every element will be updated, it is likely that much of the General Plan will speak to the importance of preserving and protecting the unique community aspects of Rancho Cucamonga that make it such a wonderful place to live, work, and play such as our excellent neighborhoods, our world-famous Victoria Gardens Regional Mall, and an outstanding network of parks and recreation areas. For those areas of the City still likely to develop or change, the General Plan will have to provide greater levels of direction and detail in order to more effectively explain our community's vision for the future. Updating the General Plan will be an intensive, several million dollars, multiple fiscal year effort, but our history has shown that having a clear vision for our future and a plan to achieve that vision has been one of our most effective tools for success. Rancho Cucamonga, long known as the City with a Plan, will remain the City with a [21st Century] Plan. Etiwanda Heights 'I can accept failure, everyone fails at something. But I can't accept not trying." Michael Jordan "Is any man afraid of change? What can take place without change? What then is more pleasing or more suitable to the universal nature? And can you take a hot bath unless the wood for the fire undergoes a change? And can you be nourished unless the food undergoes a change? And can anything else that is useful be accomplished without change? Do you not see then that for yourself also to change is just the same, and equally necessary for the universal nature?" Marcus Aurelius The Etiwanda Heights Neighborhood and Conservation p Plan and Environmental Impact Report are now available for public review. After more than a decade of work on planning for the annexation of half of the City's Sphere of Influence and over 89,000 points of input from the •� s community, we now have a community-based plan that charts the future for the 4,300 acres of land in the „� M northeastern corner of the City. The Etiwanda Heights Plan; is both a vision document and regulatory tool. The plan' specifies a vision for a series of walkable, traditional neighborhoods designed to incorporate the rural heritage of our foothill neighborhoods. The proposed neighborhoods would be comprised of a range of single-family homes, from half -acre equestrian estates to smaller starter homes to active adult living options. The plan reflects the full extent of our experience and expertise with designing and delivering world-class neighborhoods. Every home would be within a 2 to 4 -minute walk of a park or trail. A small "Main Street" shopping area would provide residents with shopping and dining opportunities within walking and biking distance of their homes. The new neighborhoods would be built around a new K-8 school and connected via a network of small, traditionally sized blocks and tree -lined streets. Furthermore, Wilson and Rochester will be finished, extending much needed roadway capacity and accessibility into the foothill neighborhoods that will bring residents traffic relief and improve first responders' Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 20 ability to access our neighborhoods. The emphasis of designing for people and improved accessibility has paid off. Initial analysis indicates these neighborhoods will generate at least 15% less traffic per person than our existing neighborhoods. In part, the reduced need for cars is achieved by the extensive trail network proposed to complete our trail network in the area. The plan enhances recreational opportunities for those with horses, bicyclists, hikers, and runners by providing for more than 11 miles of new trails. Within the 828 -acre neighborhood area, the plan proposes 2,900 homes, 85 acres of parks, and 180,000 square feet of shops, retail, and community center. It is this proposed development that will help the City achieve the overarching goal: widespread conservation of the front country adjacent to the National Forest. The remaining 3,565 acres of the plan are proposed as Rural Conservation and would provide for a mix of conserved habitat mitigation lands and open space, existing open space preserves, and very low-density rural homesteads. First, the plan prioritizes and directs new mitigation land into the creation of three new preserves. Second, the plan applies the City's General Plan land uses, proposed for this area ten years ago, onto the front country, applying our stronger hillside design standards to undeveloped lands and providing for no more than 100 new homes in the Rural Conservation Area. The plan further defines and clarifies these standards, such as requiring clustering of houses, smaller roadways, and vegetation buffers, so as to further minimize the impact of potential new development and reduce fire risks to new homes. Third, the plan establishes a transfer of development rights program. This program would provide a mechanism for land owners within the Rural Conservation Area to sell the development potential of their lands to the developers of the Neighborhood Area, providing those land owners with a way of recapturing the value of their lands without having to develop those lands first. Such a program will deliver more conserved open space without infringing on anyone's property rights. Finally, the City's proposed trail network will thread through the both the Neighborhood Area and the Rural Conservation Area, tying the new open spaces and neighborhoods together and to the City's existing foothill neighborhoods. Significant Budget Drivers and Major Changes Back Seat Drivers 2018 saw a significant change in the law in California regarding employment practices liability, specifically as it relates to workplace harassment. What drove those changes? A 2018 Hiscox Workplace Harassment Study found that: 78% of accused harassers are men • 73% of accused harassers are in a senior position to the accuser • 36% of companies do not offer employees anti -harassment training • Millennials reported the highest percentage of being harassed A January 2018 online survey from the nonprofit group Stop Street Harassment found that 81% of women and 43% of men had experienced some form of sexual harassment during their lifetime. Driven by this, the California Legislature passed several new bills in this regard including: Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 21 • SB 1300 — Amends the Fair Employment and Housing Act — Lowers employee's burden and standard of proof; adds legislative intent making "motions for summary judgements" virtually impossible; effectively eliminates CCP 998 offers; expands employer liability for harassment by non -employees; and allows but does not require an employer to provide "bystander intervention training." • SB 820 — Settlements of Sexual Harassment Claims — Prohibits confidentiality clauses in settlement agreements that limit the disclosure of facts related to sexual assault, sexual harassment, workplace harassment, or discrimination based on sex. • AB 3109 — Confidentiality Clause in Settlement Agreements — Prohibits contracts or settlement agreements from limiting a party's right to testify in an administrative, legislative or judicial proceeding they are requested to attend • AB 1343 — Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Expanded: In addition to the currently required two hours of supervisory training every two years, one hour of training is now required for all nonsupervisory employees including all part-time and seasonal employees. • SB 224 — Expansion of Definition of Sexual Harassment: Expands list of professional relationships where liability for sexual harassment claims may arise to include investors, elected officials, lobbyists, directors, and producers; and gives the Department of Fair Employment and Housing jurisdiction to investigate/take enforcement actions against these individuals. • AB 1619 — Increased Statute of Limitations for Sexual Assault: 10 years (was 3 years) from the date of the assault or within 3 years after plaintiff discovers injury or illness due to assault, whichever is later. As a result, California is facing a 5% to 15% increase in insurance rates for employment practices liability. Legally, the City has the affirmative and mandatory duty to ensure a harassment and discrimination free workplace environment, and is required to conduct prompt investigations of harassment and discrimination claims (American Airlines v. Superior Court, 114 Cal. App. 4th 881 (2003), rev. den. (2004)). The City has the duty to investigate if the City knows or should have known of harassing conduct. Investigations are one method to reduce costs, over time, as they can provide a defense against claims by the complainant, if the City takes reasonable care to prevent/correct harassment and the complainant unreasonably failed to pursue corrective opportunities. Personnel investigations can provide a defense against wrongful termination claims by the harasser as well. Although these investigations can run from several thousand to over ten thousand dollars, per investigation, it is critical that the City use unbiased, professionally trained, outside investigators to provide a fact based and timely analysis of situations when complaints do arise. Based on discussions between the City's Human Resources Director and other municipalities within the Inland Empire, the occurrence of six to twelve personnel investigations per year is not atypical and in fact is on the lower end of the municipalities based on the number of full and part-time employees. Although a growing line item cost in the budget, we recognize this is a cost of doing business and far less costly than the alternative. "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." Benjamin Franklin Complementing these increases, unfortunately, is the fact that 2018 was a bad year for property and casualty insurance due to new records for catastrophic losses. Specific to California, there were some $11 billion in estimated wildfire losses from the Camp, Woolsey, Carr and Mendocino Complex fires. These fires destroyed over 21,000 structures and killed nearly 100 people. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 22 Further, with initial findings indicating both PG&E and SCE may have had some part in causation, the fires are affecting the stability of those two utilities. Additionally, the risk of increasing and expensive cyber losses due to compromised information technology infrastructure continues to grow at an alarming rate. Cyber claims are second only to harassment in terms of high frequency and high impact on public entities. Other emerging areas of increasing claims include active shooters, shared bikes/scooters, drone deliveries and autonomous vehicles. In addition to increasing rates, there is ever increasing frequency of lawsuits as well. Translating these trends to the local level, one interesting area of growing costs for the City is knocked down streetlights. With the ownership of the streetlights in town comes the responsibility for replacing those lights when one is knocked down due to a traffic accident or, in most cases, drunk or distracted driving. The Human Resources Department coordinates with RCMU and the Police Department to gain the information needed to subrogate for the costs of the replacement street light (i.e. Police Reports and Replacement Cost -sheets). This involves contacting those responsible and their insurance companies when they are known. The subrogation process can also include small claims court when insurance is not available, and/or repayment plans through the court ruling or through an agreement between the City and the responsible party. Subrogation is defined as the legal right to collect a debt or damages. California Government Code section 53069.6 gives public entities the authority to take all practical and reasonable steps to recover civil damages for the negligent, willful, or unlawful damaging or taking of property of the local agency, including the institution of appropriate legal action. Pursuant to Government Code section 53069.6, the City diligently pursues these recovery costs. Subrogation can include contacting the responsible party for payments and payment arrangements, contacting insurance companies for payments, drafting settlement agreements, tracking long term payment agreements, filing appropriate court documents, serving court notices and even representing the City in small claims court. Law Enforcement Costs "I know what you're thinking. Did he fire six shots or only five? Well, to tell you the truth, in all this excitement, I've kinda lost track myself. But being as this is a .44 magnum, the most powerful handgun in the world, and would blow your head clean off, you've got to ask yourself one question: "Do I feel lucky?" Well, do ya, punk?" Clint Eastwood I know what you are thinking — why did the City Manager choose a quote about firearms for a section on law enforcement? Not for the reasons you think. To wit, a major external driver of the budget in Rancho Cucamonga is the cost of law enforcement. Rancho Cucamonga is a San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department contract city, and it has been since shortly after incorporation. Over the decades, the City has studied the cost of starting up its own police department, regularly reviewing these costs using outside consulting expertise, approximately every ten to twelve years. Each time, we have determined that the initial start-up costs were in the millions of dollars and ongoing costs for a comparable department level of resources were approximately 20% - 30% higher. Today, Rancho Cucamonga is by far the largest contract law enforcement agency with the Sheriff. With a large staffing increase of several deputies in FY 2018/19, the City will be working on consolidating costs and managing the budget for FY 2019/20. The Sheriff contract budget is approaching $40 million, although exactly how much and when increases happen will depend on the results of the ongoing labor negotiations with the Safety Employee Benefit Association which represents the sworn, non -management, deputies. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 23 In addition to staffing costs, all contract agencies are absorbing a nearly 20% increase in liability payouts for the Sheriff's Department countywide, the result of some significant claims in FY 2016/17 and FY 2018/19 that spiked total costs over $15,000,000. Some of these claims were the results of improper use of force, arguably like Mr. Eastwood in this opening quote. In Rancho Cucamonga, however, close cooperation between City Management and our last several Police Captains (our Chief) have resulted in a sustained emphasis on training in alternate use of force, non -lethal use of force and, if necessary, hand-to-hand combat. As a result, we have fortunately avoided many situations which could have resulted in negative headlines, and instead were resolved or defused with less than lethal force. Not all agencies in the Sheriff family have been so fortunate, however, and we are all collectively paying the price of those mistakes. Finally, like all public pension funds, the San Bernardino County Employee Retirement Association is dealing with lower market returns on investments, likely under 5%, which is a further driver of pension rate increases. These costs are included in the contract for law enforcement. The City must account for these increases when adding new deputies or other positions. We don't rely on luck to handle our law enforcement needs in Rancho Cucamonga. Rather we rely on careful planning, prudent investment in technology to supplement our fine sworn men and women, and community and solution -oriented policing that addresses quality of life issues before they become major drivers of crime. With the support of one of the finest law enforcement agencies in California, and through a close working relationship with Sheriff John McMahon, that formula has yielded good results for the last several decades. Fire and Emergency Services "Price is what you pay. Value is what you get." Warren Buffett Resource Allocation There are several major changes in the Rancho Cucamonga Fire District budget for FY 2019/20. Most are highlighted in the Department Budget Highlights section, but several warrant mentioning here. One unique initiative that is symbolic of the fiscal stewardship and conservative financial approach the City Council has always espoused is the reduction in assessment for Community Facilities District 88-1. Together, the collaboration between a fiscally conservative Fire Board (City Council) and fiscally conservative stewards at the management level of the Fire District, has in recent years yielded tremendous value for the community. One such example is that the Fire District has not collected most Fire Prevention fees since FY 2013/14, saving our businesses thousands of dollars individually, and millions of dollars collectively, enabling them to reinvest these dollars in their businesses and community. This became possible as the economy strengthened, and with the elimination of redevelopment, the fiscal solvency of the Fire District improved significantly. FY 2011/12 was the last time the rates for either Community Facilities Districts (CFD) 85-1 or 88-1 were raised. These community facility districts were formed in the late 1980's when the Fire District struggled to pay for advanced life support and other critical emergency services in a newly developing community with fixed property taxes. They supplemented the Fire District budget with additional indexed CFD fees to cover world class fire and emergency services. In FY 2015/16 a 5% fee reduction for CFD 88-1 was also implemented. During the analysis of revenues for the FY 2019/20 budget, staff determined that due to the health of the Fire General Fund, the rate for CFD 88-1 could once again be lowered and still provide for the demands for service of the community. CFD 88-1 requires specific ratios based on square footage of a home to determine the assessed rate, in other words larger homes are charged more Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 24 than smaller homes. The methodology used, was to lower the new rate of the largest homes to the same level as CFD 85-1 and apply the ratio accordingly. This reduction proposed in the FY 2019/20 budget is expected to save residential tax payers approximately $800,000, collectively. The 2018 Wildfire Season was the worst year on record for the State of California as 8,527 fires burned almost 1.9 million acres of land. The Camp Fire was recorded in 2018 as the deadliest fire in California history claiming 85 deaths. It also recorded the largest wildland fire in the state's history with the Mendocino Complex burning just over 459,000 acres. Three fires were recorded in the top 20 of the state's most destructive fires, with the Camp Fire setting an unprecedented record with nearly 19,000 structures lost. In addition, the Woolsey and Carr Fires each consumed just over 1,600 structures. In support of the mutual aid system, the Fire District responded to more than 50 fire incidents throughout the State of California. As of February 2019, the District invoiced CaIOES/USFS $1,435,000 to recover out- of-pocket costs for FY 2018/19. These reimbursements account for personnel assigned to the mutual aid incidents, as well as our recalling our personnel to ensure Fire District stations were always fully staffed. Rancho Cucamonga's wildland/urban interface area is prone to wildfire that is often fueled by Santa Ana winds. The Fire District is committed to Prevention, Community Awareness, Risk Reduction, and Hazard Abatement to reduce the impact of preventable catastrophic events. To reduce the wildfire hazard and risk of an urban conflagration resulting *; from a wildfire, similar to what has been experienced by several communities throughout California, the Fire District will complete a feasibility study to determine if an opportunity exists for a one-time, comprehensive weed and fire hazard abatement project on the private ==' equestrian trail easements throughout the City. This study will gauge community interest in such a program, estimate costs, identify potential funding resources for the project, and explore opportunities to partner with other agencies such as Cal Fire and Work Release programs. If approved, the project will include a community outreach element intended to increase the awareness of trail maintenance responsibility, especially among residents who are new to Rancho Cucamonga and unfamiliar with the trail system amenity. "How effectively do we deliver on our mission and make a distinctive impact, relative to our resources?"'- Jim Collins incident operations. These The Fire District will also evaluate the need to reinstate four (4) person staffing on the ladder trucks. Fire companies whose primary functions are to perform the variety of essential support services at fire and specialized rescue incidents, such as forcible entry, auto extrication, ventilation, search and rescue, aerial operation for water delivery and rescue, utility control, illumination, overhaul and salvage work, are known as ladder or truck companies. RCFD ladder trucks respond to all major incidents in the community, especially incidents requiring additional personnel and specialized equipment to support labor-intensive operations are best managed with a supervisor Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 25 (Captain) and three (3) other personnel, which is consistent with NFPA 1710 and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Currently, due to the staffing level of three (3) personnel on RCFD truck companies, both trucks must be simultaneously dispatched to all reported structure fires to ensure safe and effective truck company operations. Increasing the staffing by one firefighter on each truck company will reduce our deployment model on a residential structure fire to one truck company. This service enhancement will leave the other truck company available for additional calls for service. This will also potentially reduce wear and tear on these resources. Personnel Costs and Staffing Levels "The value of a business is a function of how well the financial capital and the intellectual capital are managed by the human capital. You'd better get the human capital part right. " Dave Bookbinder Personnel costs continue to be another major budget driver for Rancho Cucamonga. Every year, PERS rates continue to increase, and we are now in the middle of 2-3% a year rate increase for the next three fiscal years, until rates (hopefully) begin to level off. These rates apply to the City's three contractual groups, City Miscellaneous, Fire Miscellaneous and Fire Safety. The charts below indicate their respective rates, both historically and prospectively: City Misc. Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as %) 30.00% 27.50% 25.00% 22.50% 20.00% 17.50% 15.00% 13.47% 12.61% 13.35% 12.50% 10.00% 25.83% 24.58% 22.97% 21.02% 18.59% 16.69% 15.85% 14.59% 26.37% 26.83% FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY 12/13 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 18/19 19/20 20/21 21/22 22/23 23/24 24/25 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 26 Fire Misc. Tier 1 Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as %) 40.00% 37.87% 38.44% 38.95% 36.27% 35.00% 34.12% 31.49% 30.00% 25.00% 22.92% 20.00% 18.09% 19.20% 15.70% 15.74% 15.00% o 10.00 /o FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 FY 23/24 FY 24/25 Fire Safety Tier 1 Required PERS Employer Contribution (includes UAL Contribution as %) 60.00% 55.00% 50.00% 45.00% 40.00% 35.00% 3 % 32.98% 0.85 30.00% 27.85% 27.70% 25.00% 20.00% 15.00% 37.21% 42.92% 46.63% 49.30% 51.23% 51.98% 52.65% FY 14/15 FY 15/16 FY 16/17 FY 17/18 FY 18/19 FY 19/20 FY 20/21 FY 21/22 FY 22/23 FY 23/24 FY 24/25 As you can see, rates are a function of size of the group and benefit promised. The largest group, the City miscellaneous, was promised a 2.5% at 55 retirement benefit. Their rates are set by PERS, adjusted by returns each year and actuarial studies that track the longevity of the retirees. Similarly, Fire Miscellaneous was promised a comparable retirement benefit but the smaller size of the group drives up their contribution rates. Lastly, the Fire Safety group, a mid-level size group with a generous 3% at 50 retirement benefit is faced with the highest costs, some 100% higher than the City Miscellaneous group. What do these rates mean? Well, put simply, they represent percentages of each dollar spent on personnel, that must be paid to CalPERS for that individual employee's retirement benefit to be collected at some point in the future. So, if the City Miscellaneous rate is 21 %, for every $1.00 spent on salary, the City must budget a corresponding $0.21 cents to pay to CalPERS that year. Similarly, for every $1.00 spent on a firefighter salary, the Fire District must budget a corresponding $0.43 cents to pay to CaIPERS. So, in real time these numbers represent an Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 27 operating budget mandated cost that must be taken into account each year in balancing the budget. Why are these rates so high? Well, also simply put, the numbers include the existing ongoing normal cost of funding that retirement benefit for the upcoming year for currently working employees, plus an additional unfunded amount that is required to cover the past benefits earned for retired and active employees, because CalPERS rates were not set at a high enough level during their working careers. The following charts correspond to the same three groups, City Miscellaneous, Fire Miscellaneous and Fire Safety, and highlight those combined total costs (normal rate and unfunded rate): City of Rancho Cucamonga Estimated CaIPERS Employer Costs (in Millions) $9.0 $7.9 $8.3 $8.0 $7.0 $7.6 $7.0 $6.6 $&0 $5.4 $5.0 $4.0 $3.0 $2.0 $1.0 FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 FY 2021/22 FY 2022/23 FY 2023/24 FY 2024/25 0 Normal Cost a UAL Fire District - Miscellaneous Estimated CaIPERS Employer Costs (In Millions) $& 30 $0.29 $0.30 $0.31 $0,32 $0,31 $0.20 $0.2rp $0.27 $0.18 $017 $0.10 $- FY 2019/20 FY 2020/21 FY 2021/22 FY 2022/23 FY 2023/24 FY 2024/25 9 Normal Cost a UAL Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 28 ■ Normal Cost 0 UAL In addition to the drivers noted above, Minimum Wage increases have a significant impact on the City's overall budget. When the City first incorporated minimum wage was $2.65 per hour. The current level is $12 per hour as of January 1, 2019, with already approved increases of $1 per hour for each of the next three years. That growth is significant, and exceeds the actual inflation adjusted amount which would otherwise be just under $11 per hour. Although it does not square with the misleading stereotype of well-paid government workers, minimum wage increases have a very outsize impact on the City budget. First of all, they cause compression in our part-time, and ultimately full-time salary schedule. As the lower end positions increase, the City has to make similar adjustments up the line to maintain separation, or eliminate and consolidate positions, ultimately increasing costs. Further, our higher skilled part-time positions are impacted as the differential between those positions and lower cost positions further down the scale continues to shrink. There are direct costs also. An analysis of just a partial six months of higher costs (each January is the current automatic $1 increase) in Public Works alone is slightly over $275,000. Similar, though slightly smaller increases impact Community Services and Library Services, resulting in an overall increase of just under a half million dollars for six months of a $1 minimum wage increase. Obviously, personnel costs are a critical budgetary item, but not one that should become so weighty it diminishes public services. Containing these personnel costs requires multiple approaches. From a salary perspective Rancho Cucamonga has generally been, and continues to remain, mid -pack (average) compared to many surrounding agencies. Control of salaries helps control the cost of retirement benefits which are driven directly by salaries. On the PERS end, the City and Fire District pay their PERS Unfunded Accrued Liability (UAL) contributions up -front in one lump sum at the beginning of each fiscal year, helping to incrementally reduce liability by minimizing interest costs, and in addition generally pays a little more on top of those minimum contributions to slowly reduce the unfunded liability over time. The City and Fire District also have specific reserves held in trust to help offset PERS liability and pay costs in down years. Those reserves total $2,042,710 and $5,743,960, respectively. Finally, one of the more novel ways (at least for public agencies) is to control staffing. More staff generally equates to more retirees which drives total PERS costs. The City regularly looks at staffing per 1,000 residents, as compared to our surrounding large neighbors, including agencies like San Bernardino, Ontario, Pomona, Fontana and Corona. Excluding Animal and Library Services, both of which are in many cases contracted out, the City of Rancho Cucamonga is Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 29 among the leanest staffing per 1,000 residents, particularly given the high level of services we provide, as shown in the chart below: Total staffing per 1,000 Residents* *Excludes Animal and Library Services San Bernardino 3.79 Rancho Cucamonga 3.51 Pomona 4.23 Ontario 6.92 Fontana 3.35 Corona 3.62 1.00 2.00 3.00 4.00 5.00 6.00 7.00 8.00 As we seek to control staffing levels, we still recognize that some level of ongoing restructuring is not only necessary but desirable. FY 2019/20 is no exception as the City continuously reshapes its workforce and organization to reflect the dynamics and demands of the current environment. We conducted an outside review of reclassification requests received by Human Resources. Six (6) requests were received and four (4) were recommended for approval based on the information in the required questionnaire, interviews, and supplemental department information including job descriptions, class specifications, reclassification policy and relevant memorandums of understanding. The approved reclassifications were at the administrative assistant or management aide levels. Nine (9) additional new full-time positions were requested through our public employee review process. Two (2) were denied, two (2) were withdrawn, one (1) was restructured and the remaining four (4) were approved. Most of the new positions were at the supervisor or mid -management level in the RCCEA group, thus improving the span of control and accountability of the City. Affected departments included Engineering Services, Public Works Services, Community Services, Building and Safety Services, Planning, RCMU and Fire. The net General Fund impact was approximately $161,000 which was subsequently almost completely offset with a later resignation of a mid-level manager position that will not be refilled. Overall, costs were contained through the elimination or consolidation of vacant positions. MS4 Permit The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) requires that all local agencies obtain and follow the requirements of a Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) Permit for all drainage systems that convey stormwater to waters of the U.S. The cities within San Bernardino County and the County fall under a joint permit issued by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB). The latest MS4 Permit expired on January 29, 2015 and issuance of the new permit has been delayed due to ongoing litigation over potential unfunded mandates within the proposed permit. The new permit is not expected to be in force before the mid -2020. A few provisions from the new permit have been imposed by order of the RWQCB including provisions to reduce trash discharge to surface waters, which will fully take effect in 2020. With the delay in the issuance of the new permit, the City has realized lower than anticipated costs for compliance with the MS4 permit. Accordingly, the proposed budget indicates reduced anticipated expenditures for the MS4 permit line item. Based on information currently available, it is anticipated that this line item will experience a sharp increase in Fiscal Year 2020/21 when the new permit is expected to be issued. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 30 Criminal Citation Prosecution During 2017, Solution Oriented Policing Deputies began issuing RCMC citations to more effectively respond to quality of life issues. As the number of citations increased, the cost of prosecution also increased. In June 2018, Police Department Commanders met with Community Improvement and the City prosecutor to identify methods to reduce costs, which included: • Citing under the Penal Code to shift prosecution to the District Attorney (DA) • Dismissing citations in the interest of justice • Working with the DA for global disposition, obtaining stay away orders as part of probation • Writing fewer citations Additionally, effective on January 1, 2019, local jurisdictions were prohibited from charging or collecting from defendants the costs associated with prosecution. Citations issued by Quarter: Costs by Quarter: The municipal codes cited, except for Trespass, are largely quality of life concerns which are only prohibited in the municipal code. Depending on the recipient and the circumstances, Deputies may be able to utilize the administrative law citation process. Citations were issued for the following violations: 2018 2019 1 st Qtr. 88 49 2nd Qtr. 96 RC9.16.020 3rd Qtr. 103 17 4th Qtr. 67 29 The municipal codes cited, except for Trespass, are largely quality of life concerns which are only prohibited in the municipal code. Depending on the recipient and the circumstances, Deputies may be able to utilize the administrative law citation process. Citations were issued for the following violations: 2018 2019 1 st Qtr. $44,173.00 $64,333.00 2nd Qtr. $64,578.00 RC9.16.020 3rd Qtr. $49,681.00 17 4th Qtr. $59,199.00 29 The municipal codes cited, except for Trespass, are largely quality of life concerns which are only prohibited in the municipal code. Depending on the recipient and the circumstances, Deputies may be able to utilize the administrative law citation process. Citations were issued for the following violations: Solution Oriented Policing Deputies have found the RCMC particularly effective as a tool. As case law and the Legislature have ruled out some standards tools, RCMC violations became the Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 31 2018 2019 RC9.18.012 Trespass 121 12 RC9.16.020 Drinking in public 99 17 RC9.31.010 Solicitation, Aggressive or on street 29 1 RC9.26.010 Loitering in Public Places 24 12 RC9.31.020 Solicitation Non -charitable 24 RC12.04.010 Community Service Regulations 21 RC9.26.020 Loitering in front of buildings 17 3 RC9.18.014 Public Urination 11 2 RC9.31.030 Solicitation Charitable 3 RC5.04.030 Business License required 2 RC9.04.010 Discharging Firearm 1 RC9.04.030 Poss of weapon by minor 1 TOTAL 353 47 Solution Oriented Policing Deputies have found the RCMC particularly effective as a tool. As case law and the Legislature have ruled out some standards tools, RCMC violations became the Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 31 method of effectively responding to quality of life concerns. The defendants identified in the citations are often repeat violators, receiving multiple citations. These chronic offenders are often transient population, creating the appearance of blight, causing unsanitary conditions, or contributing to a perception of unsafe neighborhoods or business complexes. Approximately 20 individuals received three or more citations in 2018. Information on resolutions is not readily available on all cases. The following table shows the cases most recently appearing in court and the latest status: DEFENDANT DATE CODE CURRENT STATUS SL 1/12/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $25,000 AE 1/12/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $70,000 LW 1/12/2018 RC9.26.010 FTA, BW No bail CD 3/9/2018 RC9.18.012 Dismissed in Interest of Justice, in custody and pending mental health evaluation CJ 3/9/2018 RC9.16.020 FTA, BW $25,000 BJ 3/16/2018 RC9.18.012 Plead to Misd. With DA, 36 mo. Probation with stay away order CD 4/26/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $100,000 SK 5/31/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $60,000 AR 6/20/2018 RC9.16.020 Plead to more serious misdemeanor, stay away orders for term of probation AR 6/28/2018 RC9.16.020 Plead to more serious misdemeanor, stay away orders for term of probation ME 7/4/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $50,000 GA 7/23/2018 RC9.16.020 FTA, BW $90,000 BJ 8/14/2018 RC9.18.012 Plead to Misd. With DA, 36 mo. Probation with stay away order GA 9/5/2018 RC9.26.010 Dismissed, in custody and mentally incompetent AR 9/21/2018 RC9.16.020 Plead to more serious misdemeanor, stay away orders for term of probation FJ 9/21/2018 RC9.26.020 FTA, BW $25,000 HC 11/1/2018 RC12.04.010 FTA, BW $5,000 ST 11/1/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $5,000 BL 11/1/2018 RC9.18.012 Plead to felony with DA, Probation with stay away order CG 11/26/2018 RC9.16.020 FTA, BW $5,000 KL 11/26/2018 RC9.31.010 Dismissed with Prob. Vio., 365 days 'ail WJ 12/5/2018 RC9.26.010 Hearing 5/8, working on finding housing JD 12/19/2018 RC9.18.012 FTA, BW $10,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 32 VA 1/3/2019 RC9.12.010 Dismissed, Interest of Justice LE 1/3/2019 RC9.26.010 Guilty plea, time served SM 1/3/2019 RC9.26.010 FTA, BW $10,000 DC 1/4/2019 RC9.26.010 Plead to felony, 3 yrs. Probation with stay away order HB 1/18/2019 RC9.26.020 Dismissed, mentally incompetent PE 1/28/2019 RC9.26.010 FTA, BW $10,000 SD 2/11/2019 RC9.16.020 FTA, BW $10,000 EL 2/13/2019 RC9.26.010 FTA, BW $10,000 GJ 2/14/2019 RC9.26.010 FTA, BW $2,500 City Council Goals These 2019 goals were developed and updated at the January 2019 City Council goal -setting session. As noted, many of these programs and projects are multi-year in nature. PUBLIC SAFETY Proactively develop public safety programs and facilities to meet community needs. Focus efforts on addressing potential ABC concerns, reviewing massage establishments, meeting regularly with all hotels and enhanced transient outreach. Police V By 3rd Quarter 2020, focus efforts on reducing illegal dumping specifically multi- housing and commercial property through enhanced patrols, elevating public awareness; and exploring options with Burrtec and property management. Police, Engineering, and Community Improvement * By 4th Quarter 2020, develop and implement a plan to allow for live viewing of PSVN cameras outside of the PD monitoring room using mobile or desktop browsers. Evaluate the ability to allow crowd -source viewing of select cameras covering neighborhood assets. Department of Innovation & Technology V By 4th Quarter 2017, continue to build/expand the Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) to include most major public facilities in town as well as the City perimeter. Police (prior year Council Goal) V By 4th Quarter 2021, with the Automated License Plate Readers (ALPR), continue to build safety to encircle the city for investigation purposes. Focus on west -end of the city and intersections south of 1-210. Police (prior year Council Goal) V By 1 st Quarter 2019, award a contract for the construction of the re -build of the San Bernardino Road Station (172), which will include a Police Department substation, at the new location at the northwest corner of Vineyard and San Bernardino Road. Fire (prior year Council Goal) V By 4th Quarter 2020, work with the Taking Back Our Community Coalition and the League of California Cities to raise public awareness of why crime is increasing in our state; provide facts and impacts of AB 109, Prop 47, and Prop 57; and advocate for State legislative changes to improve law enforcement's ability to respond to crime. City Manager's Office (prior year Council Goal) PARKS AND RECREATION DEVELOPMENT Proceed with planning and development of major parks and recreational projects. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 33 By 211 Quarter 2020, position the City to be a competitive applicant for the State of California Parks, Environment, and Water Bond 2018, Prop. 68. Community Services By 4th Quarter 2019, develop a plan for enhancements to the Cultural Center Courtyard that include shade and seating, directional signage from parking areas and design work for future capital improvements. Community Services, Library, City Manager's Office, and Planning (prior year Council Goal) V By 1 It Quarter 2020, complete the survey and environmental review, develop a site plan, and establish a rough cost of development for Etiwanda Creek Park. Community Services (prior year Council Goal) '.If' By 1St Quarter 2019, complete the survey and environmental review, develop a site plan and establish a cost of development for the Central Park Trailhead as envisioned in the Central Park Master Plan. Community Services (prior year Council Goal) ENHANCING PREMIER COMMUNITY STATUS As the community matures, undertake programs and projects to enhance Rancho Cucamonga's position as the premier community in our region. IN Conduct updated analysis with respect to AB 2404 to ensure that existing recreational athletic resource allocations are equitable for all participants. Ongoing. Community Services and City Attorney V By 3rd Quarter 2019, launch a new mobile -first, service -based City website, and intranet. City Manager's Office and Department of Innovation & Technology V By 1St Quarter 2020, building off the Strategic Communications Plan, develop a Community Engagement Policy with a health equity framework to ensure RC's diverse community perspectives are included in shaping City policies, practices, programs, and services. City Manager's Office It By 2nd Quarter 2020, in order to improve safety and provide for economic development, complete design and right-of-way activities necessary to allow for the construction of the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project. Engineering V By 2nd Quarter 2021, to support improvement of traffic flow through active management of the City's transportation infrastructure, design and construct Phase I of the Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) which will provide remote connectivity between the Traffic Management Center and 100% of the traffic signals in the City. Engineering V By 4th Quarter 2019, as dockless bicycle/scooter share services continue to expand throughout other communities, evaluate whether these types of micro -transit services are appropriate for Rancho Cucamonga and develop suitable regulations or restrictions that reflects the community's interests. City Manager's Office ' By 3rd Quarter 2022, complete the design and fabrication of exhibits for the Second Story and Beyond interactive discovery space at the Biane Library. Library Services It By 2nd Quarter 2016, develop a Public Art Master Plan to consider how significant art pieces can be incorporated into future public and private development, to include funding options for both art installation and long-term maintenance. City Manager's Office (prior year Council Goal) MID AND LONG-RANGE PLANNING Begin efforts to develop mid-range and long-term goals and vision for the City. It By 31d Quarter 2019, in partnership with the Library and Community Services, complete transition away from City directed and led Foundations to a model resembling the Animal Center Foundation. Develop Memorandum of Understandings with each Foundation for future Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 34 partnerships that advocate and support the department's fundraising goals and initiatives. Community Services and Library V By 4th Quarter 2020, develop and adopt a comprehensive Tree Ordinance and Urban Forestry Master Plan. Public Works and Administrative Services V By 4th Quarter 2019, prepare the Etiwanda Heights Neighborhood and Conservation Plan and submit it to Planning Commission and City Council for review. Community Development V By 4th Quarter 2022, prepare a comprehensive update to the General Plan. Community Development and City Manager's Office * By 2nd Quarter 2019, review the City's zoning districts and evaluate/investigate creating overlay districts or specific plan areas that will create villages or development districts in order to revitalize underperforming or underutilized areas and create synergy amongst the varying land uses. Planning (prior year Council Goal) V By 2nd Quarter 2018, build upon existing performance metrics, develop additional tools, such as business intelligence dashboards and interactive reporting, to visualize and interpret Citywide data in order to enhance understanding and decision making across applicable service categories. Department of Innovation & Technology (prior year Council Goal) V Continue to advocate for changes in the San Bernardino Council of Government's (SBCOG's) function and operation including updating fee structure and to increase COG services for the West Valley. Ongoing. Engineering and City Manager's Office (prior year Council Goal) V By 4th Quarter 2018, enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the City's weekly cash disbursement (A/P) cycle by implementing scanning and electronic routing of invoices for approval and payment within the City's financial system. Replace paper filing system with digital filing system. Finance and Department of Innovation & Technology (prior year Council Goal) Team RC Vision, Mission and Values — It's You, It's Me, It's Us The following represents our organization's Vision, Mission and Values developed by a team of City employees through a collaborative and inclusive process as part of the Team RC workforce development initiative. This is a living document that represents a hope for our future and will continue to grow and develop with the organization. VISION Team RC exceeds expectations of those we serve with pride in the delivery of quality services and programs in an environment of employee excellence and innovation, empowered by inspired leadership, opportunity and a collaborative spirit. MISSION Team RC delivers superior service to all who live, work and play in our community. VALUES—(S.P.I.R.I.T.) SERVICE: We are committed to providing a superior level of services and going above and beyond individual duties to better serve both fellow team members and the community. PEOPLE: Our respect for each other is demonstrated by empowering and valuing one another while also encouraging personal growth and enhanced health and wellbeing. We embrace a healthy life/work balance and are continuously striving to ensure the highest quality of life for our employees. INDIVIDUAL EXCELLENCE: Individual excellence is achieved through recognizing workforce strengths. It is fostered through individuals who possess a strong work ethic, sense of pride and commitment, and who value honesty, integrity and personal growth. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 35 RANCHO WAY: The Rancho Way is fostered through maintaining a high level of professionalism, producing quality work products and striving to retain the public's trust through fiscal discipline and accountability. INNOVATION: Embrace and appreciate technology; use technology to bring innovation and a creative spirit to our current work and to help anticipate the challenges of tomorrow. TEAMWORK: Teamwork is encouraged and reinforced through collaboration, communication and leadership at all levels. Unwavering unity, common goals and a positive attitude are embodied by all. Awards Received Animal Services 2016 — Helen Putnam Award in the category of Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics, & Community Involvement for the Kitten Nursery City Manager's Office 2015, 2016, 2017 — KABOOM! recognizes the City as a Playful City USA 2015 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Excellence in Communication Award of Merit for Graphics, "Join the Healthy RC Picture" 2015, 2019 — 1 st Place Directing Change Program and Film Competition awarded by Each Mind Matters for the Healthy RC Youth Leaders Mental Health video 2016, 2018 — Beacon Platinum Level Spotlight Award for Sustainability Best Practices, the Streetlight Retrofit Project and Sustainable Community Action Plan from the Institute for Local Government 2016 — Honorable Mention for the Directing Change Program and Film Competition awarded by Each Mind Matters for the Healthy RC Youth Leaders Mental Health video 2016 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Most Improved Publication, Healthy RC for its School Safety Brochure 2016 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Citizen Participation/Community Visioning Award of Merit, Healthy RC for its Circulation Master Plan 2016 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Award of Distinction, Healthy RC for its Walk to School Day 2018 — Helen Putman Award in the category of Health & Wellness Programs for Your Mind Matters Mental Health Campaign 2018 — Inland Empire Economic Partnership Red Tape to Red Carpet Award for Sustainable and Green Development for the Sustainable Community Action Plan 2019 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Award of Distinction in the category of Multicultural Outreach/Campaign for the Spanish Your Mind Matters Campaign Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 36 2016 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Most Creative/Dollar Stretcher Award of Merit, Healthy RC Grow Healthy Together 2016 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Multi-year Strategic Planning and Execution Award of Distinction, Healthy RC Strategic Planning and Execution 2016 — Dairy Council of California awarded Healthy RC Youth Leader Annika Kim as a Student Community All-Star for the state of California 2017 — California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) Excellence in Communication Award of Merit for Most Effective Social/New Media Campaign, "City of Rancho Cucamonga Council Districts Measure Q outreach" 2017 — Innovations in American Government Bright Idea award by Harvard Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation 2017 — Community Partner Award from National CORE Hope Through Housing 2017 — Dairy Council of California awarded Healthy RC Youth Leader Maelin Aquino as a Student Community All-Star for the state of California 2018 — Southern California Edison Cool Planet Award for the Streetlight Retrofit Project and Sustainable Community Action Plan. 2018 — Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) 2018 Sustainability Award for our Sustainable Community Action Plan 2018 — American Planning Association (APA) California, Innovation in Green Community Planning Award for the Sustainable Community Action Plan Community Services 2016 — Award of Excellence for the Lewis Family Playhouse Website in the category of Marketing & Communication from CPRS 2016 — International Award in the category of Marketing from LERN 2017, 2018— Project of the Year award in the category of Recreation and Athletic Facilities from APWA 2017 — Award of Excellence for Los Amigos Park in the category of Park Planning and Development from CPRS 2017 — Helen Putnam Award for Excellence for Los Amigos Park in the category of Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics and Community Involvement from the League of California Cities 2018 — Outstanding New Recreation Facility Award from the Southern California Municipal Athletic Federation DoIT 2016 — Digital Cities Survey Award, ranked 2nd among cities of same size 2017 — Digital Cities Survey Award, ranked 8th among cities of same size 2018 — Digital Cities Survey Award, ranked 9th among cities of same size Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 37 2017 — Municipal Information Systems Association of California (MISAC) Innovation Award 2017 — MISAC Quality Visual Information Achievement Award 2017 — California Graphic Information Association (CGIA) Exemplary Systems Award Engineering 2015, 2016, 2017 — APPA "Safety Award of Excellence" 2017 — Inland Empire Economic Partnerships Turning Red Tape into Red Carpet "Smart City" Award 2018 — American Public Power Association Safety Award 2018 — One in a Million Award from CalRecycle for City's Household Hazardous Waste Program recovery and reuse of mobility scooter Finance 2015, 2016, 2017 — The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) awarded a Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting for the comprehensive annual financial report (CAFR) for the fiscal year 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 — The Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) awarded a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award for the annual budget document for the fiscal year Fire 2016 — Inland Empire Media Awards - Best Public Service of the Year Award for the ReadyRC campaign 2018 — Public Project of the Year Award from the American Institute of Architects, Inland Empire Chapter Human Resources 2016 — Innovation Academy Class Completion Award — Alliance for Innovation 2017 — Most Innovative Organization Award — Southern California Public Management Association for Human Resources 2017 — Client -Partner Team Award — GM Business Interiors Police Department 2015 — WeTip National Crime Fighting Conference awarded "Police Department of the Year" 2017, 2018 — named by WalletHub one of the Safest Cities in America Procurement 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 — The Achievement of Excellence in Procurement, awarded by the National Procurement Institute Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 38 Operating Budgets Analysis and Comparisons "Lies, damned lies, and statistics" Mark Twain The operating budgets for the City of Rancho Cucamonga are comprised of the following main sections: • Operating Budget (basic municipal operations) o City General Fund o Library Operational Fund o Fire District Operational Funds • Special Districts (restricted funding sources for specific operational purposes) In addition, the complete budget includes various other special funds including developer impact fee funds, grant funds, and reserves. Most of these funds are restricted from use for general municipal operations. Operating Budget The City General Fund budget, which supports the majority of City services, is made up of a number of revenue sources. General Fund revenue for FY 2019/20 is projected to be $88,290,270 which is just over $1 million higher than in FY 2018/19. By comparison, General Fund revenues grew some $3 million from FY 2017/18 to FY 2018/19. This slowing of revenue growth reflects the generally built out nature of the City where it will over the years become increasingly more of a challenge to balance costs versus revenue, particularly given growth in certain cost areas such as salaries and benefits (including medical and PERS). The overall Operating Budget is divided up among the various departments as indicated below: City Operating Budgets City General Fund, Fire District Funds and Library Funds $2,749,310 $505,450 $5,562,050 $5,771,450 $14,754,010 $805,350 = $1,916,950 -,t $2,780,770 $1,810,830 • $11,662,280 $3,416,210 ■ Governance Records Mgmt. Community Services Library Services ■ Admin. Services Econ. and Comm. Dev. ■ Building & Safety Services ■ Engineering Services ■ Planning ■ Public Works Services ■ Animal Care & Services ■ Police ■ Fire The pie chart above reflects the traditional, and relatively typical, focus of municipal services. By far the largest cost is Police services which is followed by Fire services. When combined with Animal Care & Services, these three departments comprise Public Safety as a whole and make up over 63% of the City's operating budget. Rancho Cucamonga is fortunate in this regard as the efficiency of our police and fire services, and their relatively modest cost and staffing compared to other agencies, have allowed the City more resources for other areas. In some Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 39 older, financially constrained communities, public safety services approach 80% or more of the budget. Other large areas include Public Works Services and Administrative Services (Human Resources, Finance, Dolt, Purchasing). Library and Community Services are also significant areas of municipal operations. It is important to note that this pie chart reflects the overall expenditure of Operating Budget funds; however, not all the funds are equally fungible. For example, because Fire is a separate subsidiary district, which pre -dated the City, their funds are restricted only for emergency services operations. They cannot be used to supplement community services or public works. Overall, the total Operating Budget increased by just over $6.3 million, or 4.81 %, from the prior year as noted below. Changes in Operating Budget $140,000,000 $130,000,000 $120,000,000Ig $110,000,000 ' $100,000,000 w E $90,000,000 p $80,000,000 $70,000,000 $60,000,000 $ 50,000,000 ■ General Fund v Library Fund Ng Fire District Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 40 General Fund The City's General Fund is the primary funding source for municipal operations. It is comprised of seven major revenue services, making up 91% of total revenues, as indicated below: Sales tax is the primary revenue source at $32.5 million, most of which primarily comes from Victoria Gardens. While this seems like a large number, in perspective, if sales tax were our only revenue it would cover just over 70% of the Police Department budget! Additionally, while our sales tax revenue is strong, even with Victoria Gardens, we still receive less sales tax annually than our neighboring cities of Ontario, Fontana and San Bernardino. When one considers that sales tax revenues in Rancho Cucamonga are regional, coming mostly from patrons outside the Com, it makes clear the importance of nurturing and growing our retail operations. As growth in sales tax continues to skew towards online retailers, the future for cities like Rancho Cucamonga, who lack Amazon -type fulfillment centers, is rather bleak. Online sales tax goes not to the location where the product is ordered, or in some cases where it is shipped from, but instead to the County sales tax pool for allocation based on the existing proportion of physical sales tax. Cities like Fontana with its auto mail, or Ontario with its auto malls and outlet mall, generally receive a disproportionate share of the online sales tax (allocated through the pools) as compared to what their residents actually purchase. Reforming this distribution to one that is more equitably based on the location where the product is received and the location where the product is shipped is a focus of the City's legislative efforts. For FY 2019/20, sales tax grew by about $1.6 million or approximately 5.16% from the prior year. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 41 Franchise Property tax fees $9,672,760 $6,652,070 Development Transient fees $4,180,000 Vehicle license ompancy Business licenses Sales tax $32,552,480 fees $20,279,320 �caxes ,6',i,3,41ti $2,779,690 Sales tax is the primary revenue source at $32.5 million, most of which primarily comes from Victoria Gardens. While this seems like a large number, in perspective, if sales tax were our only revenue it would cover just over 70% of the Police Department budget! Additionally, while our sales tax revenue is strong, even with Victoria Gardens, we still receive less sales tax annually than our neighboring cities of Ontario, Fontana and San Bernardino. When one considers that sales tax revenues in Rancho Cucamonga are regional, coming mostly from patrons outside the Com, it makes clear the importance of nurturing and growing our retail operations. As growth in sales tax continues to skew towards online retailers, the future for cities like Rancho Cucamonga, who lack Amazon -type fulfillment centers, is rather bleak. Online sales tax goes not to the location where the product is ordered, or in some cases where it is shipped from, but instead to the County sales tax pool for allocation based on the existing proportion of physical sales tax. Cities like Fontana with its auto mail, or Ontario with its auto malls and outlet mall, generally receive a disproportionate share of the online sales tax (allocated through the pools) as compared to what their residents actually purchase. Reforming this distribution to one that is more equitably based on the location where the product is received and the location where the product is shipped is a focus of the City's legislative efforts. For FY 2019/20, sales tax grew by about $1.6 million or approximately 5.16% from the prior year. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 41 Sales Tax $34,000,000 $32,000,000 $30,000,000 $28,000,000 $26,000,000 $24,000,000 $22,000,000 $20,000,000 00 o° o° o° oti oti oti oti o'' oti oti oti oti oti L k'L ,'1 y'1 ,'L y L `Y1 A'L y'1 �'L ,1 -k' �ti F e� F� F F F F� F� F Looking forward we expect that locally General Consumer Goods will be mostly flat with perhaps a 1% growth. Restaurants and Food/Drug sales are expected to grow 2-3%, while Building and Construction plus Business and Industry should increase a modest 1 % or so. The largest growth in sales tax is likely to come in the State and County pools as California, through the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration, squares its collection practices with the United States Supreme Court decision in Wayfair v. South Dakota imposing sales tax on even out-of-state retailers not previously subject to state sales tax. These funds largely go into the State and County pools and are rapidly becoming significant. Just how significant is visible on the chart below: Local 1 % Sales Tax by Calendar Year $1,000,00 JK $1400.004K $1,200,000K Stick&Mortar $1.000,000K $800.000K O dine 1 O"YN h 3N'1 -21"s $Q00,000K $400.000K .+e."..+ $200,000K SOK `00 '01 '02 U3 '04 '05 '00 '07 '08 '09 '10 '1t '12 '13 14 '15 '16 '17 '18 Vehicle License Fees (VLF) and Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF are a significant revenue source to state and local governments, and the City estimates them to be at $20.2 million for FY 2019/20, which is $1,049,890, about 5.46%, more than in FY 2018/19. Prior to the 2004 budget act, the VLF tax rate was 2% of the value of the vehicle, although the State often swapped out over 1.3% of the total VLF fees for general fund revenues to local agencies. During the economic downturn Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 42 at that time, it was proposed that a swap of revenue occur in which cities would receive a like amount of property tax revenue in place of the State general fund revenue and that the adjusted amount would thereafter increase annually in proportion to the growth in gross assessed valuation for that jurisdiction. This swap has benefited cities with higher assessed valuations (generally upper -middle income communities where property is in demand) like Rancho Cucamonga. VLF and Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF $21,000,000 $20,000,000 $19,000,000 $18,000,000 $17,000,000 $16,000,000 $15,000,000 $14,000,000 $13,000,000 4J�©a$FQ �OO�4yO�O�OF�O��Fy����O��Fa�Q���C�0 o��F��ON�F�O�F�O��Fa�Oy�`yo Property Tax is a modest revenue source (#3 at $9.6 million) for Rancho Cucamonga because we are a post -prop 13, low property tax city. This does NOT mean property taxes are any lower in Rancho Cucamonga than any other agency, rather it means that because the City incorporated after Prop 13, the pre-existing pre -incorporation tax rates that were in effect at the time Prop 13 passed, effectively limit the property tax revenue the City can receive. There are numerous tax rate property Tax Dollar areas in Rancho Cucamonga and each one is Breakdown different. In general, however, if you look at the more recent tax rate areas that have been developed, the City receives approximately $0.05 (allocated between the General Fund and Library Fund) of every property tax dollar paid. Most of the property tax (22%) goes to the State (and then to schools), another portion goes directly to the FWW various School Districts (30%) and about 15% goes to San Bernardino County. Other agencies dividing CPlow o" Cn. ab up the remaining share include Flood Control, Inland Empire Utility Agency and County Superintendent of Schools. Residential property is the single biggest assessed value category in Rancho Cucamonga comprising over 60% of the total value of the tax roll. For FY 2018/19, the City saw a strong Citywide net taxable value increase of 5.83% and an increase of 4.37% is anticipated for FY 2019/20. Overall, property tax revenue for the General Fund is estimated to grow about $649,580 next year, or a relatively strong 6.72%. Interestingly, some of the major property taxpayers are Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 43 not necessarily residential in nature, including Goodman Rancho LLC (industrial), Rancho Mall LLC (retail), Frito Lay (manufacturing) and ProLogis/Catellus (industrial). Property Taxes* $11,000,000 $10,000,000 $9,000,000 $8,000,000 $7,000,000 $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 00 0° o° oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti J" J� y, J� y� �� J� J� 1� yT k�� �� k 4 � 4 � F F F F F � F F F Franchise Fees are those fees paid by natural gas, electric and refuse providers in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. They are the fee that is paid by the utility (Southern California Gas, Southern California Edison, and Burrtec) for the privilege of operating exclusively in the City and using the city right of way. In some cases, they are regulated by the California Public Utility Commission. Typically, a solid and modestly growing revenue source, franchise fees have largely stagnated and become somewhat volatile from year to year with increasing amounts of conservation, alternatives like solar and battery power, and ever tightening energy efficiency regulations for new construction. Franchise fees are estimated at $6.6 million for FY 2019/20, which is $311,530, or about 4.47%, less than in FY 2018/19. The primary reason for the decrease is due the reclassification of Towing Services Fees from the franchise fee category to the Charges for Services category in the General Fund revenues. The FY 2018/19 Adopted Budget included $300,000 in Franchise Fee -Towing Services revenues which were moved to Charges for Services as part of the FY 2018/19 Amended Budget to more accurately reflect the nature of these revenues. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 44 Franchise Fees $7,500,000 $7,000,000 $6,500,000 $6,000,000 $5,500,000 $5,000,000 w�°� ��tio o�tiy o° o° o° 43N (311oti oti oti oti oti oti oti <Z;" , ati � ,ti ,�' ,ti ,ti �ti J Transient Occupancy Tax was originally developed to compensate local government with an additional stable source of general fund monies. It has no cap, however, new or increased TOT requires a vote. It is authorized by the Revenue and Taxation Code and applies to stays of 30 days or fewer in hotels. TOT is set as a percentage of the hotel room rate, and it is collected by the owners and operators of hotels and motels. Just ten (10) years ago this was a modest revenue source to the City, however, with the area growth in travel and business, it has now become of increasing significance. As a result, the City regularly audits hotels for TOT compliance. The TOT rate in Rancho Cucamonga is 10%, which is less than some of our surrounding and competing jurisdictions. The City estimates it will collect $4.6 million in TOT for FY 2019/20, which is just $107,610 more, or 2.39% more than in FY 2018/19. By comparison the prior year saw a nearly $770,000 growth in TOT with some $330,000 in growth the year before (FY 2017/18) and another $760,000 growth in FY 2016/17. With most hotels in the Rancho Cucamonga and Ontario area being limited service, lower -end full service, or extended stay, the City is looking to diversify and differentiate its hotel offerings with a new Hilton Tapestry luxury hotel getting ready to begin construction at Base Line and Day Creek. Similar efforts are being focused on attracting full service and luxury hotels at other locations in the City. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 45 Transient Occupancy Taxes $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $4'oVo'0on $z'soo'000 $s'000'uoo gz'sno'000 $z'000'nnu $1'soo'000 $1'000'000 Business License and Development F99G8na the final two revenues which make up the City's top seven General Fund revenues. Business License revenue ioatax 0nthe privilege ofengaging in business in the |oC8| city. It is authorized by the California Constitution and collected by well over 9096 0f@|| local agencies. Business License revenues are estimated to be $2.7 million for FY 2019/20. essentially flat as compared to FY 2018/19. This reflects the generally built out nature ofthe City with limited new businesses opening each year. Business Licenses $z,9so'OoO $z'80n.Vo0 $z'a5o.000 $z'sou'ono $z'sso'oou $2,zuo'000 $2,oso'000 $1'soo'000 $1'750'000 |5innibarky, Development Fees are na|aUvek/ consistent with the prior year, coming in at an Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 46 $5,500,000 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 $3,000,000 $2,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,500,000 Development Fees `tip 1� oti1�� otic'\y° °ti°K11 oti��o��,�1)0' Interestingly, you can see that these fees have still not returned to the level they were in FY 2007/08, the last full year before the Great Recession. That is even after being adjusted for inflation and cost increases. Again, this reflects the fact that the City is increasingly built out and while we are reviewing ever more complex projects (typical of an infill community), we are reviewing smaller and smaller numbers of those projects. Rancho Cucamonga's large growth and development days are clearly behind us, still visible in the rearview mirror, but shrinking quickly as we move into the 21St century. Overall, the City's revenue growth is typical of a largely built out community. What is not necessarily typical of many built out, older communities, is the following: Reduction in Usage of Reserves - City General Fund $1,400,000 $1,200,000 $1,000,000 $800,000 $600,000 $400,000 $200,000 �\O 00 ti ■ Economic Circumstances Rsry Interest from Fund 025 Insurance Reimb from Fund 025 "The business schools reward difficult complex behavior more than simple behavior, but simple behavior is more effective." Warren Buffett Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 47 Oi � �A\"y %\'� O� 5\,0 ti0Oyti�OtitiOtitiOy-Oti ti ■ Economic Circumstances Rsry Interest from Fund 025 Insurance Reimb from Fund 025 "The business schools reward difficult complex behavior more than simple behavior, but simple behavior is more effective." Warren Buffett Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 47 This is because the City, led by conservative fiscal stewards on the City Council, has a long- standing commitment to living within its means. The City typically only uses its reserves during fiscal downturns, as a cushion to prevent large swings in services. Once the Great Recession was over, the City promptly weaned itself off of reserves and has not used them for nearly.seven years now. Reflecting this conservative fiscal approach, when the City approached Standard & Poors in the fall of 2018 about a credit rating for the bond sale for the Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network, Standard & Poors UPGRADED the City's credit rating from AA- to AA+. This is the second highest credit rating possible, exceeded only by AAA, which very few cities in California actually have. Overall, the City of Rancho Cucamonga General Fund remains healthy. With the loss of Redevelopment, and the loss of $197,000,000 in reserves that it had brought to Rancho Cucamonga, the City was forced to begin saving General Fund dollars for significant capital repairs and improvements, including equipment replacement. In many cities, without a history of saving and setting aside reserve funding, infrastructure or capital competes with the personnel and services for limited general funds, or it is entirely dependent on grants or outside funds. Rancho Cucamonga has a history of setting aside funds in the reserves to cover these needs, and, as the chart below indicates, the City continues to practice that prudent approach to fiscal management: Fiscal Year 2013/14 2014/15 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Budgeted General Fund Reserve Contribution $ 508,680 $ 607,480 $ 700,000 $1,000,000 $1,025,000 $1,140,000 $1,175,000 Similarly, this year the City is bumping up its vehicle and equipment depreciation by $230,000, from $300,000 last year to $530,000 in FY 2019/20. Another $162,640 is going into computer equipment depreciation, which is an 38.6% increase from FY 2018/19. These efforts, along with other cost savings measures such as the street light purchase and LED conversion or the Solar RC Expansion Project, will continue as the City prepares for the future. We do these things because we know that another downturn is coming, and those who save for winter, make it through the winter. Those that do not, often never see another spring. "Someone's sitting in the shade today because someone planted a tree a long time ago." Warren Buffett Library "Bad libraries build collections, good libraries build services, great libraries build communities." R. David Lankes On April 23, 2013, the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library was awarded the National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation's highest honor than can be bestowed upon a library or museum. As a relatively new library, the City, upon first separating from the county system, Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 48 focused on flexibility in programs and services to the community. With an entrepreneurial and innovative staff, the Library has continued to grow and thrive. Programs for after school tutoring, adult literacy, cultural arts nights and the Play and Learn Island interactive manipulative exhibits that help children grown and improve their hand -eye coordination and small motor skills, are just some of the highlights. This focus on community driven services was recognized by the Institute of Museum and Library Services when it awarded Rancho Cucamonga the gold medal in 2013. Now, just six years later and under the direction of a new and even more innovative Library Director, the Rancho Cucamonga Public Library (RCPL) has continued to grow and thrive. For FY 2019/20, the budget has grown by several hundred thousand dollars to just under $5.8 million, as noted in the chart below: Changes in Operating Budget - Library Fund $6,000,000 $5,500,000 $5,000,000 $4,500,000 $4,000,000 $3,500,000 o°e o°�\yo oti°\yy otiti\y� oti�\y� oti�'\y� oti�\y� oti�'\y° oti'Sy ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti _ ti ti ti Despite this increase, RCPL continues to manage its fiscal house with appropriate oversight, not using reserves for regular operating costs whenever possible. Reserves are typically utilized for capital or other one-time costs. Usage of Library Reserves $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 w $100,000 $50,000 $- ti°°,b\° ti°°�\N ti°ti°\� ti°ti_'\<1 °tiI\� ti5;1- -15\N Fiscal Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 49 0' L°'N\' oy'4' Fiscal Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 49 This is critical because RCPL is primarily property tax funded, a stable revenue but one not generally subject to large upward swings in an infill community. This prudent approach is important because the Library is working on its Second Story, both literally and figuratively. In early 2017, tenant improvements to the second floor of the Biane Library at Victoria Gardens were completed. The space now features an Art Studio, STEM Lab, Workshop, Kitchenette and an Open Exhibit area that are all ready for people of all ages to learn through play and hands-on experiences. Some of the exciting offerings are listed at www.cityofrc.us/cityhall/Iib/2nd story and more are coming soon. The space is available for rentals, including private meetings, celebrations and corporate events. Ultimately, the Open Exhibit Area will be fully improved into an interactive children's learning environment where children of all ages can grow and learn and challenge their imagination and creativity in a literature themed series of continuously changing interactive exhibits like nothing else in California. The ultimate goal: a second IMLS Gold Medal this time as a children's museum. Because great libraries build communities. Fire District "You need to plan the way a fire department plans: it cannot anticipate where the next fire will be, so it has to shape an energetic and efficient team that is capable of responding to the unanticipated as well as to any ordinary event "Andy Grove Fifty-seven years before the incorporation of the City, the community of Alta Loma first grappled with fire protection issues in the early 1920's. Just a few decades later so too did the community of Cucamonga. Ultimately, the Alta Loma and Cucamonga Fire Departments merged in 1975 to form the Foothill Fire District, a separate entity from the city. In 1989, the District gave up its independence, becoming a self -governed subsidiary district of the City of Rancho Cucamonga in which the City Council sits as the ex -officio Board of Directors of the District. Generally, the District covers the same land area as the City, although it extends all the way to the National Forest, whereas, the City's incorporated boundaries presently do not. The Fire District budget for FY 2019/20 continues to increase, growing from $35.8 million last fiscal year to $37.1 million this fiscal year, a 3.7% increase. Changes in Operating Budget - Fire District $40,000,000 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 IS11 ��ro�e��o o° o° o° o° oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti oti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 50 Operating cost increases are generally driven by increases in labor costs and medical/retirement benefits. Major revenue sources include property tax (71.2%) as well as assessment revenues from CFD 85-1 (16.1%) and CFD 88-1 (1.2%). The budget is structurally balanced without the use of reserves and the Fire District is fiscally in generally good health. As noted earlier, not only are fees for fire inspections being waived again for the seventh consecutive year, a moderate reduction in fees for CFD 88-1 is proposed to bring revenues in line with CFD 85-1 (which is also proposed for an eighth straight year with no fee increase). Meanwhile, after the successful opening in 2018 of the Rancho Cucamonga All Risk Public Safety Training Facility on Jersey Avenue, which is a 46,000 square feet police and fire training facility with structures simulating industrial, high-rise, single and multi -family residential facilities, the District is now partnering again with the Rancho Cucamonga Police Department on a west -side Public Safety Center at Vineyard Avenue and San Bernardino Road. This new facility will relocate the existing San Bernardino Road Station, old and under -sized, to a more optimal (for response time) westerly location that includes a fully functioning and manned west end Sheriff's substation including new and enlarged evidence storage and equipment storage facilities for the Police Department. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 51 it of RCFPD Fire General Fund The Califiomia Municipal Financial Health Diagnostic Financial Health Indicators - Summary Checklist Indicator Rabin 1. Net pera ing deficit / surplus. There are no recurring genera fund operating deficits. General revenues are sufficient to meet the net general of oroorams Healthy 2. Fund balance. Reserves are sufficient over multiple consecutive years and in Healthy compliance with adopted policy v, 3. Capital Asset Condition. The cou,ny is keeping pace with the aging of its Healthy 9' capital assets. N M o 4. Liquidity. Cash and short-term investments are suffieicent to cover current Health y liabilities (including short-term debt and accounts payable within 60 days) 5. Fixed costs & labor costs. Fixed costs (including debt service and other contractual obligations), salaries and benefits are stable or decreasing over multiple Cauf on ears relative to reasonably expected revenue growth. 6. General fund subsidies of other funds. Any general fund subsidies other Healthy enterprises or special funds are sustainable and in compliance with adopted policy. 7. Constraints on budgetary discretion. The board of supervisors authority Healthy to make budget changes is not excessively constrained by charter, contract: or law 8. Balancing the budget with temporary funds. The use of reserves, selling assets, deferring asset maintenance to balance the general fund has been Healthy limited. prudent and in compliance with adopted policy 9. Balancing the budget with borrowing. The use of short-term borrowing, v, internal borrowing or transfers from special funds to balance the general fund has Healthy C been limited, prudent and in compliance with adopted policy 10. Balancing the budget by deferring employee compensation costs. U Pension liabilities and other non -salary benefits have been determined, disclosed Healthy .a C: and actuarialty funded in compliance with adopted policy. 11. Balancing the budget with backloaded debt service payments. Debt Healthy service payments have not been "backloaded' into future years. r2 12. Funding operating costs with non-recurring revenues, ongoing operating costs are being funded with ongoing rather than temporaryrevenues(a�g , Healthy from develo ent etc. 13. Timeliness and accuracy of financial reports. Financial Reports are being filed on time (CAFR, Annual Audit, State Controllers Financial Transactions Healthy Report) 14. Service level solvency. Public service levels meet the standards and needs Healthy in this community As noted earlier, not only are fees for fire inspections being waived again for the seventh consecutive year, a moderate reduction in fees for CFD 88-1 is proposed to bring revenues in line with CFD 85-1 (which is also proposed for an eighth straight year with no fee increase). Meanwhile, after the successful opening in 2018 of the Rancho Cucamonga All Risk Public Safety Training Facility on Jersey Avenue, which is a 46,000 square feet police and fire training facility with structures simulating industrial, high-rise, single and multi -family residential facilities, the District is now partnering again with the Rancho Cucamonga Police Department on a west -side Public Safety Center at Vineyard Avenue and San Bernardino Road. This new facility will relocate the existing San Bernardino Road Station, old and under -sized, to a more optimal (for response time) westerly location that includes a fully functioning and manned west end Sheriff's substation including new and enlarged evidence storage and equipment storage facilities for the Police Department. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 51 Special Districts "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. " Albert Einstein There are thirty-five special assessment districts in the City, and these districts play a key role in the City's budget. In Rancho Cucamonga's early days, an important decision was made to have new development pay its own way. Thus, whether it was infrastructure such as streets and storm drains, or new parks and trails, or other public improvements, virtually all new development in the City was part of one or more special tax districts. These Mello -Roos tax districts help pay to develop the infrastructure in the community surrounding a home so the burden does not fall on existing taxpayers. Most of these districts were created prior to Proposition 218 in 1996 and have no index to adjust for rising costs. Prior to Prop 218, the City Council would review and adjust each district's budget annually to keep pace with rising costs like electricity, water and contract labor costs. Once Prop 218 passed, any increases in rates now had to be approved by the property owners within the districts. As long as these districts kept growing, they were stable because of the influx of new revenues from new properties. As the growth ended, and the improvements matured to the point that regular maintenance was needed, that fiscal stability became challenged. Following the City's long-standing policy of living within its means, services were adjusted to match revenues. Eventually, plans were developed to address the fiscal challenges and, in many cases (LIVID 2, LIVID 4, LIVID 6), property owners voted to approve new updated assessment rates that keep pace with rising costs. This was not the case in all districts as PD 85 and LIVID 1 on the west side of town, paying an average rate of $30 per parcel since 1985, voted down an increase to $90 per year by a nearly 3:1 margin. As a result, the west side city parks and trails, primarily in Council Districts 1 and 2, are balanced on mid 1980's dollars at 2019 costs for water, electricity and contract labor services. In the mid to late 1980's, for example, gasoline was between $1.00 and $1.50 per gallon versus 3-4 times higher today. A new vehicle was between $4,000 and $16,000 versus 2-4 times higher today. Minimum wage was in the $3.00 - $4.00 per hour range versus 3-4 times higher today. The implications are obvious, either the City's General Fund subsidizes the difference (and thereby has less resources for public safety, public works and senior and community services) or services are reduced accordingly. In this case, the City Council, representing the entire population of Rancho Cucamonga, and not just those two specific areas, has chosen to lower maintenance levels and minimize capital replacement until a new revenue source becomes available. The City provides a General Benefit equivalent payment to PD 85 and LMD 1, using the same methodology as was used on the east side parks and landscape districts, which ensures absolute equity. The percent of General Fund contribution (approximately 11 %) is capped to provide equity with the East -side Districts who have previously increased their local assessments to maintain higher service levels. While the General Fund's contributions of $715,310 in FY 2019/20 provide some interim financial stability, there still remains a need to address the long-term service level stability of PD 85 (Heritage and Red Hill Parks), LIVID 1 (8 parks and various green spaces/trails), and SLD 2 (local street lights). Additionally, the list of deferred and unfunded maintenance items continues to grow, and includes: Ball field lighting replacement at Old Town Park, Red Hill Park, and Heritage Playground resurfacing at Old Town Park, Heritage, Church Street Park, Hermosa Park, Bear Gulch Park and Red Hill Park Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 52 • Shade shelter and amphitheater repair and replacement at Old Town Park, Heritage Park, Golden Oak Park and Red Hill Park • Bridge repair and replacement at Heritage Park • Restroom repair at various parks • Walking and jogging path resurfacing at various parks • Fence repair and replacement at various parks • Ball field/soccer field rehabilitation and renovation at various parks A new approach will eventually be needed to ensure fiscal stability for the West -side parks and landscape districts. To that end, the West -side Citizens' Oversight Committee was formed and regularly reviews the PD 85, LIVID 1, and SLD 2 budgets, including revenue and expenses. This committee is working on communicating more information with West -side residents. In three of the City's newer districts, rate increases are recommended this year. It should be noted that rate increases are only recommended where they are necessary to maintain a structurally balanced budget for those districts. Increases, when needed, provide fiscal stability and help to avoid the structural imbalances down the road that plague other districts, particularly those that have no mechanism for regular rate adjustments. Several factors, such as increasing costs of maintenance and essential utilities, when out -paced by assessment revenues lead to these imbalances. SPECIAL DISTRICTS WITH RATE ADJUSTMENT MECHANISM District Recommendation Change (%) Maximum Assessment Recommended Assessment LIVID 2 Keep Flat 0.00% $ 518.98 $ 503.80 LIVID 4-R Keep Flat 0.00% $ 457.96 $ 397.15 LIVID 6-R Increase 3.00% $ 438.75 $ 438.75 LIVID 9 Increase 31.70% $ 596.80 $ 311.92 LIVID 10 Keep Flat 0.00% $ 904.44 $ 736.62 CFD 2000-03B Increase 6.00% $ 1,387.73 $ 1,387.73 Department Budget Highlights Public Safety Services and City Management Police Department The Police Department is committed to providing the best law enforcement services possible to help keep the City of Rancho Cucamonga among the safest cities in the state. The Department remains committed to working with our local schools to provide safe learning environments. The station currently has six (6) School Resource Officers (SRO). Four (4) are dedicated to the four (4) high schools and the remaining two (2) are dedicated to the middle and elementary schools. One (1) of these SRO positions is new to the city and allows the high schools to maintain a dedicated SRO nearly full time. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 53 Our Crime Prevention Unit has hosted events to educate and mentor young kids and pre -teens. One of these programs is the B.R.A.V.E program. B.R.A.V.E stands for Be Brave, Be Ready, Be Aware, Be Victorious and Be Empowered. B.R.A.V.E was developed by the Joyful Child Foundation in Memory of Samantha Runion. It is a self-defense program for kids aged 5-12. The skills are basic but coupled with education and prevention. It has been successful and well received by the public. It also includes a workshop for parents. Topics include predatory behaviors, reducing vulnerabilities and the grooming of children. Another program is T.H.A.T. which stands for Teen Human -trafficking Awareness Talk. Human trafficking has become a nationwide epidemic. Before it gets any bigger or any closer, the Crime Prevention Unit sets out to develop and deliver programs that educate our community with prevention strategies. Strategies to address quality of life issues such as homelessness are carefully evaluated to be effective and comprehensive. Homeless issues are addressed through outreach to connect the homeless with available resources to decrease crimes associated with the homeless population. This past year, the Department also added a Deputy to the Solution Oriented Policing (SOP) Quality of Life Team to work as a homeless resource officer focusing solely on homelessness, trespassing and vagrancy issues. Additionally, the SOP team continues to provide "harden the target" training to the community in relation to active shooter events. This is done by providing free training to members of the community, school districts and city employees. The Automated License Plate Reader (ALPR) program continues to produce great results for the City. The program's goal is to capture data on wanted vehicles allowing Deputies to locate those vehicles in the field before they can be used to commit additional crimes. Between May 1, 2018 and April 30, 2019, the ALPR cameras captured 304 readings. Of those readings, 84 hits resulted in criminal reports, i.e., stolen vehicle, wanted vehicle related to a crime, missing person, etc. The Department also utilizes a Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) as a force multiplier for the City. PSVN cameras have been added at locations throughout the City that are heavily visited by citizens. Additionally, they've also been added to several intersections near the Victoria Gardens and at some intersections along Foothill Boulevard, a main thoroughfare in the City. PSVN cameras at these locations allow the Department to view many situations and give direction to responding Deputies as to the location of suspects and/or other vital details captured on the camera. The PSVN cameras have proven helpful in capturing suspect descriptions and vehicle information. For example, this past year, Central Park was burglarized for several gardening tools. Investigators used information captured on the PSVN cameras, in conjunction with the ALPR cameras, to identify the suspect. Thanks to both the PSVN and ALPR cameras, the suspect was arrested and the equipment was recovered. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Currently, the Department operates out of the main station in the Civic Center along with a satellite office at Victoria Gardens Regional Shopping Center. However, the West Side Public Safety Facility will break ground in 2019, which will house both Fire District and Police staff. This facility will greatly improve customer service for residents along the western side of the city. It will also allow deployment into the field directly from the facility to handle calls for Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 54 service. The Department will continue to plan for the eventual staffing and equipping of the new station during FY 2019/20. The Department will continue interaction with the homeless and transient population to limit quality of life crimes such as littering, loitering and panhandling. The Solution Oriented Police team works with the San Bernardino County Sheriff's HOPE team and attends training classes to stay up to date with rehabilitation programs available to the homeless. • The Crime Prevention Unit will continue to host events educating the public on Human Trafficking, teen self-defense and internet safety, Every 15 Minutes DUI education program, Citizen Advisory Meetings and the National Night Out event. Building on the past success of the ALPR program, the Department will add additional ALPR cameras to the intersections of: ➢ Haven Avenue and 19th Street ➢ Base Line Road and Carnelian Street ➢ Day Creek Boulevard and Highland Avenue Fire District The Fire District's mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting and demonstrating a readiness to respond to, and reduce, threats to life and property through the delivery of emergency and non -emergency services and programs in an efficient and effective manner. Three pillars establish the foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services: Community Risk Reduction, LL Emergency Response and Emergency Management. Leading our Risk Reduction efforts, the Prevention Bureau reduces risk and eliminates hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction and public education/community outreach. Additionally, firefighters deliver an efficient and effective emergency response through structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, technical rescue and tactical response. The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness and response programs. The Fire District will continue to foster a high level of readiness through the development and training of a diverse workforce in an effort to enhance the all-risk emergency and non -emergency services we provide. Best practices and cutting-edge innovations while leveraging partnerships, resources, data and technology will also be utilized to maximize the value in the delivery of our services. In 2018, the District responded to 16,652 incidents. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 55 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights In collaboration with Team RC, the Fire District will continue the construction of the new West Side Public Safety Facility, which includes the relocation of San Bernardino Road Fire Station (172) along with a Rancho Cucamonga Police Department Sub -Station. This will provide a fully functioning community-based facility on the northwest corner of San Bernardino Road and Vineyard Avenue. With modern design and construction, the facility is intended to meet the joint public safety mission for a minimum of fifty (50) years. • The Fire District will complete the Banyan Fire Station 175 water conservation landscaping project, along with ADA compliant hardscape repairs and improvements. This project aligns with our sustainability efforts to conserve natural resources. In effort to increase public response and our ability to provide critical information to the community, the Fire District will procure a mass notification system that will allow alerts to be sent to the public and internally to City employees during emergencies and disasters. The Fire District will replace the 1997 Type 1 Heavy Rescue apparatus. This apparatus supports the Technical Rescue Team and is a self-sufficient apparatus that can transport personnel and its equipment to the scene of Urban Search and Rescue (US&R) incidents such as earthquakes, extrications, trench collapse, confined space rescue and advanced high angle rope rescue. The apparatus can power its own equipment and lighting, as well as provide air and hydraulic supply for the variety of lifting, cutting and breaking tools and equipment. It must carry the minimum equipment required by CAL OES for Type 1 Heavy Level Rescue. The Fire District will complement our HAZMAT unit with Type 2 equipment to provide a premier service and value to the residents and businesses of Rancho Cucamonga. Type 2 equipment is defined to handle "known and unknown chemicals," which will provide a cost- effective platform to mitigate potential demands for service caused by industrial/commercial businesses, hazardous material transport on our freeways, and day-to-day household emergencies. • The Fire District continues to fund proposed operations and capital projects, while holding or reducing Community Facilities District (CFD) assessment levels. • For the seventh (7th) consecutive year, Fire Prevention Permit and Inspection Fees continue to be suspended. • The Fire District proposes funding one (1) full-time Lead Maintenance Worker to oversee staff, schedule preventive maintenance, assist in management of maintenance contracts, and other day-to-day operations of Fire District facilities. This additional oversight will ensure that these programs are kept up-to-date and the facilities are maintained in a safe and efficient manner. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 56 During FY 2019/20, staff will evaluate the need to reinstate four (4) person staffing on the ladder trucks. Fire companies whose primary functions are to perform the variety of essential support services at fire and specialized rescue incidents, such as forcible entry, auto extrication, ventilation, search and rescue, aerial operation for water delivery and rescue, utility control, illumination, overhaul and salvage work, are known as ladder or truck companies. Fire District ladder trucks respond to all major incidents in the community, especially incidents requiring additional personnel and specialized equipment to support incident operations. These labor-intensive operations are best managed with a supervisor (Captain) and three (3) other personnel, which is consistent with NFPA 1710 and the National Institute of Standards and Technology. To reduce the wildfire hazard and reduce the risk of an urban conflagration resulting from a wildfire, similar to what has been experienced by several communities throughout California, the Fire District will complete a feasibility study to determine if there exists an opportunity for a one-time, comprehensive weed and fire hazard abatement project on the private equestrian trail easements throughout the City. This study will gauge community interest in such a program, estimate costs, identify potential funding resources for the project, and explore opportunities to partner with other agencies such as Cal Fire and Work Release programs. If approved, the project will include a community outreach element intended to increase the awareness of trail maintenance responsibility, especially among residents who are new to Rancho Cucamonga and unfamiliar with the trail system amenity. Active shooter threats continue to affect society. Over the last 16 years, Rancho Cucamonga police and fire personnel have facilitated 154 dynamic training sessions to more than 7,500 first responders throughout the region. The training grew into a whole -community approach, which has collectively trained over 25,000 civilians from schools, businesses, places of worship, and community classes. This training focused on empowering people with proper survival strategies and medical intervention skills should they find themselves in an active shooter scenario. The Fire District will continue to expand workforce and community -wide training in how to react to an active shooter or purposeful mass injury incident. This comprehensive public safety and community resiliency program helps "harden the target" and makes our community more impenetrable to terrorist acts. "When we listen and celebrate what is both common and different, we become a wiser, more inclusive, and better organization."- Pat Wadors, Head of HR at Linkedln According to Human Resource professionals, when organizations focus equally on diversity and inclusion they will start to see results from a performance standpoint, from a business promotion standpoint and from an employee engagement standpoint. As reported by the Forbes Coaches Council, "It's been proven that when a team includes people of different genders, ethnicities, cultural backgrounds, etc., it produces more creative, innovative and effective results. That's because diverse groups offer a wider range of experiences, and don't simply parrot back the same old ideas produced by people of similar backgrounds. But, diversity doesn't just happen on its own: organizations need to actively seek and recruit candidates from a variety of backgrounds to ensure they're not inadvertently creating a homogenous workforce." The Fire District, in collaboration with the City of Rancho Cucamonga and community stakeholders, will engage with current and future employees to recruit and hire a diverse workforce, fulfilling our mission to provide emergency and non- emergency services to the residents of our City. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 57 Animal Care and Services "Such short little lives our pets have to spend with us, and they spend most of it waiting for us to come home each day." John Grogan The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an innovative Animal Care and Services Department whose mission is Building a Community in which every Adoptable Pet Finds a Home. The Department cares for more than 5,000 homeless pets annually and responds to more than 6,000 calls for service related to stray animals, rescues, and animal welfare. Last year, 91 % of all the dogs and cats that we cared for were placed into new homes, with rescue partners or were reunited with their owners. Some of the Department's responsibilities include bringing pets and people together through pet adoptions, animal retention programs, community outreach as well as developing enrichment programs to keep our homeless pets healthy and happy as they wait for their forever homes. The Department is also charged with the responsibility of investigating cases of animal abuse and neglect and protecting the public's health and safety through enforcement of animal laws, responding to calls of stray and aggressive animals and enforcing animal licensing and a rabies control program. By working together, our mission will become a reality. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights The Animal Center's budget continues to provide funding for high quality care to 5,000 homeless pets received each year. The animal care, veterinary and neonatal Kitten Nursery programs are supplemented by the Animal Care Foundation's fundraising efforts. The additional donations enable the Center to provide specialized surgeries, such as orthopedics, and purchase additional supplies to increase the number of pets adopted into new homes. • The Field Services division continues to budget for proper tools, equipment and continued education to ensure a prompt and professional response to animal related community concerns and natural disasters. • The Animal Services Department continues to increase the number of outreach and community events attended each year. The Center is also enhancing its community involvement, specifically the Pet Cadet program, where youth between the ages of 12 and 18 can volunteer with a parent or guardian. • Utilizing the City's Vehicle and Equipment Replacement Fund, the Center will be purchasing additional dental equipment to complement what was purchased in the prior year for medium/large animals. The additional plate will allow for the Department to work on small animals as well. • Additionally, funding will be provided for the purchase of a second Autoclave for use in the surgery center to sterilize all surgical equipment. The second machine will allow staff to alternate between the two machines, thus extending the life of both machines. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 58 City Management/Community Improvement "To add value to others, one must first value others." John Maxwell The City Manager is the administrative head of day-to-day City government, equivalent to the Chief Executive Officer of a private corporation. The City Manager is assisted by three Deputy City Managers and other staff to ensure there is adequate span -of -control and oversight for all thirteen departments and 500+ employees. The City Manager enforces municipal codes, directs daily operations of the City, makes recommendations to the City Council, prepares and monitors the municipal budget, and appoints and supervises all City department heads and employees. The City Manager's Office (CMO) supports a number of interdepartmental initiatives including Community Affairs, Community Improvement, Healthy RC, Legislative Affairs, and Performance Management through data -based decision making. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Community Affairs — Continue implementation of the Strategic Communications Plan, including small shifts in the City's traditional branding. Also, working with the Department of Innovation and Technology, the Community Affairs Network will be launching a brand-new City website in the third quarter of 2019. Community Improvement — Continue efforts to proactively respond to nuisance and vacant structures, including trail issues, abandoned vehicles, and other neighborhood concerns. Mental Health — Healthy RC will continue to host Mental Health Symposiums focusing on topics that are relevant to the community's interests related to mental health and coping skills. The Mental Health Subcommittee will continue to meet and work towards creating effective strategies to help those in our community of all ages break the stigma of mental health. properties • Youth Engagement & Development— Healthy RC in conjunction with Community Services and the Library will host the V Annual Healthy RC Youth Summit and continues to engage youth through the Healthy RC Youth Leaders Program. • Data and Performance — The City Manager's Office is currently working with all Departments to collect data and develop metrics for future Open Performance Data dashboards. This includes data collection efforts for the Thoroughbred Holiday Lights event which occurs each December. To continue to understand the effects of drive-thru only restrictions, data related to vehicle counts, pedestrian counts, and drive-thru time will be collected in December 2019. School Partnerships — The Community Schools Model has been a great success and staff will continue to work with Los Amigos Elementary as well as begin efforts with other schools to promote and enhance student success and improve family quality of life. The Healthy RC Safe Routes to School program will also continue to support the development of school specific programs that will encourage students to walk and roll to and from school. Sustainability — The CMO team will continue efforts to increase community and municipal energy efficiency and resilience as our climate continues to change. Efforts include the continuation of the GRID Alternatives solar installation program partnership, an Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 59 analysis of electric vehicle charging stations, and inventories of both community and city greenhouse gases. • Transportation – The CMO team will be working to develop a pilot transportation assistance program to aid those in our community that have difficulty accessing reliable and sensible transportation. The City will be looking into partnering with Transportation Network Companies like Uber or Lyft to provide rides at discounted prices for individuals in need. Community and Cultural Services Library Services "Libraries store the energy that fuels the imagination. They open up windows to the world and inspire us to explore and achieve and contribute to improving our quality of life. Libraries change lives for the better. "—Sidney Sheldon The Rancho Cucamonga Public Library strives to inform and enrich our community by providing access to traditional and technologically innovative resources. The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable, service-oriented staff. The Library Services Department provides services and programs from two facilities: the Paul A. Biane Library and the Archibald Library. The Department is comprised of eight divisions: Administration, Circulation Services, Adult Services, Children's Services, Literacy, Bookmobile Services, Technology Services, and Second Story and Beyond. Each year the libraries are visited by over half a million users, borrowing more than 800,000 items. The libraries' public access computers are accessed more than 70,000 times throughout the year. Annually, more than 20,000 children attend storytime sessions where the Library's early childhood development experts help its youngest visitors expand their vocabularies, gain experience in social settings and develop a love of reading. Throughout the year the Library hosts multiple large-scale events creating opportunities for families to come together to celebrate culture, art and literacy. Special events include: Asian Pacific Islander Night, Black History Night, Hispanic Heritage Night, Read Across Rancho and the Library's annual signature event—Star Wars Reads, which attracts close to 4,000 regional visitors in May. In addition to traditional public library services, the Library Services Department provides Passport Services to over 5,000 area residents throughout the year. The Library also offers outreach services, featuring Bookmobile Services to children and delivery services to homebound residents. A full-service Virtual Library provides f 24/7 access to eBooks, research databases, online homework tutoring, language learning software and local history information. Sensory storytimes offer programs targeted specifically to special needs patrons and their families. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 6o FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights Bookmobile Refresh—The Bookmobile will be receiving an interior refresh as most of its interior components are cleaned or replaced, including carpeting and upholstery. The Bookmobile's book collection will also be enhanced with additional titles, and circulation workflows will be SECOND STORY improved when the entire book collection is converted to the RFID tagging system currently used by theW,7 City's other library facilities. The goal of the project is �`_ cit/oru to provide an improved physical space, more copies - of "in demand" titles, and shorter wait times at the check-out counter. • Second Story and BeyoncL—Further development of the Second Story and Beyond interactive discovery space will take place as Library staff work with a consultant to engage the services of a premier museum exhibits designer. • Integrated Library System (ILS)—Library Staff will be researching and evaluating the Integrated Library Systems market to upgrade or replace the Library's ILS. The existing ILS manages several key aspects of the Library's Circulation Services division including: circulating library materials, sending automated email notices and hosting the online catalog interface. • Little Free Libraries—The Library will continue to champion this international grassroots initiative by offering hands-on opportunities for community members to build their own Little Free Library through classes with Second Story and Beyond. Additional City sponsored and maintained Little Free Library units will be placed in underserved areas of the City. • Increased Materials Collection—All formats of the materials collection will be expanded with new and updated titles ensuring an informative, contemporary, relevant and appealing collection overall. Community Services "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give." Winston Churchill The Community Services Department's mission is to serve the community by creating opportunities to play, celebrate, connect, explore, and be entertained through quality programs, safe parks, and well- maintained facilities. The Department coordinates programs and services through seven divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Arts/Playhouse Operations, Senior Services, and Human Services. The Department also oversees park development activities including the planning, design, and renovation of parks and facilities, as well as advocating for open space, thus helping to enhance the quality of life for individuals of all ages. There are more than 30 parks in the City, all of which are heavily used for organized youth and adult sports, picnics, and general recreational purposes. The parks provide a variety of amenities including picnic areas, park shelters, playgrounds and tot lots, exercise courses, sports fields, equestrian features, volleyball courts, basketball courts, tennis courts, and trailheads. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 61 Each year, thousands of community members benefit from participating in the Community Services Department's many recreational and social programs. These programs include Playschool, Teen Center programs, youth activities, recreational classes for all ages, trips and excursions, sports programs, and senior citizen services. Through partnerships and collaborations, the Department is also proud to offer a variety of recreational and social opportunities for community members with developmental, learning, and physical disabilities. �A wide array of family -friendly special events is also held throughout the year, all aimed at promoting art, entertainment, and cultural interests for the members of our community. These special events include the July 4th Fireworks Spectacular, Concerts in the Park, three seasons of Movies in the Park, Founder's Day Community Parade, and the new Fitspo: Fitness and Sports Expo event. The Lewis Family Playhouse at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center offers an energetic, vibrant space dedicated to igniting imaginations, fostering an appreciation for the arts and celebrating life's moments. It provides unique opportunities for the community to experience and enjoy professional theatre, young audience productions, cultural programs and family entertainment, along with exciting guest artist performances, music and dance concerts, comedy shows, national touring productions, and top headline artists. The site also provides a great backdrop and location for a wide array of private rentals. The Department assists many non-profit social service groups in their mission to provide aid to our community through partnership efforts and facility usage. As a result of these partnerships, the RC Family Resource Center provides a one-stop shop for the community's social service needs. In addition, the center hosts private rentals and is actively adding a variety of contract classes to benefit the community. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights Program and Service Analyzation — The Department will continue analyzing, streamlining, and restructuring programs and services to ensure that it continues to provide residents opportunities for healthy lifestyles, personal growth, and a sense of community. Cultural Center Courtyard Redesign — After a series of meetings between CSD Management, Playhouse Staff, and Library Staff, a design kick-off meeting and site walk was held between City Staff and the design consultant. The project is moving forward with a site survey and civil drawings to be used by the consultant as a starting point for their design and construction plans. • Central Park Master Plan Environmental Study — To accompany the recently approved Central Master Plan ReVision, the City will be moving forward by conducting an Environmental Review on the remaining undeveloped 70 acres of the park. Having an approved environmental study for the entire expedite any future funded projects by making it possible to pert 70 acres will help to orm smaller, more Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 62 specialized, and less time-consuming environmental studies for each of the individual 3 to 10 - acre projects within the Master Plan as they become possible. The City is moving forward with an environmental consultant and has an anticipated study completion date of late fall to early winter of FY 2019/20. • Etiwanda Creek Park Expansion — The City will continue the design and plan review for the next phase of Etiwanda Creek Park development, expected to begin in early 2020. This project involves the initial design of the park expansion, which may include additional athletic/recreation multi -use fields, tennis courts, a dog park, and additional parking. Required environmental and biological studies will also be completed as part of the design. Camp Cucamonga — The Youth and Family Division will continue the successful Camp Cucamonga program incorporating new and exciting programs, including a new class for 4.5 _ .t to 5 -year-old children and a 4 -month payment. plan option. Camp staff provide hands-on, innovative, fun activities that keep campers engaged all summer long! Youth and teen campers hit "The Great Outdoors" as they participate in unique summer adventures including an all -day camp offering traditional summer camp activities including hiking, fishing, building forts, exploring nature, songs, skits, group competitions, icky sticky slimy stuff, arts and crafts, games, food projects, archery and non-stop outdoor fun! RC Sports Center— Construction of the new RC Sports Center was completed in summer 2018. Built as part of the Epicenter Sports Complex, it features three indoor high school regulation size basketball courts that convert to volleyball courts; a concession area with cafe seating; a multi-purpose room used for team meetings and award ceremonies; staff area; and three outdoor covered basketball courts. Programming at the Sports Center now includes youth and adult basketball, youth volleyball, pee wee basketball, court rentals, party packages and drop-in play. The Sports Center has seen an increase in adult basketball registration and is also attracting an increasing number of unique rentals, including professional boxing events, cultural celebrations, and new sports clinics. Concerts in the Park — The Department has expanded the annual Summer Concerts in the Parks series at Red Hill Community Park to provide additional fun for the entire family during the months of June to August. The series has increased to feature six bands of various genres, as well as a beer garden for adults 21 and over to enjoy while listening to the music. A variety of food vendors, activities, and the mid -show raffle complete this annual community event. City Clerk Services "The price of greatness is responsibility. "Winston Churchill The City Clerk Services Department promotes community involvement and awareness and supports the City Council, staff, and the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga by coordinating the legislative process and administering City elections. Governed by provisions of state, election, and municipal codes, the Department serves to preserve and protect the legislative history of the City. The Department assists with a number of important activities, including accurately preparing and processing agendas; administering the Citywide records management program, including records storage and destruction; and coordinating City elections, including the filing of Candidate Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interests, as required by law. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 63 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • The Department will continue to implement electronic improvements to City Council and Board/Committee/Commission agenda compilation/publishing and related document management including training for Citywide staff on the new software and agenda process. • As part of our goal, the City Clerk's Office will strive to increase customer/citizen research methodologies by providing access to public records within the City's document imaging system via a Weblink Public Portal made available on the City's webpage. • During FY 2019/20, the City Clerk's Office will also implement and coordinate with other City departments, the City's new Records Management Manual involving records storage, retrieval, retention, and destruction; and provide training on records management, including electronic documents and scanning of documents, while ensuring compliance with city, state and federal regulations. • In an effort to improve access to public documents, the City Clerk's Office will provide a Public Portal Access Link to Netfile, the City's online filing system for Campaign Statements, thereby reducing paper and staff time and increasing transparency by making it easier for the public to access campaign information through the City's website at any time. Administrative Services Finance/Special Districts The Finance Department is comprised of five Reporting, Budget Management, Business Management. divisions, including Accounting and Financial Licensing, Special Districts, and Treasury For 31 consecutive years, the Department has received the Government Finance Officers Association's (GFOA) Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in 49 Financial Reporting. This award recognizes excellence in financial reporting by state and local governments and is the highest form of C -d -W of A&ie eme,I a _� ¢— recognition in governmental accounting and financial reporting. For the °h k q Jird ✓ 1K 11 17ntIWt {yyvvn.ac the last seven years, the Department has received the GFOA'sCEyaaicr°m"Mb C. Distinguished Budget Presentation Award, which is the highest form C I Ernia of recognition in governmental budgeting.�, FY 2019/20 Finance Budget Highlights In conjunction with the Department of Innovation & Technology (DoIT), facilitate the implementation of the COGNOS Reporting module for the City's financial system. COGNOS Reporting is a comprehensive reporting solution that allows staff to: generate reports that conform to accepted industry or internal standards; develop reports that meet the City's needs and save them as templates for repeated use; and control access to specific data elements or collections of data by users or groups of users. • The Accounts Payable Division will work to implement electronic routing of accounts payable invoices for approval. This will help to reduce the amount of paperwork generated by the division and facilitate electronic storage of the invoices and supporting documentation. • The Department will continue to develop training opportunities for the City organization. • Continue to facilitate economic studies for our community to guide key City decision makers. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 64 Human Resources/Risk Management "When people talk, listen completely." Ernest Hemingway The Human Resources Department oversees the City's Human Resources and Risk Management functions. These functions include talent management (attract develop retain, motivate and engage employees), citywide values (Culture — Team RC), benefits management, employee transactions (classification and compensation), employee relations, labor relations, organization and employee development, policies and procedures, risk management (safety, general liability, subrogation, excess insurance), wellness, and workers compensation. The mission of the Human Resources Department is to work collaboratively as a business partner with all City departments to assist them in developing and maintaining a diverse high-quality workforce that supports and fosters a dynamic, meaningful, customer oriented and safe environment for Team RC members. We encourage all employees to look for innovative ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the City for optimal success. We support a continuous learning environment for employees to help them achieve an enriching employee experience. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • The Department is completing the implementation of a Performance Management System to improve the City's current performance evaluation and goal setting system. The new Performance Management System will provide more effective and meaningful performance evaluations for employees and the organization. Human Resources (HR) will slowly roll out the program and provide continuous training to end users. • The Department will be implementing a Learning Management System to improve the delivery, management, tracking, and reporting of various employee trainings. The new system will be designed to increase the development, productivity, safety, and retention of current employees. The Department will continue to make revisions and manage the new onboarding program to ensure a more meaningful onboarding experience. The Department will continue to provide training to supervisors and managers on using the new onboarding software. • During the new fiscal year, the Department will initiate innovative advertising, sourcing, and applicant tracking tools to improve the City's talent acquisition strategies. In addition, the Department will continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs and participate in community events to improve outreach for recruitments. • HR will continue to work with DoIT and Finance to refine and enhance the employee self- service tool in the existing HRIS system to allow employees better access to benefit and pay information. • The Department will continue to track and report information for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and/or deal with its repeal and replacement. The Department is also updating City policies and procedures to ensure compliance with changing mandates and deadlines of the program. • Efforts will continue to update City and Fire District policies to assure compliance with California and Federal regulations. • Overall, the Department will continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HR practices and procedures to better serve internal and external customers. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 65 Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) Imagine City Hall as a Service. The ability to serve the community with or without the confines of a physical City Hall. The ability to attract, hire and retain the best and brightest talent from around the world without the need to relocate. This is the technology roadmap the Department of Innovation and Technology proposes for the upcoming decade. From 2010 to 2019, there has been a persistent and accelerating trend towards mobilization. With the release of the iPhone in 2007, the world shifted from pre -digital to a fully digital society within a few short years. With lower cost to entry and dramatically increased access, mobile internet has become a dominant force over the past decade. This shift has changed expectations as well. Consumers are increasingly seeking lack -of -friction over exceptional personal service. Ease is the new watermark for services, and City Hall is no exception. As the pace of change continues to accelerate with technology, the challenge for the near future will be not to accurately predict what outcome will arrive, but to effectively prepare for a multitude of outcomes arriving simultaneously. The classic strategy of "wait and see" for local government provides more operational peril than financial security in the upcoming digital environment. The new normal is flexibility, both at the service level for users and in the IT infrastructure the City relies on to conduct the business of governance. The Fiscal Year 2019/20 budget for DoIT focuses on investments that maximize the City's ability to interact online with patrons and expands the efficiency of allowing employees to complete data collection in the field and to work remotely, independent of the confines of City Hall. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • The Department will complete the City's backup data center project in cooperation with the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District to provide high -availability services capable of continuing City operations uninterrupted in the event of a failure at either data center and rapid disaster recovery for the City's digital estate. • The Department will work in cooperation with the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility to expand municipal fiber optic network services to fire stations and other City facilities currently utilizing leased network services to connect to the City's data network. • Increased digital security measures will be put in place including implementation of enterprise identity management, multi -factor authentication platforms, enhanced e-mail fraud detection, and continued citywide user security training. • The City's use of drones will be expanded to assist with development, construction inspection, hazard mitigation, and public safety response. Drones have been used to examine building inspection areas that are harder to reach or take a longer time to get to. They can also be used to inspect larger areas and in a view from overhead where a capture of data can be compared at multiple timeframes. • Efforts that began during FY 2018/19 will continue as the Department updates all legacy personal computers to Windows 10 operating system ahead of end -of -life for Windows 7 in January 2020 and upgrades legacy servers to ensure continued security support from Microsoft. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 66 Procurement The Procurement Division is responsible for soliciting Requests for Quotes, Bids and Proposals for its internal customer base. Additionally, the processing of City Hall and off-site location mail is conducted in the Procurement Division. Under Municipal Code, the Procurement Division has been vested with the authority for the centralized procurement of commodities and services. Centralization of the procurement process ensures that solicitations are conducted in an impartial, open, fair competitive manner. The Division is also responsible for the establishment of procurement procedures that generate solicitation results for commodities or services that offer the best value at the most competitive price to the City. FY 2019/20 Procurement Budget Highlights • The Division will implement an electronic Request for Proposal ("RFP") Evaluation system. An electronic RFP evaluation process simplifies the manual evaluation process by saving time and generating a more confidential evaluation. Conducting evaluations directly through the bid system streamlines the process for evaluators who will be able to review and evaluate the RFP material from their computer in lieu of attending meetings. This ensures that the evaluation process is conducted from an objective view and adds to the impartiality, equality and transparency of the Procurement process as a whole. • The completion and implementation of the City's Federal Grant Procurement Policy as well as the City's Procurement Manual are planned for the upcoming fiscal year. Economic and Community Development Services Engineering Services "Management is doing things right, leadership is doing the right thing. " Peter F. Drucker The Engineering Services Department in partnership with departments citywide strives to build a City where the infrastructure supports a community that is a great place to live, work, and play through strategic design, well planned maintenance, and fiscal and environmental sustainability. The Department fulfills this goal through its four sections: Capital Project Management; Environmental Programs; Land Development and Transportation; and the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • This year, the Department will be preparing transportation thresholds, procedures, and guidelines for implementation of SB743 requirements for the City along with taking a leading role in the Countywide implementation. • Construction of the first phase of the Advance Traffic Management System (ATMS) will commence beginning with the Haven Avenue and Foothill Boulevard corridors. The second phase will begin design and construction of ATMS along Milliken Avenue, 19th Street, and Arrow Route. • The upgrade of existing traffic signals to include Flashing Yellow Left Turn Arrows will occur at four intersections along Day Creek Boulevard. • Approximately 1,005,310 SF of pavement will be resurfaced on major roadways including Highland Avenue from Archibald Avenue to Haven Avenue; Hermosa Avenue north of Banyan Street; Banyan Avenue between Haven Avenue and Rochester Avenue; and Church Street Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 67 from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue. In addition, approximately 2,782,300 SF of pavement rehabilitation and slurry seal are planned on local residential streets citywide. • During FY 2019/20, the Etiwanda Grade Separation Project will complete the design phase and move into construction which is anticipated to begin in June 2020 and be completed within 18 months. A preliminary rendering is shown. • RCMU will continue to design and construct the build out of the RC Fiber Network and in cooperation with Inyo Networks, the City's third -party retail provider, expand the retail service base for high quality, high speed internet service within the RCMU service area. • A major update to the City's ADA Transition Plan will begin in early FY 2019/20 with the assistance of a multi -departmental team, the assistance of the community, and a highly qualified consultant team. This updated plan will aid in identifying and planning projects to remove architectural barriers and continue to provide access to residents and visitors to City facilities. • Several programs will continue or commence that will aid in meeting the City's environmental objectives as well as various regulatory requirements. Among these are building partnerships with businesses, schools, and City facilities to establish organic recycling programs (AB1826); providing recycling bins to schools to increase recycling opportunities; development of an implementation plan to reduce short-lived climate pollutants (SB1383); and completion of Phase II of the On -Land Visual Trash Assessments (MS4 Permit). Public Works Services "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill The Public Works Services Department maintains the City's infrastructure including approximately 533 lane miles of roadway, 214 signal -controlled intersections/crossings (five additional signals anticipated in FY 2019/20), comprehensive inventory of trees, 31 parks, 14 City facilities and 8 Fire District facilities. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights Minimum Wage: Minimum wage impacts continue to be the largest reason for budget increases in the Public Works budget (approximately $276,000 increase for FY 2019/20) due to the heavy dependence on contract labor- intensive services such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services. Overseeding: In the active use area of the parks and sports fields, additional funds have been added in Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs) 2, 4, and 10 to dethatch, aerate and overseed turf areas that have compacted over the years and where re-establishing turf has been a problem. This process will strengthen existing turf, help reduce soil compaction, provide a denser playing surface, reduce water consumption by retaining what's provided and protecting it from evaporation, and improve overall soil and turf health. Staff will address these issues at Vintage Park, Windrows Park, Victoria Groves Park, Kenyon Park, Coyote Canyon Park, Spruce Park, and Rancho Summit Park. • Paseo Lighting Retrofits: While park lighting was addressed previously in LMD 2, this year the focus will be on the repair, replacing, or upgrading of paseo lighting (including Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 68 poles, wires, and underground connections) in various locations of LMD 2. These retrofits are expected to result in a 30% reduction in electricity use as well as reduced maintenance costs. Water Costs/Water Audit: The City takes a holistic approach to water management looking at the entire landscape, not just the irrigation system, to identify water conservation opportunities. One component of this program is the performance of comprehensive water audits of landscape sites. These audits evaluate current horticultural practices, plant palettes, irrigation programs and the physical condition of the landscape and irrigation system. The results of these audits provide a guide for improving the landscape while reducing overall water consumption. Drought Tolerant Landscape Renovations: As part of the water saving effort, $800,000 has been set aside in LMDs 2 ($400,000) and 4R ($400,000) specifically for turf removals, and we will continue to search for grants and rebates to help offset these expenses. The work in LMD 2 will continue on Victoria Park Lane, just east of Day Creek Boulevard and includes the removal of turf in parkways and tract inlets, along with converting existing planter sections with low water use landscape plants and materials. Likewise, the work in LMD 4R will be a continuation of previous turf removals and drought tolerant landscaping. Work this year will be done mostly in parkways and paseos along Base Line Road east of Haven Avenue. Additional work may be done on landscape sites within the neighborhoods. The design was completed in FY 2018/19, and construction is scheduled to commence in FY 2019/20. Rubberized Playground Surface Replacement: The rubberized surface that has been installed under the playground equipment must meet impact requirements of the National Playground Safety standards. This project will be for the replacement of the deteriorating rubberized surfaces in LMD's 1, 2, and 4R, PD85 and CFD 2000-03. Park Facility Painting: This is a painting project that will _ address all paintable surfaces of structures and amenities located in a park site at one time. This process will insure that the finishes protecting wood, steel and other materials will be uniform throughout the park. In addition, this project extends the service life of the amenities and minimizes liability, thereby reducing costs and the need for reactive maintenance. Parks will be completed on a five-year schedule with parks in LMD's 2, 4R, 9 and 10 scheduled for completion in FY 2019/20. • Signal Maintenance: In FY 2018/19, the city added 5 additional signals installed at the following locations for maintenance in FY 2019/20: 0 1St location: East Avenue at Miller Avenue 0 2nd location: Rochester Avenue at 6th Street 0 3rd location: Milliken Avenue at 5th Street 0 4th location: Rochester Avenue at Jersey Boulevard 0 5th location: Hellman Avenue at 8th Street • There are several traffic signal equipment replacements that are included in the FY 2019/20 budget: Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 69 o Traffic Signal Battery Replacement ($76,500): These are replacement batteries for the traffic signal uninterrupted power supply systems. The average battery life is 3 to 5 years. This is an on-going, multi-year request. o Traffic Signal Cabinet Replacements ($140,000): Traffic signal cabinets are knocked out of service 2-3 times per year by careless drivers. Each cabinet costs approximately $60,000 and takes approximately three months to be built. This is an on-going, multi-year request. o Traffic Signal Controller Replacements ($25,000): Traffic signal controllers do just what their name implies, they control the traffic signals going from red to yellow to green for each signal in each direction of an intersection. Each controller costs approximately $5,000, and we are in the process of replacing outdated controllers that are no longer repairable and must be replaced with a new type of controller. This is an on- going, multi-year request. o Traffic Signal UPS Replacements ($40,000): These uninterrupted power supply systems for signalized intersections are needed to replace aging systems. Each replacement is approximately $10,000. This is an on-going, multi-year request. o Traffic Signal Battery Back -Up System ($300,000): This project will replace outdated traffic signal back-up systems. This is a 5 -year phased project. Construction of a second warehouse at the Public Works Services Center will be underway in FY 2019/20. The second warehouse will be constructed adjacent to the existing warehouse as detailed in the master plan for the site. It is similar in size to the existing warehouse that was constructed in 2001 and has reached its capacity. This warehouse will be constructed to support solar panels on the roof and will allow for additional storage for all City departments. • Garcia Park: Design and install new LED ballfield lights, including electrical service upgrade and landscape restoration. • Milliken Underpass Sidewalk Expansion: The expansion of the sidewalk area under Milliken is needed to create a safer working environment and reduce the traffic lane reductions currently necessary when staff is working in this area. It will also eliminate some irrigation which will help with water savings goals. • Other new facilities projects for this year include: roof repair at the City Yard; the Metrolink canopy painting; replace restroom and storage building roofs at Heritage Park; and concrete sealing for the seating area at the City's Minor League baseball stadium. • Other miscellaneous small projects include: refurbish the equestrian main arena; and improvement of wrought iron in various locations in LIVID 4R. Planning "As a rule, men worry more about what they cannot see, than about what they can." Julius Caesar The Planning Department functions as the professional and technical advisor to the Planning and Historic Preservation Commission and the City Council on policy matters and issues concerning the physical development of the community. The Department strives to encourage proactive long- range planning; to recognize and solve problems before they occur and take advantage of Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 70 opportunities while they exist; to promote citizen awareness in support of community goals, objectives, policies, and programs; and to actively promote retail expansion by attracting new stores, restaurants, and services to the community. The Department has experienced a high number of visits and calls to the Public Counter over the last fiscal year. The volume of development applications submitted to the City for review has been steady. As the amount of readily available vacant land within Rancho Cucamonga diminishes, development has shifted towards "in -fill" development. In -fill development requires increased coordination between the City, the applicant, and stakeholders within the community to ensure compatibility with existing development and consistency with the community's expectations. Furthermore, new environmental regulations require more detailed analysis of development applications and more frequent engagement with regulatory agencies. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • The Planning Department is evaluating a new mixed-use project at Haven Avenue and 26th Street, as well as a hotel project proposed at Haven Avenue and 4th Street. Infrastructure for the Empire Lakes project is moving forward, and we are reviewing residential development proposals for apartment and for sale housing along the south end of the project area. • Work continues on evaluating regulations from the state regarding housing. The 15 bills adopted into last year's state "Housing Package" may have far reaching impacts to the City. Staff will work with the City Attorney's office and other departments to understand the impact of these bills and address changes needed to the development code or our development review process. • The Etiwanda Heights Specific Plan is expected to be completed in FY 2019/20. • Staff will begin work with a selected consultant for the next General Plan Update. The next General Plan will build on and refine the City's vision for a world class community: create a diverse set of places, maintain and grow a strong industrial and manufacturing sector, develop new urban cores/neighborhoods and protect/maintain/enhance suburban neighborhoods and rural areas of city. • The FY 2019/20 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Annual Action Plan will be based on the Federal appropriation. The CDBG program provides vital housing programs and services to low -and -moderate income families. The Department will be selecting an outside contractor during the year to administer the program to ensure all HUD requirements are met. Building and Safety Services "One of the tests of leadership is the ability to recognize a problem before it becomes an emergency."Arnold Glasgow The Building and Safety Services Department enforces a series of nationally recognized standards and construction codes as well as mandates from the state regulatory agencies, in matters pertinent to building construction, drainage, water quality and permit process. In addition, Building and Safety Services also enforces compliance to codes as it relates to energy, ADA laws, places of assembly, and housing requirements. Field inspections and safety assessments are performed by field inspectors. Reviewing plans is accomplished by in-house plan check staff and through the use of contract engineers, if needed, in order to meet the goal of quality service to the development community. The Department provides plan checks and inspections for compliance with California Fire Code and all fire, life and safety inspection activities. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 71 FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Aerial Imagery is being tested and will be utilized in the next year to evaluate and inspect tall buildings and difficult -to -access construction features. Utilizing a drone, electronic plans and editing software will provide safe and accurate inspections in the future. • Additional funds were allocated to the Department for contract services for outside consultants to provide assistance in plan check and inspections as the robust economy continues into the new fiscal year. • The Department continues to train new and existing staff on technical code requirements. This training is critical to effectively implement changing State code amendments including accessibility and energy requirements. Economic Development "Sustainable development is the pathway to the future we want for all. It offers a framework to generate economic growth, achieve social justice, exercise environmental stewardship and strengthen governance"— Ban Ki -moon At its heart, economic development is about building a healthy local economy in order to have a healthy community. The City's economic development efforts are intended to promote and meet the needs of business and industry and to create the best community in which to live, work, learn and do business. Economic development efforts span across business support services, to workforce development and expansion of public infrastructure. The City's Economic Development Strategic Plan offers new strategies and improves on existing activities to remain competitive in today's environment. It also ensures that the City is positioned for success in a new emerging economy and marketplace. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • The Department will implement the Economic Development Strategic Plan to lay the foundation for the City's economic development efforts over the next 5 to 10 years. • Plans are in place to partner with the Inland Center for Sustainable Development (ICSD) to identify and support regional issues unique to the Inland Empire. ICSD partners include both San Bernardino and Riverside Counties, the University of California Riverside, San Bernardino County Transportation Authority, Bank of America and several other agencies and cities. • The Department will continue to provide support to the business community through the City's Economic Development liaison and partnering with other agencies to provide business services such as workforce development, small business consultation, and education. • Economic and Community Development staff will continue to work with Engineering staff to assist in the improvement of the City's infrastructure and build new technology infrastructure to provide support to existing and startup businesses and residents in the community including businesses seeking to expand within or relocate to Rancho Cucamonga. • Overall, staff will support the development of housing to create a diverse residential market with opportunities for people of all income levels. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 72 Summary "You are not here merely to make a living. You are here in order to enable the world to live more amply, with greater vision, with a finer spirit of hope and achievement. You are here to enrich the world, and you impoverish yourself if you forget the errand." Woodrow Wilson Rancho Cucamonga grew out of three (3) separate communities, Alta Loma, Etiwanda and Cucamonga. Together, in the late 1970's, those communities incorporated as one because they wanted to control their own destiny and not be annexed by surrounding agencies or subject to the whim of unabated County planning decisions. Although not supported by all, the incorporation was approved by a majority and so was born "A World Class Community" built around a long- term plan and vision. Over 4 decades, the City evolved its plan but held fast to its core values and fundamental precepts. With long-term City Council stability, and only three (3) City Managers since incorporation, the foundations on which the organization was built have proven unshakeable to the economic storms of the day. In FY 2019/20, with a credit rating of AA+, all-time lows for crime and unemployment, record highs for property values and sales taxes, some of the finest schools in the State, and an array of diverse retail and cultural offerings, that original formula has enriched this part of the world in many ways, large and small, and contributed to a commUNITY which prides itself on its spirit of hope and achievement. As we move into the 21St Century and embark on a new General Plan and other long-term plans and programs, we recognize that a greater vision requires the same things tomorrow as it does today and did yesterday. A vision that is achievable but not believable. Local control over our own destiny. Fiscal and environmental sustainability. Embracing innovation as the opportunity for continuous improvement. Celebrating our community successes in a public way that highlights the best of what makes Rancho Cucamonga a special place. A place where all have an opportunity to succeed. An inclusive community for all who put family first and are seeking that place to live where arts, technology, business, health, education and our creative nature come together in harmony. That is the greater vision. Because we are one Rancho Cucamonga. One commUnity. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 73 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 74 GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award PRESENTED TO City of Rancho Cucamonga California For the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2018 0'0., P ;bze� Executive Director The Government Finance Officers Association of the United. States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2018. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, operations guide, financial plan, and communications device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements and will be submitted to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 75 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 76 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA. GENERAL INFORMATION Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 77 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 78 XT--- L. T--o L. Dennis Michael Lynne Kennedy Ryan Hutchison Kristine Scott Sam Spagnolo CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget City Officials City Council Mayor Mayor Pro -Tem Council Member Council Member Council Member Administration and Department Heads City Manager Deputy City Manager/Civic and Cultural Services Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services Deputy City Manager/Economic and Community Development City Attorney Treasurer City Clerk Animal Services Director City Clerk Services Director Community Services Director Engineering Services Director/City Engineer Finance Director Fire Chief Human Resources Director Innovation and Technology Director Library Director Police Chief Public Works Services Director Term Exip res 2022 2020 2022 2022 2020 John R. Gillison Elisa C. Cox Lori Sassoon Matt Burris James L. Markman James Frost Janice C. Reynolds Veronica Fincher Linda Troyan Jennifer Hunt -Gracia Jason Welday Tamara L. Layne Ivan Rojer Robert Neiuber Darryl Polk Julie Sowles Donny Mahoney Bill Wittkopf Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 79 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 8o CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Organization Chart unizens of Rancho Cucamonga City Clerk I I City Council City City Manager City Treasurer Administrative Civic and Police Economic and Services Cultural Services Department Community Admin/Procurement Development Fire Community District Finance Services Animal Care Human Library and Services Resources Services Community Innovation and Records Improvement Technology Management Building and Engineering Public Works Planning Safetv Services Services Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 81 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 82 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Functional Units by Fund Type Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019120 Prelimivary Budget $268,588,400 $88,290,270 $151,996,700 Governance AB 2928 Traffic Congestion Relief Police AB2766 Air Quality Improvement Animal Care and Services AD 91-2 Redemption -Day Canyon Administrative Services AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center Finance Animal Center Impact Fee Human Resources Assessment Districts Admin Economic and Comm. Dev. Asset Seizure - State and Federal Building and Safety Beautification Engineering Services CA Recycle/Litter Reduction Grant Planning CA State Library Public Works Services CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance Community Services Citywide Infrastructure Imprv. Community Dev. Block Grant rer .ener, 'un s Community/Rec Center Development $9,678,500 COPS Hiring Program Grant Governance COP'S Program Grant - State Comm Dev Technical Services Dept of Homeland Security Grant Police Drainage Facilities Reimb St/County Parking Cit Emergency Mgmt Performance Grant Law Enforcement Reserve Etiwanda No. Equestrian Facility Traffic Safety Federal Safetea-LU Administrative Services Fire Protection District Info Technology -Development Freedom Courtyard Rsrc Grant City Technology Fee Gas Tax Capital Reserve General City Street Lights Finance Housing Sucessor Agency Benefits Contingency Integrated Waste Management Human Resources Landscape Maintenance Districts Capital Reserve Library Capital Fund Economic and Comm. Dev. Library Development Comm Dev Technical Services Library Fund City Technology Fee LMD #I Capital Replacement Building and Safety Measure I Comm Dev Technical Services Park Development City Technology Fee Park Improvement Mobile Home Park Program Park Land Acquisition SB 1186 Cert Access Special Program PD 85 Capital Replacement Engineering Services PD 85 Redemption Fund Comm Dev Technical Services Pedestrian Grant/Art 3 City Technology Fee Police Impact Fee Capital Reserve Proposition 1B State Funding Planning Public Resrce Grants/Healty RC Comm Dev Technical Services Recreation Services City Technology Fee Road Maint & Rehab Acct Public Works Services Safe Routes to School Program CVWD Reimbursements SB 1 - TCEP County of S. B. Reimbursements Staff Innovation (CA ST LB) Capital Reserve Street Light Maintenance Districts Community Services The Big Read Library Gant Capital Reserve Transportation Underground Utilities Used Oil Recycling Victoria Gardens Cultural Center $1,210 AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello CFD 2001-01 Sports Complex REGIS Connect Municipal Utility Utility Public Benefit RCMU Capital Replacement Fund Fiber Optic Network $2,191,110 Equipment Nehicle Replacement Computer Equip/Tech Replacement Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 83 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 84 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga General Information: The City of Rancho Cucamonga currently has an estimated population of 179,412 and encompasses approximately 40.2 square miles. It is located between the cities of Upland to the west, Ontario to the south, Fontana to the east and is in the western section of San Bernardino County which is in the southern part of the State of California. The local economy includes a diverse business base of office, light manufacturing and distribution, and retail which emphasizes the City's efforts at attracting and retaining sales tax generating businesses to help provide a stable financial base. Government: The City of Rancho Cucamonga (the City) was incorporated in 1977 as a general law city under the provisions of the Government Code of the State of California, and it operates under the Council -Manager form of city government. The City officials elected at large include a Mayor, a City Clerk and a City Treasurer. Effective December 7, 2016, the four Council members are elected by geographic districts. Districts 2 and 3 held elections in November 2018. Districts 1 and ' 4 will hold elections in 2020. The Mayor and Q ,, Council members are elected on a staggered basis for a term of four years. There is no limit on the , number of terms an individual can serve as Mayor or as Council members. The Mayor and City R. Council appoint the City Manager and City Attorney. Population (per California State Department of Finance): 2008-175,627 2009177,051 2010178,904 2011-169,498 2012171,058 2013172,299 2014174,064 2015-175,251 2016-177,324 2017-177,589 2018176,671 2019-179,412 Number of Registered Voters (San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters): 92,591 Capital Asset Statistics (per June 30, 2018 CAM: Police: Stations: 1 Patrol units: 65 Public Works: Streets (miles): 532 Streetlights: 16,721 Traffic signals: 235 Fire: Fire Stations: 7 Parks and Recreation: Parks: 32 Acreage: 346 Community centers: 6 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 85 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Population by Age 2010 (Census), 2018 (est), and 2022 (est) Total 177,704 Total 165,269 0 - 4 6.2% 5 - 9 6.8% 10-14 7.7% 15-24 15.6% 25-34 14.4% 35-44 15.0% 45-54 15.7% 55-64 10.8% 65-74 4.7% 75-84 2.3% 85+ 0.9% Total 177,704 0 - 4 5.9% 5 - 9 6.1% 10-14 6.5% 15-24 13.5% 25-34 16.4% 35-44 14.1% 45-54 13.7% 55-64 12.5% 65-74 7.4% 75-84 2.8% 85+ 1.1% Total 185,777 0 - 4 6.0% 5 - 9 6.0% 10-14 6.2% 15-24 11.8% 25-34 16.3% 35-44 15.9% 45-54 12.5% 55-64 11.9% 65-74 8.7% 75-84 3.7% 85+ 1.1% Source: Esri Community Profile (U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2018 and 2023. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 86 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Educational Attainment Current Year Total 120,720 Less than 9th Grade 3.4% 9th - 12th Grade, No Diploma 5.3% High School Graduate 17.0% GED/Alternative Credential 2.8% Some College, No Degree 26.6% Associate Degree 10.3% Bachelor's Degree 21.5% Graduate/Professional Degree 13.0% Source: Esri Community Profile (U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2018. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 87 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA Principal Employers Current Year and Nine Years Ago* Note: "Total Employment" as used above represents the total employment of all employers located within City limi I Includes full-time and part-time employees. *Only the top ten employers for each year presented have data displayed. If a company did not rank in the top ten employers for both years presented, then one of the two years will state 'Wa". Source: June 30, 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 88 2018 2009 Percent of Percent of Number of Total Number of Total Employer Employees, Rank Employment Employees, Rank Employment Inland Empire Health Plan (IEHP) 2,315 1 2.50% n/a n/a n/a Etiwanda School District 2,293 2 2.47% 1,267 2 1.63% Chaffey Community College 2,111 3 2.28% 1,300 1 1.68% Alta Loma School District 1,095 4 1.18% 923 3 1.19% City of Rancho Cucamonga 865 5 0.93% 908 4 1.17% Amphastar Pharmaceutical 643 6 0.69% 880 5 1.13% Mercury Insurance Company 632 7 0.68% 550 7 0.71% Macy's 615 8 0.66% n/a n/a n/a Central School District 605 9 0.65% n/a n/a n/a Big Lots Distribution Center 600 10 0.65% n/a n/a n/a Bass Pro Shop 500 11 0.54% n/a n/a n/a Coca Cola Bottling Co. 400 12 0.43% n/a n/a n/a ADECCO 360 13 0.39% n/a n/a n/a Note: "Total Employment" as used above represents the total employment of all employers located within City limi I Includes full-time and part-time employees. *Only the top ten employers for each year presented have data displayed. If a company did not rank in the top ten employers for both years presented, then one of the two years will state 'Wa". Source: June 30, 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 88 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA Principal Sales Tax Remitters Current Year and Nine Years Ago 2018 2009 Business Name Business Category Business Name Business Category Ameron Heavy Industrial Active Sports Goods/Bike Stores Anker Electronics/Appliance Stores Ameron International Contractors Apple Electronics/Appliance Stores Apple Electronics/Appliance Stores Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Sporting Goods/Bike Stores Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Sporting Goods/Bike Stores Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Chevron Service Stations Chevron Service Stations Costco Discount Department Stores Circle K 76 Service Stations Edgepark Surgical Medical/Biotech Circuit City Electronics/Appliance Stores Home Depot Building Materials Costco Discount Department Stores ICL Performance Products Drug/Chemicals Dan Reshaw Mobil Service Stations JC Penney Department Stores Day Creek Arco Service Stations Jeromes Home Furnishings Distributor Warehouse Business Services Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings Home Depot Building Materials Lowes Building Materials JC Penney Department Stores Macys Department Stores Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings Meadowbrook Meat Company Food Service Equip./Supplies Lowes Lumber/Building Materials Monoprice Fulfillment Centers Macys Department Stores Parallon Supplies Chain Solution Medical /Biotech Novartis Animal Health Medical/Biotech Ralphs Grocery Stores Liquor Pauls TV Electronics/Appliance Stores Ross Family Apparel Sears Department Stores Tamco Heavy Industrial Southwire Energy/Utilities Target Discount Department Stores Tamco Heavy Industrial USA Gasoline Service Stations Target Discount Department Stores Walmart Discount Department Stores Walmart Discount Department Stores Walters Wholesale Electric Plumbing/Electrical Supplies Walters Wholesale Electric Plumbing/Electrical Supplies * Firms listed alphabetically Source: June 30, 2018 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 89 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page go CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Budget Guide The purpose of the City of Rancho Cucamonga's budget is to serve as a "blueprint" for providing City services and as a working financial plan for the fiscal year. It also represents the official organization plan, by which, City policies, priorities, and programs are implemented. It provides the means to communicate to the residents, businesses, and employees how the City's financial sources are used to provide services to the community. The budget includes both the operating costs to manage the City and the capital improvement projects that the City plans to undertake during the fiscal year. The budget is organized by fund, by department, and by account. A fund is defined as a fiscal accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources, together with all related liabilities and balances, which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. A department (e.g., Public Works Services) is an organizational unit with divisions (e.g., City Facilities Maintenance). "Line" accounts provide the details of the type of expenditure that each department/division spends — e.g., salaries, benefits, supplies, and so forth. The budget document can be broken down into the following sections: Introduction: This section includes the City Manager's executive summary to the City Council and describes what is in the budget, including budget issues and policies that lead to the development of the budget. It also includes the City's GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award. General Information: This section includes a listing of City Officials; a City-wide Organization Chart; a Functional Units by Fund Type chart; various demographic and economic data for the City; a Budget Guide; and a description of the Budget Process. Summaries of Financial Data: This section provides a variety of financial analyses such as multi-year revenue comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; multi-year expenditure comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; and the beginning and ending fund balances for each fund. Departmental Budget Details: This section divides the document by department. It starts with City Council. The reader will find a narrative of the department describing each division and each program within that department; current year budget highlights; multi-year comparisons of expenditures by funding source and category; multi-year summaries of budgeted full and part time staffing; performance statistics; and services to the community. Capital Improvement Program: This section provides a summary of the capital improvement projects planned for the year including their descriptions, funding sources, and the estimated cost of each project. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 91 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Budget Process The City's budget process begins in January. The City Manager outlines the goals and directives for the development of the coming year's budget based on the results of the semi-annual Council goal setting workshops. Finance distributes the budget calendar, instructions, forms, and budget worksheets to the departments. Public Works Services coordinates the departmental building modification and vehicle replacement requests. Engineering coordinates the capital improvement project requests. After the departments have input their budget requests, Finance compiles the data and calculates the total amount requested including estimated revenues and projected fund balances. The City Manager and Finance Director hold departmental budget meetings. Subsequently, the City Manager makes his recommendations and Finance prepares the proposed budget document. The City Manager submits the proposed budget to City Council. The Council conducts a budget study session; sets a public hearing; and adopts the budget prior to the beginning of the fiscal year. After the budget is adopted, staff integrates the budgetary data into the City's accounting system. Month-end reports are distributed to the departments to monitor budget performance throughout the year. Capital Improvement Projects Budget Process: The City maintains a rolling Five -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). In February each year, the Engineering Services Department solicits proposals from the other City departments for inclusion in the coming year's capital improvement projects budget. Around the same time, the Finance Department provides Engineering Services the estimated fund balances available for appropriation for CIP. These fund balances usually come from Special Revenue Funds and Capital Projects Funds. Both these fund types are earmarked for specific uses. Engineering Services staff then prepares the Capital Improvement Project form, which provides detailed information about the proposed capital improvement project. Typically, a project costing $5,000 or more (with some exceptions depending on the type of project) is categorized as a capital improvement project. During the departmental budget meetings, the City Manager and staff conduct a "walkthrough" of the various proposed projects. After the City Manager's evaluation of what will be included in the proposed budget, the CIP is submitted to the Planning Commission to determine if the projects conform to the General Plan. The proposed CIPs relating to parks are also submitted to the Parks and Recreation Commission for comments and recommendations. Budget amendments: Supplemental appropriations, when required during the fiscal year, require approval by the City Council. Although supplemental appropriations can occur throughout the fiscal year, a comprehensive update to budgeted figures occurs once per year as part of the Amended Budget process which is presented to the City Council in May each fiscal year. Budget changes within each department or between accounts are approved by the City Manager and/or the respective department head depending on the dollar threshold of the budget change. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 92 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Budget Process Basis of budgeting: The City uses the modified accrual basis in budgeting governmental funds. This means that obligations of the City, including outstanding purchase orders, are budgeted as expenses and revenues are recognized when they are both measurable and available to fund current expenditures. For proprietary funds, the budget is prepared on a full accrual basis. This means expenses are recognized when incurred and revenues are recognized when due the City. Depreciation expense is not included in budgeting for proprietary funds, but the full purchase price of equipment is included in the budget. Basis of accounting: The City uses the modified accrual basis of accounting for governmental funds. Revenues are recorded when measurable and available to fund current expenditures. Expenditures are recorded when the services are substantially performed or the goods have been received and the liabilities have been incurred. The City's proprietary funds use the full accrual basis of accounting; revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when incurred. Budgetary control is maintained at the department level within each fund. The City also maintains an encumbrance accounting system budgetary control. Estimated purchase amounts are encumbered prior to the release of purchase orders to vendors. At fiscal year end, all operating budget appropriations lapse. Open encumbrances are reported as reservations of fund balances at fiscal year end. Budgetary Data: Annual budgets are legally adopted for all funds on a basis consistent with generally accepted accounting principles, except for the following funds for which no budget is proposed for FY 2019/20: Other General Funds: County of S.B. Reimbursements Special Revenue Funds: SB 140 Various Grant Funds Foothill Blvd. Maintenance Capital Projects Funds: ADs 82-1, 86-2 CFDs 2000-01, 2003-01, 2004-01, 2006-01, 2006-02 The following Flow Chart describes the City's annual budget process. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 93 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget January FINANCE Analyze and Project Revenue Estimates February FINANCE Present Mid -Year Budget Review March/April CITY MANAGER/ FINANCE DIRECTOR Budget Meetings with Departments May 1 CITY MANAGER Submit Proposed Budget to City Council Budget Process FLOW CHART February DEPARTMENTS Early January Submit Budget Requests to Finance Department BUDGET KICK-OFF February/March April/May FINANCE Prepare Proposed Budget June CITY COUNCIL/ CITY MANAGER Conduct Budget Study Session FINANCE Review and Analyze Budget Requests/ Finalize Revenue Projections May ENGINEERING/ PUBLIC WORKS CIP presented to Planning Commission June CITY COUNCIL Hold Public Hearing and Adopt Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 94 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 95 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY - OPERATING BUDGET Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Description Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $106,999,306 $107,485,540 $111,461,650 Licenses & Permits 4,084,986 4,314,650 4,364,620 Fines & Forfeitures 1,573,602 1,157,510 1,367,420 Use of Money & Property 868,694 1,133,950 1,047,040 Charges for Services 3,474,247 3,278,620 3,992,960 Intergovernmental 181,177 198,610 169,080 Other 4,691,228 4,445,790 5,265,250 Transfer In 2,986,477 2,855,720 3,757,480 Total Revenues $124,859,717 $124,870,390 $131,425,500 Expenditures By Department: $ 464,958 $ Governance: $ 505,450 Community Services City Council $ 116,510 $ 126,720 $ 118,110 City Clerk 1,868 1,970 1,960 City Treasurer 10,654 12,390 12,420 City Management 2,190,703 2,547,030 2,616,820 Total Governance $ 2,319,735 $ 2,688,110 $ 2,749,310 Public Safety: Fire District $ 32,583,525 $ 35,819,290 $ 37,144,160 Police Human Resources 37,086,712 982,330 39,974,900 Innovation and Technology 42,327,060 Animal Care Services 4,067,690 3,113,889 $ 13,698,583 3,350,790 $ 14,754,010 3,416,210 Total Public Safety $ 72,784,126 $ 79,144,980 $ 82,887,430 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures Civic and Cultural Services: $ (19,530) $ 219,620 Records Management $ 464,958 $ 580,390 $ 505,450 Community Services 4,793,458 5,232,070 5,562,050 Library Services 4,606,578 5,126,230 5,771,450 Total Civic and Cultural Services $ 9,864,994 $ 10,938,690 $ 11,838,950 Administrative Services: Administration/General Government $ 7,690,165 $ 7,353,060 $ 7,791,390 Finance 1,749,880 1,833,250 1,877,380 Human Resources 811,448 982,330 1,017,550 Innovation and Technology 3,447,090 3,841,150 4,067,690 Total Administrative Services $ 13,698,583 $ 14,009,790 $ 14,754,010 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 543,758 $ 792,280 $ 805,350 Building and Safety Services 1,641,372 1,892,240 1,916,950 Engineering Services 2,010,319 2,509,100 2,780,770 Planning 2,133,031 1,656,030 1,810,830 Public Works Services 9,578,360 11,258,700 11,662,280 Total Economic and Community Development $ 15,906,840 $ 18,108,350 $ 18,976,180 Total Expenditures $114,574,278 $124,889,920 $131,205,880 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures $ 10,285,439 $ (19,530) $ 219,620 See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 96 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY - ALL FUNDS Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $130,483,403 $ 131,861,200 $ 137,631,770 Licenses & Permits 1,648,507 4,315,462 1,959,190 4,573,710 34,665,720 4,623,380 Fines & Forfeitures Planning 1,823,471 7,808,790 1,419,250 Public Works Services 1,613,680 Use of Money & Property 31,962,350 4,242,081 $ 64,029,407 7,253,240 $128,412,850 8,140,200 Charges for Services $ 229,950,370 19,390,547 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures 21,500,220 $ (18,233,570) 23,516,770 Intergovernmental 13,508,218 24,103,790 67,939,860 Development Fees 10,283,990 4,839,430 4,457,340 Other 10,737,430 8,392,860 7,013,190 Transfer In 7,660,835 7,773,100 11,258,700 Total Revenues $ 202,445,437 $ 211,716,800 $ 266,194,890 Expenditures By Department: Governance: City Council $ 116,510 $ 126,720 $ 118,110 City Clerk 1,868 1,970 1,960 City Treasurer 10,654 12,390 12,420 City Management 2,190,703 2,556,760 2,626,550 Total Governance $ 2,319,735 $ 2,697,840 $ 2,759,040 Public Safety: Police $ 38,296,395 $ 44,782,690 $ 44,016,280 Fire District 51,432,943 $ 50,163,500 $ 41,768,390 Animal Care Services 3,113,889 3,350,790 3,416,930 Total Public Safety $ 92,843,227 $ 98,296,980 $ 89,201,600 Civic and Cultural Services: Records Management $ 464,958 $ 580,390 $ 505,450 Community Services 13,928,053 11,314,570 11,407,490 Library Services 4,801,526 5,153,970 6,379,910 Total Civic and Cultural Services $ 19,194,537 $ 17,048,930 $ 18,292,850 Administrative Services: Administration/General Government $ 15,109,020 $ 14,811,110 $ 17,512,910 Finance 18,044,565 5,387,030 6,029,220 Human Resources 811,448 982,330 1,017,550 Innovation and Technology 4,629,684 5,043,080 5,362,380 Total Administrative Services $ 38,594,717 $ 26,223,550 $ 29,922,060 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 785,583 $ 1,437,260 $ 1,464,010 Building and Safety Services 1,648,507 1,932,690 1,959,190 Engineering Services 34,665,720 46,112,370 89,264,070 Planning 3,293,955 7,808,790 3,763,230 Public Works Services 23,635,642 28,391,960 31,962,350 Total Economic and Community Development $ 64,029,407 $ 85,683,070 $128,412,850 Total Expenditures $ 216,981,623 $ 229,950,370 $ 268,588,400 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures $ (14,536,186) $ (18,233,570) $ (2,393,510) See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 97 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA NOTES TO FINANCIAL SUMMARY Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget The accompanying Financial Summary reports provide a snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California's operating budget as well as the organization as a whole. The City's operating budget is comprised of the General Fund (Fund 001), the Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and the Library Fund (Fund 290). Financial Summary — Operating Budget: 2017/18 Actual: Overall, revenues for the Operating Budget were slightly higher than anticipated and expenditures were less than anticipated. The primary cause of operating expenditures overall being less than anticipated/budgeted was the differences in budgetary accounting verses GAAP accounting methods. Certain transactions were budgeted to authorize the spending (e.g., debt service payments and contributions to the Fire District's irrevocable trust for pension rate stabilization); however, in the final accounting, these transactions only affected the balance sheet not the statement of revenues and expenditures. Other positive variances were due to less than anticipated expenditures for public safety contract and labor costs. 2018/19 Adopted and 2019/20 Adopted: The City's goal is to adopt a balanced Operating Budget with the exception of the planned use of reserves. For FY 2018/19, the General Fund budget included the planned use of reserves in the amount of $25,000 to fund dental/x-ray equipment for the Animal Center, and the Library Fund's budget included the use of $24,580 in reserves to offset the cost of the opening day collection for the new cloudLibrary virtual book collection. The use of reserves by the General Fund and the Library Fund for FY 2018/19 was partially offset by an anticipated contribution to reserves in the amount of $30,050 for Community Facilities District (CFD) 85-1 (Fund 282). This contribution to reserves will be utilized in a future year to replace certain capital assets within the CFD. All other Fire District Operational Funds were balanced for FY 2018/19. For FY 2019/20, there is no planned usage of reserves for the General Fund or the Library Fund. However, CFD 85-1 includes the planned usage of reserves in the amount of $77,720 due to the fine-tuning of the assessments sent to the tax roll based on parcel type. Financial Summary — All Funds: 2017/18 Actual: Revenues increased overall by $8,930,812, with $8,745,750 of this increase resulting from growth in taxes (sales tax - $2,147,479; property tax in -lieu of VLF - $1,053,676; property tax payments related to the former Redevelopment Agency - $1,356,471; and general property tax increases from an overall increase in the City's assessed valuation and additional parcels being added on to the tax roll). Additionally, intergovernmental revenues decreased $4,003,672 due to prior year reimbursements from various governmental agencies for their share of operating and capital projects for general infrastructure improvements throughout the City. Development fees increased $3,281,708 as a result of a surge in development activity. Expenditures increased $38,894,829 primarily due to an increase in spending for capital projects throughout the City, including the Fire District's new All -Risk Training Center and the City's purchase and acquisition of streetlights from Southern California Edison. 2018/19 Adopted and 2019/20 Adopted: The Operating Budget is incorporated into this schedule. In addition to the discussion noted above regarding the Operating Budget, many of the other City funds have capital outlay expenditures budgeted which are funded by resources accumulated over a period of time. This can result in overall expenditures exceeding revenues in a given year, depending on the level of capital improvement activity. The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) section of this document details out the projects budgeted for FY 2019/20 and includes the funding sources. Some of the larger items included in the CIP include the Etiwanda Grade Separation ($52,175,000); the Advance Traffic Management System — Phases 1 and 2 ($6,867,000); and the Public Works Services Department's Warehouse Expansion ($2,140,000). Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 98 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000&00 a, I -w n -4 -t 'n "" N -w L wot--'oaa,0o, M N rS 00 M --' L � oo vooI- v»Op O N C� N 0o L -� 7 N oo N O n; M M O Ci r- M oo � --i N --� l� N 00 .� b rn ,-. w O C� M 'o-• C� M ,O N .-r M In 'n ,O ,O 'n C� 7 O N D\ --� rn v1 0o Ll- V)00 t - lO O O� O N In L� L- 7 00 M r- 7 n = 10 'n -� M N oo O D1 M M M No -� �o N n O 00 ^. b N 69 6A 69 6A 69 a E H y On M C, ' ' ' ' ' N ' ' ' O 'n O 00 00 O � .�-.: 00 'n 'Nn O O M ;I W q NN 0 yN O 'n N 69 69 ID . 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W q NN 0 yN b,N N ID . O Vl W W O ".� ,UOU Q 'Cy) Ma O �¢N, y .4cE: LE 0� F� U .ay.AUAAOF Vi vi y O Ltl y O. Ld d O. Y LqN� wti wH waOUAUF. E xv) W., Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 99 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Special Districts Summary The City of Rancho Cucamonga has twelve Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), eight Street Lighting Maintenance Districts (SLDs) as well as several other Special Districts, including one Benefit Assessment District (AD), various Community Facilities Districts (CFDs), and one Park and Recreation District (PD). Three of these other Special Districts provide funding for maintenance of specific public improvements within the City — AD 91-2, PD -85, and CFD 2000-03. Those Special Districts, along with the LMDs and SLDs, are summarized below and in the following schedule to identify Special Districts with fiscal sustainability issues that will need to be addressed in future years. When the LMDs were established, they were created in conjunction with new development coming into the City, and were intentionally designed to ensure that each district bore the costs of the maintenance of the infrastructure that provides special benefit to the property owners. The assessments received for LMDs are utilized only for the maintenance and operation of parks and other landscaping within the boundaries of each district. Maintenance and operation includes, but is not limited to, turf, ground cover, planter beds, shrubs, plants and trees, landscape lighting, irrigation systems, electrical energy for irrigation controllers, insect/disease control, graffiti removal, hardscapes, entry signs, sound walls and all appurtenant facilities. The City utilizes current year assessment revenues, prior year carryovers, and (in some cases) contributions from the General Fund to meet each district's annual expenses. The budgeted contributions from the General Fund for FY 2019/20 are $135,830 for LMD #1, $324,860 for LMD #2 and $41,090 for LMD #6R. The SLDs provide street light coverage throughout the general city and planned communities. Each year the assessments received are earmarked for the maintenance and operation of street lights, traffic signals and appurtenant facilities. This maintenance and operation includes the cost and supervision of street lighting maintenance, including repair, removal or replacement of all or any part of any improvement providing for lighting within these Districts. During FY 2018/19, the SLDs purchased most of the streetlights throughout the City from Southern California Edison which will greatly reduce annual utility costs. The budgeted contribution from the General Fund for FY 2019/20 is $284,250 for SLD #2 and $83,920 for SLD #7. The deficit fund balance for SLD #5 will also be addressed in future years through a phased -in approach. PD -85 was originally created to provide funds to finance the cost of construction, maintenance, operation and debt service payments for Heritage Community Park and Red Hill Community Park. Heritage Community Park is a 40 -acre facility located on the southwest corner of Hillside Road and Beryl Street. Red Hill Community Park is 42 acres and is located on the southwest corner of Base Line Road and Vineyard Avenue. The District's boundary includes all of the City of Rancho Cucamonga with the general exception of land east of the Deer Creek Channel and the Victoria, Caryn and Terra Vista Planned Communities. The annual assessments levied and collected are dedicated to the ongoing maintenance and operation and periodic capital improvement expenditures for the parks. The budgeted contribution from the General Fund for FY 2019/20 of $213,530 is set to cover operations of the Heritage Community Park, Red Hill Community Park, and the Red Hill Water Feature. AD 91-2 was formed for the protection of certain properties with the construction of a 27+ acre-foot desilting basin and a 1,460+ linear foot concrete drainage channel. Annual assessments provide funding for the annual maintenance of these basins. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page loo City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Special Districts Summary CFD 2000-03 was formed to build certain public facilities in the Rancho Summit housing tracts within the City. Annual assessments from Special Tax B provide for the maintenance of these public facilities which include parks and parkways. The FY 2019/20 Budget includes a 6.0% increase in the annual assessments. Following is a summary of changes in fund balances for each of the districts mentioned above. The summary includes prior years' actuals for revenues and expenditures, with a break out of support from other funds, along with budgeted revenues and expenditures for FY 2019/20. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page lol CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS, STREET LIGHTING MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS, AND OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 838 AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 40,408 32,174 548 FY 2017/18 47,520 847 PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 96,391 (499) Fund Balance Actual Support From Actual Fund Balance Fund # Fund Name 6/30/2017 Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2018 1,957 475,268 486,786 LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 130 LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,177,537 1,290,260 123,410 1,188,013 1,403,194 131 LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,528,133 3,409,866 293,490 3,540,000 3,691,489 132 LMD #3A HYSSOP 38,580 3,693 7,264 35,009 133 LMD #313 MEDIANS 1,820,006 1,026,890 779,803 2,067,093 134 LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 4,897,658 2,761,524 2,004,469 5,654,713 135 LMD #5 ANDOVER 39,175 2,707 7,336 34,546 136 LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 419,982 498,473 52,460 420,382 550,533 137 LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,135,275 983,619 50,000 906,882 1,262,012 138 LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 69,586 34,561 35,222 68,925 139 LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,533,057 317,542 558,594 1,292,005 140 LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,164,874 598,104 536,844 1,226,134 141 LMD #1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 84,817 (350) 90,000 6,083 168,384 STREET LIGHTING DISTRICTS 151 SLD #1 ARTERIAL 281,532 1,263,062 4,975,598 (3,431,004) 152 SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 235,795 772,846 350,170 4,721,348 (3,362,537) 153 SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,229,099 414,935 1,875,437 (231,403) 154 SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 552,727 229,208 938,884 (156,949) 155 SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (100,601) 81,742 425,418 (444,277) 156 SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 430,377 144,016 707,656 (133,263) 157 SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA (34,545) 247,899 105,100 1,324,938 (1,006,484) 158 SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,016,618 87,168 383,176 1,720,610 OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 838 AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 40,408 32,174 548 25,610 47,520 847 PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 96,391 (499) 116,800 8,268 204,424 848 PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,342,936 1,309,843 203,990 1,174,033 1,682,736 868 CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 495,711 464,386 1,957 475,268 486,786 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 102 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 103 FY 2018/19 Estimated FY 2019/20 Estimated Estimated Support From Estimated Fund Balance Budgeted Support From Budgeted Fund Balance Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2019 Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2020 1,323,140 135,820 1,534,590 1,327,564 1,320,940 135,830 1,848,730 935,604 3,609,490 299,540 4,044,960 3,555,559 3,612,270 324,860 4,849,910 2,642,779 4,330 10,050 29,289 4,280 11,000 22,569 1,110,590 1,093,590 2,084,093 1,093,480 1,399,800 1,777,773 2,836,240 2,447,820 6,043,133 2,888,970 3,416,550 5,515,553 3,070 8,980 28,636 3,020 9,670 21,986 518,520 60,370 585,560 543,863 533,200 41,090 629,190 488,963 1,009,030 30,000 1,205,920 1,095,122 999,930 1,252,200 842,852 35,930 36,450 68,405 35,520 39,960 63,965 537,170 647,060 1,182,115 689,550 1,204,850 666,815 627,370 692,810 1,160,694 624,590 740,340 1,044,944 3,360 90,000 40,440 221,304 3,890 90,000 40,620 274,574 898,300 1,050,920 (3,583,624) 830,580 1,005,760 (3,758,804) 392,620 188,420 739,360 (3,520,857) 376,450 284,250 661,180 (3,521,337) 397,090 355,470 (189,783) 385,090 328,780 (133,473) 185,630 312,200 (283,519) 184,270 178,260 (277,509) 47,460 82,920 (479,737) 44,220 77,210 (512,727) 145,670 146,800 (134,393) 141,430 137,630 (130,593) 132,670 62,590 236,550 (1,047,774) 132,670 83,920 216,730 (1,047,914) 111,870 100,720 1,731,760 109,060 98,120 1,742,700 34,810 26,690 55,640 34,640 25,110 65,170 4,110 116,800 41,340 283,994 3,760 116,800 165,670 238,884 1,347,660 214,250 1,359,730 1,884,916 1,346,500 213,530 1,520,070 1,924,876 479,370 502,920 463,236 505,160 665,670 302,726 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 103 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 104 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Revenue Summaries Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 105 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 1o6 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates The City receives a multitude of revenue from many sources, most of which must be accounted for separately and their identity kept intact. Revenue projections in the Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget are estimated using historical information, expert analysis, data collected from the State Controller, the State Department of Finance, the League of California Cities, the San Bernardino County Auditor -Controller's Office, and numerous financial indicators. Utilizing historical revenue data, a general sense of the economic status of the local community, and other indicators noted above, the City's budget staff produce a financially conservative picture of the near future. Concurrent with the near-term revenue projections, City budget staff, using the same data and historical data noted above, keep a running five-year forward projection that we use in conjunction with our near-term estimates to help guide the agency's medium and long-term planning for expenditures. Major Revenues of Funds Operating Budget. The City's Operating Budget, which is comprised of the City General Fund, Fire District Operational Funds, and City Library Fund, is primarily supported by seven key revenue sources. These key revenue sources include: sales tax, vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in Lieu of VLF), franchise fees, property tax, development fees, business licenses, and transient occupancy tax. Sales Tax. California sales tax is imposed on the total retail price of any tangible personal property (excluding a variety of state mandated exemptions), while use tax is imposed on the purchaser for eligible transactions when sales tax has not been collected. The sales and use tax rate in San Bernardino County is currently 7.75%, of which Rancho Cucamonga receives 1% from the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration (CDTFA) for transactions occurring within the City. The City also receives its share of the Proposition 172 half -cent public safety sales tax from the County of San Bernardino in addition to the amount distributed directly by the State. The City works closely with its sales tax consultant, HdL Companies, in projecting sales tax revenue. Based on HDL's analysis of the trend in year-to-date tax receipts, macroeconomic conditions (done in collaboration with its partner Beacon Economics) and an examination of local business data, the consultant anticipates the City will receive sales tax revenue of $32.6 million for FY 2019/20, a $1.7 million or 5.5% increase over the FY 2018/19 budget. Vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in lieu of VLF). The majority of this revenue source is Property Tax in lieu of VLF and is a result of the VLF for property tax swap of 2004 which was part of the state -local budget agreement. Growth in this revenue source is based on the increase in the City's assessed valuation of the properties within the City. This was a change from the growth factor used for VLF which was the change in the City's population. The City works closely with its property tax consultant, HdL Coren & Cone, to project the growth in the City's assessed valuation. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page ion CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates SB89 of 2011 eliminated, effective July 1, 2011, Vehicle License Fee (VLF) revenue allocated under California Revenue and Taxation Code 11005 to cities. As a part of the Legislature's efforts to solve the state's chronic budget problems, the bill shifted all city VLF revenues to fund law enforcement grants that previously had been paid by a temporary state tax and — prior to that — by the state general fund. The City receives a small amount of VLF in Excess from the State which is allocated under Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11001.5(b). Half of these revenues go to counties and half go to cities apportioned on a population basis. Overall revenues for vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in lieu of VLF) are projected to be $20,279,320 which is a $1,049,890 or 5.5% increase from the FY 2018/19 budget. Franchise fees. The City receives franchise fees for gas, electric, refuse, and cable service providers within the City as "rent" for the use of the streets and rights of way within our municipality. Revenues are projected based on estimated population increases (based on the State Department of Finance's population estimates adjusted for the impact of the projected date of build -out in the City), anticipated rate changes, and known changes in activities communicated by the respective service providers. Franchise fees are projected to be $6,652,070 which is a $311,530 or 4.5% decrease from FY 2018/19. The primary reason for the decrease is due the reclassification of Towing Services Fees from the franchise fee category to the Charges for Services category in the General Fund revenues. The FY 2018/19 Adopted Budget included $300,000 in Franchise Fee -Towing Services revenues which were moved to Charges for Services as part of the FY 2018/19 Amended Budget to more accurately reflect the nature of these revenues. Property tax. Property tax is an ad valorem (value -based) tax imposed on real property such as land, buildings, and tangible personal property. Property tax revenue is collected by the County of San Bernardino and allocated according to State law among cities, counties, school districts, and special districts. Rancho Cucamonga property owners pay a basic tax equal to 1% of the assessed value on real property. The City's share of each property tax dollar is approximately $0.0511, or 5.11 cents, (shared between the City General Fund and City Library Fund) and the Fire District's share of this property tax dollar is approximately $0.1248, or 12.48 cents, for a total of $0.1759, or 17.59 cents, for the City's operating budget. The City works with its property tax consultant in projecting property tax revenue, an estimate made with four factors in mind: property turnover rate, pricing and appeals exposure, new construction activity, and Proposition 13's annual inflation adjustment. After considering these factors, the City's consultant has projected that Rancho Cucamonga's property tax revenue will increase 4.60%. Property tax revenues for the City General Fund (including post -RDA property tax revenue) have increased overall by $566,170 or 7.1% from FY 2018/19, with property transfer taxes projected to increase by $83,410 or 7.7%. The Library's property tax has increased by $477,780 or 10.8% from FY 2018/19 and continues to include the statutory pass-through payment from the County of San Bernardino, formerly paid by the now dissolved Redevelopment Agency. The Fire District General Fund property tax revenue has increased by $1,278,640 or 5.1% from FY 2018/19, partially due to the County's annual inflation adjustment combined with new secured properties being added to the tax roll and positive home buying activity. Property tax revenue for the Fire Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 1o8 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates District's two Community Facilities Districts (CFDs) decreased by $881,450 or 12% from FY 2018/19. The majority of the decrease was in CFD 88-1. During the analysis of revenues for the FY 2019/20 budget, staff determined that due to the health of the Fire General Fund, the rate for CFD 88-1 could once again be lowered and still provide for the demands for service of the community. CFD 88-1 requires specific ratios based on square footage of a home to determine the assessed rate, in other words larger homes are charged more than smaller homes. The methodology used, was to lower the new rate of the largest homes to the same level as CFD 85-1 and apply the ratio accordingly. The District continues to be committed to maintaining CFD rates without CPI increases to the extent practical and, where possible, to reduce rates in a prudent manner. Development fees. Development fees are collected through the Community Development departments and are projected based upon known or anticipated development projects within the City. Depending on what phase a project is in for a given fiscal year, the corresponding Building and Safety, Engineering, or Planning Fees are adjusted accordingly. Based on input received from the Community Development departments, development fees are projected to increase by $350,000 (excluding special services fees) or 9.1%, from FY 2018/19. Business licenses. The City taxes businesses for the privilege of conducting business within the City. The amount of the tax is determined based on either gross receipts or gross payroll for the business. Business Licenses revenues are projected to increase $62,490 or 2.3% from FY 2018/19. Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT). TOT is a 10% tax applied to the cost of hotel or other lodging stays of less than 30 days. Factors influencing TOT revenues include business and leisure travel, room rate increases, and new hotel development. The growth factor applied to this revenue source is the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as published by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics to anticipate potential room rate increases as well as increased travel due to a slightly improving economy. The Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) is projected to increase $107,610 or 2.4% from FY 2018/19. The revenues discussed above total $118,418,600 and represent 90.1% of the City's Operating Budget and 31.7% of the City's overall budget. Other Funds. Revenues for the other City funds are comprised of various taxes, charges for services, intergovernmental, and other sources. Property taxes are collected for the City's various Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), Street Lighting Districts (SLDs), and various special districts. These property tax revenues total $14,971,500, or 5.6% of the City's overall budget. The amounts of the assessments have been calculated in accordance with the governing regulations and are assessed on a per parcel or per dwelling unit basis. Certain special districts have a provision for an annual CPI increase, but the majority of the special districts do not have such a provision. All revenues collected are legally restricted for use in the respective special districts only. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page log CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates Additional property tax revenues are reflected in the Fire Protection Capital Fund in the amount of $9,758,450, or 3.7%, of the City's overall budget. These property tax revenues represent the tax increment that was collected by the Redevelopment Agency in prior years for Fire District capital expenditures. Due to the elimination of the Redevelopment Agency on February 1, 2012, these revenues are now distributed directly to the Fire District and will be primarily used for the same capital expenditure purposes. Charges for services are received for Community Services recreational and community activities, in the amount of $1,888,950, as well as for the City's Municipal Utility, in the amount of $14,520,320, which provides electrical service to a portion of the City. Together, these revenues represent 5.5% of the City's overall budget. All charges for services are set by fee resolutions which are approved by the City Council and comply with all State laws regarding fees and taxes including Proposition 26. Intergovernmental revenues include the various State Gas Tax revenues as well as grant income received. The State provides revenue estimates during the City's budget process and grant income is projected based on the amount applied for. Intergovernmental revenues represent $67,939,860, or 25.5%, of the City's overall budget. Other sources of revenue include interest earnings, reimbursements from other funds, and transfers in. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 110 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 111 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Intergovernmental Other Charges for SPNirpq n , �O 3.04`. Use of Money & P 0.80% Fines & Forfeitures 1.04% Licenses & Permit 3.32% Taxes: In Property Tax** $ 67,638,520 Sales Tax 32,552,480 Franchise Fees 6,652,070 Transient Occupancy Tax 4,613,410 Admissions Tax 5,170 Subtotal -Taxes 111,461,650 Licenses & Permits 4,364,620 Fines & Forfeitures 1,367,420 Use of Money & Property 1,047,040 Charges for Services 3,992,960 Intergovernmental 169,080 Other 5,265,250 Transfer In 3,757,480 Total Operating Budget $ 131,425,500 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001), Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and City Library Fund (Fund 290). **Includes Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF in the amount of $20,193,480 for the City General Fund (Fund 001). Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 112 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iia 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 001 - GENERAL FUND TAXES $ 70,504,953 $ 70,588,230 $ 73,689,370 LICENSES & PERMITS 4,068,941 4,298,150 4,348,120 FINES & FORFEITURES 1,286,714 1,083,510 1,249,420 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 286,721 522,270 410,330 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 3,252,216 3,056,700 3,785,440 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 170,690 173,610 159,080 OTHER 3,445,839 2,546,400 2,857,640 TRANSFER IN 1,874,716 1,650,530 1,790,870 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 84,890,790 $ 83,919,400 $ 88,290,270 281 - FIRE FUND TAXES $ 24,960,848 $ 25,159,940 $ 26,438,580 LICENSES & PERMITS 16,045 16,500 16,500 FINES & FORFEITURES 152,381 74,000 118,000 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 505,020 502,400 490,400 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 559 3,320 5,320 OTHER 1,077,293 1,551,320 1,572,060 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 26,712,146 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 TAXES $ 5,963,747 $ 6,056,100 $ 5,987,200 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 18,947 39,820 43,570 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,982,694 $ 6,095,920 $ 6,030,770 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES $ 1,232,642 $ 1,240,750 $ 428,200 TRANSFER IN 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,291,362 $ 2,445,940 $ 2,394,810 290 - LIBRARY FUND TAXES $ 4,337,116 $ 4,440,520 $ 4,918,300 FINES & FORFEITURES 134,507 0 0 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 58,006 69,460 102,740 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 221,472 218,600 202,200 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 10,487 25,000 10,000 OTHER 168,096 348,070 835,550 TRANSFER IN 53,041 0 0 TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND $ 4,982,725 $ 5,101,650 $ 6,068,790 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 124.859.717 $ 124.870390 131.425.500 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iia City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget FINES & FORFEITURES 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 4302 Parking Citations 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 4308 General Ordinance Fines 4309 False Alarm Fees 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings $ 219 640,694 240,672 5,508 197,069 61,200 141,352 $ 1,286,714 $ 0 459,470 266,700 5,500 194,390 68,060 89,390 $ 1,083,510 $ 0 563,790 266,700 6,840 227,890 81,770 102,430 $ 1,249,420 502,693 $ 445,270 $ 332,400 (433,354) 0 0 122,686 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 114 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 001- GENERAL FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 4,394,174 $ 4,506,200 $ 4,838,990 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 156,080 183,230 171,880 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 87,919 94,180 96,810 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 61,014 182,170 67,200 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 130,981 115,380 144,240 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 2,111,177 815,360 863,570 4107 Property Transfer Tax 1,182,724 1,085,230 1,168,640 4111 Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF 18,281,381 19,135,120 20,193,480 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 2,076,352 2,041,430 2,321,430 4120 Sales and Use Tax 30,906,609 30,400,000 31,965,020 4121 Prop 172 -Half Cent Sales Tax 571,685 554,480 587,460 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 3,578,006 4,505,800 4,613,410 4126 Admissions Tax 6,008 6,050 5,170 4130 Franchise Fee -Gas & Electric 2,545,780 2,532,790 2,530,760 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid. Refuse 981,237 1,070,210 921,260 4132 Franchise Fee -Comm. Refuse 1,672,976 1,536,870 1,749,060 4133 Franchise Fee -Cable 1,470,848 1,523,730 1,450,990 4135 Franchise Fee -Towing Services 290,000 300,000 0 TOTAL TAXES $ 70,504,951 $ 70,588,230 $ 73,689,370 LICENSES & PERMITS 4201 Business Licenses $ 2,606,637 $ 2,610,400 $ 2,670,440 4207 Building Permits 1,039,024 1,250,000 1,200,000 4208 Bldg Pmt -Strong Motion Fees 2,420 9,090 9,110 4209 Mobile Home Permit 5,798 6,160 4,120 4210 Bldg Permits-SB1473(90% to CA) 814 1,760 1,760 4215 Animal Licenses 286,229 313,230 351,740 4216 Parking Permits 200 250 710 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 478 460 990 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 10,950 11,300 11,560 4232 Business Licenses -Penalties 116,391 95,500 97,690 TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS $ 4,068,941 $ 4,298,150 $ 4,348,120 FINES & FORFEITURES 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 4302 Parking Citations 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 4308 General Ordinance Fines 4309 False Alarm Fees 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings $ 219 640,694 240,672 5,508 197,069 61,200 141,352 $ 1,286,714 $ 0 459,470 266,700 5,500 194,390 68,060 89,390 $ 1,083,510 $ 0 563,790 266,700 6,840 227,890 81,770 102,430 $ 1,249,420 502,693 $ 445,270 $ 332,400 (433,354) 0 0 122,686 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 114 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 26,500 26,930 27,860 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 68,196 50,070 50,070 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ 286,721 $ 522,270 $ 410,330 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees $ 950,265 $ 1,030,000 $ 1,030,000 4502 Building Plan Check 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds (1,144) 910,670 0 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 0 4508 Planning Fees 42,710 741,408 337,306 750,000 366,090 750,000 4509 Planning- Special Services Fee 1,610 15,711 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 220,000 361,830 220,000 4510 Engineering Fees 200,000 1,298,926 200,000 800,000 128,193 1,200,000 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 168 0 0 4999 Unapplied Cash 0 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 0 849 $ 3,445,840 $ 590 2,857,640 300 4560 Fingerprint Fees 17,445 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 19,530 71,850 $ 9,220 4563 Candidates Filing Fees 350,170 0 218,390 22,000 0 4564 Returned Item Charge 460 430 860 4570 Sale of Printed Material 9,464 6,150 9,060 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 136 0 0 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 141,437 130,000 130,000 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 10,952 17,000 17,000 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 12,888 11,000 9,000 4634 Animal Impound Fees 22,538 21,000 21,000 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 15,215 15,000 15,000 4638 Microchipping Fee 8,835 7,500 7,500 4640 Vaccination Services 6,663 6,500 6,500 4680 Towing Services Agreement Fees 0 0 360,000 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 3,252,216 $ 3,056,700 $ 3,785,440 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4701 Motor Vehicle In -Lieu Fees $ 93,340 $ 94,310 $ 85,840 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 77,350 79,300 73,240 TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL $ 170,690 $ 173,610 $ 159,080 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ 1,253,244 $ 775,060 $ 908,230 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 103,644 86,660 125,160 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 504,127 910,670 964,640 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 55,136 63,820 42,710 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 337,306 146,750 366,090 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 1,610 810 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 863,945 361,830 250,000 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 200,000 4919 Housing Court Receivership 128,193 0 0 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 286 0 0 4999 Unapplied Cash (41) 0 0 TOTAL OTHER $ 3,445,840 $ 2,546,400 $ 2,857,640 TRANSFER IN 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 $ 39,170 $ 71,850 $ 64,720 8188 Transfer In -Fund 188 350,170 188,420 218,390 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 115 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 281 - FIRE FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 4110 Homeowners Exemption 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA TOTAL TAXES LICENSES & PERMITS 4211 Fire Permits TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS FINES & FORFEITURES 4309 False Alarm Fees 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 4314 Red Light Fines 4316 Weed Abatement TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees 4546 FSD Fees 4548 D.U.I. Recovery 4549 Hazmat Recovery 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES OTHER 4901 Other Revenue 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements $ 16,622,926 $ 2018/19 2019/20 18,305,650 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 8190 Transfer In -Fund 190 206,301 0 0 8290 Transfer In -Library Fund 37,935 0 0 8705 Transfer In -Municipal Utility 1,241,140 1,390,260 1,507,760 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 1,874,716 $ 1,650,530 $ 1,790,870 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND 84.890.789 93 919 400 R8 290 270 281 - FIRE FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 4110 Homeowners Exemption 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA TOTAL TAXES LICENSES & PERMITS 4211 Fire Permits TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS FINES & FORFEITURES 4309 False Alarm Fees 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 4314 Red Light Fines 4316 Weed Abatement TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees 4546 FSD Fees 4548 D.U.I. Recovery 4549 Hazmat Recovery 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES OTHER 4901 Other Revenue 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements $ 16,622,926 $ 17,185,110 $ 18,305,650 590,443 693,290 650,210 332,755 330,230 366,430 131,070 122,920 144,340 480,609 322,100 529,260 512,646 573,550 623,710 174,286 171,240 168,280 6,116,112 5,761,500 5,650,700 $ 24,960,847 $ 25,159,940 $ 26,438,580 $ 16,045 $ 16,500 $ 16,500 $ 16,045 $ 16,500 $ 16,500 $ 14,162 $ 4,000 $ 20,000 14,150 8,000 8,000 (220) 0 0 124,289 62,000 90,000 $ 152,381 $ 74,000 $ 118,000 $ 479,726 $ 404,510 $ 382,940 (333,649) 0 0 264,559 0 0 92,468 97,890 107,460 1,917 0 0 $ 505,021 $ 502,400 $ 490,400 $ 112 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 0 140 140 297 280 280 0 900 900 150 1,000 3,000 $ 559 $ 3,320 $ 5,320 $ 27,782 $ 10,600 $ 10,600 900,724 691,800 706,800 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iib City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 117 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 144,933 845,520 851,260 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 3,854 3,400 3,400 TOTAL OTHER $ 1,077,293 $ 1,551,320 $ 1,572,060 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 26,712,146 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 5,938,124 $ 6,006,190 $ 5,959,650 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 7,160 30,610 7,550 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 18,463 19,300 20,000 TOTAL TAXES $ 5,963,747 $ 6,056,100 $ 5,987,200 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 48,832 $ 39,820 $ 43,570 4402 Unrealized Gain (29,885) 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ 18,947 $ 39,820 $ 43,570 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,982,694 $ 6,095,920 $ 6,030,770 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 1,215,406 $ 1,230,760 $ 410,150 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 12,668 8,020 13,420 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4,568 1,970 4,630 TOTAL TAXES $ 1,232,642 $ 1,240,750 $ 428,200 TRANSFER IN 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund $ 1,058,720 $ 1,205,190 $ 1,966,610 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 1,058,720 $ 1,205,190 $ 1,966,610 TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,291,362 $ 2,445,940 $ 2,394,810 290 - LIBRARY FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,990,931 $ 4,085,350 $ 4,540,760 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 85,680 100,220 98,730 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 48,263 51,510 55,610 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 71,902 63,100 82,860 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 140,340 140,340 140,340 TOTAL TAXES $ 4,337,116 $ 4,440,520 $ 4,918,300 FINES & FORFEITURES 4312 Library Fines and Fees $ 134,507 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES $ 134,507 $ 0 $ 0 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 79,878 $ 67,460 $ 92,740 4402 Unrealized Gain (76,110) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 117 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iib 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4410 Media Rentals 54,237 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 0 2,000 10,000 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ 58,005 $ 69,460 $ 102,740 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4512 Library Card & Merchndse Sales $ 5,321 $ 0 $ 5,000 4515 Interlibrary Loan (ILL) 110 100 100 4565 Passport Processing Fees 140,527 120,000 120,000 4567 Passport Photo Fees 28,411 24,000 20,000 4570 Sale of Printed Material 26,547 24,000 24,000 4575 Exhibit Sales 0 0 15,000 4591 Recreation Fees - ActiveNet 380 10,000 6,600 4690 Contract Classes -Library 19,317 25,500 10,000 4691 Program Revenue -Library 859 15,000 1,500 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 221,472 $ 218,600 $ 202,200 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4740 Grant Income $ 10,487 $ 25,000 $ 10,000 TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL $ 10,487 $ 25,000 $ 10,000 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ 3,490 $ 125,940 $ 125,940 4907 Private Contributions Library 137,000 137,000 140,000 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 31,000 65,000 554,610 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 2,500 2,500 0 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 0 17,630 15,000 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 302 0 0 4946 Fee Revenue - ActiveNet (6,196) 0 0 TOTAL OTHER $ 168,096 $ 348,070 $ 835,550 TRANSFER IN 8299 Transfer In -Library Devel Fund $ 53,041 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 53,041 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND $ 4,982,724 $ 5,101,650 $ 6,068,790 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 124,859,715 $ 124,870,390 $ 131,425,500 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iib THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 119 Intergovernmental 25.52% Charges for Sei 8.83% City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Revenue Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget DevelODment Fees Other Licenses & Permits 1.74% Taxes $ 137,631,770 Licenses & Permits 4,623,380 Fines & Forfeitures 1,613,680 Use of Money & Property 8,140,200 Charges for Services 23,516,770 Intergovernmental 67,939,860 Development Fees 4,457,340 Other 7,013,190 Transfer In 11,258,700 Total All Funds Budget $ 266,194,890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 120 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL ALL FUNDS BUDGET $ 202,445,437 $ 211,716,800 $ 266,194,890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 121 2017/18 Actual 2018/19 Adopted Budget 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA TAXES $ 90,542,023 $ 91,098,340 $ 95,019,340 LICENSES & PERMITS 4,299,417 4,557,210 4,606,880 FINES & FORFEITURES 1,671,090 1,345,250 1,495,680 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 3,429,174 6,227,950 7,067,570 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 19,389,673 21,495,900 23,510,950 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 13,508,218 24,103,790 67,939,860 DEVELOPMENT FEES 10,283,990 4,839,430 4,457,340 OTHER 9,641,956 6,824,540 5,424,130 TRANSFER IN 6,602,115 6,567,910 9,292,090 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 159,367,656 $ 167,060,320 $ 218,813,840 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TAXES $ 39,941,380 $ 40,762,860 $ 42,612,430 LICENSES & PERMITS 16,045 16,500 16,500 FINES & FORFEITURES 152,381 74,000 118,000 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 812,907 1,025,290 1,072,630 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 874 4,320 5,820 OTHER 1,095,474 1,568,320 1,589,060 TRANSFER IN 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 43,077,781 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 TOTAL ALL FUNDS BUDGET $ 202,445,437 $ 211,716,800 $ 266,194,890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 121 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 122 2017/18 Actual 2018/19 Adopted Budget 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001 - GENERAL FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 4,394,174 $ 4,506,200 $ 4,838,990 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 156,080 183,230 171,880 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 87,919 94,180 96,810 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 61,014 182,170 67,200 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 130,981 115,380 144,240 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 2,111,177 815,360 863,570 4107 Property Transfer Tax 1,182,724 1,085,230 1,168,640 4111 Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF 18,281,381 19,135,120 20,193,480 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 2,076,352 2,041,430 2,321,430 4120 Sales and Use Tax 30,906,609 30,400,000 31,965,020 4121 Prop 172 -Half Cent Sales Tax 571,685 554,480 587,460 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 3,578,006 4,505,800 4,613,410 4126 Admissions Tax 6,008 6,050 5,170 4130 Franchise Fee -Gas & Electric 2,545,780 2,532,790 2,530,760 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid. Refuse 981,237 1,070,210 921,260 4132 Franchise Fee -Comm. Refuse 1,672,976 1,536,870 1,749,060 4133 Franchise Fee -Cable 1,470,848 1,523,730 1,450,990 4135 Franchise Fee -Towing Services 290,000 300,000 0 4201 Business Licenses 2,606,637 2,610,400 2,670,440 4207 Building Permits 1,039,024 1,250,000 1,200,000 4208 Bldg Pmt -Strong Motion Fees 2,420 9,090 9,110 4209 Mobile Home Permit 5,798 6,160 4,120 4210 Bldg Permits -SB 1473(90% to CA) 814 1,760 1,760 4215 Animal Licenses 286,229 313,230 351,740 4216 Parking Permits 200 250 710 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 478 460 990 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 10,950 11,300 11,560 4232 Business Licenses -Penalties 116,391 95,500 97,690 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 219 0 0 4302 Parking Citations 640,694 459,470 563,790 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 240,672 266,700 266,700 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 5,508 5,500 6,840 4308 General Ordinance Fines 197,069 194,390 227,890 4309 False Alarm Fees 61,200 68,060 81,770 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 141,352 89,390 102,430 4401 Interest Earnings 502,693 445,270 332,400 4402 Unrealized Gain (433,354) 0 0 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings 122,686 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 26,500 26,930 27,860 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 68,196 50,070 50,070 4501 Plan Check Fees 950,265 1,030,000 1,030,000 4502 Building Plan Check (1,144) 0 0 4508 Planning Fees 741,408 750,000 750,000 4509 Planning- Special Services Fee 15,711 220,000 220,000 4510 Engineering Fees 1,298,926 800,000 1,200,000 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 168 0 0 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 849 590 300 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 122 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 4303 Parking Cit Surcharge -State 4304 Parking Cit Surchrge-County 4305 Parking Cit Surcharge-Cnty Crt 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt TOTAL 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 8,694 $ 2018/19 2019/20 12,020 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4560 Fingerprint Fees 17,445 19,530 9,220 4563 Candidates Filing Fees 0 22,000 0 4564 Returned Item Charge 460 430 860 4570 Sale of Printed Material 9,464 6,150 9,060 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 136 0 0 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 141,437 130,000 130,000 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 10,952 17,000 17,000 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 12,888 11,000 9,000 4634 Animal Impound Fees 22,538 21,000 21,000 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 15,215 15,000 15,000 4638 Microchipping Fee 8,835 7,500 7,500 4640 Vaccination Services 6,663 6,500 6,500 4680 Towing Services Agreement Fees 0 0 360,000 4701 Motor Vehicle In -Lieu Fees 93,340 94,310 85,840 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 77,350 79,300 73,240 4901 Other Revenue 1,253,244 775,060 908,230 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 103,644 86,660 125,160 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 504,127 910,670 964,640 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 55,136 63,820 42,710 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 337,306 146,750 366,090 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 1,610 810 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 863,945 361,830 250,000 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 200,000 4919 Housing Court Receivership 128,193 0 0 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 286 0 0 4999 Unapplied Cash (41) 0 0 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 39,170 71,850 64,720 8188 Transfer In -Fund 188 350,170 188,420 218,390 8190 Transfer In -Fund 190 206,301 0 0 8290 Transfer In -Library Fund 37,935 0 0 8705 Transfer In -Municipal Utility 1,241,140 1,390,260 1,507,760 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 84,890,789 $ 83,919,400 $ 88,290,270 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 4303 Parking Cit Surcharge -State 4304 Parking Cit Surchrge-County 4305 Parking Cit Surcharge-Cnty Crt 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt TOTAL 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 8,694 $ 9,070 $ 12,020 6,550 6,870 9,100 26,202 27,600 36,560 (317) 0 0 90,285 79,130 104,800 $ 131,414 $ 122,670 $ 162,480 $ (10,649) $ 0 $ 0 329,339 350,000 463,500 $ 318,690 $ 350,000 $ 463,500 (317) $ 0 $ Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 123 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4518 General Plan Update Fee TOTAL 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 4401 Interest Earnings 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4519 Information Technology Revenue TOTAL 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4517 Technology Fee -Permit TOTAL 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 4218 Mobile Home Lot Fees -City 4219 Mobile Home Lot Fees -State 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4650 SB 1186 Cert Access Spec Prog TOTAL 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget $ (317) $ 0 $ 0 $ 32,908 $ 287,700 $ 47,630 (22,661) 0 0 26,924 30,790 53,790 $ 37,171 $ 318,490 $ 101,420 $ 130,016 $ 96,270 $ 150,930 (88,707) 0 0 21,885 0 0 $ 63,194 $ 96,270 $ 150,930 $ 208,423 $ 218,200 $ 188,580 (1,292) 0 0 153,470 179,230 220,160 $ 360,601 $ 397,430 $ 408,740 $ 8,236 $ 8,440 $ 0 (6,223) 0 0 138,140 158,000 0 $ 140,153 $ 166,440 $ 0 1,493 1,320 24,700 (999) 0 0 204,268 182,000 287,180 $ 204,762 $ 183,320 $ 311,880 $ 14,916 $ 14,910 $ 14,910 3,150 3,150 3,150 2,267 1,980 2,780 (1,727) 0 0 1,120 1,120 1,120 $ 19,726 $ 21,160 $ 21,960 $ 673 $ 580 $ 1,390 (736) 0 0 23,942 18,550 18,550 $ 23,879 $ 19,130 $ 19,940 $ 856,805 $ 893,010 $ 1,023,970 (404,369) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 124 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 4901 Other Revenue 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue 8802 Transfer In -Fund 802 TOTAL 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 110 - BEAUTIFICATION Ill - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4818 Park Land Acq Impact Fee TOTAL 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4806 Storm Drain Fees TOTAL 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4822 Community/Rec Ctr Impact Fee 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 22,519 0 0 1,025,000 1,140,000 1,175,000 $ 1,499,955 $ 2,033,010 $ 2,198,970 $ 40,827 $ 37,380 $ 60,210 (15,781) 0 0 m nc AAc 1 O m rn niA $ 11,977 $ 10,270 $ 12,130 (9,487) 0 0 951,600 879,240 1,007,120 $ 954,095 $ 889,510 $ 1,019,250 $ 2,387 $ 170 $ 210 (92) 0 0 $ 2,295 $ 170 $ 210 $ 18,399 $ 19,600 $ 16,610 (14,769) 0 0 227,842 837,150 541,600 $ 231,472 $ 856,750 $ 558,210 $ 16,713 $ 12,000 $ 16,560 (11,622) 0 0 $ 5,091 $ 12,000 $ 16,560 $ 20,014 $ 19,860 $ 35,980 (15,910) 0 0 190,389 180,000 250,000 $ 194,493 $ 199,860 $ 285,980 $ 44,884 $ 41,300 $ 59,490 (37,683) 0 0 1,091,047 500,000 100,000 a, i Ano neo a, CAI 'Inn Q 1 C nnn $ 7,698 $ 7,710 $ 15,440 (6,049) 0 0 65,645 70,000 310,730 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 125 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT $ 67,294 $ 77,710 $ 326,170 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 0 TOTAL 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 6,206 $ 6,390 $ 7,950 4402 Unrealized Gain (4,302) 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 93,756 75,000 0 TOTAL 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 95,660 $ 81,390 $ 7,950 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ (10,735) $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ (10,735) $ 0 $ 0 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 117,800 124 - TRANSPORTATION 4401 Interest Earnings 4401 Interest Earnings $ 33,408 $ 30,620 $ 37,250 4402 Unrealized Gain (22,953) 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 109,582 75,000 0 TOTAL 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 120,037 $ 105,620 $ 37,250 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 9,121 $ 8,600 $ 10,700 4402 Unrealized Gain (6,354) 0 0 TOTAL 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 2,767 $ 8,600 $ 10,700 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 11,301 $ 11,210 $ 20,200 4402 Unrealized Gain (8,853) 0 0 4819 Park Improvement Impact Fee 96,238 100,000 200,000 TOTAL 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT $ 98,686 $ 111,210 $ 220,200 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 172,039 $ 183,920 $ 145,780 4402 Unrealized Gain (70,746) 0 0 TOTAL 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 101,293 $ 183,920 $ 145,780 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 13,594 $ 12,380 $ 16,160 4402 Unrealized Gain (10,644) 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 217,965 0 0 TOTAL 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 220,915 $ 12,380 $ 16,160 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,107 $ 7,060 $ 10,720 4402 Unrealized Gain (5,419) 0 0 4814 Library Impact Fee 43,401 50,000 107,080 TOTAL 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE $ 45,089 $ 57,060 $ 117,800 124 - TRANSPORTATION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 394,334 $ 352,200 $ 492,590 4402 Unrealized Gain (285,389) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 126 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 4820 Regional Transportation Fee 4821 Local Transportation Fee TOTAL 124 - TRANSPORTATION 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4815 Animal Center Impact Fee TOTAL 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4816 Police Impact Fee TOTAL 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4813 Underground Utilities Fee 4814 Library Impact Fee TOTAL 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4901 Other Revenue 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 3,051,364 1,140,000 1,250,000 4,999,708 2,500,000 2,000,000 0 1Ln n77 N ') nn7 Inn N 1 7A1 [nn $ 1,447 $ 1,480 $ 2,220 (1,099) 0 0 9,534 15,000 23,100 $ 9,882 $ 16,480 $ 25,320 $ 9,696 $ 9,150 $ 11,370 (6,753) 0 0 $ 2,943 $ 9,150 $ 11,370 $ 4,989 $ 4,640 $ 8,570 (4,376) 0 0 113,023 40,000 102,000 $ 113,636 $ 44,640 $ 110,570 $ 10,807 $ 10,420 $ 12,690 (7,579) 0 0 $ 3,228 $ 10,420 $ 12,690 $ 170,824 $ 167,740 $ 198,180 (114,762) 0 0 89,021 90,000 90,000 13,665 0 0 $ 158,748 $ 257,740 $ 288,180 $ 1,232,152 $ 1,232,090 $ 1,232,960 10,612 11,900 11,900 3,184 2,000 2,000 19,477 16,850 21,330 (18,298) 0 0 27,431 24,910 24,910 4,347 4,450 4,450 330 1,000 1,000 10,636 22,290 22,290 111 100 100 279 0 0 123,410 135,820 135,830 $ 1,413,671 $ 1,451,410 $ 1,456,770 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 127 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,381,906 $ 3,496,470 $ 3,522,770 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 17,404 29,730 29,730 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4,524 5,000 5,000 4401 Interest Earnings 52,744 46,380 52,770 4402 Unrealized Gain (48,027) 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 1,315 2,000 2,000 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 293,490 299,540 324,860 TOTAL 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA $ 3,703,356 $ 3,879,120 $ 3,937,130 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,517 $ 3,690 $ 3,690 4401 Interest Earnings 575 530 590 4402 Unrealized Gain (400) 0 0 TOTAL 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP $ 3,692 $ 4,220 $ 4,280 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 805,488 $ 820,370 $ 805,860 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 3,672 9,730 9,730 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 503 970 970 4216 Parking Permits 211,809 240,000 240,000 4401 Interest Earnings 30,381 27,540 36,580 4402 Unrealized Gain (25,272) 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 309 340 340 TOTAL 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS $ 1,026,890 $ 1,098,950 $ 1,093,480 134 - LMD #411 TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 2,735,663 $ 2,713,340 $ 2,779,600 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 10,876 12,500 12,500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,093 1,250 1,250 4401 Interest Earnings 77,989 70,110 93,040 4402 Unrealized Gain (67,299) 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 898 2,080 2,080 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 304 500 500 TOTAL 134 - LMD #411 TERRA VISTA $ 2,761,524 $ 2,799,780 $ 2,888,970 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 2,493 $ 2,470 $ 2,470 4401 Interest Earnings 570 530 550 4402 Unrealized Gain (355) 0 0 TOTAL 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER $ 2,708 $ 3,000 $ 3,020 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 491,561 $ 504,780 $ 519,920 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4,073 3,500 3,500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,400 350 350 4401 Interest Earnings 7,527 6,480 9,430 4402 Unrealized Gain (7,090) 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 52,460 60,370 41,090 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 128 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL 136 - LMD #611 CARYN COMMUNITY 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4901 Other Revenue 8868 Transfer In -Fund 868 TOTAL 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals TOTAL 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4901 Other Revenue 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet TOTAL 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 129 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget $ 550,931 $ 575,480 $ 574,290 $ 934,037 $ - 937,780 $ 937,780 10,450 9,610 9,610 3,267 2,250 2,250 17,892 16,070 18,500 (15,222) 0 0 27,839 25,660 25,660 1,616 540 540 3,730 5,590 5,590 10 0 0 50,000 30,000 0 $ 1,033,619 $ 1,027,500 $ 999,930 $ 34,185 $ 33,920 $ 33,920 76 350 350 10 30 30 1,059 1,000 1,220 (768) 0 0 $ 34,562 $ 35,300 $ 35,520 $ 301,986 $ 507,940 $ 668,730 1,298 1,000 1,000 755 380 380 21,421 16,390 16,940 (13,588) 0 0 3,752 2,000 2,000 1,918 500 500 $ 317,542 $ 528,210 $ 689,550 $ 556,200 $ 573,200 $ 573,200 3,858 5,500 5,500 2,883 1,250 1,250 17,913 16,000 19,870 (14,291) 0 0 26,410 7,500 7,500 296 4,740 4,740 113 2,000 2,000 3,911 7,030 7,030 0 3,500 3,500 811 0 0 $ 598,104 $ 620,720 $ 624,590 $ 1,911 $ 1,930 $ 3,890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 129 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 353,135 $ 352,870 $ 355,500 2018/19 1,779 2019/20 3,510 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2017/18 350 Adopted 4401 Interest Earnings Preliminary 18,640 25,730 Actual (15,055) Budget 0 Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 0 (2,261) TOTAL 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 0 375,370 $ 0 8130 Transfer In -Fund 130 90,000 90,000 $ 163,382 $ 90,000 TOTAL 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 89,650 $ 91,930 $ 93,890 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,110 $ 1,080 $ 30 4402 Unrealized Gain (1,047) 0 0 4923 Misc. Other Financing Sources 46,604 0 0 8151 Transfer In -Fund 151 0 47,880 112,200 8152 Transfer In -Fund 152 0 46,870 109,840 8153 Transfer In -Fund 153 0 18,580 43,550 8154 Transfer In -Fund 154 0 8,620 20,220 8155 Transfer In -Fund 155 0 4,090 9,600 8156 Transfer In -Fund 156 0 6,410 15,030 8157 Transfer In -Fund 157 0 12,980 30,430 8158 Transfer In -Fund 158 0 4,570 10,720 TOTAL 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS $ 46,667 $ 151,080 $ 351,620 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 807,445 $ 808,040 $ 811,300 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 5,148 5,500 5,500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,582 1,250 1,250 4401 Interest Earnings 3,057 1,520 11,530 4402 Unrealized Gain (6,481) 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 0 1,000 1,000 4901 Other Revenue 452,312 0 0 TOTAL 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL $ 1,263,063 $ 817,310 $ 830,580 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 369,103 $ 371,030 $ 371,420 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 3,173 3,480 3,480 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 979 550 550 4402 Unrealized Gain (11,013) 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 0 1,000 1,000 4901 Other Revenue 410,605 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 350,170 188,420 284,250 TOTAL 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL $ 1,123,017 $ 564,480 $ 660,700 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 353,135 $ 352,870 $ 355,500 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 1,779 3,510 3,510 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 463 350 350 4401 Interest Earnings 19,398 18,640 25,730 4402 Unrealized Gain (15,055) 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 55,215 0 0 TOTAL 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA $ 414,935 $ 375,370 $ 385,090 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 163,382 $ 162,300 $ 164,740 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 130 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4720 Gas Tax 2105 -Prop 111 4721 State Gas Tax -2106 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 725 1,600 1,600 219 160 160 8,752 7,100 17,770 (7,220) 0 0 63,350 0 0 $ 229,208 $ 171,160 $ 184,270 $ 43,748 $ 43,710 $ 43,710 384 440 440 236 70 70 (1,661) 0 0 39,035 0 0 $ 81,742 $ 44,220 $ 44,220 $ 132,221 $ 134,590 $ 132,530 672 750 750 92 130 130 6,618 6,350 8,020 (4,967) 0 0 9,380 0 0 $ 144,016 $ 141,820 $ 141,430 $ 128,288 $ 128,590 $ 128,590 1,345 1,300 1,300 512 400 400 76 0 2,380 (1,812) 0 0 119,490 0 0 105,100 62,590 83,920 $ 352,999 $ 192,880 $ 216,590 $ 70,865 $ 70,250 $ 70,490 1,079 700 700 346 100 100 31,964 30,670 37,340 (22,296) 0 0 0 430 430 5,211 0 0 $ 87,169 $ 102,150 $ 109,060 $ 150,122 $ 122,670 $ 151,370 (96,167) 0 0 962,279 1,037,580 981,180 607,519 618,540 608,380 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page iii City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 4722 State Gas Tax -2107 4723 State Gas Tax -2107.5 4725 Gas Tax R&T7360 4727 State GF Loan Repmt-HUTA 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 TOTAL 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 176 - MEASURE 11990-2010 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 176 - MEASURE 11990-2010 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4715 Measure I Local St Allotment TOTAL 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 178 - SB 140 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 178 - SB 140 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4726 Road Maint & Rehab Acct Rev TOTAL 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 181 - SB 1 - TCEP 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 181 - SB 1 - TCEP 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 4134 Integrated Waste Mgmt Fee 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4590 Administrative Fee-C&D Program 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 190 - PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 4401 Interest Earnings Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 132 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 1,252,347 1,288,030 1,281,500 10,000 10,000 10,000 690,543 678,620 1,521,640 201,587 201,590 199,240 2,696 0 0 0 0 150,000 $ 3,780,926 $ 3,957,030 $ 4,903,310 $ 7,674 $ 6,350 $ 5,650 (5,034) 0 0 $ 2,640 $ 6,350 $ 5,650 $ 52,598 $ 55,060 $ 44,720 (31,907) 0 0 3,082,468 3,128,210 3,016,420 $ 3,103,159 $ 3,183,270 $ 3,061,140 $ (369) $ 0 $ 0 $ (369) $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,984 $ 4,630 $ 14,770 (10,3 84) 0 0 1,039,040 2,944,660 2,903,570 $ 1,030,640 $ 2,949,290 $ 2,918,340 0 7,850,000 52,150,000 $ 0 $ 7,850,000 $ 52,150,000 $ (3,210) $ 0 $ 0 $ (3,210) $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,327,107 $ 1,296,330 $ 1,335,170 601 1,000 700 46,932 45,520 59,710 (35,086) 0 0 33,757 33,000 40,000 657,429 325,000 100,000 $ 2,030,740 $ 1,700,850 $ 1,535,580 $ 0 $ 3,180 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 132 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 190 - PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT $ 0 $ 3,180 $ 0 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 4401 Interest Earnings $ 3,866 $ 3,730 $ 4,540 4402 Unrealized Gain (2,701) 0 0 TOTAL 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING $ 1,165 $ 3,730 $ 4,540 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,140 $ 1,210 $ 1,320 4402 Unrealized Gain (526) 0 0 TOTAL 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 614 $ 1,210 $ 1,320 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 4401 Interest Earnings $ 81 $ 100 $ 60 4402 Unrealized Gain (61) 0 0 TOTAL 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 20 $ 100 $ 60 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 4401 Interest Earnings $ 390,276 $ 378,480 $ 441,550 4402 Unrealized Gain (257,510) 0 0 4740 Grant Income 158,999 0 0 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 1,203,650 1,250,000 1,250,000 4823 Traffic Mitigation Fee 8,971 2,000 2,000 4901 Other Revenue 198,582 0 0 TOTAL 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV $ 1,702,968 $ 1,630,480 $ 1,693,550 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ (3,523) $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 718,049 1,780,140 1,290,010 4741 Program Income 117,908 350,000 150,000 TOTAL 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT $ 832,434 $ 2,130,140 $ 1,440,010 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 4401 Interest Earnings $ 399 $ 480 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain (136) 0 0 4740 Grant Income 1,652,677 600,000 0 TOTAL 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 1,652,940 $ 600,480 $ 0 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP 4401 Interest Earnings $ 41 $ 50 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain (31) 0 0 4740 Grant Income 0 19,920 0 TOTAL 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP $ 10 $ 19,970 $ 0 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 4740 Grant Income $ 46,596 $ 43,000 $ 451,000 8198 Transfer In -Fund 198 9,883 0 0 TOTAL 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 $ 56,479 $ 43,000 $ 451,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 133 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 4740 Grant Income 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements TOTAL 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS -DREIER 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS -DREIER 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 4520 Recreation Fees 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 4581 Ticket Sales 4586 Advertising Revenue 4591 Recreation Fees - ActiveNet 4592 Sale of Tax Items - ActiveNet 4901 Other Revenue 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 4946 Fee Revenue - ActiveNet TOTAL 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget $ 0 $ 9,730 $ 9,730 0 9,510 9,510 495 360 360 $ 495 $ 19,600 $ 19,600 $ (175) $ 0 $ 0 56,411 70,840 59,390 $ 56,236 $ 70,840 $ 59,390 $ 535 $ 530 $ 600 (647) 0 0 38,921 47,000 48,830 $ 38,809 $ 47,530 $ 49,430 $ 20,437 $ 145,610 $ 118,900 $ 20,437 $ 145,610 $ 118,900 341 0 0 $ 341 $ 0 $ 0 $ (123) $ 0 $ 0 $ (123) $ 0 $ 0 $ 40,355 $ 35,040 $ 37,600 (29,185) 0 0 2,549 727,500 725,370 768,973 0 0 60,337 2,013,850 1,816,400 0 26,000 28,000 57,758 55,570 44,550 125 2,500 0 1,739,462 0 0 25,498 0 0 5,898 186,630 183,060 121,734 116,690 130,880 12,004 0 0 120,638 0 0 (16,228) 0 0 $ 2,909,918 $ 3,163,780 $ 2,965,860 $ 8,505 $ 7,280 $ 13,960 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 134 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 135 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain (7,349) 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 50,724 361,500 464,050 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 317,339 0 0 4520 Recreation Fees 0 61,070 41,550 4522 Processing Fees 57,618 80,840 85,000 4523 Web Sales Fees 42,809 0 0 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 1,761 1,300 650 4581 Ticket Sales 868,673 748,530 835,890 4586 Advertising Revenue 2,647 14,750 5,000 4588 Theatre Rental Ticket Sales 4,895 0 0 4591 Recreation Fees - ActiveNet 39,941 0 0 4592 Sale of Tax Items - ActiveNet 300 0 0 4596 Advertising Revenue -ActiveNet 2,625 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 63,454 72,500 42,500 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 131,443 137,000 126,700 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 34,895 0 0 TOTAL 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER $ 1,620,280 $ 1,484,770 $ 1,615,300 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 40 $ 40 TOTAL 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS $ 0 $ 40 $ 40 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,990,931 $ 4,085,350 $ 4,540,760 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 85,680 100,220 98,730 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 48,263 51,510 55,610 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 71,902 63,100 82,860 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Bic 140,340 140,340 140,340 4312 Library Fines and Fees 134,507 0 0 4401 Interest Earnings 79,878 67,460 92,740 4402 Unrealized Gain (76,110) 0 0 4410 Media Rentals 54,237 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 0 2,000 10,000 4512 Library Card & Merchndse Sales 5,321 0 5,000 4515 Interlibrary Loan (ILL) 110 100 100 4565 Passport Processing Fees 140,527 120,000 120,000 4567 Passport Photo Fees 28,411 24,000 20,000 4570 Sale of Printed Material 26,547 24,000 24,000 4575 Exhibit Sales 0 0 15,000 4591 Recreation Fees - ActiveNet 380 10,000 6,600 4690 Contract Classes -Library 19,317 25,500 10,000 4691 Program Revenue -Library 859 15,000 1,500 4740 Grant Income 10,487 25,000 10,000 4901 Other Revenue 3,490 125,940 125,940 4907 Private Contributions Library 137,000 137,000 140,000 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 31,000 65,000 554,610 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 2,500 2,500 0 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 0 17,630 15,000 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 302 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 135 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 4946 Fee Revenue - ActiveNet 8299 Transfer In -Library Devel Fund TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4575 Exhibit Sales TOTAL 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT -2000 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 8290 Transfer In -Library Fund TOTAL 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 370 - OTS-"DRINK,DRIVE,LOSE" GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain 4740 Grant Income 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget (6,196) 0 0 53,041 0 0 $ 4,982,724 $ 5,101,650 $ 6,068,790 $ (1,715) $ 0 $ 0 15,657 30,000 21,130 $ 3,982 $ 3,840 $ 4,610 (2,793) 0 0 701 0 2,920 $ 1,890 $ 3,840 $ 7,530 $ 0 $ 960 $ 0 0 20,000 0 $ 0 $ 20,960 $ 0 $ (382) $ 0 $ 0 382 0 0 $ (400) $ 0 $ 0 $ (400) $ 0 $ 0 (338) 0 0 338 0 0 $ 14,431 $ 14,200 $ 14,180 (8,138) 0 0 0 0 500,000 $ 6,293 $ 14,200 $ 514,180 $ (7,489) $ 0 $ 0 378,009 200,000 271,820 $ 370,520 $ 200,000 $ 271,820 $ 140 $ 0 $ 0 47,682 47,000 0 $ 47,822 $ 47,000 $ 0 (154) 0 0 154 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 136 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ (123) $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 177 0 0 TOTAL 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT $ 54 $ 0 $ 0 380 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ (307) $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 307 0 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 4740 Grant Income $ 9,081 $ 15,530 $ 68,290 TOTAL 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE $ 9,081 $ 15,530 $ 68,290 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 4740 Grant Income $ 27,028 $ 27,030 $ 26,730 TOTAL 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 27,028 $ 27,030 $ 26,730 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 306,159 $ 94,660 $ 154,560 4402 Unrealized Gain (96,934) 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 1,217,536 12,000 12,000 TOTAL 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 1,426,761 $ 106,660 $ 166,560 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 4401 Interest Earnings $ 209 $ 210 $ 250 4402 Unrealized Gain (123) 0 0 TOTAL 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 86 $ 210 $ 250 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 4401 Interest Earnings $ 17,962 $ 17,260 $ 21,020 4402 Unrealized Gain (12,537) 0 0 TOTAL 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 5,425 $ 17,260 $ 21,020 612 - CFD 2001-01 4401 Interest Earnings $ 8,068 $ 7,650 $ 53,950 4402 Unrealized Gain (43,466) 0 0 TOTAL 612 - CFD 2001-01 $ (35,398) $ 7,650 $ 53,950 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,321 $ 0 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain (2,461) 0 0 TOTAL 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND $ (1,140) $ 0 $ 0 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,441 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER $ 1,441 $ 0 $ 0 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 4401 Interest Earnings $ 378 $ 80 $ 100 4402 Unrealized Gain (31) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 137 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 4401 Interest Earnings TOTAL 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 4126 Admissions Tax 4402 Unrealized Gain 4411 Special Event Rental 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4426 Stadium Lease -Minimum Rent 4431 Special Event Rental-ActiveNet 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 4520 Recreation Fees 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4562 Maintenance Fees 4580 Stadium Security Reimbursement 4583 Baseball Security Reimb. 4585 Parking Fees -Sports Complex 4901 Other Revenue 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 702 - REGIS CONNECT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4670 REGIS Connect Service Fees TOTAL 702 - REGIS CONNECT 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4601 Monthly Srvc Fee -Electric Util 4602 Commodity Fee -Electric Util. 4603 New Srvc Activation Fee-Util. 4604 Dist Line Ext Fee-Elec Utility 4605 Wholesale Energy Sales & Cntrt 4608 Standby Demand Fee 4610 Late Fee -Electric Utility 4620 Low Income Disc (Contra Rev) 4621 Med Supp Assist (Contra -Rev) 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget $ 347 $ 80 $ 100 $ 0 $ 30 $ 40 $ 0 $ 30 $ 40 $ 81 $ 100 $ 120 (61) 0 0 $ 20 $ 100 $ 120 $ 62,195 $ 90,000 $ 105,000 3,656 0 0 27,950 7,000 13,000 134,956 178,920 183,400 103,000 100,000 110,000 26,725 0 0 35,084 42,500 42,500 126,926 85,260 85,800 4,111 4,410 4,410 2,503 3,220 3,220 37,471 6,250 6,250 30,735 34,150 34,150 47,904 47,320 47,320 (822) 0 0 70,929 1,500 3,500 862 0 0 1,917,299 2,067,420 2,166,750 $ 2,631,484 $ 2,667,950 $ 2,805,300 $ (163) $ 320 $ 1,310 (768) 0 0 42,930 105,280 50,000 $ 41,999 $ 105,600 $ 51,310 207,011 212,300 314,010 (161,222) 0 0 564,899 525,000 600,000 10,151,388 12,000,000 12,500,000 190,565 35,000 15,000 137,911 250,000 500,000 528,076 450,000 800,000 83,710 91,320 91,320 12,148 14,000 14,000 (100) 0 0 (120) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 138 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4609 Public Benefit Fund-Elec Util TOTAL 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 10,682 $ 6,780 $ 8,290 (8,000) 0 0 266,762 300,000 300,000 T ')fQ add It 1AA 7Rn e znR lon 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2018/19 2019/20 69,390 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4622 Economic Dev (Contra -Revenue) (45,847) 0 0 4735 ARB -Cap and Trade Revenue 428,218 325,000 325,000 4802 Developer Participation 90,680 0 20,000 4901 Other Revenue 2,920 0 0 4935 Contributed Capital 521,415 0 0 TOTAL 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 12,711,652 $ 13,902,620 $ 15,179,330 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4609 Public Benefit Fund-Elec Util TOTAL 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 10,682 $ 6,780 $ 8,290 (8,000) 0 0 266,762 300,000 300,000 T ')fQ add It 1AA 7Rn e znR lon 4401 Interest Earnings $ 78,309 $ 69,390 $ 100,570 4402 Unrealized Gain (64,211) 0 0 TOTAL 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 14,098 $ 69,390 $ 100,570 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 4401 Interest Earnings $ (2,277) $ 0 $ 141,570 4402 Unrealized Gain 108 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 58,857 75,000 75,000 4446 Fiber License Revenue 0 275,000 275,000 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 4,950 4,950 4,950 4921 Long -Term Debt Proceeds 0 2,100,000 0 4935 Contributed Capital 588,730 0 0 8025 Transfer In -Capital Rsry Fund 0 0 960,360 TOTAL 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK $ 650,368 $ 2,454,950 $ 1,456,880 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 34,329 $ 34,650 $ 28,210 4402 Unrealized Gain (17,605) 0 0 4540 Intragovernmental User Fees 0 300,000 530,000 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 0 0 150,000 TOTAL 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 16,724 $ 334,650 $ 708,210 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 20,689 $ 18,340 $ 21,050 4402 Unrealized Gain (10,936) 0 0 4540 Intragovernmental User Fees 349,180 421,550 584,190 8020 Transfer In -Fund 020 182,940 182,940 0 8025 Transfer In -Capital Rsry Fund 0 0 429,660 8288 Transfer In -Fund 288 0 0 107,420 TOTAL 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND $ 541,873 $ 622,830 $ 1,142,320 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 32,120 $ 32,580 $ 33,130 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 46 500 500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 5 150 150 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 139 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings 565 550 860 4402 Unrealized Gain (563) 0 0 TOTAL 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON $ 32,173 $ 33,780 $ 34,640 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 0 100 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,269 $ 2,360 $ 3,760 4402 Unrealized Gain (2,768) 0 0 8848 Transfer In -Fund 848 116,800 116,800 116,800 TOTAL 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 116,301 $ 119,160 $ 120,560 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4901 Other Revenue 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4554 Park Maintenance Fees TOTAL 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281 - FIRE FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 4110 Homeowners Exemption 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA 4211 Fire Permits 4309 False Alarm Fees 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures $ 1,148,934 78 11,120 3,910 22,289 (20,793) 121,232 4,777 210 15,922 206 203,990 1 51 1 271; $ 1,149,560 0 11,500 2,500 20,970 0 107,450 6,500 650 39,220 500 214,250 T 1 1;1;2 1nn $ 1,147,500 0 11,500 2,500 30,680 0 107,450 6,500 650 39,220 500 213,530 01 1 ;An nln $ 453,470 $ 466,600 $ 494,600 8,807 3,600 3,600 3,115 1,250 1,250 6,705 5,710 5,710 (5,854) 0 0 100 0 0 $ 466,343 $ 477,160 $ 505,160 e 11;o'2f74r1 e 1f7 nfn 2'n 4Z 112 R12 Ran $ 16,622,926 $ 17,185,110 $ 18,305,650 590,443 693,290 650,210 332,755 330,230 366,430 131,070 122,920 144,340 480,609 322,100 529,260 512,646 573,550 623,710 174,286 171,240 168,280 6,116,112 5,761,500 5,650,700 16,045 16,500 16,500 14,162 4,000 20,000 14,150 8,000 8,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 140 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 43,077,781 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 141 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 4314 Red Light Fines (220) 0 0 4316 Weed Abatement 124,289 62,000 90,000 4401 Interest Earnings 479,726 404,510 382,940 4402 Unrealized Gain (333,649) 0 0 4403 Restricted - Interest Earnings 264,559 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 92,468 97,890 107,460 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 1,917 0 0 4501 Plan Check Fees 112 1,000 1,000 4546 FSD Fees 0 140 140 4548 D.U.I. Recovery 297 280 280 4549 Hazmat Recovery 0 900 900 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees 150 1,000 3,000 4901 Other Revenue 27,782 10,600 10,600 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 900,724 691,800 706,800 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 144,933 845,520 851,260 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 3,854 3,400 3,400 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 26,712,146 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 5,938,124 $ 6,006,190 $ 5,959,650 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 7,160 30,610 7,550 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 18,463 19,300 20,000 4401 Interest Earnings 48,832 39,820 43,570 4402 Unrealized Gain (29,885) 0 0 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,982,694 $ 6,095,920 $ 6,030,770 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 1,215,406 $ 1,230,760 $ 410,150 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 12,668 8,020 13,420 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4,568 1,970 4,630 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,291,362 $ 2,445,940 $ 2,394,810 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 387 $ 350 $ 400 4402 Unrealized Gain (224) 0 0 4517 Technology Fee -Permit 315 1,000 500 TOTAL 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 478 $ 1,350 $ 900 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA $ 7,784,143 $ 8,306,070 $ 9,758,450 4401 Interest Earnings 505,454 482,720 538,260 4402 Unrealized Gain (216,677) 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 18,181 17,000 17,000 TOTAL 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND $ 8,091,101 $ 8,805,790 $ 10,313,710 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 43,077,781 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 141 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 202,445,442 $ 211,716,800 $ 266,194,890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 142 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 143 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 84,890,789 $ 83,919,400 $ 88,290,270 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 84,890,789 $ 83,919,400 $ 88,290,270 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 131,414 $ 122,670 $ 162,480 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 318,690 350,000 463,500 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS (317) 0 0 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 37,172 318,490 101,420 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 63,194 96,270 150,930 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 360,601 397,430 408,740 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 140,153 166,440 0 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 204,762 183,320 311,880 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 19,726 21,160 21,960 023 - SB 1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 23,880 19,130 19,940 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 1,499,954 2,033,010 2,198,970 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 25,046 37,380 60,210 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 2,824,275 $ 3,745,300 $ 3,900,030 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 954,095 $ 889,510 $ 1,019,250 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 2,295 170 210 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 231,472 856,750 558,210 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 5,091 12,000 16,560 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 194,493 199,860 285,980 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 1,098,248 541,300 159,490 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 67,295 77,710 326,170 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 95,659 81,390 7,950 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE (10,735) 0 0 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 120,037 105,620 37,250 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 2,767 8,600 10,700 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 98,686 111,210 220,200 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 101,292 183,920 145,780 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 220,916 12,380 16,160 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 45,089 57,060 117,800 124 - TRANSPORTATION 8,160,017 3,992,200 3,742,590 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 9,882 16,480 25,320 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 2,943 9,150 11,370 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 113,637 44,640 110,570 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 3,227 10,420 12,690 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 158,748 257,740 288,180 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,413,671 1,451,410 1,456,770 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,703,356 3,879,120 3,937,130 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 3,693 4,220 4,280 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS 1,026,890 1,098,950 1,093,480 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 2,761,524 2,799,780 2,888,970 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 2,707 3,000 3,020 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 550,932 575,480 574,290 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,033,619 1,027,500 999,930 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 143 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 144 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 34,561 35,300 35,520 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 317,542 528,210 689,550 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 598,104 620,720 624,590 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 89,650 91,930 93,890 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 46,667 151,080 351,620 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 1,263,062 817,310 830,580 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 1,123,016 564,480 660,700 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 414,935 375,370 385,090 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 229,208 171,160 184,270 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 81,742 44,220 44,220 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 144,016 141,820 141,430 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 352,999 192,880 216,590 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 87,168 102,150 109,060 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 3,780,924 3,957,030 4,903,310 176 - MEASURE 11990-20 10 2,640 6,350 5,650 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 3,103,159 3,183,270 3,061,140 178 - SB 140 (369) 0 0 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 1,030,640 2,949,290 2,918,340 181 - SB 1 - TCEP 0 7,850,000 52,150,000 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF (3,210) 0 0 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 2,030,740 1,700,850 1,535,580 190 - PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 0 3,180 0 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 1,165 3,730 4,540 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 614 1,210 1,320 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 20 100 60 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 1,702,969 1,630,480 1,693,550 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 832,434 2,130,140 1,440,010 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 1,652,939 600,480 0 211 - PROP 113 - SLPP 10 19,970 0 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 56,479 43,000 451,000 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 495 19,600 19,600 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 56,236 70,840 59,390 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 38,808 47,530 49,430 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 20,437 145,610 118,900 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 341 0 0 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS -DREIER (123) 0 0 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 2,909,917 3,163,780 2,965,860 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 1,620,278 1,484,770 1,615,300 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 0 40 40 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4,982,724 5,101,650 6,068,790 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 13,942 30,000 21,130 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 1,890 3,840 7,530 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 0 20,960 0 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT (400) 0 0 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 6,293 14,200 514,180 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 370,520 200,000 271,820 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 47,823 47,000 0 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT 54 0 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 9,081 15,530 68,290 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 27,028 27,030 26,730 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 1,426,761 106,660 166,560 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 144 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 159,367,654 $ 167,060,320 $ 218,813,840 $ 26,712,146 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 5,982,694 6,095,920 6,030,770 2,291,362 2,445,940 2,394,810 477 1,350 900 8,091,101 8,805,790 10,313,710 $ 43,077,780 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 $ 43,077,780 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 $ 202.445.434 S 211.716.800 S 266.194.890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 145 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 32,174 33,780 34,640 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 116,301 119,160 120,560 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,511,876 1,553,100 1,560,030 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 466,343 477,160 505,160 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 54,804,169 $ 58,905,520 $ 104,795,850 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 86 $ 210 $ 250 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 5,425 17,260 21,020 612 - CFD 2001-01 (35,399) 7,650 53,950 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND (1,140) 0 0 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 1,441 0 0 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 348 80 100 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 0 30 40 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 20 100 120 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ (29,219) $ 25,330 $ 75,480 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,631,484 $ 2,667,950 $ 2,805,300 702 - REGIS CONNECT 41,999 105,600 51,310 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 12,711,651 13,902,620 15,179,330 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 269,445 306,780 308,290 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 14,097 69,390 100,570 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 650,367 2,454,950 1,456,880 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 16,319,043 $ 19,507,290 $ 19,901,680 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 16,724 $ 334,650 $ 708,210 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 541,873 622,830 1,142,320 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 558,597 $ 957,480 $ 1,850,530 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 159,367,654 $ 167,060,320 $ 218,813,840 $ 26,712,146 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 5,982,694 6,095,920 6,030,770 2,291,362 2,445,940 2,394,810 477 1,350 900 8,091,101 8,805,790 10,313,710 $ 43,077,780 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 $ 43,077,780 $ 44,656,480 $ 47,381,050 $ 202.445.434 S 211.716.800 S 266.194.890 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 145 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 146 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Expenditure Summaries Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 147 Building & Safety Services 1.46% Econ. and Comm. Dev. 0.61% Innovation & Technology. 3.10% Human Resources 0.78% Finance. 1.43% Administrative Services 5.94% Library Ser 4.40% City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Expenditure Summary by Department Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Engineering Services 2.12% Planning Public Works Services 1.38%` 8.89% Governance 2.10% . Police 32.26% Community Services—/ 1 4.24% Records Management 0.39% Animal Care and Services 2.60% Governance Police Fire District Animal Care and Services Records Management Community Services Library Services Administrative Services Finance Human Resources Innovation & Technology Econ. and Comm. Dev. Building & Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Fire District 28.31% $ 2,749,310 42,327,060 37,144,160 3,416,210 505,450 5,562,050 5,771,450 7,791,390 1,877,380 1,017,550 4,067,690 805,350 1,916,950 2,780,770 1,810,830 11,662,280 Total Operating Budget $ 131,205,880 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001), Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and City Library Fund (Fund 290). Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 148 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 149 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 001 -GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 25,730,383 $ 28,424,160 $ 30,289,680 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 52,704,083 56,058,520 58,846,590 CAPITAL OUTLAY 76,248 533,000 475,000 DEBT SERVICE 25,692 108,250 106,450 COST ALLOCATION (5,376,960) (5,527,170) (6,072,840) TRANSFER OUT 4,224,730 4,347,640 4,645,390 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 77,384,176 $ 83,944,400 $ 88,290,270 281 -FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 17,413,950 $ 19,489,380 $ 19,432,400 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5,809,751 6,212,250 6,841,860 DEBT SERVICE 94,935 400,660 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,377,356 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 282 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 5,095,240 $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 831,920 742,140 720,960 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,927,160 $ 6,065,870 $ 6,108,490 283 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 2,063,680 $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 215,329 228,660 229,950 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,279,009 $ 2,445,940 $ 2,394,810 290 -LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 3,251,833 $ 3,543,130 $ 3,751,760 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 1,309,154 1,483,310 1,514,690 CAPITAL OUTLAY 0 98,000 5,000 DEBT SERVICE 7,656 1,790 0 TRANSFER OUT 37,935 0 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 4,606,578 $ 5,126,230 $ 5,771,450 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 114,574,279 $ 124,889,920 $ 131,205,880 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 149 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 150 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 001 -GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 15,750,147 $ 17,280,240 $ 18,381,960 5005 - Overtime Salaries 286,483 363,760 353,160 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,213,035 2,355,260 2,327,240 Fringe Benefits 7,624,137 8,425,050 9,137,900 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 18,998 30,000 26,000 5061 - Employee Development 91,357 170,000 101,040 5065 - Coffee Fund 4,006 5,000 5,000 5070 - Executive Reimbursement 0 0 10,000 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (257,780) (205,150) (52,620) TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 25,730,383 $ 28,424,160 $ 30,289,680 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 342,144 $ 429,000 $ 415,000 5102 - Training 256,089 320,590 322,890 5105 - Mileage 6,141 7,880 7,730 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 187,981 231,030 226,060 5151 - Postage 97,687 98,410 98,410 5152 - Computer Software 26,668 16,180 8,980 5160 - Membership Dues 149,342 169,010 181,870 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 9,857 29,440 23,880 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 185,522 204,500 194,750 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,303,903 1,712,140 1,680,950 5201 - O & M/Volunteer Program 20,000 20,000 20,000 5204 - O & M/Facilities 423,794 478,000 468,000 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 23,379 0 0 5210 - O & M/Crime Prevention 22,843 23,000 29,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 9,922 27,940 23,500 5217 - Technical Investigative Costs 95,347 148,900 200,780 5220 - Cellular Technology 137,613 149,200 147,010 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 367,238 450,850 449,350 5251 - Depreciation - Vehicles 0 250,900 443,260 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 22,346 38,300 37,000 5253 - Vehicle Collision Repair 28,987 100,000 100,000 5255 - Gasoline 510,542 490,000 546,000 5256 - Diesel Fuel 16,582 15,000 15,000 5257 - CNG Fuel 10,517 13,400 13,400 5260 - O&M/Animal Care 115,375 123,330 116,630 5262 - O&M/Community & Info Programs 4,053 5,500 4,000 5263 - O&M/Field Services 5,282 5,000 5,000 5264 - O&M/Veterinarian Services 175,281 149,000 139,000 5265 - O&M/Kitten Nursery 47,447 23,000 20,090 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 21,410 30,480 30,480 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 150 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget COST ALLOCATION 5990 - Cost Allocation Plan Offset $ (5,376,960) $ (5,527,170) $ (6,072,840) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 151 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5281 - Depreciation - Equipment 0 49,100 86,740 5283 - Depreciation -Computer Equip 349,180 421,550 584,190 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 40,953 46,000 46,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 85,321 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 42,027,817 44,376,070 46,367,680 5303 - Contract Sery/Reimbursable 27,800 240,200 240,450 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 1,446,450 1,714,400 1,840,080 5310 - Tree Maintenance 654,023 665,000 575,000 5312 - Legal Services 519,123 430,000 656,250 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 11,359 24,320 24,320 5360 - Contract Sery/Animal Care 14,967 14,820 14,820 5362 - Contract Sery/Comm & Info Prgm 718 2,490 2,490 5363 - Contract Sery/Field Services 13,361 16,500 15,500 5364 - Contract ServNet Services 77,409 81,400 56,400 5365 - Cont Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 13,866 15,000 40,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 171,279 42,690 132,930 5401 - Gas Utilities 91,110 101,150 112,330 5402 - Water Utilities 409,831 470,620 470,620 5403 - Electric Utilities 1,083,652 1,119,500 1,111,300 5405 - Internet Services 105,528 119,340 130,000 5410 - Property Insurance 202,305 233,660 270,110 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 69,974 114,730 101,360 5725 - Other Expenditures 641,474 0 0 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 23,292 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 52,704,084 $ 56,058,520 $ 58,846,590 CAPITAL OUTLAY 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land $ 3,750 $ 0 $ 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 25,000 0 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 29,957 8,000 0 5650 - Capital Project 127,862 500,000 475,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (85,321) 0 0 TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY $ 76,248 $ 533,000 $ 475,000 DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense $ 17,400 $ 13,700 $ 11,980 5701 - Principal Repayments 985,177 92,750 94,470 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 8,292 1,800 0 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (985,177) 0 0 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 25,692 $ 108,250 $ 106,450 COST ALLOCATION 5990 - Cost Allocation Plan Offset $ (5,376,960) $ (5,527,170) $ (6,072,840) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 151 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 152 2017/18 Actual 2018/19 Adopted Budget 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL COST ALLOCATION $ (5,376,960) $ (5,527,170) $ (6,072,840) TRANSFER OUT 9018 - Transfer Out - Traffic Safety $ 153,470 $ 179,230 $ 220,160 9025 - Transfer Out -Capital Reserve 1,025,000 1,140,000 1,175,000 9130 - Transfer Out-LMD1 123,410 135,820 135,830 9131 - Transfer Out-LMD2 293,490 299,540 324,860 9136 - Transfer Out-LMD6R 52,460 60,370 41,090 9152 - Transfer Out-SLD2 350,170 188,420 284,250 9157 - Transfer Out-SLD7 105,100 62,590 83,920 9235 - Transfer Out -Fund 235 341 0 0 9700 - Transfer Out -Sports Complex 1,917,299 2,067,420 2,166,750 9848 - Transfer Out -Fund 848 203,990 214,250 213,530 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 4,224,730 $ 4,347,640 $ 4,645,390 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 77,384,177 $ 83,944,400 $ 88,290,270 281 -FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,089,015 $ 13,572,200 $ 13,720,630 5005 - Overtime Salaries 3,559,647 3,929,050 3,979,510 5010 - Part Time Salaries 137,363 145,310 176,450 Fringe Benefits 7,811,573 9,400,860 9,124,930 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 2,300 10,000 10,000 5082 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (5,095,240) (5,323,730) (5,387,530) 5083 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 88-1 (2,063,680) (2,217,280) (2,164,860) 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (27,028) (27,030) (26,730) TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 17,413,950 $ 19,489,380 $ 19,432,400 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 15,048 $ 30,490 $ 27,160 5102 - Training 92,554 159,520 155,670 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 23,908 33,570 32,550 5151 -Postage 7 300 300 5152 - Computer Software 0 640 640 5155 - Public Relations/Educ Material 34,140 36,750 36,750 5160 - Membership Dues 5,047 8,640 10,530 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 1,306 5,410 14,050 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 5,561 8,470 9,030 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 247,069 322,460 339,420 5204 - O & M/Facilities 71,005 102,000 98,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 2,451 0 0 5220 - Cellular Technology 39,411 52,200 53,200 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 129,356 209,800 209,930 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 152 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL FIRE FUND 282 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES Fringe Benefits $ 24,377,358 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 0 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 153 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,500 1,500 5255 - Gasoline 34,386 52,930 54,520 5256 - Diesel Fuel 80,189 123,800 132,420 5258 -Propane 10,927 10,000 19,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 18,094 44,500 40,500 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 68,119 82,600 117,190 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 38,394 47,000 47,200 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 24,534 30,350 49,100 5300 - Contract Services 929,337 1,029,090 1,216,610 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 164,661 256,500 277,200 5312 - Legal Services 39,605 50,000 50,000 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 2,040 2,500 2,500 5321 - Fire Incident Costs 3,708 3,500 3,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 20,401 26,320 17,910 5401 - Gas Utilities 5,073 11,110 12,080 5402 - Water Utilities 15,213 18,460 19,640 5403 - Electric Utilities 56,938 94,970 95,010 5410 - Property Insurance 87,659 89,850 95,250 5411 - Other Insurance 4,310 4,750 5,500 5416 - General Liability Insurance 224,227 253,600 295,560 5500 - Assessment Administration 42,520 87,300 97,570 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,264,880 2,365,500 2,725,110 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 112,233 212,100 123,600 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 337,790 343,770 356,160 5725 - Other Expenditures 609,166 0 0 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other (51,514) 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 5,809,753 $ 6,212,250 $ 6,841,860 DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense $ 92,020 $ 77,830 $ 63,200 5701 - Principal Repayments 308,005 322,150 336,790 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 2,915 680 0 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (308,005) 0 0 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 94,935 $ 400,660 $ 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 9283 - Transfer Out -CFD 88-1 $ 1,058,720 $ 1,205,190 $ 1,966,610 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 1,058,720 $ 1,205,190 $ 1,966,610 TOTAL FIRE FUND 282 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES Fringe Benefits $ 24,377,358 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 0 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 153 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees $ 1,290 $ 1,310 $ 1,410 2018/19 2019/20 4,000 4,000 2017/18 85,232 Adopted Preliminary 5400 - Telephone Utilities 3,275 Actual 1,600 Budget Budget 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund 2,070 5,095,240 3,670 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 5,095,240 $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 107,030 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 215,329 $ 228,660 $ 229,950 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment $ 43 $ 0 $ 0 5160 - Membership Dues 40 0 0 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 11 0 0 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 3,035 2,960 3,200 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 15,199 10,000 10,000 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 64,633 0 0 5255 - Gasoline 16,125 0 0 5256 - Diesel Fuel 43,560 0 0 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 3,297 0 0 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 15,624 15,640 0 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 2,971 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 343,523 367,400 375,330 5400 - Telephone Utilities 6,804 11,780 4,270 5401 - Gas Utilities 4,376 5,930 5,930 5402 - Water Utilities 12,000 10,580 13,710 5403 - Electric Utilities 45,825 52,470 56,240 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 251,720 265,380 252,280 5725 - Other Expenditures 3,132 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 831,918 $ 742,140 $ 720,960 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,927,158 $ 6,065,870 $ 6,108,490 283 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES Fringe Benefits 0 0 0 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 2,063,680 $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 2,063,680 $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees $ 1,290 $ 1,310 $ 1,410 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,323 4,000 4,000 5300 - Contract Services 85,232 86,880 93,420 5400 - Telephone Utilities 3,275 5,440 1,600 5401 - Gas Utilities 1,230 2,070 2,070 5402 - Water Utilities 3,670 5,240 5,240 5403 - Electric Utilities 13,899 15,180 15,180 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 104,410 108,540 107,030 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 215,329 $ 228,660 $ 229,950 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 154 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 290 -LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5152 - Computer Software 5160 - Membership Dues 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5220 - Cellular Technology 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5360 - Contract Sery/Animal Care 5400 - Telephone Utilities 5402 - Water Utilities 5403 - Electric Utilities 5405 - Internet Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense 5703 - Capital Lease Payment TOTAL DEBT SERVICE TRANSFER OUT 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 9329 - Transfer Out -Library Cap Fund $ 2,279,009 $ 2,445,940 $ 2,394,810 $ 1,637,670 $ 1,747,630 $ 1,842,420 763,170 878,200 928,810 $ 2,400,840 $ 2,625,830 $ 2,771,230 850,992 917,300 980,530 $ 31,659 $ 26,450 $ 31,740 5,977 6,000 0 745 1,000 1,000 18,742 20,750 20,750 0 3,000 1,400 5,668 6,700 7,190 706,426 870,990 799,700 0 40,000 40,000 43,325 23,400 20,240 470 1,010 500 22,005 0 0 270,002 254,160 352,830 (150) 0 0 9,509 10,500 10,500 5,913 5,040 5,040 65,698 65,000 65,000 37,365 54,930 54,930 85,800 94,380 103,870 $ 2,160,146 $ 2,400,610 $ 2,495,220 $ 20,005 $ 8,000 $ 5,000 2,000 90,000 0 0 $ 98,000 $ 5,000 104 $ 0 $ N $ 7,656 $ 1,790 $ 0 $ 37,935 $ 0 $ 0 0 0 500,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 155 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 37,935 $ 0 $ 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 4,606,577 $ 5,126,230 $ 5,771,450 $ 114,574,279 $ 124,889,920 $ 131,205,880 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 156 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 157 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Expenditure Summary by Department All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Public Works Services 11.90% Planning 1.40%- Engineering .40%_ Engineering Services 33.23% Building and Safety' Services 0.73% Econ. and Comm. Dev. 0.55% Innovation and Technology 2.00% / Human Resources - 0.38% Finance 2.24% Governance Governance 1.03% Police 16.39% Fire District 15.55% Animal Care and Services 1.27% s, Records Management 0.19% Community Services 4.25% Library Services Administrative2.38% Services 6.52% Police Fire District Animal Care and Services Records Management Community Services Library Services Administrative Services Finance Human Resources Innovation and Technology Econ. and Comm. Dev. Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Total All Funds Budget $ 2,759,040 44,016,280 41,768,390 3,416,930 505,450 11,407,490 6,379,910 17,512,910 6,029,220 1,017,550 5,362,380 1,464,010 1,959,190 89,264,070 3,763,230 31,962,350 �� Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 158 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 216,981,622 $ 229,950,370 $ 268,588,400 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 159 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 42,388,341 $ 46,521,420 $ 48,766,250 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 97,434,809 87,554,930 93,329,930 CAPITAL OUTLAY 24,314,890 43,659,000 79,121,470 DEBT SERVICE 162,507 1,037,810 2,517,260 COST ALLOCATION (5,376,960) (5,527,170) (6,072,840) TRANSFER OUT 6,652,121 6,567,910 9,184,670 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 165,575,708 $ 179,813,900 $ 226,846,740 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 24,572,870 $ 27,030,390 $ 26,984,790 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 7,680,812 7,803,620 8,322,350 CAPITAL OUTLAY 17,998,577 13,696,610 3,960,500 DEBT SERVICE 94,935 400,660 399,990 TRANSFER OUT 1,058,720 1,205,190 2,074,030 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 51,405,914 $ 50,136,470 $ 41,741,660 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 216,981,622 $ 229,950,370 $ 268,588,400 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 159 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001 -GENERAL FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 15,750,147 $ 17,280,240 $ 18,381,960 5005 - Overtime Salaries 286,483 363,760 353,160 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,213,035 2,355,260 2,327,240 Fringe Benefits 7,624,137 8,425,050 9,137,900 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 18,998 30,000 26,000 5061 - Employee Development 91,357 170,000 101,040 5065 - Coffee Fund 4,006 5,000 5,000 5070 - Executive Reimbursement 0 0 10,000 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (257,780) (205,150) (52,620) 5100 - Travel and Meetings 342,144 429,000 415,000 5102 - Training 256,089 320,590 322,890 5105 - Mileage 6,141 7,880 7,730 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 187,981 231,030 226,060 5151 - Postage 97,687 98,410 98,410 5152 - Computer Software 26,668 16,180 8,980 5160 - Membership Dues 149,342 169,010 181,870 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 9,857 29,440 23,880 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 185,522 204,500 194,750 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,303,903 1,712,140 1,680,950 5201 - O & M/Volunteer Program 20,000 20,000 20,000 5204 - O & M/Facilities 423,794 478,000 468,000 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 23,379 0 0 5210 - O & M/Crime Prevention 22,843 23,000 29,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 9,922 27,940 23,500 5217 - Technical Investigative Costs 95,347 148,900 200,780 5220 - Cellular Technology 137,613 149,200 147,010 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 367,238 450,850 449,350 5251 - Depreciation - Vehicles 0 250,900 443,260 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 22,346 38,300 37,000 5253 - Vehicle Collision Repair 28,987 100,000 100,000 5255 - Gasoline 510,542 490,000 546,000 5256 - Diesel Fuel 16,582 15,000 15,000 5257 - CNG Fuel 10,517 13,400 13,400 5260 - O&M/Animal Care 115,375 123,330 116,630 5262 - O&M/Community & Info Programs 4,053 5,500 4,000 5263 - O&M/Field Services 5,282 5,000 5,000 5264 - O&M/Veterinarian Services 175,281 149,000 139,000 5265 - O&M/Kitten Nursery 47,447 23,000 20,090 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 21,410 30,480 30,480 5281 - Depreciation - Equipment 0 49,100 86,740 5283 - Depreciation -Computer Equip 349,180 421,550 584,190 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 40,953 46,000 46,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 85,321 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 42,027,817 44,376,070 46,367,680 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 16o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 161 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5303 - Contract Serv/Reimbursable 27,800 240,200 240,450 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 1,446,450 1,714,400 1,840,080 53 10 - Tree Maintenance 654,023 665,000 575,000 5312 - Legal Services 519,123 430,000 656,250 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 11,359 24,320 24,320 5360 - Contract Sery/Animal Care 14,967 14,820 14,820 5362 - Contract Sery/Comm & Info Prgm 718 2,490 2,490 5363 - Contract Sery/Field Services 13,361 16,500 15,500 5364 - Contract ServNet Services 77,409 81,400 56,400 5365 - Cont Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 13,866 15,000 40,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 171,279 42,690 132,930 5401 - Gas Utilities 91,110 101,150 112,330 5402 - Water Utilities 409,831 470,620 470,620 5403 - Electric Utilities 1,083,652 1,119,500 1,111,300 5405 - Internet Services 105,528 119,340 130,000 5410 - Property Insurance 202,305 233,660 270,110 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 69,974 114,730 101,360 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land 3,750 0 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 25,000 0 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 29,957 8,000 0 5650 - Capital Project 127,862 500,000 475,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (85,321) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 17,400 13,700 11,980 5701 - Principal Repayments 985,177 92,750 94,470 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 8,292 1,800 0 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (985,177) 0 0 5725 - Other Expenditures 641,474 0 0 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 23,292 0 0 5990 - Cost Allocation Plan Offset (5,376,960) (5,527,170) (6,072,840) 9018 - Transfer Out - Traffic Safety 153,470 179,230 220,160 9025 - Transfer Out -Capital Reserve 1,025,000 1,140,000 1,175,000 9130 - Transfer Out-LMD1 123,410 135,820 135,830 9131 - Transfer Out-LMD2 293,490 299,540 324,860 9136 - Transfer Out-LMD6R 52,460 60,370 41,090 9152 - Transfer Out-SLD2 350,170 188,420 284,250 9157 - Transfer Out-SLD7 105,100 62,590 83,920 9235 - Transfer Out -Fund 235 341 0 0 9700 - Transfer Out -Sports Complex 1,917,299 2,067,420 2,166,750 9848 - Transfer Out -Fund 848 203,990 214,250 213,530 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 77,384,177 $ 83,944,400 $ 88,290,270 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 131,771 $ 122,670 $ 162,480 TOTAL REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 131,771 $ 122,670 $ 162,480 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 161 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 020 -CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 162 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5000 - Regular Salaries 71,915 95,650 102,290 5005 - Overtime Salaries 1 0 0 Fringe Benefits 34,036 44,940 49,100 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 43,525 51,300 86,500 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5,622 10,000 10,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,000 1,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 445 500 500 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 39,170 71,850 64,720 9174 - Transfer Out -Fund 174 0 0 150,000 9712 - T/O Equipment/Vehicle Replacem 0 0 150,000 TOTAL CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS $ 194,714 $ 275,240 $ 614,110 016 -COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 1,088 $ 1,400 $ 1,400 5102 - Training 0 500 500 5152 - Computer Software 12,270 0 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,641 3,000 5,200 5215 - 0 & M/Computer Equipment 2,613 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 41,094 404,000 554,000 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 15,000 0 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 0 38,000 0 TOTAL COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND $ 58,706 $ 461,900 $ 561,100 017 -LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 5152 - Computer Software $ 80,799 $ 0 $ 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 31,053 0 1,300 5207 - 0 & M/Capital Supplies 0 0 33,000 5215 - 0 & M/Computer Equipment 5,977 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 12,190 0 198,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,210 5,580 2,420 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 185,880 334,000 415,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 3,600,000 0 TOTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE $ 321,109 $ 3,939,580 $ 649,720 018 -TRAFFIC SAFETY 5300 - Contract Services $ 350,016 $ 393,000 $ 405,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,430 3,740 4,260 TOTAL TRAFFIC SAFETY $ 354,446 $ 396,740 $ 409,260 019 -INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 124,760 $ 105,450 $ 0 TOTAL INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT $ 124,760 $ 105,450 $ 0 020 -CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 162 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 180 140 $ 97,560 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 182,940 182,940 0 TOTAL CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 183.120 $ 183.080 $ 97.560 022 -MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 3,150 $ 3,150 $ 3,150 5300 - Contract Services 0 31,000 31,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,860 390 2,360 TOTAL MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM $ 7,010 $ 34,540 $ 36,510 023-SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 5102 - Training $ 75 $ 780 $ 780 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 3,600 3,600 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 50 1,530 1,350 TOTAL SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG $ 125 $ 5,910 $ 5,730 025 -CAPITAL RESERVE 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 3,813 $ 10,000 $ 5,000 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 0 74,000 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 22,000 10,000 150,400 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 117,456 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 54,732 75,440 416,900 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 0 0 70,000 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 17,268 20,000 20,000 5411 -Other Insurance 22,797 35,070 34,910 5416 - General Liability Insurance 326,475 356,670 424,690 5417 - General Liability Claims 361,674 500,000 500,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 36,330 36,700 67,350 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 474,743 775,780 922,000 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 3,513 0 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 54,277 0 5,000 5650 - Capital Project 3,111,858 2,783,000 2,155,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (117,456) 0 0 5725 - Other Expenditures 176,000 0 0 9711 - Transfer Out -Fund 711 0 0 960,360 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 0 0 429,660 TOTAL CAPITAL RESERVE $ 4,665,480 $ 4,602,660 $ 6,235,270 073 -BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 1,165,853 $ 897,300 $ 897,300 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 7,020 9,270 9,460 TOTAL BENEFITS CONTINGENCY $ 1,172,873 $ 906,570 $ 906,760 100 -ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 163 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 164 F 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5000 - Regular Salaries 146,472 170,370 159,430 Fringe Benefits 68,756 79,510 75,950 5100 - Travel and Meetings 3,760 9,250 7,350 5102 - Training 550 3,000 3,000 5105 - Mileage 0 300 300 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 520 1,500 1,500 5151 - Postage 350 10,000 10,000 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 17,076 34,690 29,240 5300 - Contract Services 84,298 146,910 178,660 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 516,460 470,570 605,800 9805 - Transfer out to Fund 805 39,976 0 0 9810 - Transfer Out -Fund 810 0 0 0 9842 - Transfer out to Fund 842 10,030 0 0 TOTAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 888,248 $ 926,100 $ 1,071,230 101 -AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 220 $ 210 TOTAL AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER $ 0 $ 220 $ 210 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 17,834 $ 20,000 $ 15,560 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 1,413 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 1,380 1,410 1,410 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,790 430 840 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 20,000 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 160,000 5650 - Capital Project 14,982 611,160 813,180 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,413) 0 0 TOTAL AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT $ 35,986 $ 653,000 $ 990,990 110 -BEAUTIFICATION 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 850 $ 270 $ 440 5650 - Capital Project 9,426 537,000 410,000 TOTAL BEAUTIFICATION $ 10,276 $ 537,270 $ 410,440 111 -PARK LAND ACQUISITION 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 30,350 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 290 360 TOTAL PARK LAND ACQUISITION $ 0 $ 290 $ 30,710 112 -DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 23,569 $ 32,710 $ 27,670 Fringe Benefits 11,160 15,370 13,290 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 12,106 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 164 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 165 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5300 - Contract Services 0 50,000 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 7,600 6,430 6,710 5650 - Capital Project 299,236 100,000 100,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (12,106) 0 0 TOTAL DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL $ 341,565 $ 204,510 $ 147,670 113-COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 10,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 110 140 TOTAL COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT $ 0 $ 110 $ 10,140 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 25,000 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 400 390 370 TOTAL DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 400 $ 25,390 $ 370 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 250 $ 260 TOTAL HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ 0 $ 250 $ 260 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 20,890 $ 20,920 $ 23,930 Fringe Benefits 9,892 9,830 11,490 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 67,750 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 0 150,000 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,120 4,190 4,180 5650 - Capital Project 67,750 100,000 100,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (67,750) 0 0 TOTAL ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 102,652 $ 284,940 $ 139,600 118 -UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 25,000 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 380 380 390 TOTAL UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 380 $ 25,380 $ 390 119 -PARK IMPROVEMENT 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 14,660 TOTAL PARK IMPROVEMENT $ 0 $ 0 $ 14,660 120 -PARK DEVELOPMENT 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 66,566 $ 64,010 $ 67,540 5010 - Part Time Salaries 15,434 16,810 0 Fringe Benefits 31,745 30,320 32,420 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 165 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 166 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5100 - Travel and Meetings 1,329 2,300 2,300 5102 - Training 280 500 500 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 0 200 200 5160 - Membership Dues 85 240 240 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 0 150 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,388 600 500 5300 - Contract Services 1,565 5,000 50,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,570 15,680 15,020 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 170,000 150,000 5650 - Capital Project 4,251,366 405,000 450,000 TOTAL PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 4,374,328 $ 710,810 $ 768,720 122 -SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 180 $ 160 $ 240 TOTAL SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 180 $ 160 $ 240 123 -LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 3,330 TOTAL LIBRARY IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 0 $ 3,330 124 -TRANSPORTATION 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 523,039 $ 437,020 $ 396,400 Fringe Benefits 247,159 205,060 190,280 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 114,318 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 81,150 83,150 62,650 5650 - Capital Project 5,585,474 5,006,750 7,747,500 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (114,318) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 59,670 59,760 0 TOTAL TRANSPORTATION $ 6,496,492 $ 5,791,740 $ 8,396,830 125 -ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 720 TOTAL ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 0 $ 720 126 -LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 25,000 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 390 390 400 TOTAL LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 390 $ 25,390 $ 400 127 -POLICE IMPACT FEE 5309 - Contract Srvc/Electric Utility $ 0 $ 0 $ 960 TOTAL POLICE IMPACT FEE $ 0 $ 0 $ 960 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 166 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 167 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 128-ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 190 $ 170 $ 180 TOTAL ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. $ 190 $ 170 $ 180 129 -UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 222,747 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,310 3,180 3,210 5650 - Capital Project 222,747 75,000 77,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (222,747) 0 0 TOTAL UNDERGROUND UTILITIES $ 226,057 $ 78,180 $ 80,210 130-LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 16,644 $ 17,090 $ 17,820 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,457 5,000 5,000 Fringe Benefits 8,101 9,030 9,560 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 53,354 70,100 70,100 5204 - O & M/Facilities 2,218 2,300 2,300 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 1,321 2,000 2,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 2,800 5,800 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 1,547 2,000 2,000 5300 - Contract Services 462,927 636,320 649,360 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 6,214 7,600 7,630 5310 - Tree Maintenance 51,985 52,500 52,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 2,085 2,790 2,000 5402 - Water Utilities 329,429 342,760 342,760 5403 - Electric Utilities 52,022 82,470 65,980 5500 - Assessment Administration 66,090 56,230 62,850 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 40,960 45,930 47,410 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 50,000 363,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 50,000 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 660 660 660 9141 - Transfer Out -Fund 141 90,000 90,000 90,000 TOTAL LMD #1 GENERAL CITY $ 1,188,014 $ 1,477,580 $ 1,848,730 131-LMD #2 VICTORIA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 498,195 $ 544,690 $ 555,760 5005 - Overtime Salaries 622 1,090 1,090 5010 - Part Time Salaries 51,811 90,220 90,220 Fringe Benefits 240,160 273,240 284,810 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 76,711 86,150 86,150 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 1,665 5,000 5,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 200 200 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 64,320 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 1,088,151 1,365,910 1,627,240 5310 - Tree Maintenance 163,321 163,340 163,340 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 167 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 168 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5400 - Telephone Utilities 173 0 0 5402 - Water Utilities 777,822 776,530 801,940 5403 - Electric Utilities 61,416 90,520 72,420 5500 - Assessment Administration 36,060 31,390 35,080 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 265,170 280,010 289,680 5504 - Interfund Allocation 75,180 78,000 80,430 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 15,976 6,000 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 13,260 0 114,000 5650 - Capital Project 174,308 110,000 642,550 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (64,320) 0 0 TOTAL LMD #2 VICTORIA $ 3,540,001 $ 3,902,290 $ 4,849,910 132-LMD #3A HYSSOP 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 499 $ 1,250 $ 1,250 5300 - Contract Services 3,633 5,030 5,260 5310 - Tree Maintenance 0 900 900 5402 - Water Utilities 1,130 1,320 1,320 5403 - Electric Utilities 652 900 900 5500 - Assessment Administration 50 50 50 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,300 600 1,320 TOTAL LMD #3A HYSSOP $ 7,264 $ 10,050 $ 11,000 133-LMD #313 MEDIANS 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 66,918 $ 75,330 $ 76,640 5010 - Part Time Salaries 6,880 21,600 21,600 Fringe Benefits 32,556 39,630 41,110 5152 - Computer Software 495 500 500 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 6,969 15,700 16,450 5204 - O & M/Facilities 7,317 11,500 11,500 5300 - Contract Services 401,960 525,660 694,300 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 41,164 145,800 210,480 5310 - Tree Maintenance 23,404 26,210 26,210 5400 - Telephone Utilities 443 760 0 5402 - Water Utilities 113,875 120,470 120,470 5403 - Electric Utilities 35,681 55,600 44,480 ' 5500 - Assessment Administration 6,570 5,580 6,240 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 35,570 37,170 39,820 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 90,000 TOTAL LMD #313 MEDIANS $ 779,802 $ 1,081,510 $ 1,399,800 134-LMD #411 TERRA VISTA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 605,061 $ 662,520 $ 678,970 5005 - Overtime Salaries 246 1,050 1,050 5010 - Part Time Salaries 32,084 47,280 47,280 Fringe Benefits 288,677 319,170 335,370 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 168 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 169 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 80,804 99,750 99,750 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 6,000 6,000 6,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,700 1,700 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 2,869 3,750 3,750 5300 - Contract Services 296,803 501,340 664,110 5310 - Tree Maintenance 54,735 74,970 74,970 5400 - Telephone Utilities 176 0 0 5402 - Water Utilities 353,730 342,470 382,810 5403 - Electric Utilities 23,239 32,500 33,940 5500 - Assessment Administration 22,080 18,770 20,980 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 221,990 228,600 235,870 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 15,976 6,000 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 430,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 440,000 400,000 TOTAL LMD #4R TERRA VISTA $ 2,004,470 $ 2,785,870 $ 3,416,550 135-LMD #5 ANDOVER 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 1,853 $ 1,850 $ 1,910 5010 - Part Time Salaries 307 840 840 Fringe Benefits 906 1,040 1,090 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 289 1,300 1,300 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 0 70 70 5300 - Contract Services 557 1,590 1,580 5402 - Water Utilities 606 800 800 5403 - Electric Utilities 277 490 490 5500 - Assessment Administration 250 220 240 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,290 880 1,350 TOTAL LMD #5 ANDOVER $ 7,335 $ 9,080 $ 9,670 136-LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 10,315 $ 11,580 $ 13,230 Fringe Benefits 4,877 5,440 6,360 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5,553 11,900 11,900 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 200 200 5300 - Contract Services 211,664 293,450 330,830 5310 - Tree Maintenance 28,361 34,850 34,850 5402 - Water Utilities 114,238 182,300 182,300 5403 - Electric Utilities 6,655 9,130 7,330 5500 - Assessment Administration 7,030 5,980 6,680 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 31,690 33,350 35,510 TOTAL LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY $ 420,383 $ 588,180 $ 629,190 137-LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 115,371 $ 127,110 $ 130,280 5010 - Part Time Salaries 6,971 13,160 13,160 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 169 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 170 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget Fringe Benefits 55,273 62,170 65,170 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 21,315 39,800 39,800 5204 - O & M/Facilities 449 1,500 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 2,200 2,200 5300 - Contract Services 314,632 446,190 464,690 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 1,893 2,750 11,300 5310 - Tree Maintenance 7,450 25,090 25,090 5400 - Telephone Utilities 374 820 0 5402 - Water Utilities 259,808 364,960 364,960 5403 - Electric Utilities 21,155 27,640 23,280 5500 - Assessment Administration 16,910 14,430 16,130 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 84,600 89,410 93,960 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 680 680 680 TOTAL LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 906,881 $ 1,217,910 $ 1,252,200 138-LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 4,410 $ 3,320 $ 3,980 Fringe Benefits 2,079 1,560 1,920 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 998 2,250 2,250 5300 - Contract Services 8,854 10,180 10,600 5310 - Tree Maintenance 3,720 3,720 3,720 5402 - Water Utilities 5,500 6,390 6,390 5403 - Electric Utilities 902 1,450 1,160 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,110 950 1,060 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 7,650 7,630 8,880 TOTAL LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 35,223 $ 37,450 $ 39,960 139-LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 185,318 $ 201,390 $ 207,890 5010 - Part Time Salaries 8,535 21,200 21,200 Fringe Benefits 88,430 98,640 104,030 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 17,795 30,510 30,510 5220 - Cellular Technology 809 2,740 2,740 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,200 1,200 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 14,364 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 71,759 132,160 167,230 5310 - Tree Maintenance 32,211 33,930 33,930 5402 - Water Utilities 60,073 56,580 62,780 5403 - Electric Utilities 5,851 9,590 7,680 5500 - Assessment Administration 8,010 6,890 7,700 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 53,780 53,500 57,960 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 11,657 1,000 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 14,364 0 0 5650 - Capital Project 0 500,000 500,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (14,364) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 170 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 171 2017/18 Actual 2018/19 Adopted Budget 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA $ 558,592 $ 1,149,330 $ 1,204,850 140-LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 148,545 $ 158,180 $ 162,200 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 1,050 1,050 5010 - Part Time Salaries 19,515 31,110 31,110 Fringe Benefits 72,297 80,320 84,080 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 10,419 21,400 21,400 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 1,500 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 2,000 2,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 500 500 500 5300 - Contract Services 81,548 189,490 206,910 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 2,498 3,950 12,540 5310 - Tree Maintenance 10,500 11,800 11,800 5402 - Water Utilities 98,689 98,900 109,590 5403 - Electric Utilities 15,766 20,080 17,560 5500 - Assessment Administration 4,330 4,120 4,120 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 67,990 69,780 73,330 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 3,597 2,000 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 650 650 650 TOTAL LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA $ 536,844 $ 696,830 $ 740,340 141-LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 1,291 $ 10,000 $ 10,000 5300 - Contract Services 4,792 30,000 30,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 440 620 TOTAL LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 6,083 $ 40,440 $ 40,620 150 -GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 28,367 $ 50,000 $ 100,000 5300 - Contract Services 0 100,000 250,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 20 1,620 TOTAL GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS $ 28,367 $ 150,020 $ 351,620 151 -SLD #1 ARTERIAL 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 14,167 $ 14,130 $ 14,560 Fringe Benefits 6,708 6,640 6,990 5102 - Training 25 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 7,598 7,990 7,990 5220 - Cellular Technology 1,773 2,000 2,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 500 500 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 4,144,734 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 71,894 47,750 47,750 5400 - Telephone Utilities 2,265 1,500 1,500 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 171 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 152 -SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 4,276,761 $ 2018/19 2019/20 5300 - Contract Services 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 5403 - Electric Utilities Actual Budget Budget 5403 - Electric Utilities 489,520 290,000 358,160 5500 - Assessment Administration 160,890 136,890 152,990 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 50,470 50,230 51,220 5650 - Capital Project 4,144,734 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (4,144,734) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 25,554 37,730 37,540 5701 - Principal Repayments 128,807 202,310 212,130 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (128,807) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 47,880 112,200 TOTAL SLD #1 ARTERIAL $ 4,975,598 $ 845,780 $ 1,005,760 152 -SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 4,276,761 $ 0 $ 0 5300 - Contract Services 32,770 20,980 20,980 5403 - Electric Utilities 336,844 204,000 235,930 5500 - Assessment Administration 40,030 34,070 38,080 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,400 2,540 1,900 5650 - Capital Project 4,276,761 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (4,276,761) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 31,543 40,240 38,260 5701 - Principal Repayments 156,494 215,780 216,190 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (156,494) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 46,870 109,840 TOTAL SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 153 -SLD #3 VICTORIA $ 4,721,348 $ 564,480 $ 661,180 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 18,869 $ 19,060 $ 19,640 Fringe Benefits 8,935 8,960 9,430 5102 - Training 180 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 9,933 9,940 9,940 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 1,598,940 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 12,452 8,050 8,050 5403 - Electric Utilities 171,351 90,000 100,150 5500 - Assessment Administration 36,000 30,640 34,240 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 8,350 6,930 8,010 5650 - Capital Project 1,598,940 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,598,940) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 10,427 15,080 14,370 5701 - Principal Repayments 53,204 80,850 81,170 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (53,204) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 18,580 43,550 TOTAL SLD #3 VICTORIA 154 -SLD #4 TERRA VISTA $ 1,875,437 $ 288,320 $ 328,780 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 172 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 155 -SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 4,433 $ 2018/19 2019/20 Fringe Benefits 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 5102 - Training Actual Budget Budget 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 18,869 19,060 19,640 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 0 600 Fringe Benefits 8,935 8,960 9,430 5102 - Training 190 190 190 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 4,472 4,940 4,940 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 1,000 1,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 806,563 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 2,420 3,730 3,730 5403 - Electric Utilities 64,367 39,000 43,280 5500 - Assessment Administration 22,050 18,750 20,950 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,710 4,960 6,020 5650 - Capital Project 806,563 120,000 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (806,563) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 5,308 7,600 7,250 5701 - Principal Repayments 27,342 40,730 40,960 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (27,342) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 8,620 20,220 TOTAL SLD #4 TERRA VISTA $ 938,884 $ 277,590 $ 178,260 155 -SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 4,433 $ 4,440 $ 4,590 Fringe Benefits 2,099 2,090 2,210 5102 - Training 0 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 8,832 8,990 8,990 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 363,547 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 3,345 1,770 1,770 5403 - Electric Utilities 30,976 19,000 19,400 5500 - Assessment Administration 7,020 5,970 6,670 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,190 1,540 2,090 5650 - Capital Project 363,547 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (363,547) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 2,976 3,410 3,260 5701 - Principal Repayments 14,392 18,270 18,400 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (14,392) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 4,090 9,600 TOTAL SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 156 -SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA $ 425,418 $ 69,800 $ 77,210 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 18,869 $ 19,060 $ 19,640 Fringe Benefits 8,935 8,960 9,430 5102 - Training 154 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5,881 6,940 6,940 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 800 800 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 173 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 157 -SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 14,087 $ 2018/19 2019/20 Fringe Benefits 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 5102 - Training Actual Budget Budget 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 579,011 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 19,423 2,780 2,780 5403 - Electric Utilities 60,500 33,000 36,090 5500 - Assessment Administration 5,900 5,020 5,610 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,760 4,920 6,090 5650 - Capital Project 579,011 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (579,011) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 3,223 5,540 5,260 5701 - Principal Repayments 16,633 29,670 29,730 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (16,633) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 6,410 15,030 TOTAL SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA $ 707,656 $ 123,330 $ 137,630 157 -SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 14,087 $ 14,130 $ 14,560 Fringe Benefits 6,671 6,640 6,990 5102 - Training 96 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 4,923 4,940 4,940 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 1,156,896 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 9,647 5,630 5,630 5403 - Electric Utilities 97,164 57,000 60,780 5500 - Assessment Administration 21,380 18,230 20,370 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,670 3,700 3,920 5650 - Capital Project 1,156,896 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,156,896) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 9,404 10,910 10,360 5701 - Principal Repayments 45,569 58,490 58,520 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (45,569) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 12,980 30,430 TOTAL SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 1,324,938 $ 192,880 $ 216,730 158 -SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 17,392 $ 17,580 $ 18,110 Fringe Benefits 8,236 8,260 8,700 5102 - Training 121 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 0 40 40 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 4,903 4,940 4,940 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 301,341 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 340 1,980 1,980 5403 - Electric Utilities 35,336 22,000 21,660 5500 - Assessment Administration 8,720 7,420 8,290 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,000 4,270 5,350 5650 - Capital Project 301,341 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (301,341) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 1,788 2,920 2,730 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 174 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 174 -GAS TAX R&T7360 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5102 - Training 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5403 - Electric Utilities 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) 5720 - Misc Contributions to City TOTAL GAS TAX R&T7360 176 -MEASURE 11990-2010 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL MEASURE 11990-2010 177 -MEASURE 12010-2040 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries Fringe Benefits 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5720 - Misc Contributions to City TOTAL MEASURE 12010-2040 179 -ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 181 -SB 1 - TCEP 5650 - Capital Project $ 1,028,257 $ 2018/19 2019/20 12,693 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 35,276 Actual Budget Budget 5701 - Principal Repayments 9,113 15,670 15,420 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (9,113) 0 0 9150 - Transfer Out -Fund 150 0 4,570 10,720 TOTAL SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 383.177 $ 89.830 $ 98.120 174 -GAS TAX R&T7360 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5102 - Training 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5403 - Electric Utilities 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) 5720 - Misc Contributions to City TOTAL GAS TAX R&T7360 176 -MEASURE 11990-2010 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL MEASURE 11990-2010 177 -MEASURE 12010-2040 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries Fringe Benefits 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5720 - Misc Contributions to City TOTAL MEASURE 12010-2040 179 -ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 181 -SB 1 - TCEP 5650 - Capital Project $ 1,028,257 $ 1,146,180 $ 1,195,000 12,693 12,000 12,000 35,276 88,340 88,340 486,647 552,740 590,110 1,725 2,780 2,780 362 620 620 0 6,110 6,110 1,375 1,200 1,200 881,878 0 0 151,459 307,860 292,860 147,971 168,000 168,000 223,910 228,740 230,510 1,111,234 311,000 560,000 (881,878) 0 0 10,000 10,150 8,940 $ 3,210,909 $ 2,835,720 $ 3,156,470 $ 660 $ 120 $ 210 27,663 150,000 200,000 $ 28,323 $ 150,120 $ 200,210 $ 155,477 $ 231,700 $ 260,160 14,154 14,300 14,300 73,171 108,480 124,440 1,144,214 1,168,400 1,194,780 35,410 42,720 45,780 2,564,002 1,460,000 2,125,000 19,760 19,910 20,050 $ 4,006,188 $ 3,045,510 $ 3,784,510 $ 0 $ 2,366,000 $ 1,866,000 $ 0 $ 2,366,000 $ 1,866,000 $ 0 $ 7,850,000 $ 52,150,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 175 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL SB 1- TCEP 182 -AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 1884NTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5160 - Membership Dues 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5204 - O & M/Facilities 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5220 - Cellular Technology 5300 - Contract Services 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 5310 - Tree Maintenance 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund TOTAL INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 190 -PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund TOTAL PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 194 -PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 195 -STATE ASSET SEIZURE 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) TOTAL STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 0 $ 7,850,000 $ 52,150,000 $ 80 $ 70 $ 80 $ 80 $ 70 $ 80 $ 604,312 $ 599,380 $ 676,010 45,587 50,000 50,000 13,723 13,880 0 282,445 278,950 322,760 731 1,500 1,500 0 500 500 118 100 100 881 2,000 1,000 400 920 920 17,213 25,500 25,500 0 500 500 526 0 0 1,181 1,440 1,940 81,447 143,300 93,300 730 1,000 2,000 0 45,000 0 134,250 140,980 126,590 350,170 188,420 218,390 $ 1,533,714 $ 1,493,370 $ 1,521,010 $ 0 $ 50 $ 0 206,301 0 0 $ 206,301 $ 50 $ 0 $ 70 $ 60 $ 70 $ 70 $ 60 $ 70 $ 48,322 $ 0 $ 0 0 6,000 40,000 5,670 930 180 48,322 0 0 (48,322) 0 0 $ 53,992 $ 6,930 $ 40,180 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 176 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 177 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 196 -CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 0 $ 6,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 60 30 10 TOTAL CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 60 $ 30 $ 6,010 198 -CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 0 $ 15,020 $ 14,170 Fringe Benefits 0 7,060 6,810 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 12,500 0 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 41,444 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 497 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 12,430 12,910 13,530 5650 - Capital Project 5,231,196 3,641,820 290,890 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (41,444) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 23,740 23,980 23,630 9214 - Transfer Out -Fund 214 9,883 0 0 TOTAL CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV $ 5,277,746 $ 3,713,290 $ 349,030 204 -COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 244,504 $ 283,640 $ 184,640 5010 - Part Time Salaries 8,609 6,650 39,140 Fringe Benefits 115,231 134,540 98,650 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 47,780 48,380 50,940 5650 - Capital Project 490,508 1,198,530 916,640 TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT $ 906,632 $ 1,671,740 $ 1,290,010 209 -FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 150 $ 310 5650 - Capital Project 1,652,939 600,000 0 TOTAL FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 1,652,939 $ 600,150 $ 310 211 -PROP 1B - SLPP 5650 - Capital Project $ 0 $ 19,920 $ 0 TOTAL PROP 1B - SLPP $ 0 $ 19,920 $ 0 214 -PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 5650 - Capital Project $ 46,596 $ 43,000 $ 451,000 TOTAL PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 $ 46,596 $ 43,000 $ 451,000 218 -PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 9,730 $ 9,730 TOTAL PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC $ 0 $ 9.730 $ 9.730 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 177 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 178 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 225 -CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 3,217 $ 4,600 $ 4,600 5100 - Travel and Meetings 963 1,600 1,600 5102 - Training 1,300 1,350 1,350 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 38,356 49,760 37,660 5300 - Contract Services 12,400 12,500 13,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 1,030 1,180 TOTAL CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT $ 56,236 $ 70,840 $ 59,390 227 -USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 16,779 $ 16,000 $ 25,000 5100 - Travel and Meetings 0 1,300 150 5102 - Training 0 700 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 21,459 24,000 24,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 570 1,210 650 TOTAL USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM $ 38,808 $ 43,210 $ 49,800 234 -SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 5010 - Part Time Salaries $ 14,023 $ 15,000 $ 11,700 Fringe Benefits 1,078 220 2,630 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 10,737 25,340 7,500 5300 - Contract Services 0 14,250 6,270 5650 - Capital Project 0 90,800 90,800 TOTAL SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM $ 25,838 $ 145,610 $ 118,900 250 -RECREATION SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 495,372 $ 570,930 $ 552,010 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 1,000 1,000 5010 - Part Time Salaries 1,277,948 1,550,060 1,357,650 Fringe Benefits 312,864 382,000 373,480 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 3,338 4,920 2,900 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 224,812 327,940 259,820 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 1,500 0 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 2,188 20,000 15,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 61,961 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 742,413 732,140 642,350 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 41,010 41,010 41,010 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 61,961 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (61,961) 0 0 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 1,360 0 0 TOTAL RECREATION SERVICES $ 3,163,266 $ 3,631,500 $ 3,245,220 255 -VG CULTURAL CENTER 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 85,876 $ 119,060 $ 127,720 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 178 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 291 -CA STATE LIBRARY Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 179 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5005 - Overtime Salaries 480 1,000 1,000 5010 - Part Time Salaries 270,274 311,690 321,800 Fringe Benefits 52,658 74,760 78,930 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 67 0 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 98,829 116,250 119,420 5300 - Contract Services 920,483 861,970 869,430 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,740 7,350 7,640 TOTAL VG CULTURAL CENTER $ 1,434,407 $ 1,492,080 $ 1,525,940 272 -FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 5204 - O & M/Facilities $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,150 TOTAL FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,150 290 -LIBRARY FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 1,637,670 $ 1,747,630 $ 1,842,420 5010 - Part Time Salaries 763,170 878,200 928,810 Fringe Benefits 850,992 917,300 980,530 5100 - Travel and Meetings 31,659 26,450 31,740 5102 - Training 5,977 6,000 0 5105 - Mileage 745 1,000 1,000 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 18,742 20,750 20,750 5152 - Computer Software 0 3,000 1,400 5160 - Membership Dues 5,668 6,700 7,190 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 706,426 870,990 799,700 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 0 40,000 40,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 43,325 23,400 20,240 5220 - Cellular Technology 470 1,010 500 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 22,005 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 270,002 254,160 352,830 5360 - Contract Sery/Animal Care (150) 0 0 5400 - Telephone Utilities 9,509 10,500 10,500 5402 - Water Utilities 5,913 5,040 5,040 5403 - Electric Utilities 65,698 65,000 65,000 5405 - Internet Services 37,365 54,930 54,930 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 85,800 94,380 103,870 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 20,005 8,000 5,000 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 2,000 90,000 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (22,005) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 104 0 0 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 7,552 1,790 0 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 37,935 0 0 9329 - Transfer Out -Library Cap Fund 0 0 500,000 TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 4,606,577 $ 5,126,230 $ 5,771,450 291 -CA STATE LIBRARY Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 179 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 18o 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 14,157 20,000 $ 20,600 5300 - Contract Services 2,600 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 400 530 TOTAL CA STATE LIBRARY $ 16,757 $ 20,400 $ 21,130 292 -STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 0 $ 1,500 $ 5,750 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,890 1,780 80 TOTAL STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) $ 1,890 $ 3,280 $ 5,830 299 -LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 720 $ 0 9290 - Transfer Out -Library Fund 53,041 0 0 TOTAL LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND $ 53,041 $ 720 $ 0 301 -THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 50 $ 50 TOTAL THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT $ 0 $ 50 $ 50 329 -LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 113,950 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,510 3,290 3,120 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 7,802 0 0 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 113,950 0 0 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 575,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (113,950) 0 0 TOTAL LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND $ 123,262 $ 3,290 $ 578,120 354 -COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 9,115 $ 9,200 $ 9,200 5300 - Contract Services 270,973 300,000 300,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,000 11,220 4,930 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 6,243 0 38,000 TOTAL COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE $ 289,331 $ 320,420 $ 352,130 361 -JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment $ 2,739 $ 0 $ 0 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 2,221 0 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 45,084 0 0 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 0 5,890 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (2,221) 0 0 TOTAL JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) $ 47,823 $ 5,890 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 18o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 181 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 381 -HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 5300 - Contract Services $ 9,081 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,070 30 220 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 15,500 68,260 TOTAL HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE $ 11,151 $ 15,530 $ 68,480 383 -EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 5723 - Misc Contributions to Fire $ 27,028 $ 27,030 $ 26,730 TOTAL EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 27,028 $ 27,030 $ 26,730 396 -HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 450 $ 0 5245 - Subsidies To Low/Mod Housing 54,100 80,400 48,000 5300 - Contract Services 0 0 214,210 5620 - Project Improvement Costs 465,433 4,200,000 200,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (465,433) 0 0 5720 - Mise Contributions to City 200,000 200,000 200,000 TOTAL HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 254,100 $ 4,480,850 $ 662,210 602 -AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 310 $ 280 $ 300 TOTAL AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 310 $ 280 $ 300 612 -CFD 2001-01 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 140 $ 120 $ 910 TOTAL CFD 2001-01 $ 140 $ 120 $ 910 700 -SPORTS COMPLEX 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 806,097 $ 869,140 $ 913,880 5005 - Overtime Salaries 42,216 37,280 37,280 5010 - Part Time Salaries 196,507 292,660 251,540 Fringe Benefits 404,582 452,310 485,630 5080 - Pension Expense 102,169 0 0 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 0 300 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 82,038 98,200 98,200 5204 - O & M/Facilities 50,810 52,760 52,760 5206 - O & M/Recreation Programs 63 200 200 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 0 1,500 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 7,668 9,500 17,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 15,435 16,000 16,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 69,121 0 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 507,744 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 90,334 123,290 124,920 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 143,316 222,640 270,670 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 181 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 702 -REGIS CONNECT 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 1,090 $ 2018/19 2019/20 5102 - Training 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 5105 - Mileage Actual Budget Budget 5305 - Contract Serv/Recreation Prgs 223 1,500 3,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,903 3,000 3,000 5401 - Gas Utilities 8,099 7,200 7,200 5402 - Water Utilities 88,002 127,130 127,130 5403 - Electric Utilities 185,871 185,770 212,320 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 25,000 25,000 25,000 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 0 0 15,000 5650 - Capital Project 98,228 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (98,228) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 24,771 21,140 19,200 5701 - Principal Repayments 916,816 121,430 123,370 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (916,816) 0 0 TOTAL SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,851,969 $ 2,667,950 $ 2,805,300 702 -REGIS CONNECT 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 1,090 $ 0 $ 0 5102 - Training 826 0 0 5105 - Mileage 312 0 0 5152 - Computer Software 95 0 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 662 0 0 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 4,527 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 6,405 0 1,140 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,590 3,350 270 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 87,462 70,000 25,000 TOTAL REGIS CONNECT 705 -MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 104,969 $ 73,350 $ 26,410 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 244,654 $ 255,760 $ 346,290 5010 - Part Time Salaries 49,956 65,120 48,080 Fringe Benefits 118,860 125,320 172,860 5080 - Pension Expense 41,699 0 0 5100 - Travel and Meetings 4,598 7,640 7,250 5102 - Training 1,535 42,000 42,000 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 995 1,000 1,000 5152 - Computer Software 0 4,000 4,000 5160 - Membership Dues 13,590 17,140 19,450 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 1,620 1,620 1,620 5209 - O & M/Electric Utility 5,598,559 5,971,800 6,675,800 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 985 3,400 5,070 5220 - Cellular Technology 1,346 73,300 73,300 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 181,933 0 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 852,025 0 0 5309 - Contract Srvc/Electric Utility 667,319 702,350 864,360 5312 - Legal Services 22,112 30,000 30,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,118 7,500 7,500 5501 -Admin./General Overhead 208,300 235,190 239,270 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 182 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 706 -UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 2018/19 2019/20 106,930 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment Actual Budget Budget 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 170,471 70,000 70,000 5650 - Capital Project 865,609 1,985,000 1,000,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,036,081) 0 0 5720 - Mise Contributions to City 0 37,760 0 5899 - Clearing Acct -Electric Utility (2,359) 0 0 5900 - Bad Debt Expense -Electric Util 27,909 0 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (337,135) 0 0 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 1,241,140 1,390,260 1,507,760 TOTAL MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 8,940,758 $ 11,026,160 $ 11,115,610 706 -UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 106,733 $ 106,930 $ 137,250 Fringe Benefits 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 49,831 1,000 49,550 5152 - Computer Software 65,590 5160 - Membership Dues 0 1,200 0 2,210 126,200 2,210 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 31,200 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 200 0 200 5209 - O & M/Electric Utility 0 130,278 270,000 510,000 0 460,000 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,900 950 100,000 5650 - Capital Project 10,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 445,000 15,980 (494,250) 16,410 0 18,000 TOTAL UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND $ 305,922 $ 785,300 $ 693,250 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 144,924 $ 2,440,150 $ 1,788,630 712-EOUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 1,200 $ 1,130 $ 1,410 TOTAL RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 1.200 $ 1.130 % 1.410 711 -FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 0 $ 1,000 $ 1,000 5102 - Training 0 1,000 1,000 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 0 1,000 1,000 5152 - Computer Software 0 75,000 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 0 126,200 5209 - O & M/Electric Utility 0 31,200 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 144,924 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 0 100,000 270,000 5309 - Contract Srvc/Electric Utility 0 230,000 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 950 4,820 5650 - Capital Project 494,250 2,000,000 445,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (494,250) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 629,610 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 310,000 TOTAL FIBER OPTIC NETWORK $ 144,924 $ 2,440,150 $ 1,788,630 712-EOUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 30,339 $ 83,850 $ 165,350 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 58,673 0 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 917,357 0 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 183 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 714 -COMP EOUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 2018/19 2019/20 $ 52,000 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 58,200 Actual Budget Budget 5300 - Contract Services 30,064 6,000 13,500 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 32,030 37,330 28,980 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 41,605 0 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 518,509 494,850 336,000 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 210,706 0 169,000 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 0 0 60,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 150,000 150,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (770,820) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 783 0 0 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 56,760 0 0 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (56,760) 0 0 TOTAL EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 1,069,246 $ 772,030 $ 922,830 714 -COMP EOUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 0 $ 52,000 $ 52,000 5152 - Computer Software 149,991 58,200 4,000 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 22,113 14,750 11,500 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 82,828 14,000 342,300 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 114,415 0 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 364,571 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 194,977 430,690 27,530 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 10,590 8,490 8,520 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 97,936 445,000 285,350 5650 - Capital Project 115,764 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (213,700) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 13,382 0 0 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 410,710 0 537,080 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (410,710) 0 0 TOTAL COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND $ 952,867 $ 1,023,130 $ 1,268,280 802 -AD 82-2 INVESTMENT EARNINGS 9100 - Transfer Out -Assess Dist Admin $ 5 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL AD 82-2 INVESTMENT EARNINGS $ 5 $ 0 $ 0 838 -AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 11,928 $ 13,870 $ 14,060 5005 - Overtime Salaries 87 0 0 Fringe Benefits 5,545 6,370 6,750 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,940 1,700 1,900 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 6,110 3,490 2,400 TOTAL AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON $ 25,610 $ 25,430 $ 25,110 847 -PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 3,046 $ 15,000 $ 15,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 2,000 2,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 184 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 848 -PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 2018/19 2019/20 143,700 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5300 - Contract Services 5,221 23,000 23,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 0 1,340 670 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 125,000 TOTAL PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 8,267 $ 41,340 $ 165,670 848 -PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 136,570 $ 143,700 $ 142,150 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 3,680 3,680 Fringe Benefits 64,369 67,220 68,240 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 45,120 103,910 103,910 5204 - 0 & M/Facilities 1,276 2,500 2,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 4,409 4,500 6,500 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 234 4,500 4,500 5300 - Contract Services 216,172 318,260 306,790 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 10,672 12,740 12,870 5310 - Tree Maintenance 19,124 19,120 19,120 5400 - Telephone Utilities 6,472 9,570 6,700 5402 - Water Utilities 177,299 184,010 196,160 5403 - Electric Utilities 106,695 137,530 120,320 5500 - Assessment Administration 152,220 129,370 144,590 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 48,640 44,550 51,980 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 65,000 210,300 5650 - Capital Project 65,000 30,000 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 2,960 2,960 2,960 9847 - Transfer Out -Fund 847 116,800 116,800 116,800 TOTAL PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND $ 1,174,032 $ 1,399,920 $ 1,520,070 868 -CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 133,111 $ 135,360 $ 136,770 5010 - Part Time Salaries 4,822 8,890 8,890 Fringe Benefits 62,809 65,100 67,430 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 24,411 25,000 25,000 5204 - 0 & M/Facilities 0 1,000 1,000 5300 - Contract Services 38,262 50,930 98,800 5310 - Tree Maintenance 0 5,000 5,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,428 2,260 0 5402 - Water Utilities 96,439 103,720 103,720 5403 - Electric Utilities 3,137 4,900 3,920 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,980 1,690 1,890 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 58,870 59,940 63,250 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 150,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 30,000 0 9137 - Transfer Out -Fund 137 50,000 30,000 0 TOTAL CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE $ 475,269 $ 523,790 $ 665,670 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 185 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 165,575,703 179,813,900 226,846,740 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281 -FIRE FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,089,015 $ 13,572,200 $ 13,720,630 5005 - Overtime Salaries 3,559,647 3,929,050 3,979,510 5010 - Part Time Salaries 137,363 145,310 176,450 Fringe Benefits 7,811,573 9,400,860 9,124,930 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 2,300 10,000 10,000 5082 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (5,095,240) (5,323,730) (5,387,530) 5083 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 88-1 (2,063,680) (2,217,280) (2,164,860) 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (27,028) (27,030) (26,730) 5100 - Travel and Meetings 15,048 30,490 27,160 5102 - Training 92,554 159,520 155,670 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 23,908 33,570 32,550 5151 - Postage 7 300 300 5152 - Computer Software 0 640 640 5155 - Public Relations/Educ Material 34,140 36,750 36,750 5160 - Membership Dues 5,047 8,640 10,530 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 1,306 5,410 14,050 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 5,561 8,470 9,030 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 247,069 322,460 339,420 5204 - O & M/Facilities 71,005 102,000 98,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 2,451 0 0 5220 - Cellular Technology 39,411 52,200 53,200 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 129,356 209,800 209,930 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,500 1,500 5255 - Gasoline 34,386 52,930 54,520 5256 - Diesel Fuel 80,189 123,800 132,420 5258 -Propane 10,927 10,000 19,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 18,094 44,500 40,500 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 68,119 82,600 117,190 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 38,394 47,000 47,200 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 24,534 30,350 49,100 5300 - Contract Services 929,337 1,029,090 1,216,610 5304 - Contract Sery/Facilities 164,661 256,500 277,200 5312 - Legal Services 39,605 50,000 50,000 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 2,040 2,500 2,500 5321 - Fire Incident Costs 3,708 3,500 3,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 20,401 26,320 17,910 5401 - Gas Utilities 5,073 11,110 12,080 5402 - Water Utilities 15,213 18,460 19,640 5403 - Electric Utilities 56,938 94,970 95,010 5410 - Property Insurance 87,659 89,850 95,250 5411 - Other Insurance 4,310 4,750 5,500 5416 - General Liability Insurance 224,227 253,600 295,560 5500 - Assessment Administration 42,520 87,300 97,570 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 186 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 187 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,264,880 2,365,500 2,725,110 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 112,233 212,100 123,600 5700 - Interest Expense 92,020 77,830 63,200 5701 - Principal Repayments 308,005 322,150 336,790 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 2,915 680 0 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (308,005) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 337,790 343,770 356,160 5725 - Other Expenditures 609,166 0 0 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other (51,514) 0 0 9283 - Transfer Out -CFD 88-1 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,377,358 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 282 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 5,095,240 $ 5,323,730 $ 5,387,530 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 43 0 0 5160 - Membership Dues 40 0 0 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 11 0 0 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 3,035 2,960 3,200 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 15,199 10,000 10,000 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 64,633 0 0 5255 - Gasoline 16,125 0 0 5256 - Diesel Fuel 43,560 0 0 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 3,297 0 0 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 15,624 15,640 0 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 2,971 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 343,523 367,400 375,330 5400 - Telephone Utilities 6,804 11,780 4,270 5401 - Gas Utilities 4,376 5,930 5,930 5402 - Water Utilities 12,000 10,580 13,710 5403 - Electric Utilities 45,825 52,470 56,240 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 251,720 265,380 252,280 5725 - Other Expenditures 3,132 0 0 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,927,158 $ 6,065,870 $ 6,108,490 283 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 2,063,680 $ 2,217,280 $ 2,164,860 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 1,290 1,310 1,410 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,323 4,000 4,000 5300 - Contract Services 85,232 86,880 93,420 5400 - Telephone Utilities 3,275 5,440 1,600 5401 - Gas Utilities 1,230 2,070 2,070 5402 - Water Utilities 3,670 5,240 5,240 5403 - Electric Utilities 13,899 15,180 15,180 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 104,410 108,540 107,030 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 187 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 -FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 -FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5240 - Operation of Acquired Property 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5312 - Legal Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc TOTAL FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 3 L,L/V,UUV � 2,443,V4U �5 2,J94,61U $ 140 $ 90 $ 200 $ 140 $ 90 $ 200 $ 1,580 $ 35,500 $ 0 83,708 110,000 110,000 175,389 159,000 63,000 64,498 76,000 78,920 995 1,000 1,000 39,476 50,000 50,000 70,882 3,000 3,000 15,531 16,000 0 4,169 4,200 38,000 17,391 17,000 1,300 168,053 0 0 5 9, 04 8 115,000 13 5, 000 87,122 0 0 35,830 33,780 49,160 710,784 411,610 0 158,602 510,000 44,500 812,056 950,000 1,826,000 160,733 0 500,000 1,000,000 300,000 1,140,000 15,324,455 11,525,000 450,000 (168,053) 0 0 0 0 107,420 $ 18,822,249 $ 14,317,090 $ 4,597,300 51 ani 91 a 0, Sn 1 IA 17n � 11 Tat AAn P 716 991 617 IR 779 950 170 � 769 SRR 100 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 188 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget TOTAL GENERAL FUND OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT $ 77,384,176 $ 83,944,400 $ 88,290,270 $ 131,771 $ 122,670 $ 2018/19 2019/20 275,240 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary 561,100 Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 396,740 409,260 124,760 GENERAL FUND 0 DIVISION 001 - NON -DEPARTMENTAL GENERAL $ 6,183,588 $ 5,591,560 $ 6,047,620 002 - NON -DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 89,314 142,050 129,310 101 - CITY COUNCIL 116,510 126,720 118,110 102 - CITY MANAGEMENT 873,221 957,580 991,920 103 - CITY CLERK 1,868 1,970 1,960 104 - ANIMAL CARE AND SERVICES 3,113,889 3,350,790 3,416,210 106 - RECORDS MANAGEMENT 464,958 580,390 505,450 107 - HEALTHY RC PROGRAM 502,573 595,640 628,910 108 - COMMUNICATIONS 219,596 272,160 236,420 201 - ADMIN SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 263,747 292,650 277,430 204 - BUSINESS LICENSING 357,802 361,430 369,680 205 - CITY FACILITIES 902,039 1,070,730 1,062,520 206 - FINANCE 1,392,078 1,471,820 1,507,700 209 - INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY SRVCS 3,228,670 3,683,660 3,855,130 210 - PERSONNEL 587,198 708,290 735,110 211 - PROCUREMENT 251,478 256,070 274,510 212 - RISK MANAGEMENT 224,250 274,040 282,440 213 - TREASURY MANAGEMENT 10,654 12,390 12,420 217 - CITY TELECOMMUNICATIONS 218,420 157,490 212,560 301 - ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DVLPMNT 543,758 792,280 805,350 302 - BUILDING AND SAFETY 1,641,372 1,892,240 1,916,950 303 - ENGINEERING - ADMINISTRATION 314,929 411,620 433,040 305 - ENGINEERING - DEVELOPMENT MGT 796,641 888,810 1,106,870 306 - ENGINEERING - NPDES 329,428 384,650 381,340 307 - ENGINEERING - PROJECT MGT 423,459 488,090 603,800 308 - ENGINEERING - TRAFFIC MGT 145,862 335,930 255,720 311 - FIRE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 234,702 252,420 356,160 312 - CITY FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 3,359,741 3,871,380 3,997,670 314 - PLANNING 2,117,334 1,632,150 1,793,550 315 - PLANNING COMMISSION 15,698 23,880 17,280 317 - VEHICLE AND EQUIP. MAINT. 799,555 1,071,050 1,127,540 318 - STREET MAINTENANCE 2,517,362 2,802,840 2,889,140 319 - PARK MAINTENANCE 2,667,000 3,261,010 3,291,770 322 - COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT 595,312 721,650 759,570 401 - COMMUNITY SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 4,791,973 5,232,070 5,562,050 420 - PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 1,485 0 0 701 - POLICE -ADMINISTRATION 37,086,712 39,974,900 42,327 060 TOTAL GENERAL FUND OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT $ 77,384,176 $ 83,944,400 $ 88,290,270 $ 131,771 $ 122,670 $ 162,480 194,714 275,240 614,110 58,705 461,900 561,100 321,109 3,939,580 649,720 354,446 396,740 409,260 124,760 105,450 0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 189 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page igo 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 183,120 183,080 97,560 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 7,010 34,540 36,510 023 - SB 1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 125 5,910 5,730 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 4,665,481 4,602,660 6,235,270 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 1,172,873 906,570 906,760 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 7,214,114 $ 11,034,340 $ 9,678,500 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 888,247 $ 926,100 $ 1,071,230 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 0 220 210 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 35,987 653,000 990,990 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 10,276 537,270 410,440 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 0 290 30,710 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 341,565 204,510 147,670 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 0 110 10,140 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 400 25,390 370 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 0 250 260 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 102,653 284,940 139,600 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 380 25,380 390 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 0 0 14,660 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 4,374,328 710,810 768,720 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 180 160 240 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 0 0 3,330 124 - TRANSPORTATION 6,496,493 5,791,740 8,396,830 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 0 0 720 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 390 25,390 400 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 0 0 960 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 190 170 180 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 226,057 78,180 80,210 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,188,013 1,477,580 1,848,730 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,540,000 3,902,290 4,849,910 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 7,264 10,050 11,000 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS 779,803 1,081,510 1,399,800 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 2,004,469 2,785,870 3,416,550 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 7,336 9,080 9,670 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 420,382 588,180 629,190 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 906,882 1,217,910 1,252,200 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 35,222 37,450 39,960 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 558,594 1,149,330 1,204,850 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 536,844 696,830 740,340 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 6,083 40,440 40,620 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 28,367 150,020 351,620 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 4,975,598 845,780 1,005,760 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 4,721,348 564,480 661,180 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,875,437 288,320 328,780 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 938,884 277,590 178,260 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 425,418 69,800 77,210 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 707,656 123,330 137,630 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,324,938 192,880 216,730 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 383,176 89,830 98,120 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 3,210,909 2,835,720 3,156,470 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page igo City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 191 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget 176 - MEASURE 11990-2010 28,323 150,120 200,210 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 4,006,189 3,045,510 3,784,510 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 0 2,366,000 1,866,000 181 - SB 1 - TCEP 0 7,850,000 52,150,000 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 80 70 80 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 1,533,715 1,493,370 1,521,010 190 - PROP 42 -TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 206,301 50 0 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 70 60 70 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 53,992 6,930 40,180 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 60 30 6,010 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 5,277,747 3,713,290 349,030 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 906,633 1,671,740 1,290,010 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 1,652,939 600,150 310 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP 0 19,920 0 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 46,596 43,000 451,000 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 0 9,730 9,730 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 56,236 70,840 59,390 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 38,808 43,210 49,800 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 25,838 145,610 118,900 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 3,163,265 3,631,500 3,245,220 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 1,434,408 1,492,080 1,525,940 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 0 0 2,150 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4,606,577 5,126,230 5,771,450 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 16,757 20,400 21,130 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 1,890 3,280 5,830 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 53,041 720 0 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 0 50 50 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 123,261 3,290 578,120 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 289,331 320,420 352,130 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 47,823 5,890 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 11,151 15,530 68,480 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 27,028 27,030 26,730 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 254,100 4,480,850 662,210 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 25,610 25,430 25,110 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 8,268 41,340 165,670 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,174,033 1,399,920 1,520,070 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 475,268 523,790 665,670 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 66,605,107 $ 66,045,560 $ 110,255,040 CAPITAL PROJECTS 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 310 $ 280 $ 300 612 - CFD 2001-01 140 120 910 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 450 $ 400 $ 1,210 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,851,970 $ 2,667,950 $ 2,805,300 702 - REGIS CONNECT 104,968 73,350 26,410 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 8,940,760 11,026,160 11,115,610 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 305,923 785,300 693,250 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 1,200 1,130 1,410 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 144,924 2,440,150 1,788,630 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 191 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget 2018/19 2019/20 2017/18 Adopted Preliminary Actual Budget Budget TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 12,349,745 $ 16,994,040 $ 16,430,610 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS FIDUCIARY FUNDS 802 - AD 82-2 INVESTMENT EARNINGS TOTAL FIDUCIARY FUNDS TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 1,069,245 $ 772,030 $ 922,830 952,866 1,023 ,130 1,268,280 $ 2,022,111 $ 1,795,160 $ 2,191,110 $ 5 $ 0 $ 0 $ 5 $ 0 $ 0 $ 165,575,708 $ 179,813,900 $ 226,846,740 $ 24,377,356 $ 27,307,480 $ 28,640,860 5,927,160 6,065,870 6,108,490 2,279,009 2,445,940 2,394,810 140 90 200 18,822,249 14,317,090 4,597,300 $ 51,405,914 $ 50,136,470 $ 41,741.660 $ 51,405,914 $ 50,136,470 $ 41,741,660 $ 216,981,622 $ 229,950,370 $ 268,588,400 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 192 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - SUMMARY ADOPTED Preliminary 2017/18 2019/19 2019/20 DEPARTMENT GOVERNANCE 115.0 115.0 22.0 City Council 5.0 5.0 5.0 City Clerk 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Treasurer 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Management 18.0 19.0 19.0 79.0 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 25.0 26.0 26.0 PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District Animal Care and Services TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Community Services Library Services TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Administration/Procurement Finance Human Resources Innovation and Technology TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 115.0 115.0 115.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 137.0 137.0 137.0 6.0 5.0 5.0 46.5 46.5 45.5 27.5 28.5 28.5 80.0 80.0 79.0 5.0 5.0 5.0 21.0 21.0 21.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 23.0 23.0 23.0 58.0 58.0 58.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 16.0 16.0 16.0 37.0 37.0 39.0 14.0 14.0 13.0 128.0 129.0 130.0 198.0 199.0 201.0 498.0 500.0 501.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 193 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE GOVERNANCE Elected Officials Mayor Councilmember City Clerk City Treasurer City Management Administrative Assistant Administrative Secretary City Manager Communications Manager Communications and Marketing Officer** Community Affairs Officer* Community Improvement Manager Community Improvement Officer I Community Improvement Officer II Community Programs Coordinator DCM/Civic & Cultural Services Executive Assistant Management Aide Management Analyst I Management Analyst II Management Analyst III Office Specialist I Principal Management Analyst Senior Community Improvement Officer Senior Executive Assistant PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District Captain Specialist Community Affairs Senior Coordinator* Emergency Management Coordinator EMS Administrator Field Training Officer Fire Battalion Chief Fire Captain Fire Chief Fire Deputy Chief Total Elected Officials ADOPTED Preliminary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 7.0 7.0 7.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 Total City Management 18.0 19.0 19.0 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 25.0 26.0 26.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 27.0 27.0 27.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 194 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Administrative Assistant** 0.0 2.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 195 ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Fire Engineer 27.0 27.0 27.0 Fire Equipment Apprentice Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Equipment Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Equipment Lead Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Marshall 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Prevention Specialist I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Prevention Specialist 1I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Prevention Supervisor 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Shop Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Firefighter 27.0 27.0 27.0 Management Aide** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Management Analyst 1** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Management Analyst 1I* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Management Analyst III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist 11 3.0 3.0 3.0 Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Administrative Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Fire District 115.0 115.0 115.0 Animal Care and Services Administrative Assistant 0.0 3.0 3.0 Animal Behavior Specialist* 0.0 0.0 2.0 Animal Care Supervisor (1) 1.0 2.0 2.0 Animal Caretaker 2.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Center Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Handler** 3.0 3.0 0.0 Animal Rescue Specialist* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Animal Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Services Dispatcher 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Services Officer 3.0 3.0 3.0 Community Programs Specialist 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist 11 3.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Animal Services Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Veterinary Technician 0.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinarian 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Technician 3.0 2.0 2.0 Total Animal Care and Services 22.0 22.0 22.0 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 137.0 137.0 137.0 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Administrative Assistant** 0.0 2.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 195 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Assistant City Clerk 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Clerk Records Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Clerk Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant I* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Office Specialist 11 3.0 0.0 0.0 Total Records Management 6.0 5.0 5.0 Community Services Administrative Assistant** 0.0 6.0 3.0 Artistic Producer -Main Street Theatre* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Box Office Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Affairs Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Affairs Senior Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Affairs Technician* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Services Coordinator** 18.0 18.0 12.0 Community Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Services Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Services Marketing Coordinator** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Community Services Superintendent 2.0 2.0 2.0 Community Services Supervisor** 6.0 6.0 4.0 Community Services Technician* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Community Theater Producer* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Cultural Arts Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 Cultural Center Manager 0.0 1.0 1.0 Deputy Community Services Director* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Event & Rental Services Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Executive Assistant II (2) 0.0 1.0 1.0 Front of House Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Fund Development Coordinator 0.5 0.5 0.5 Management Aide** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Management Analyst I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Office Specialist II 6.0 0.0 0.0 Patron and Events Supervisor* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Senior Administrative Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Theater Productions Supervisor* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Theatre Technician 111 4.0 4.0 4.0 Total Community Services 46.5 46.5 45.5 Library Services Assistant Library Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant II 0.0 1.0 1.0 Fund Development Coordinator 0.5 0.5 0.5 Librarian 1 (3) 8.0 10.0 10.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 196 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Librarian II 2.0 1.0 1.0 Library Assistant 11 2.0 2.0 2.0 Library Clerk 2.0 3.0 3.0 Library Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Page 1.0 0.0 0.0 Library Services Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Technician 5.0 5.0 5.0 Senior Administrative Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Librarian 3.0 3.0 3.0 Total Library Services 27.5 28.5 28.5 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 80.0 80.0 79.0 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 2.0 2.0 2.0 Administration/Purchasing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Administrative Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 DCM/Administrative Services 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant 0.0 1.0 1.0 Procurement Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Procurement Technician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Admin/Purchasing 5.0 5.0 5.0 Finance Account Clerk 5.0 5.0 5.0 Account Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Accounts Payable Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Budget Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Business License Clerk 2.0 2.0 2.0 Business License Program Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Business License Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Finance Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Finance Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst III 2.0 2.0 2.0 Payroll Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Principal Accountant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Accountant 2.0 2.0 2.0 Special Districts Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Finance 21.0 21.0 21.0 Human Resources Administrative Assistant Deputy Human Resources Director* Human Resources Director 0.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 197 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE Human Resources Manager** Human Resources Technician Management Analyst I Office Specialist I Risk Management Analyst Senior Risk Management Analyst (4) Total Human Resources Innovation and Technology Administrative Assistant Deputy Director of Innovation and Technology GIS Analyst GIS Specialist*(5) GIS Supervisor Information Technology Analyst 1 (6) Information Technology Analyst II (7) Information Technology Specialist II Information Technology Technician Innovation and Technology Director Office Specialist I Office Specialist II Senior GIS Analyst Senior GIS Technician** Senior Information Technology Analyst Total Innovation and Technology TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration DCM/Economic & Community Development Management Aide Management Analyst II Total Administration Building and Safety Services Administrative Assistant Building and Safety Services Director Building Inspection Supervisor Building Inspector** Building Safety Manager Executive Assistant Office Specialist II ADOPTED Preliminary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 1.0 1.0 0.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 9.0 9.0 9.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 23.0 23.0 23.0 58.0 58.0 58.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 3.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 5.0 5.0 4.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 198 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE ADOPTED Preliminary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Plans Examiner I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Plans Examiner II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Building Inspector* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Senior Plans Examiner 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Building and Safety Services 16.0 16.0 16.0 Engineering Services Administrative Assistant 0.0 2.0 2.0 Administrative Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Assistant City Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant Engineer 5.0 5.0 5.0 Associate Engineer (8) 6.0 6.0 6.0 Engineering Services Director/City Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Engineering Technician 4.0 4.0 4.0 Environmental Programs Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Environmental Programs Inspector 2.0 2.0 2.0 Environmental Programs Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant 0.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide* 1.0 1.0 2.0 Management Analyst 1 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst 11 0.0 0.0 0.0 Office Specialist II 2.0 0.0 0.0 Principal Engineer (9) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Services Technician III 2.0 2.0 2.0 Public Works Inspector I** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Public Works Inspector II* 1.0 1.0 2.0 Senior Civil Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Supervising Public Works Inspector 1.0 1.0 1.0 Traffic Engineer (9) 1.0 1.0 1.0 Utilities Division Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Utilities Operations Supervisor* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Total Engineering Services 37.0 37.0 39.0 Planning Administrative Assistant** 0.0 2.0 1.0 Assistant Planner** 4.0 4.0 2.0 Associate Planner** 3.0 3.0 2.0 Executive Assistant 11 0.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst 11* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Office Specialist 1 1.0 0.0 0.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 199 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE ADOPTED Preliminary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Office Specialist II 1.0 0.0 0.0 Planning Commission Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Planning Director* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Planning Manager** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Planning Technician* 1.0 1.0 2.0 Principal Planner* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Senior Planner 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Planning 14.0 14.0 13.0 Public Works Services Administrative Assistant 0.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Deputy Director of Public Works 0.0 1.0 1.0 Electrician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Equipment Operator 5.0 5.0 5.0 Executive Assistant 0.0 1.0 1.0 Facilities Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fleet Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Inventory Specialist Equipment/Materials 1.0 1.0 1.0 Lead Maintenance Worker* 15.0 15.0 16.0 Lead Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Maintenance Coordinator 9.0 9.0 9.0 Maintenance Supervisor 10.0 10.0 10.0 Maintenance Worker 57.0 57.0 57.0 Management Analyst 1 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Office Specialist I1 1.0 0.0 0.0 Parks/Landscape Maintenance Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Safety Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Maintenance Worker (10) 11.0 11.0 11.0 Signal & Lighting Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Signal & Lighting Technician 2.0 2.0 2.0 Streets/Storm Drain Maintenance Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Public Works Services 128.0 129.0 130.0 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 198.0 199.0 201.0 TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 498.0 500.0 501.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 200 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Changes in staffing levels for Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget *Position(s) funded for FY 2019/20 **Position(s) defunded in FY 2019/20 (1) One position underfilled by Animal Caretaker (2) Position underfilled by Executive Assistant I (3) One position underfilled by Library Technician (4) Position underfilled by Risk Management Coordinator (5) One position underfilled by Information Technology Technician (6) One position underfilled by Information Technology Specialist II (7) One position underfilled by Information Technology Analyst I (8) Position underfilled by Assistant Engineer (9) Position underfilled by Senior Civil Engineer (10) Two positions overfilled by Senior Maintenance Worker Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 201 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2019/20 PRELIMINARY BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 PART TIME EMPLOYEES FTEs (FULL TIME EQUIVALENTS) GOVERNANCE City Management 1.4 0.4 0.8 TOTAL CITY MANAGEMENT 1.4 0.4 0.8 PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District 3.5 3.5 3.5 Animal Care and Services 12.8 12.8 15.9 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 16.3 16.3 19.4 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management 0.0 0.5 0.5 Community Services 189.6 189.8 93.6 Library Services 36.8 35.1 27.6 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 226.4 225.4 121.7 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Purchasing 1.0 1.0 1.4 Human Resources 0.5 0.5 0.5 Finance 2.3 2.3 2.7 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 3.8 3.8 4.6 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration 0.0 0.0 0.0 Building and Safety Services 0.5 0.5 0.5 Engineering Services 1.9 1.9 1.2 Planning 0.8 0.8 0.8 Public Works Services 34.1 34.1 34.1 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 37.3 37.3 36.6 TOTAL PART TIME POSITIONS 285.2 283.2 183.1 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 202 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fund Balance Summaries Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 203 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 204 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Spendable Fund Balances With the implementation of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions, local governments are required to use new fund balance terminology. As indicated in the Glossary of Budget Terms, fund balance is essentially the difference between the assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund. There are five separate components of fund balance, each of which identifies the extent to which the City is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts can be spent. • Nonspendable fund balance (inherently nonspendable) • Restricted fund balance (externally enforceable limitations on use) • Committed fund balance (self imposed limitations on use) • Assigned fund balance (limitation resulting from intended use) • Unassigned fund balance (residual net resources) The first two components listed above are not included in the Spendable Fund Balances report on the following pages due to the nature of their restrictions, with the exception of Special Revenue and Capital Projects Funds. These two fund types have restricted funding sources; however, the budgets presented represent qualifying expenditures that are in line with the restrictions. Therefore, the respective fund balances are presented. The last three components are incorporated into the report for all fund types. For the City's Operating Budget, following are the main components of the committed fund balance included in the fund balance roll forward: Fund 001 — General Fund: Changes in Economic Circumstances $18,006,176 Working Capital $ 4,414,514 Funds 281-283 — Fire District Operating Funds: Working Capital $16,889,406 Changes in Economic Circumstances $ 9,128,022 Employee Leave Payouts $ 3,425,536 All other fund balances in the City's Operating Budget are either committed or assigned. The Operating Budget has no unassigned fund balances. For descriptions of the City's committed fund balance categories, please refer to the City's Financial Policies included in the Appendix to this budget document. The City adopts a balanced Operating Budget each year resulting in minimal overall fluctuations in the fund balance from year to year. In the Other Funds, increases or decreases are dependent upon general fluctuations in recurring revenues, such as gas tax; the receipt of new grant funding; or the usage of funding received in prior years for capital expenditures. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 205 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July I, 2019 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2020 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERALFUND 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 416,036 $ 001 -GENERAL FUND $ 26,210,066 $ 86,499,400 $ 1,790,870 $ 4,645,390 $ 83,644,880 $ 26,210,066 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 26,210,066 $ 86,499,400 $ 1,790,870 $ 4,645,390 $ 83,644,880 $ 26,210,066 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 984,931 16,560 410,440 591,051 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 2,306,739 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 3,781 $ 162,480 $ - $ - $ 162,480 $ 3,781 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 3,115,705 1,074,026 839,855 463,500 364,720 249,390 923,416 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 228,533 33,337 - 236,113 - - 33,337 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND - 2,844,411 966,832 101,420 - 561,100 2,384,731 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 1,724,258 4,541,543 559,058 150,930 - 649,720 4,042,753 018 -TRAFFIC SAFETY 1,231,328 6,155 188,580 220,160 409,260 5,635 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 1,454,919 7,186,677 311,880 - 97,560 1,669,239 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 1,084,868 139,894 585,593 21,960 36,510 125,344 023 - SB 1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 23,035,203 70,755 - 19,940 - - 5,730 84,965 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 47,791,833 145,814 1,023,970 1,175,000 1,390,020 4,845,250 43,755,533 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 606,550 2,537,045 456,013 60,210 - - 906,760 1,690,495 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 60,497,699 $ 2,504,870 $ 1,395,160 $ 1,754,740 $ 7,923,760 $ 54,719,229 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 416,036 $ 1,019,250 $ $ $ 1,071,230 $ 364,056 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 303,745 210 210 303,745 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 580,835 558,210 990,990 148,055 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 984,931 16,560 410,440 591,051 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 2,306,739 285,980 30,710 2,562,009 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 3,103,885 159,490 147,670 3,115,705 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 839,855 326,170 10,140 1,155,885 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 228,533 7,950 370 236,113 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 967,092 - - 260 966,832 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 1,826,608 37,250 139,600 1,724,258 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 559,058 10,700 390 569,368 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 1,231,328 220,200 14,660 1,436,868 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 7,809,617 145,780 768,720 7,186,677 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 1,068,948 16,160 240 1,084,868 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 585,593 117,800 3,330 700,063 124 - TRANSPORTATION 23,035,203 3,742,590 - 8,396,830 18,380,963 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 121,214 25,320 720 145,814 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 595,580 11,370 400 606,550 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 456,013 110,570 960 565,623 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 692,684 12,690 180 705,194 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 10,790,460 288,180 - - 80,210 10,998,430 130 - LMD # 1 GENERAL CITY 1,327,565 1,320,940 135,830 90,000 1,758,730 935,605 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,555,559 3,612,270 324,860 - 4,849,910 2,642,779 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 29,289 4,280 - 11,000 22,569 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS 2,084,093 1,093,480 - 1,399,800 1,777,773 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 6,043,133 2,888,970 - 3,416,550 5,515,553 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 28,637 3,020 - 9,670 21,987 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 543,863 533,200 41,090 629,190 488,963 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,095,121 999,930 - 1,252,200 842,851 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 68,406 35,520 39,960 63,966 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,182,115 689,550 1,204,850 666,815 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,160,694 624,590 - 740,340 1,044,944 141 - LMD #I CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 221,304 3,890 90,000 - 40,620 274,574 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 206 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 207 Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1, 2019 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2020 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 88,386 30 351,590 - 351,620 88,386 151 - SLD #I ARTERIAL 362,513 830,580 - 112,200 893,560 187,333 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 500,858 376,450 284,250 109,840 551,340 500,378 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,320,235 385,090 - 43,550 285,230 1,376,545 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 478,388 184,270 - 20,220 158,040 484,398 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (137,560) 44,220 - 9,600 67,610 (170,550) 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 418,610 141,430 - 15,030 122,600 422,410 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 40,750 132,670 83,920 30,430 186,300 40,610 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,018,309 109,060 - 10,720 87,400 2,029,249 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 7,585,205 4,753,310 150,000 - 3,156,470 9,332,045 176 - MEASURE 11990-2010 219,459 5,650 - - 200,210 24,899 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 1,179,312 3,061,140 - 3,784,510 455,942 178 - SB 140 36,160 - - - - 36,160 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 470,750 2,918,340 - - 1,866,000 1,523,090 181 -SB 1 -TCEP - 52,150,000 - - 52,150,000 - 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 289,511 - 80 289,431 186 - FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1,433) - - (1,433) 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 3,814,866 1,535,580 218,390 1,302,620 3,829,436 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 247,829 4,540 - 70 252,299 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 65,545 1,320 - 40,180 26,685 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 6,045 60 - - 6,010 95 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 20,637,569 1,693,550 - - 349,030 21,982,089 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 709,826 1,440,010 - - 1,290,010 859,826 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 360 - - - 310 50 211 - PROP IB - SLPP 3,118 - - - 3,118 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 - 451,000 - - 451,000 - 215 - ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GRNT (96) - - - - (96) 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC (29,484) 19,600 - - 9,730 (19,614) 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT - 59,390 - - 59,390 - 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 1,534 49,430 - - 49,800 1,164 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 6 118,900 - - 118,900 6 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS -DREIER (177) - - - (177) 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 1,551,397 2,965,860 - 3,245,220 1,272,037 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 625,717 1,615,300 - - 1,525,940 715,077 258 - SENIOR OUTREACH GRANT (5,267) - - - (5,267) 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 40 40 - 2,150 (2,070) 290 - LIBRARY FUND 6,322,692 6,068,790 500,000 5,271,450 6,620,032 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 26,760 21,130 - 21,130 26,760 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 1,290 7,530 5,830 2,990 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 19,950 - 50 19,900 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 36,486 - - 36,486 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT -2000 6,128 - - - 6,128 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 810,028 14,180 500,000 578,120 746,088 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 466,351 271,820 - 352,130 386,041 356 - JUSTICE ASSIST GRNT (JAG) ARRA 33 - - - 33 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 45,941 - - - 45,941 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 881 68,290 - - 68,480 691 383 - EMPG (28) 26,730 - - 26,730 (28) 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 1,986,748 166,560 - - 662,210 1,491,098 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 55,639 34,640 - - 25,110 65,169 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 283,995 3,760 116,800 - 165,670 238,885 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,884,916 1,346,500 213,530 116,800 1,403,270 1,924,876 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 463,235 505,160 - - 665,670 302,725 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 207 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1, 2019 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2020 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 130,753,062 $ 102,503,980 $ 2,291,870 $ 1,276,780 $ 108,978,260 $ 125,293,872 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 606 - AD 86-2 R/C DRAINAGE DISTRICT 607 - CFD 2000-01 SOUTH ETIWANDA 612 - CFD 2001-01 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 702 - REGIS CONNECT 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 711 -FIBER OPTIC NETWORK TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 13,539 250 $ - $ - $ 13,789 1,147,608 21,020 300 1,168,328 (41,128) - - (41,128) 63 - - 63 514,370 53,950 910 567,410 173,937 - - 173,937 6,682 - 6,682 48,904 100 49,004 1,888 40 1,928 6,224 120 - 6,344 $ 1,872,087 $ 75,480 $ $ $ 1,210 $ 1,946,357 $ 40,722 $ 638,550 $ 2,166,750 $ $ 2,805,300 $ 40,722 (24,120) 51,310 - 26,410 780 13,976,176 15,179,330 1,507,760 9,607,850 18,039,896 744,455 308,290 - 693,250 359,495 5,477,550 100,570 - 1,410 5,576,710 12,885,870 496,520 960,360 - 1,788,630 12,554,120 $ 33,100,653 $ 16,774,570 $ 3,127,110 $ 1,507,760 $ 14,922,850 $ 36,571,723 $ 1,824,666 $ 558,210 $ 150,000 $ $ 922,830 $ 1,610,046 1,370,268 605,240 537,080 1,268,280 1,244,308 $ 3,194,934 $ 1,163,450 $ 687,080 $ $ 2,191,110 $ 2,854,354 $ 255,628,501 $ 209,521,750 $ 9,292,090 $ 9,184,670 $ 217,662,070 $ 247,595,601 SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND $ 28,837,813 $ 28,640,860 $ $ 1,966,610 $ 26,674,250 $ 28,837,813 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 3,123,910 6,030,770 - 6,108,490 3,046,190 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 12,353 428,200 1,966,610 2,394,810 12,353 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 24,409 900 - - 200 25,109 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 20,365,610 10,313,710 - 107,420 4,489,880 26,082,020 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 52,364,095 $ 45,414,440 $ 1,966,610 $ 2,074,030 $ 39,667,630 $ 58,003,485 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 52,364,095 $ 45,414,440 $ 1,966,610 $ 2,074,030 $ 39,667,630 $ 58,003,485 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 307,992,596 $ 254,936,190 $ 11,258,700 $ 11,258,700 $ 257,329,700 $ 305,599,086 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 208 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 - GENERAL FUND TOTAL GENERAL FUND OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 023 - SB 1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 101 -AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 1 I 1 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 119 -PARK IMPROVEMENT 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 124 - TRANSPORTATION 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 130 - LMD #I GENERAL CITY Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July 1, 2019 June 30, 2020 Change Change Reason for Changes >$500,000 and 10% $ 26,210,066 $ 26,210,066 $ 0.00% $ 26,210,066 $ 26,210,066 $ 0.00% $ 3,781 $ 3,781 $ 0.00% 1,074,026 923,416 (150,610) -14.02% 33,337 33,337 - 0.00% 2,844,411 2,384,731 (459,680) -16.16% 4,541,543 4,042,753 (498,790) -10.98% 6,155 5,635 (520) N/A 1,454,919 1,669,239 214,320 14.73% 139,894 125,344 (14,550) -10.40% 70,755 84,965 14,210 20.08% 47,791,833 43,755,533 (4,036,300) -8.45% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 2,537,045 1,690,495 (846,550) -33.37% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time $ 60,497,699 $ 54,719,229 $ (5,778,470) -9.55% 416,036 303,745 580,835 984,931 2,306,739 3,103,885 839,855 228,533 967,092 1,826,608 559,058 1,231,328 7,809,617 1,068,948 585,593 23,035,203 121,214 595,580 456,013 692,684 10,790,460 1,327,565 364,056 303,745 148,055 591,051 2,562,009 3,115,705 1,155,885 236,113 966,832 1,724,258 569,368 1,436,868 7,186,677 1,084,868 700,063 18,380,963 145,814 606,550 565,623 705,194 10,998,430 935,605 (51,980) (432,780) (393,880) 255,270 11,820 316,030 7,580 (260) (102,350) 10,310 205,540 (622,940) 15,920 114,470 (4,654,240) 24,600 10,970 109,610 12,510 207,970 (391,960) 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,555,559 2,642,779 (912,780) 132 - LMD 93A HYSSOP 29,289 22,569 (6,720) 133 - LMD #3B MEDIANS 2,084,093 1,777,773 (306,320) 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 6,043,133 5,515,553 (527,580) 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 28,637 21,987 (6,650) 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 543,863 488,963 (54,900) 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,095,121 842,851 (252,270) 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 68,406 63,966 (4,440) 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,182,115 666,815 (515,300) 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,160,694 1,044,944 (115,750) 141 - LMD #I CAPITAL RESERVE FUND 221,304 274,574 53,270 -12.49% 0.00% -74.51% -39.99% 11.07% 0.38% 37.63% 3.32% -0.03% -5.60% 1.84% 16.69% -7.98% 1.49% 19.55% -20.20% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 20.29% 1.84% 24.04% 1.81% 1.93% -29.52% Capital projects for Paseo Lighting Retrofits, Water Conservation Efforts, and Replacement of -25.67% Rubberized Playground Surfaces -22.94% -14.70% -8.73% -23.22% -10.09% -23.04% -6.49% -43.59% Capital project for Garcia Park Ball Field Lights -9.97% 24.07% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 209 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 210 Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July 1. 2019 June 30, 2020 Change Change Reason for Changes >$500.000 and 10% 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 88,386 88,386 0.00% 151 - SLD # 1 ARTERIAL 362,513 187,333 (175,180) -48.32% 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 500,858 500,378 (480) -0.10% 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,320,235 1,376,545 56,310 4.27% 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 478,388 484,398 6,010 1.26% 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (137,560) (170,550) (32,990) 23.98% 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 418,610 422,410 3,800 0.91% 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 40,750 40,610 (140) -0.34% 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,018,309 2,029,249 10,940 0.54% 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 7,585,205 9,332,045 1,746,840 23.03% Results of operations, for use in future period 176 - MEASURE 11990-20 10 219,459 24,899 (194,560) -88.65% 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 1,179,312 455,942 (723,370) -61.34% Funding of various capital projects 178 -SB 140 36,160 36,160 - 0.00% 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 470,750 1,523,090 1,052,340 223.55% Results of operations, for use in future period 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 289,511 289,431 (80) -0.03% 186 - FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1,433) (1,433) - 0.00% 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 3,814,866 3,829,436 14,570 0.38% 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 247,829 252,299 4,470 1.80% 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 65,545 26,685 (38,860) -59.29% 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 6,045 95 (5,950) -98.43% 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 20,637,569 21,982,089 1,344,520 6.51% 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 709,826 859,826 150,000 21.13% 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 360 50 (310) -86.11% 211 - PROP IB - SLPP 3,118 3,118 - 0.00% 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 - - 0.00% 215 - ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GRNT (96) (96) - 0.00% 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC (29,484) (19,614) 9,870 -33.48% 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT - - - 100.00% 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 1,534 1,164 (370) -24.12% 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 6 6 - 0.00% 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS -DREIER (177) (177) 0.00% 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 1,551,397 1,272,037 (279,360) -18.01% 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 625,717 715,077 89,360 14.28% 258 - SENIOR OUTREACH GRANT (5,267) (5,267) - 0.00% 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 40 (2,070) (2,110) -5275.00% 290 - LIBRARY FUND 6,322,692 6,620,032 297,340 4.70% 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 26,760 26,760 - 0.00% 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 1,290 2,990 1,700 0.00% 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 19,950 19,900 (50) -0.25% 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 36,486 36,486 - 0.00% 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT -2000 6,128 6,128 0.00% 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 810,028 746,088 (63,940) -7.89% 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 466,351 386,041 (80,310) -17.22% 356 - JUSTICE ASSIST GRNT (JAG) ARRA 33 33 0.00% 361 -JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 45,941 45,941 - 0.00% 381 -HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 881 691 (190) -21.57% 383 - EMPG (28) (28) - 0.00% 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 1,986,748 1,491,098 (495,650) -24.95% 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 55,639 65,169 9,530 17.13% 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 283,995 238,885 (45,110) -15.88% 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,884,916 1,924,876 39,960 2.12% 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 463,235 302,725 (160,510) -34.65% TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 130,753,062 $ 125,293,872 $ (5,459,190) -4.18% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 210 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 606 - AD 86-2 R/C DRAINAGE DISTRICT 607 - CFD 2000-01 SOUTH ETIWANDA 612 - CFD 2001-01 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 702 - REGIS CONNECT 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July I, 2019 June 30, 2020 Change Change Reason for Changes >$500,000 and 10% $ 13,539 $ 13,789 $ 250 1.85% 1,147,608 1,168,328 20,720 1.81% (41,128) (41,128) - 0.00% 63 63 - 0.00% 514,370 567,410 53,040 10.31% 173,937 173,937 - 0.00% 6,682 6,682 - 0.00% 48,904 49,004 100 0.20% 1,888 1,928 40 2.12% 6,224 6,344 120 1.93% $ 1,872,087 $ 1,946,357 $ 74,270 3.97% $ 40,722 $ 40,722 $ - 0.00% (24,120) 780 $ 24,900 -103.23% 13,976,176 18,039,896 $ 4,063,720 29.08% Results of operations, for use in future period 744,455 359,495 $ (384,960) -51.71% 5,477,550 5,576,710 $ 99,160 1.81% 12,885,870 12,554,120 $ (331,750) 100.00% $ 33,100,653 $ 36,571,723 $ 3,471,070 10.49% INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 1,824,666 $ 1,610,046 $ (214,620) -11.76% 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 1,370,268 1,244,308 (125,960) -9.19% TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 3,194,934 $ 2,854,354 $ (340,580) -10.66% TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 255,628,501 $ 247,595,601 $ (8,032,900) -9.93% R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND $ 28,837,813 $ 28,837,813 $ 0.00% 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 3,123,910 3,046,190 (77,720) -2.49% 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 12,353 12,353 - N/A 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 24,409 25,109 700 2.87% 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 20,365,610 26,082,020 5,716,410 28.07% Results of operations, for use in future period TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 52,364,095 $ 58,003,485 $ 5,639,390 10.77% TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 52,364,095 $ 58,003,485 $ 5,639,390 10.77% TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 307,992,596 $ 305,599,086 $ (2,393,510) -0.78% Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 211 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 212 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 213 City Council Department Budget Summary Overview of Department As a body of elected officials, the separately elected Mayor and four -member City Council establish local laws, set policy, approve programs, adopt the annual budget, and appropriate funds. As elected representatives of the citizens, the City Council is responsible to all of the people and, as such, devotes its energies to making decisions which are in the best interest of the public welfare. The City Council is elected by geographic districts with the Mayor being elected at large. They each serve staggered four-year terms. The City Council also serves as the Board of Directors for the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District (a subsidiary district of the City). The City Council meets the first and third Wednesday of the month at City Hall to discuss and vote on pertinent issues facing the City and its residents. In addition, the City Council is responsible for appointing the City Manager, City Attorney, and members of certain foundations, boards and commissions. City Council Mission Statement The Mission of the City Council of Rancho Cucamonga is to: • Make decisions, and be perceived as making decisions, for the general welfare of the community. • Always work to improve existing services and develop policies to meet the expected as well as anticipated needs of the community. • Work together cooperatively to respect all persons and their ideas in order to develop and maintain the trust of the community. • Reflect the community's desires and priorities by assuring that decisions accurately reflect the community's interests by fairly translating public feedback into public policy. • Enhance the quality of life of all Rancho Cucamonga residents through the continued pursuit of excellence and commitment to the City's core values and goals. • Set the vision for the community for the future. • Have a professional, objective, and respectful relationship with each other to more effectively address the challenges of the future. FY 2019/20 City Council Priorities The four primary goals established by the City Council for the upcoming fiscal year are as follows: • Public Safety: Proactively develop public safety programs and facilities to meet community needs. • Parks and Recreation Development: Proceed with planning and development of major parks and recreational projects. • Enhancing Premier Community Status: As the community matures, undertake programs and projects to enhance Rancho Cucamonga's position as the premier community in our region. • Mid and Long -Range Planning: Begin efforts to develop mid-range and long-term goals and vision for the City. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 214 City Council Department Budget Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 215 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 145,986 $ 151,750 $ 144,670 Operations and Maintenance 21,684 27,550 24,800 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (51,160) (52,580) (51,360) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 116,510 126,720 118,110 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 145,986 151,750 144,670 Operations and Maintenance 21,684 27,550 24,800 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (51,160) (52,580) (51,360) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost S 116,510 S 126,720 S 118,110 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 5.0 5.0 5.0 Total Staffing 5.0 5.0 5.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 215 City Clerk Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Clerk is an elected official charged with the responsibility of maintaining records of City Council actions, recordation of minutes for all meetings of the City Council, and verification of all Resolutions and Ordinances. In addition, the City Clerk is responsible for all documents and duties associated with municipal elections. The statutes of the State of California prescribe the basic functions and duties of the City Clerk, and the Government Code and Election Code provide precise and specific responsibilities and procedures to follow. This position works with the City Clerk Services Director, who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the office. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Maintain an accurate record of City Council proceedings and official City documents. • Conduct municipal elections in accordance with federal and state laws. • Administer the Oath of Office. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 216 City Clerk Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 $ 2,658 $ 2,790 $ 2,810 (790) (820) (850) 1,868 1,970 1,960 Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 2,658 2,790 2,810 Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (790) (820) (850) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 1,868 $ 1,970 $ 1,960 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 217 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Treasurer is an elected official charged with the responsibility for the custody and investment of all City funds. The Treasurer is the City's official "signature" for all financial transactions made. The Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services has been appointed as Deputy City Treasurer and has the authority to assign Finance staff to handle treasury functions needing daily attention. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Maintain funds in secure and liquid investments. • Structure maturities to meet City cash flow needs throughout the year. • Present the City's investment policy to the City Council for annual approval. • Maintain CMTA Investment Policy Certification which certifies the City's investment policy complies with the current State statutes governing the investment practices of local government entities located within the State of California. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 218 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 $ 2,658 $ 2,790 $ 2,810 13,046 14,740 15,010 (5,050) (5,140) (5,400) 10,654 12,390 12,420 Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 2,658 2,790 2,810 Operations and Maintenance 13,046 14,740 15,010 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (5,050) (5,140) (5,400) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 10,654 $ 12,390 $ 12,420 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Page 219 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget City Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Manager is appointed by the City Council to oversee the enforcement of municipal laws, direct daily operations of the City, make recommendations to the City Council, prepare and administer the municipal budget, appoint and supervise all City department heads and employees, and supervise the operation of all City departments. The City Manager's Office oversees a variety of interdepartmental activities and programs and provides direct support for the City Council. One such effort is the Healthy RC initiative, which encourages a healthy and environmentally sustainable lifestyle for those who live, work, and play in Rancho Cucamonga. Healthy RC initiatives include the Safe Routes to School program, CASA healthy cooking classes, mental health symposiums, electric vehicle charging station network, and the implementation of policies that encourage access to healthy food and physical activity, including farmers' markets, community gardens, and walkable neighborhoods. The City Manager's Office provides management of the City's ,1 �►�� award-winning Community Affairs Program including V publication of the Rancho Reporter newsletter, media relations, community outreach and engagement, social media platforms, special projects, and other public information efforts. Staff also responds to and follows -up on citizen inquiries and concerns regarding City programs and services, operates and is involved with original programming on the government access channel RCTV-3, and oversees live broadcasts of City Council meetings. The Community Affairs Program utilizes a creative mix of innovative communication tools and technology, along with traditional outreach methods, to enhance community engagement. The City Manager's Office also manages the Legislative Advocacy Program to ensure that Rancho Cucamonga's interests are heard at the state and federal level. These efforts are governed by our Legislative Platform, which promotes the principle of local control and protection of local revenue. The Community Improvement Division provides enforcement services in response to nuisance conditions and other violations of the Municipal Code, providing for a safer and more beautiful community. Training is essential, and three of the four staff members have received the designation of Certified Code Enforcement Officer from the state organization. This emphasis on training creates more successful efforts to gain compliance, more effective use of staff time, and reduces liability. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue Community Improvement efforts to proactively respond to nuisance properties and vacant structures. • Continue organizational shift towards data driven and performance management processes. • Host quarterly mental health symposiums and the City's third Healthy RC Youth Summit. • Continue implementation of the Sustainable Community Action Plan and development of metrics for publicly -accessible dashboard. • Continue and expand Community Schools Model at Los Amigos Elementary. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 220 City Management Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time Part Time Total Staffing Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 $ 2,265,424 $ 2,509,990 $ 2,652,130 407,789 547,320 497,550 (482,510) (510,280) (532,860) 2,190,703 2,547,030 2,616,820 - 9,730 9,730 2,265,424 407,789 (482, 510) 9,730 9,730 2,509,990 557,050 (510,280) 2,652,130 507,280 (532,860) S 2,190,703 S 2,556,760 S 2,626,550 18.0 1.4 19.4 19.0 0.4 19.4 19.0 0.8 19.8 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 221 City Management Performance Statistics Healthy RC • Healthy RC hosted six Mental Health Symposiums and reached over 1000 attendees. • Healthy RC hosted its second Teen Summit and reached over 130 high school teens. `�( MtFN 1 0/ D MAERS • The Healthy RC Sustainability Program completed the installation of three additional EV Charging Stations, including RC's first ever DC Fast Charger. • The Sustainable Community Action Plan has been awarded six awards for its comprehensive efforts towards being a more Green RC and region. Awards include a Southern California Association of Governments Green Region Award, both Inland Empire and California American Planning Association Awards, a Cool Planet Award, a Beacon Award and a Red Tape to Red Carpet Award. • The City was recognized at the League of California Cities Conference and received a Helen Putnam Award for Excellence in Health and Wellness for the Healthy RC Your Mind Matters mental health initiative and campaign. Legislative Advocacy • In 2018, the City tracked 26 state legislative bills. From these bills, the City supported three and opposed seven. This year, our advocacy success rate was 43%, which measures the ultimate outcome of a legislative bill in comparison with the City's official position. • Mayor Dennis Michael and Council Member Spagnolo continue to be active in the League of California Cities serving on the League Board of Directors. Key staff and elected/appointed officials also serve on statewide League policy committees. InstagramAudience Growth Community Affairs • In an effort to reach a younger demographic, Community Affairs increased the use of Instagram as a tool to deploy information and engage with those previously unreached. The increase in publishing on Instagram resulted in a 40% increase in followers. AUDIENCE GROWTH. By MONTH 350 300 350 20C 150 tr . During 2018, we had a 13% increase JAN in subscribers to the EE dAR AIR M 4 AtlG SER OCT NOV DEC 2013 City's e -newsletter system. This has proven to be an efficient way of providing communication to our community. Performance Management • The City is continuing to work towards developing both its Data Dashboards and Open Data Platform to be able to display and share data. . All Departments have included at least two performance measures or metrics in their most recent Strategic Service Plans (SSPs). ..:­ , ,.. Tota'. followers Increased oy Total Followers 5,237 Folb-m Gained 1501 -40.2% since previous dare range Community Improvement • GOGovApps software has been implemented to provide specialized support in case management, document tracking, and photo storage. • Community Improvement continues to work to re- habilitate properties and reduce blight in the City. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 222 City Management Services to the Community Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 223 Police (Contract) Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department has been a proud partner with the City of Rancho Cucamonga since incorporation in 1977. Throughout the course of this partnership, the City continues to be one of the safest cities in California. This is a continued effort by and a reflection of the dedicated men and women of the Police Department as well as its robust volunteer pool. Services provided by the Department include the following: Patrol. This division provides basic emergency response services to the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga, which includes the use of three K9 units to assist with tracking suspects or missing individuals as well as identifying the presence of narcotics. Crime Prevention. This division oversees the Department's many volunteers and includes programs such as Neighborhood Watch, Citizen Advisory Group and National Night Out. Traffic Safety. This division provides targeted proactive enforcement to reduce collisions, conducts bicycle safety classes, performs dedicated DUI and distracted driving enforcement. The traffic division also presents the DUI education program Every 15 Minutes to local high schools. Investigations. This division performs felony case follow-up, tracks sex registrants and acts as the pawn shop liaison. Victoria Gardens. Located at the Department's satellite station at the Victoria Gardens Regional Mall, staff conduct retail theft investigations and work proactively with the various retail establishments to prevent crime at the Mall. Special Units. Included in this division are the Gang Teams, Solution Oriented Policing (SOP) Team, Crime Free Multi -Housing and School Resource Officers (SROs). The SOP team works to address homeless issues and also provides "harden the target" training to the community in relation to active shooter events, amongst other focused efforts. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue to plan for the eventual staffing and equipping the west side public safety station. • Continue interaction with the homeless and transient population to limit quality of life crimes such as littering, loitering and panhandling. • Crime Prevention Unit will continue to host events educating the public on human trafficking, teen self-defense and internet safety. • Add additional ALPR cameras to the intersections of Haven Avenue and 19th Street; Base Line Road and Carnelian Street; and Day Creek Boulevard and Highland Avenue. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 224 Police (Contract) Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ - $ - $ - Operations and Maintenance 36,924,836 39,787,670 42,106,900 Capital Outlay - 8,000 - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 8,406 - - Transfer Out 153,470 179,230 220,160 Subtotal 37,086,712 39,974,900 42,327,060 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 974,697 852,400 1,167,960 Capital Outlay 234,985 3,955,390 521,260 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,209,682 4,807,790 1,689,220 All Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 37,899,533 40,640,070 43,274,860 Capital Outlay 234,985 3,963,390 521,260 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 8,406 - - Transfer Out 153,470 179,230 220,160 Total Cost $ 38,296,394 $ 44,782,690 $ 44,016,280 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Safety Personnel 138.0 139.0 141.0 Non -Safety Personnel 41.0 41.0 41.0 Total Staffing 179.0 180.0 182.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 225 Police (Contract) Performance Statistics 2018 Performance Highlights • 160,059 Calls for Service — 49.0% increase • Average Response Time for Emergency Calls was 4.25 minutes in 2018 compared to 4.61 minutes in 2017 • Part 1 Crimes down 6.5% • Part 2 Crimes down 7.1 *Part I Crimes - Murder, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, etc. **Part II Crimes - Forgery, Counterfeit, Fraud, Stolen Property, Vandalism, etc. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 226 PART I* PART 11** CALLS FOR REPORTS TAKEN SERVICE ARRESTS TRAFFIC COLLISIONS 2016 4,784 5,714 1 110,781 15,549 4,439 1,795 2017 5,037 5,958 107,452 17,427 5,022 1,652 2018 4,710 5,533 160,059 17,818 4,818 1,498 *Part I Crimes - Murder, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, etc. **Part II Crimes - Forgery, Counterfeit, Fraud, Stolen Property, Vandalism, etc. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 226 Police (Contract) Services to the Community Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 227 Police (Contract) Patrol Crime Traffic Investigations Victoria Special Prevention Safety Gardens Units Volunteers Targeted MET Emergency g y Response Felony Case Retail Theft Solution Citizen Follow-up Investigations Oriented Active Advisory Collisions Policing Team Shooter Bicycle Safety L Crime Analyst L CFS/APS Response PIO Classes Crime Free Program Pawn Shop Multi -Housing Dedicated Liaison 3-K9's Neighborhood Watch DUI Enforcement School Resource Officers Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 227 Fire District Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Fire District is a subsidiary district of the City and has its own statutory funding with the City Council serving as the Fire District Board of Directors. Our mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting and demonstrating a readiness to respond to, and reduce, threats to life and property through the delivery of emergency and non -emergency services and programs in an efficient and effective manner. The foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services is focused on three premier services: Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Response and Emergency Management. The Prevention Bureau reduces risk and eliminates hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction and public education/community outreach. Additionally, firefighters deliver an efficient and effective emergency response through structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response, technical rescue and tactical response. The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness and response programs. The Fire District provides emergency and non -emergency services through progressive leadership, personnel management, professional development through high level training, advanced planning, financial administration and logistical support which includes apparatus and facilities maintenance, communications and information technology. Our emergency response and incident mitigation capabilities remain cutting edge through innovative, passionate and fiscally responsible program management, which further enhances the quality of life for those we serve. The Fire District's goal is to deliver these services in an effective, efficient and professional manner while maintaining financial stability. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue construction of the West Side Public Safety Facility. • Complete the Banyan Station (175) water conservation landscape project, along with ADA compliant hardscape improvements. • Procure a mass notification system that will send emergency alerts to the public and City employees. • Replace the 1997 Type 1 Heavy Rescue apparatus. • Obtain HAZMAT Type 2 classification status. • Reduce Community Facilities District (CFD) assessments. • Continue to suspend Fire Prevention Permit and Inspection Fees. • Fund one (1) full-time lead maintenance worker. • Conduct a feasibility study to address weed abatement in trail easements. • Continue to expand training to help prepare community members and businesses for Tactical Response and Purposeful Mass Injury Incidents. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 228 Fire District Department Budget Summary All Funds Personnel Services $ 24,572,870 Adopted Preliminary Operations and Maintenance Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget - - - Personnel Services $ 24,572,870 $ 27,030,390 $ 26,984,790 Operations and Maintenance 6,857,000 7,183,050 7,792,770 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 94,935 400,660 399,990 Transfer Out 1,058,720 1,205,190 1,966,610 Subtotal 32,583,525 35,819,290 37,144,160 Other Funds 3.5 3.5 3.5 Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 850,840 647,600 556,310 Capital Outlay 17,998,577 13,696,610 3,960,500 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - 107,420 Subtotal 18,849,417 14,344,210 4,624,230 All Funds Personnel Services $ 24,572,870 27,030,390 $ 26,984,790 Operations and Maintenance 7,707,840 7,830,650 8,349,080 Capital Outlay 17,998,577 13,696,610 3,960,500 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 94,935 400,660 399,990 Transfer Out 1,058,720 1,205,190 2,074,030 Total Cost $ 51,432,942 $ 50,163,500 $ 41,768,390 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 115.0 115.0 115.0 Part Time 3.5 3.5 3.5 Total Staffing 118.5 118.5 118.5 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 229 Fire District Performance Statistics Fire District Incident Summary 2018 • 16,651 incidents for fire, emergency medical/rescue, hazardous materials, and public service; 2% increase overall; • 382 working fires; 2,386 good intent and false alarm; • 11,730 emergency medical/rescue incidents; 2% increase; • 169 hazardous materials incidents; • 1,312 public service incidents including water salvages, lockouts, police matters and other non -emergencies; • 21 overpressure ruptures or explosions without fire - 2018 Inspections Community Engagement Highlights 2018 • 82 public education activities and station tours held in 2018; • 16,484 citizen contacts made through pub- lic education activities; • 430 people trained in Hands -Only CPR; 299 people trained in Emergency Preparedness through CERT, BERT, Amateur Radio classes, exercises and more �f Employee Development Highlights 2018 • 25,684 total training hours (including classroom); 23% increase; • 130 multi -company training exercises; 7% increase; • 2.35 average training hours per shift per employee • Conducted Recruit Academy, Engineer Academy and Exam, Captain Academy, BC Academy and Probationary FF Testing; • Opened All -Risk Training Facility Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 230 Emergency Response Fire Supression Structural Wildland Front Country Fire Investigations Emergency Medical Services Technical Rescue Haz Mat Tactical Response Response Planning Emergency Management Ready RC Mitigation Preparedness Response Recovery Community and Business Emergency Response Training Volunteer Coordination Fire District Services to the Community Fire District Community Risk Reduction Prevention Inspections Weed Abatement/ Brush Clearance Public Education New Construction Plan Review CommunityI I Administration Affairs Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 231 Personnel Management and Public Development Information Planning/Finance Special Events Apparatus and Equipment Community Maintenance Facility Outreach and Engagement Facility Maintenance Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 231 Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an innovative Animal Services Department whose mission is Building a Community in which every Adoptable Pet Finds a Home. The Animal Services Department cares for more than 5,000 homeless pets annually and responds to more than 6,000 calls for service related to stray animals, rescues, and animal welfare. The Department oversees the following program areas: Animal Care: General animal care, adoptions, reuniting lost pets with owners and promoting responsible pet ownership. Community and Information Programs: Volunteer programs, foster care, neonatal kitten nursery, fundraising, community outreach, social media and community information/education. Field Services: Animal pickup, rescues, investigations, rabies control, animal licensing, enforcement of animal regulations, co -exiting with wildlife and community education. Veterinarian Services: Veterinary treatment for animals housed at the Center, contracts for outside veterinary services for emergency and after hour care and specialized care; teaching hospital for Veterinary and Veterinary Assistant students, and low and no cost spay and neuter clinics. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue to provide funding for high quality care to 5,000 homeless pets received each year. • Utilize resources provided by the Animal Care Foundation to supplement animal care, veterinary and neonatal Kitten Nursery programs; provide specialized surgeries, such as orthopedics; and purchase additional supplies to increase the number of pets adopted into new homes. • Continue to budget for proper tools, equipment and continued education in the Field Services Division to ensure a prompt and professional response to animal related community concerns and natural disasters. • Continue to increase the number of outreach and community events attended each year. • Enhance the Center's community involvement, specifically the Pet Cadet program, where youth between the ages of 12 and 18 can volunteer with a parent or guardian. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 232 Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Actuals 2017/18 $ 2,619,031 494,858 3,113,889 Adopted Budget 2018/19 $ 2,844,390 481,400 25,000 3,350,790 2,619,031 2,844,390 494,858 481,400 - 25,000 $ 3,113,889 $ 3,350,790 Preliminary Budget 2019/20 $ 2,970,860 445,350 3,416,210 720 720 2,970,860 446,070 $ 3,416,930 Full Time 22.0 22.0 22.0 Part Time 12.8 12.8 15.9 Total Staffing 34.8 34.8 37.9 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 233 Animal Care and Services Performance Statistics 2018 Highlights • The Veterinary Services Division purchased dental equipment to provide in-house dentistry for senior dogs and cats. On-site dental equipment reduces the cost of outsourcing these procedures and allows senior pets to be treated and adopted quicker. • Funds raised from the Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care Foundation allowed for the transfer of 5 dogs from Florida after Hurricane Michael. This mutual aid partnership helped the shelter in Florida create space for additional incoming animals during a time of disaster. • The Kitten Nursery and foster care programs continued to increase the number of kittens, puppies and special need animals cared for and adopted out. The programs were funded from the general fund and offset by unique fund- raisers held such as Kitten Yoga, Beer Kitty Kitty, Heads or Tail campaign and Paint Your Pet. • Dog Live Placement: 96% Cat Live Placement: 86% Outcome Report 2017 vs. 2018 ■ Cats Field Service Activities 5000 18000 4500 16000 4000 14000 3500 12000 3000 10000 8000 2500 2000 6000 4000 1500 2000 1000 0 Field Service Calls Animal Licenses Sold Soo . . I ■ 2017 ■ 2018 0 2017 2018 2017 2018 2017 2018 2017 2018 2017 2018 2017 2018 2017 2018 Total Total Adoption Returned to Rescue TNR/SNR Transfer Euthanized Died in 2017 2018 Owner Partner Care/Foster Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 234 Animal Care and Services Services to the Community Animal Care and Services Administrative I Community Veterinary Services Programs and Services Information Administration Animal Spay and Neuter Community Programs Reuniting Lost Outreach Pets with Owners Volunteers Animal Health and Wellness Community Cat Foster Care Programs Kitten Nursery Animal Care Field and Adoptions Services Field Service Officers Animal Care Dispatcher Adoptions Animal Licensing Animal Care Foundation Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 235 Records Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department As a partner in democracy, the Records Management Department promotes community involvement and awareness and supports the City Council, staff and the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga by coordinating the legislative process and administering City elections. Governed by provisions of state, election, and municipal codes, the Department serves to preserve and protect the legislative history of the City. As a service department, staff assists the public, elected officials, and the City organization with a number of important activities, including accurately preparing and processing agendas, and administering the Citywide records management program including records storage and destruction. The City Clerk's Office administers the coordination of City elections, including the filing of Candidate Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interests as required by law. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue to implement electronic improvements to City Council, Board, Committee, and Commission agenda compilation and publishing, and related document management including training to citywide staff on the new software and agenda process. • Increase customer/citizen research methodologies by providing access to public records within the City's Document Imaging System via Weblink made available on the City's webpage. • Coordinate with Departments to implement the City's new Records Management Manual involving records storage, retrieval, retention and destruction; and provide training on records management including electronic and scanning of documents while ensuring compliance with city, state and federal regulations. • Facilitate the electronic filing of campaign and conflict of interest statements within statutory deadlines via a public portal on the City's webpage and at the front counter. 1ZC' Vicw City Council Mccting Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 236 Records Management Department Budget Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 237 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 544,760 $ 567,530 $ 602,410 Operations and Maintenance 131,538 253,700 122,840 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (211,340) (240,840) (219,800) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 464,958 580,390 505,450 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 544,760 567,530 602,410 Operations and Maintenance 131,538 253,700 122,840 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (211,340) (240,840) (219,800) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 464,958 $ 580,390 $ 505,450 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 6.0 5.0 5.0 Part Time - 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 6.0 5.5 5.5 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 237 Records Management Performance Statistics Public Records Requests By Year 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 '' I l'°Jai F¢�t�at� el`at� PQM baa l`�c� >J\� PJ�JS yeQ cp~o e� O ■ 2016 ■ 2017 ■ 2018 800 700 674 600 S00 400 300 200 100 0 City Council Agenda Items By Fiscal Year 735 FY 16('17 704 FY 17/18 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 238 Records Preservation Retention Disposition Public Records Requests Recorded Documents Maintenance of Municipal Code Records Management Services to the Community Records Management Legislation Agenda and Minute Preparation Legal Notices Bond Releases Contracts Claims/Subpoenas Bid Openings Appeals Conflict of Interest Code Board and Commission Recruitments Election Administration Legal Noticing Nomination Filing Candidate Handbook Municipal Elections Ballot Measures Receive Petitions Disclosure of Campaign Finances and Economic Interests Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 239 Community Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Community Services Department's mission is to serve the community by creating opportunities to play, celebrate, connect, explore, and be entertained through quality programs, safe parks, and well-maintained facilities. The Department coordinates programs and services through seven divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Arts/Playhouse Operations, Senior Services, and Human Services. The Department also oversees park development activities including the planning, design, and renovation of parks and facilities, as well as advocating for open space, thus helping to enhance the quality of life for individuals of all ages. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Continue analyzing, streamlining, and restructuring programs XNA and services to ensure that it continues to provide residents I q' opportunities for healthy lifestyles, personal growth, and a sense of community. I` • Begin construction of a newly designed courtyard at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center that will make it a more inviting and useable event space. • Complete a Central Park Environmental Study to accompany the recently approved Master Plan. • Continue design and plan review for the next phase of Etiwanda Creek Park development. (City Council Goal PR - 4).. • Continue the successful Camp Cucamonga program, incorporating new and exciting programs, including a new class for 4.5 to 5 -year-old children and a 4 -month payment plan option. • Support increased activity at the new RC Sports Center, including an increase in adult basketball registration and an increasing number of unique rentals, including professional boxing events, cultural celebrations, and new sports clinics. • Expand annual Summer Concerts in the Park series to six concerts and include a beer garden for adults 21 and over to enjoy while listening to music. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 240 Community Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 4,043,768 Operations and Maintenance 749,690 Capital Outlay - Cost Allocation - Debt Service - Transfer Out - $ 4,410,840 821,230 $ 4,738,150 823,900 Subtotal 4,793,458 5,232,070 5,562,050 Other Funds Personnel Services 2,766,526 3,362,350 3,152,750 Operations and Maintenance 2,116,703 2,145,150 2,092,690 Capital Outlay 4,251,366 575,000 600,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 9,134,595 6,082,500 5,845,440 All Funds Personnel Services 6,810,294 7,773,190 7,890,900 Operations and Maintenance 2,866,393 2,966,380 2,916,590 Capital Outlay 4,251,366 575,000 600,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 13,928,053 $ 11,314,570 $ 11,407,490 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 46.5 46.5 45.5 Part Time 189.6 189.8 93.6 Total Staffing 236.1 236.3 139.1 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 241 Community Services Performance Statistics • Over 37,000 registrations were processed, 87% of which were Rancho Cucamonga residents. • Over 1,500 summer camp spots were filled in Summer 2018. • The Nutrition Meal Program provided over 18,000 meals to seniors at Central Park and delivered 16,000 meals to homebound seniors in 2018. • The Department's volunteers provided nearly 43,000 hours of quality services to the community. Registrations i 32,860 22,834 . 15,012 _.. rt: 4,%5 RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT WALK-IN ON-LINE REGISTRATIONS REGISTRATIONS REGISTRATIONS REGISTRATIONS ■ 2017 = 35,815 2018 = 37,845 Registration numbers exclude the Lewis Family Playhouse and Special Events, which are tracked • The 17/18 season was the first complete season sold using the new Provenue Ticketing system. This upgrade interfaces seamlessly with the internet and is mobile optimized, so it comes as no surprise that internet sales jumped 8%. • The LFP app was launched at the beginning of last season and this concludes its second year. There were 2,553 total downloads, nearly 2,000 more than last year. The user breakdown is 55% iPhone users, 42% android users, and 3% iPad users. • The Playhouse now has over 5,000 Facebook followers and over 1,000 Instagram followers, a total of 800 more followers than last year! • This season, a total of 8,563 people purchased tickets compared to 7,267 people last season. On average, each person purchased three seats per order. Lewis Family Playhouse Ticket Sales 4>s � sxo TOTAL # OF RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT rICKE.TS SOLD TICKETS SOLD TICKETS SOLD TICKET SALES TICKET SALES ON --LINE WALK-IN/MAIL Season 11 Season 12 (2016/2017) (2017/2018) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 242 Community Services Services to the Community Recreation/ Community Services Sports Advisory Senior Advisory Youth/Teens Resource Center Seniors Sports Events Marketing Registration Operations Park Rangers Community Services Cultural Arts I I Administration Playhouse Community Clerical/ Programs I I Administration Finance Playhouse Professional Programs Park Development Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 243 Library Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Rancho Cucamonga Public Library strives to inform and enrich our community by providing access to traditional and technologically innovative resources. The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable, service-oriented staff. Programs and services offered at the Archibald Library and Paul A. Biane Library include: • Programs and information services for all ages, including weekly and special event programs, performing and cultural arts programs, Homework Center and Reading Enrichment Center. • Adult and family literacy services. • Public -access computers and free computer classes. • Enhanced interactive activities highlighting Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM), art and early learning development. The Library also offers outreach services, featuring bookmobile service to children and delivery service to homebound residence. A full-service Virtual Library provides 24/7 access to eBooks, research databases, online homework tutoring, language learning software and local history information. Sensory storytimes offer programs targeted specifically to special needs patrons and their families. The popular passport acceptance agency continues to meet a fast-growing demand for passport services in the community. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Refresh bookmobile print collection. • Further development of the Second Story and Beyond interactive Discovery Space and expansion of programming. • Replacement of Integrated Library System. • Expand City sponsored Little Free Library units. • Increase materials collections, in both print and online formats, with new and updated titles at both libraries. SECOND STORY eVon� V Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 244 Library Services Department Budget Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 245 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 3,251,833 $ 3,543,130 $ 3,751,760 Operations and Maintenance 1,309,154 1,483,310 1,514,690 Capital Outlay - 98,000 5,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 7,656 1,790 - Transfer Out 37,935 - 500,000 Subtotal 4,606,578 5,126,230 5,771,450 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance 134,106 27,740 33,460 Capital Outlay 7,802 - 575,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 53,041 - - Subtotal 194,949 27,740 608,460 All Funds Personnel Services 3,251,833 3,543,130 3,751,760 Operations and Maintenance 1,443,260 1,511,050 1,548,150 Capital Outlay 7,802 98,000 580,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 7,656 1,790 - Transfer Out 90,976 - 500,000 Total Cost $ 4,801,527 $ 5,153,970 $ 6,379,910 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 27.5 28.5 28.5 Part Time 36.8 35.1 27.6 Total Staffing 64.3 63.6 56.1 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 245 Library Services Performance Statistics Library Use Statistics 1,000,000 900,000 882,133 856,959 800,000 700,000 600,000 576,601 531,966 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 LIBRARYVISITORS ITEMS CIRCULATED ■ 2017 ■ 2018 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000 0 427,126 368,527 WEBSITE VISITS Library Use 11,489 11,254 ME NEW LIBRARY CARDS ■ 2017 ■ 2018 41,246 EBOOKS DOWNLOADED Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 246 Library Services Services to the Community Library Services Adult/ Literacy Second Teen Children's Services Story Services Services Programming programming Adult Literacy Information Information Back 2 Basics Services Services Personnel Collection Collection Grants Grants Special Special Projects Projects AdministrationI I Technology I I Outreach I ( passport Seryices Services Services Finance Technology Centers Staff Development Website Personnel Social Media Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 247 Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Administrative Services Group's mission is to support the functions of the City's line departments. While line departments typically provide service primarily to the public, the Administrative Services Group's departments and divisions, while providing some direct public services, primarily provide extensive services and support to internal staff of the various City departments. The Administrative Services Group includes the Finance, Human Resources, and Innovation and Technology Departments, as well as Administration and Procurement, under the oversight of the Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Several key technology projects will modernize work practices in Administrative Services. These include implementing the COGNOS Reporting module in OneSolution, the City's financial system; implementing electronic routing of accounts payable invoices for approval; implementing a new Performance Management System and a Learning Management System in Human Resources; implementing an electronic Request for Proposal Evaluation system in Procurement; and the upgrade of over 150 City computers to Windows 10 operating system ahead of end -of -life for Windows 7 in January 2020. • Provide administrative support for the West -side Districts Citizens' Oversight Committee and the Planned Communities LMD Citizens' Oversight Committee. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 248 Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 834,782 $ 912,510 $ 915,000 Operations and Maintenance 3,954,680 3,434,830 3,764,030 Capital Outlay 76,248 - - Cost Allocation (1,264,090) (1,270,940) (1,419,320) Debt Service 17,285 108,250 106,450 Transfer Out 4,071,260 4,168,410 4,425,230 Debt Service 18,069 Subtotal 7,690,165 7,353,060 7,791,390 Other Funds Personnel Services 1,370,408 1,116,650 1,115,390 Operations and Maintenance 2,457,159 1,446,610 2,295,930 Capital Outlay 3,540,504 4,864,790 4,920,180 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 784 - - Transfer Out 50,000 30,000 1,390,020 Subtotal 7,418,855 7,458,050 9,721,520 All Funds 1.0 1.0 1.4 Personnel Services 2,205,190 2,029,160 2,030,390 Operations and Maintenance 6,411,839 4,881,440 6,059,960 Capital Outlay 3,616,752 4,864,790 4,920,180 Cost Allocation (1,264,090) (1,270,940) (1,419,320) Debt Service 18,069 108,250 106,450 Transfer Out 4,121,260 4,198,410 5,815,250 Total Cost $ 15,109,020 $ 14,811,110 $ 17,512,910 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 5.0 5.0 5.0 Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.4 Total Staffing 6.0 6.0 6.4 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 249 Administrative Services Performance Statistics Procurement Division Highlights 2018 • 461 Purchase Orders issued; 16% increase from FY 17/18 • 20 RFPs, 18 RFBs, and 12 RFQs were processed; no change from FY 17/18 • $59,677.49 revenue received from on-line surplus auction; 8.4% decrease from FY 17/18 Members of the West -side Districts Citi=ens' Oversight Committee (above) and the Planned Communities LMD Citi ens' Oversight Committee (right) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 250 Administrative Services Services to the Community Administrative Services Administration I I Procurement Procurement of Oversight Goods and Responsibility Services for Finance, DoIT, and Human Resources Bid Management Departments Disposal of City Assets (surplus) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 251 Finance Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The overall mission of the Finance Department is to provide excellent service to both our internal and external customers with the highest degree of reliability and timeliness, while maintaining appropriate financial control of City resources. The Finance Department is responsible for managing the financial operations of the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, as well as applicable laws, regulations and City policies. The Department consists of five divisions to accomplish its mission: • Accounting and Financial Reporting: Comprised of the following sections: Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Cashiering, Debt Management, Fixed Assets, General Ledger, and Payroll. In addition, this Division is responsible for preparing the City's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). • Budget Management: Responsible for coordinating the City's annual budget and monitoring each department's compliance with the annual budget. • Business Licensing: Responsible for the issuance and annual renewal of Business Licenses to all persons transacting and carrying on business within the City. This section also ensures compliance with the City's Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) and Admissions Tax Ordinances which requires monthly reporting and remittances by the City's various hotels and businesses. • Special Districts: Responsible for placing special assessments for City parcels on the county tax rolls, tracking and paying debt service on the City's special obligations payable from the special assessments and assisting with special district formations. • Treasury Management: The Treasury Management Section works with the City Treasurer and the Deputy City Treasurer, and it is responsible for daily cash management and investment of funds for the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. The Section is also responsible for the daily transferring and settling of depository funds, investing excess funds, and reporting investments in accordance with all applicable State and Federal laws and the City's Investment Policy. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • In conjunction with DoIT, facilitate the implementation of the COGNOS Reporting module for the City's financial system. • Implement electronic routing of accounts payable invoices for approval. • Continue to develop training opportunities for the City organization • Continue to facilitate economic studies for our community to guide key City decision makers. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 252 Finance Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,271,134 $ 2,370,660 $ 2,470,960 Operations and Maintenance 78,336 73,330 62,070 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (599,590) (610,740) (655,650) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,749,880 1,833,250 1,877,380 Other Funds Personnel Services 389,994 428,090 420,710 Operations and Maintenance 15,764,457 2,070,490 2,587,990 Capital Outlay - 120,000 - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 90,223 785,200 791,550 Transfer Out 50,011 150,000 351,590 Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out 16,294,685 3,553,780 4,151,840 2,661,128 2,798,750 2,891,670 15,842,793 2,143,820 2,650,060 - 120,000 - (599,590) (610,740) (655,650) 90,223 785,200 791,550 50,011 150,000 351,590 Total Cost $ 18,044,565 $ 5,387,030 $ 6,029,220 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 21.0 21.0 21.0 Part Time 2.3 2.3 2.7 Total Staffing 23.3 23.3 23.7 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 253 Finance Performance Statistics Finance Highlights 2018 • $2,763,711 received in Business License revenue; 3.3% decrease • $3,886,107 received in Transient Occupancy Tax revenue; 11.6% increase Business License Summary* 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,°00 dOW 0 Business License- Business License, Business Clowes New Reiewats ■ 2017 w2018 *Data excludes vendors and contractors located outside of Rancho Cucamonga. Special Districts Highlights 2018 • $28,522,238 received in Special Districts tax revenue; 2.39% increase • 135,207 parcels submitted to the tax rolls for 37 special assessment districts with 100% accuracy • 42 CFD delinquency letters sent; 40.00% increase Special Districts formed two new CFDs: 0 North Etiwanda Community Facilities District 2017-010 0 The Resort at Empire Lakes Community Facilities District 2018-01 City of Rancho Cucamonga Investment Effective Rate of Return Comparison January 2018 - December 2018 3.50% 3.00% 2.50% 2.00% 1.50'% 1.00% 0.50% 0.00% ,ti0 10 �0 10 ,y4� .yam N" 1W N% N16 N% ,L4 14 o �e� rya` pQt jai �yc 111� poi 1§1 cpti 11 oe� -City Poo! Average BofA Merrill Lynch US. Treasuries/Agencies 1-5 Yrs Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 254 Accounting and Financial Reporting Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Cashiering Fixed Assets General Ledger Payroll Prepare Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) Finance Services to the Community Budget Management Coordinate City's Annual Budget Generate Quarterly Budget Updates for City Council Finance Business Licensing Issue and Renew Business Licenses Ensure Compliance with City's TOT and Admissions Tax Ordinances Special I ( Treasury Districts Management Administer 37 Daily Cash Special Districts Management in the City Investment of Manage Special Excess Funds District Formations Investment Reporting Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 255 Human Resources Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Human Resources Department oversees the City's Human Resources and Risk Management functions. The mission of the Human Resources Department is to recruit, develop, and retain a diverse, engaged, well-qualified and professional workforce that reflects the world-class standards of the community we serve, and to lead City Departments in positive employee relations, talent acquisition, succession planning, and employee engagement. The Human Resources Team provides a wide range of services to City staff in the areas of Total Compensation, Employee and Labor Relations, Training and Organizational Development, Talent Acquisition, Risk Management, Safety, Workers Compensation, and Employee Wellness. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Complete implementation of a Performance Management System and provide training to end users. • Implement a Learning Management System to improve the delivery, management, tracking, and reporting of various employee trainings. • Continue revisions and management of the new onboarding program to ensure a more meaningful onboarding experience and provide training to supervisors and managers on using the new onboarding software. • Initiate innovative advertising, sourcing, and applicant tracking tools to improve the City's talent acquisition strategies. • Participate in community events to improve outreach for recruitments. • Continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs. • Continue to work with DoIT and Finance to refine and enhance the employee self-service tool in the existing HRIS system to allow employees better access to benefit and pay information. • Continue to track and report information for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and/or deal with its repeal and replacement, and update City policies and procedures to ensure compliance with changing mandates and deadlines of the program. • Continue to update City and Fire District policies to assure compliance with California and Federal reguation. • Continue to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HR practices and procedures to better serve internal and external customers. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 256 Human Resources Department Budget Summary Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 257 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 975,389 $ 1,048,290 $ 1,098,970 Operations and Maintenance 238,799 341,660 361,080 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (402,740) (407,620) (442,500) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 811,448 982,330 1,017,550 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 975,389 1,048,290 1,098,970 Operations and Maintenance 238,799 341,660 361,080 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (402,740) (407,620) (442,500) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 811,448 $ 982,330 $ 1,017,550 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 9.0 9.0 9.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 9.5 9.5 9.5 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 257 Human Resources Performance Statistics New Hires: The total number of new hires decreased from FY 2017/18 to FY 2018/19 • Full -Time new hires decreased by 16% • Part -Time new hires decreased by 14% • Full -Time promotions decreased by 29% • Part -Time promotions increased by 67% Recruitments: The total number of recruitments increased by 41% from FY 2017/18 to FY 2018/19 Full -Time recruitments decreased by 3% Part -Time recruitments increased by 75% • In -House recruitments increased by 56% Total Applications Received: 7,917 Applications The number of applications increased by 45% in FY 2018/19 Social Media Outreach: followers increased by an average of 49% In FY 2018/19, the Human Resources Department held four (4) one -day hiring fairs, participated in three (3) Community Job Fairs, and held six (6) informational community workshops. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 258 Human Resources Services to the Community Employee Labor Relations Experience MOU/Negotiations Benefits Training & Organizational Development Human Resources Recruitment & I I EmployeeI I Risk JSelection J Il Relations Management Liability Worker's Compensation Safety/Loss Control Employee Wellness Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 259 Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Department of Innovation and Technology (DoIT) facilitates the impactful use of technology across all City Departments, allowing for increased efficiency, improved transparency, and overall enhanced service to the community. The Department is comprised of four divisions including Systems and Network, Enterprise Applications, Geographic Information Services, and Operations. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Replacement of the City's legacy blade/chassis data center environment with updated Dell/VMWare VXRail Hyperconverged infrastructure. • Completion of the City's backup data center in cooperation with the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. • Completion of the Veeam data center backup project and implementation of cloud storage for disaster recovery. • Implementation of OKTA multi -factor and single -sign -on identity management. • Addition of threat detection and security notifications to citywide e-mail services. Transition of mobile device management services for the Fire District from Safety staff to the Department of Innovation and Technology. Assist with drone deployments for building and site inspection surveys, public safety training, and updated aerial imagery for digital mapping services. Upgrade of over 150 City computers to Windows 10 operating system ahead of end -of -life for Windows 7 in January 2020. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 26o Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 23.0 23.0 23.0 Part Time - - - Total Staffing 23.0 23.0 23.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 261 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,417,398 $ 2,770,450 $ 2,977,060 Operations and Maintenance 2,501,652 2,659,100 2,859,570 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (1,471,960) (1,588,400) (1,768,940) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 3,447,090 3,841,150 4,067,690 Other Funds Personnel Services - 52,000 52,000 Operations and Maintenance 1,169,213 704,930 420,260 Capital Outlay - 445,000 285,350 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 13,382 - 537,080 Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,182,595 1,201,930 1,294,690 All Funds Personnel Services $ 2,417,398 2,822,450 3,029,060 Operations and Maintenance 3,670,865 3,364,030 3,279,830 Capital Outlay - 445,000 285,350 Cost Allocation (1,471,960) (1,588,400) (1,768,940) Debt Service 13,382 - 537,080 Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 4,629,685 $ 5,043,080 $ 5,362,380 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 23.0 23.0 23.0 Part Time - - - Total Staffing 23.0 23.0 23.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 261 Innovation and Technology Performance Statistics Information Technology Maintained by the IS Division Desktop & Notebook Computers; iPads; Central Computer Services; Printers; Enterprise Applications; Office Productivity Programs; Multi -Function Photocopiers; Wired & Wireless Networks; Help Desk Tickets Completed: 2017: 2,049 2018: 1,947 COMPLETED WORK ORDERS . 2017 . 2018 n x ... FE6 APRIL MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV C. COMPLETED WORK ORDERS BY TYPE ■ 2017 ■ 2018 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 262 m n ov 00 N r W N Q N Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 262 00 R 50 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 262 Innovation and Technology Services to the Community Innovation and Technology Geographic Customer Applications Systems Information Services (GIS) Service Enterprise Network Spatial Data Help Desk Application Security and Visualization Requests Management Management Business User Support User Interface L Data Center Intelligence Development Management Development Hardware Information Rancho Implementation Data Hosting Solutions Security Enterprise GIS Practices (REGIS) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 263 Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Department encompasses all Economic and Community Development activities including Economic Development, Building and Safety, Engineering, Planning, and Public Works Departments. The Department coordinates the activities, work products, and processes of these areas with the City Manager's Office and other City Departments. In addition, the Department coordinates implementation of the City's Economic and Community Development goals and objectives and capital projects planning programs. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Deliver services of Building and Safety, Engineering, Planning, and Public Works under a common philosophy of innovation and excellent customer service. • Support the City Manager's Office in monitoring and ensuring efficient and timely implementation of the City Council's goals and key capital projects. • Provide effective coordination and monitoring of all Economic and Community Development programs and budgets that cross-over department lines. This will include the implementation of milestones and tracking timelines for accomplishment of the Department's established annual goals and objectives. DISRUPTION wpu M1 ':Y FEBRUARY22,2019 W.I JOwn I --- Seminar flyer of event held in partnership with County of San Bernardino. • Implement the Economic Development Strategic Plan to lay the foundation for the City's economic development efforts over the next 5 to 10 years. • Continue to provide support to the business community through the City's Economic Development liaison and to partner with other agencies to provide business services such as workforce development, small business consultation, and education. • Continue to work with DoIT staff to assist in the use of technology to provide guidance to existing and startup businesses and residents in the community. • Assist City Manager's Office in the coordination and negotiation of affordable housing development for low -and -moderate income families. • Coordinate, administer, and monitor Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds that promote decent, affordable housing and create jobs through the expansion and retention of businesses. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 264 Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 403,886 $ 418,500 $ 401,010 Operations and Maintenance 139,872 373,780 404,340 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 543,758 792,280 805,350 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 58,885 409,040 - 53,000 182,940 182,940 658,660 241,825 644,980 658,660 403,886 418,500 401,010 198,757 782,820 1,063,000 - 53,000 - 182,940 182,940 - S 785,583 $ 1,437,260 $ 1,464,010 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 3.0 3.0 3.0 Part Time - - - Total Staffing 3.0 3.0 3.0 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 265 Economic and Community Development Performance Statistics Please see Performance Statistics for Economic and Community Development in each of the following department sections: Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 266 Economic and Community Development Services to the Community Oversee Services of: Building and Safety Engineering Planning Public Works Economic and Community Development Assist in Implementing City Council's Goals Oversight of Key Capital Projects Foster Economic Development through Focused Programs that Promote the Quality of Life and Economic Health of the Communitv Housing Works to ensure decent affordable housing and services are provided to families and residents of low to moderate income Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 267 Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Building and Safety Services Department, in partnership with the community: • Supports the community's construction projects through plan check, permit and inspection services to meet the requirements of building and construction codes, State mandated regulations and municipal codes; • Works with other City departments to develop regulations and conditions for construction projects through the entitlement process; • Coordinates and assists other City departments in managing building and structural capital improvement projects and enforcing accessibility regulations for City facilities; • Works closely with the Police Department in illegal business activity bringing uses and structures within safe standards; and • Provide emergency response and damage assessment during and after disaster events. Building and Safety Services enforces a series of nationally recognized standards and construction codes as well as mandates from the State regulatory agencies, in matters pertinent to building construction, site development, and the permit process. In addition, Building and Safety Services also enforces compliance to codes as it relates to energy, accessibility laws, places of assembly, and housing requirements. Field inspections and safety assessments are performed by building/fire inspectors. In-house plan review staff manage and review all building and fire plans utilizing assistance of contract experts when necessary. The Department continues to assist the Community Improvement Division in evaluation and enforcement of substandard construction or property use. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Use of aerial imagery on a test basis to evaluate and inspect tall buildings and difficult -to - access construction features. • Utilization of drone technology, electronic plans and editing software to provide safe and accurate inspections in the future. • Fund additional contract services for outside consultants to provide assistance in plan check and inspections as the robust economy continues into the new fiscal year. • Train new and existing staff on technical code requirements which is critical to effectively implement changing State code amendments including accessibility and energy requirements. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 268 Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance 7,135 40,450 42,240 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 7,135 40,450 42,240 1,390,678 1,650,810 1,796,340 257,829 281,880 162,850 $ 1,648,507 $ 1,932,690 $ 1,959,190 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 16.0 16.0 16.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 16.5 16.5 16.5 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 269 Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,390,678 $ 1,650,810 $ 1,796,340 Operations and Maintenance 250,694 241,430 120,610 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,641,372 1,892,240 1,916,950 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance 7,135 40,450 42,240 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 7,135 40,450 42,240 1,390,678 1,650,810 1,796,340 257,829 281,880 162,850 $ 1,648,507 $ 1,932,690 $ 1,959,190 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 16.0 16.0 16.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 16.5 16.5 16.5 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 269 Building and Safety Services Performance Statistics Services Department Highlights of 2018 Over 560 electronic plans were submitted on Accelerate in 2018, more than doubling last years' submittals online. • 663 solar permits were processed in 2018, down approximately 5% from the 698 issued in 2017. All inspection requests were responded to within a twenty-four hour turn -around time. Building and Safety Services Revenue 52,500,000.00 $2,152,114.00 r $2,000,000.00 $1,906,244.00 $1,776,665.00 c 0 0 E $1,500,000.00 Q W 3 � $1,000,000.00 w $500,000.00 ■ 2016 ■ 2017 2018 Year 12,000 • 2016 ■ 2017 2018 Year inspections Performed 14, S00 4,277 14,188 14,000 4,133 4,000 13,570 N G 13,500 1 v m M 13,000 12,897 c 12,500 M 12,000 • 2016 ■ 2017 2018 Year Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 270 Permits issued 4,400 4,277 4,191 4,200 4,133 4,000 w 3,800 E a 3,600 3,400 3,200 3,000 ■ 2016 ■ 2017 2018 Year Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 270 Building and Safety Services Services to the Community Building and Safety Administrative Building and Water Quality Construction Assessment Building and Support Fire Plan and Permit Review Fire Services Checks Response Services Inspections Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 271 Damage Water Quality Assessment Management Plan (WQMP) Review Complaint Response Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 271 Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department AllThe Engineering Services Department in partnership with departments citywide strives to build a City where the infrastructure supports a community that is a great place to live, work, and play through strategic design, well planned maintenance, and fiscal and environmental sustainability. There are four sections in the Engineering Services Department. The Capital Project Management Section plans, designs, and manages the construction of City - funded public improvement projects. The Environmental Programs Section is working collaboratively for an environmentally safe, healthy and sustainable community today and for future generations. The Land Development and Transportation Section provides services to residents, developers, businesses, and schools related to the development and redevelopment of land along with operation and planning for traffic and transportation needs. This section also provides administration and clerical support for the department. The Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) Section is dedicated to the operation and administration of the City's electrical distribution system, citywide streetlights and the fiber optic infrastructure network. This section also provides budget support for the department. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Preparation of transportation thresholds, procedures, and guidelines for implementation of SB743 requirements. • Construction of Phases 1 and 2 of the Advance Traffic Management System (ATMS). • Flashing Yellow Left -Turn Arrow Upgrades at four intersections along Day Creek Boulevard. • Resurfacing of four major arterial roadways. • Construction of the Etiwanda Avenue Grade Separation Project. • Build out and expansion of the RC Fiber Network. • ADA Transition Plan Update. • Build partnerships with businesses, schools, and City facilities to implement the City's environmental objectives and meet regulatory requirements. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 272 Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Actuals Funds Summary 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,751,200 Operations and Maintenance 259,119 Capital Outlay - Cost Allocation - Debt Service - Transfer Out - Subtotal 2,010,319 Other Funds Personnel Services 4,234,285 Operations and Maintenance 11,135,601 Capital Outlay 15,478,022 Cost Allocation - Debt Service - Transfer Out 1,807,494 Subtotal All Funds 32,655,402 Adopted Preliminary Budget Budget 2018/19 2019/20 $ 2,182,340 $ 2,464,020 326,760 316,750 2,509,100 2,780,770 4,477,440 4,831,160 11,140,860 11,303,190 26,406,290 67,683,190 - 939,610 1,578,680 1,726,150 43,603,270 86,483,300 Personnel Services 5,985,485 6,659,780 7,295,180 Operations and Maintenance 11,394,720 11,467,620 11,619,940 Capital Outlay 15,478,022 26,406,290 67,683,190 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - 939,610 Transfer Out 1,807,494 1,578,680 1,726,150 Total Cost $ 34,665,721 $ 46,112,370 $ 89,264,070 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 37.0 37.0 39.0 Part Time 1.9 1.9 1.2 Total Staffing 38.9 38.9 40.2 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 273 Engineering Services Performance Statistics Core Service Categories Public Infrastructure Improvements • Land Development • Transportation Development - Municipal Utility (RCMU) • Storm Water Pollution Prevention • Solid Waste Management • Recycling Programs • Household Hazardous Waste Management • Issuing Construction Permits Capital Improvements Highlights • 59 capital improvement projects identified in FY 2018/19 Capital Improvement Program (CIP)-in all phases (conception, design and construction). • 45 capital improvement projects approved for construction in 2018 totaling $35 million in community investment. Environmental Programs HHW Facility Highlights • 7,011 participants served at the HHW Collection Facility • 429,142 lbs. collected (non E -waste items) • $21,794.93 generated in E -waste Revenue Land Development Highlights • 2,444 permits issued for work in the Public Right -of -Way. • 20 customers assisted each day on aver- age at the front counter. RCMU Facts and System Data • Year established - 2001 • Date began providing power - May 2004 • Service area size - 4 square miles • Number of meters - 985 • Number of streetlights - 236 • Number of transformers - 149 • Distribution Lines - 24 (circuit miles) • Average annual consumption - 73,911 MWh • Number of customers - 985 (as of Dec 2018) • $11,018,870 revenue received Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 274. Permits Issued by Type ■ Lane Closure ■ Right -Of -Way a Oversize Load 1000 90D 600 700 604 500 444 ?,00 200 144 0 2016 2017 2018 Environmental Programs HHW Facility Highlights • 7,011 participants served at the HHW Collection Facility • 429,142 lbs. collected (non E -waste items) • $21,794.93 generated in E -waste Revenue Land Development Highlights • 2,444 permits issued for work in the Public Right -of -Way. • 20 customers assisted each day on aver- age at the front counter. RCMU Facts and System Data • Year established - 2001 • Date began providing power - May 2004 • Service area size - 4 square miles • Number of meters - 985 • Number of streetlights - 236 • Number of transformers - 149 • Distribution Lines - 24 (circuit miles) • Average annual consumption - 73,911 MWh • Number of customers - 985 (as of Dec 2018) • $11,018,870 revenue received Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 274. Engineering Services Services to the Community Engineering Services Land Development Capital Project Environmental Rancho & Management Programs Cucamonga Municipal Utility Transportation Permit Processing Billing/ Payment Project Integrated Waste Processing Administration Tract/Parcel Maps Program CIP Budget Storm Water Administration Storm Drain/ Implementation Street Improvements Household Hazardous Waste Customer Outreach Inspection Services Traffic Signal Budget/Finance Coordination Vehicle/ Pedestrian Safety Traffic Planning Clerical/ Administration Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 275 Planning Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Planning Department's primary responsibilities are developing and implementing comprehensive plans that reflect the goals and policies of the City; ensuring the long-term success of the community through effective management of the City's growth; conducting detailed analysis of all development proposals to verify consistency with the City's Goals and Policies; and working with other City Department's to build and maintain a high quality, balanced, and sustainable community for the Rancho Cucamonga residents, businesses, and visitors. The Planning Department has experienced a high number of visits and calls to the Public Counter over the last fiscal year. The volume of development applications submitted to the City for review has been steady. As the amount of readily available vacant land within Rancho Cucamonga diminishes, development has shifted towards "in -fill" development. FY 2018/19 Budget Highlights • Evaluate a new mixed-use project at Haven and 26th Street, as well as a hotel project at Haven and 6th Street. • Move forward with infrastructure for the Empire Lakes project (The Resort) and review residential development proposals for apartment and for sale housing along the south end of the project area. • Continue evaluating regulations from the state regarding housing, including the 15 bills adopted into last year's state "Housing Package," to understand the impact of these bills and address changes needed to the development code or our development review process. • Complete the Etiwanda Heights Specific Plan. (City Council Goal ML -3) • Begin work with a selected consultant for the next General Plan Update which will build on and refine the City's vision for a world class community: create a diverse set of places, maintain and grow a strong industrial and manufacturing sector, develop new urban cores/neighborhoods and protect/maintain/enhance suburban neighborhoods and rural areas of the city. • The FY 2019/20 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Annual Action Plan will be based on the Federal appropriation. The CDBG program provides vital housing programs and services to low -and -moderate income families. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 276 Planning Department Budget Summary Other Funds Personnel Services 368,345 424,830 322,430 Operations and Maintenance 302,070 329,400 513,330 Capital Outlay 490,508 5,398,530 1,116,640 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 1,160,923 6,152,760 1,952,400 1,610,872 1,726,510 Adopted Preliminary 683,750 Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,242,527 $ 1,301,680 $ 1,490,770 Operations and Maintenance 890,504 354,350 320,060 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 2,133,031 1,656,030 1,810,830 Other Funds Personnel Services 368,345 424,830 322,430 Operations and Maintenance 302,070 329,400 513,330 Capital Outlay 490,508 5,398,530 1,116,640 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 1,160,923 6,152,760 1,952,400 1,610,872 1,726,510 1,813,200 1,192,574 683,750 833,390 490,508 5,398,530 1,116,640 S 3,293,954 S 7,808,790 S 3,763,230 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 14.0 14.0 13.0 Part Time 0.8 0.8 0.8 Total Staffing 14.8 14.8 13.8 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 277 8000 6000 4000 2000 0 Planning Performance Statistics New Development Highlights 2018 Notable developments taking shape: • Day Creek Square at Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard • Arte Apartments at Foothill Boule- vard and Hermosa Avenue • Haven City Market at Haven and I Arrow Planning Counter Visits 9553 2016 9474 7191 2017 : =15 3500 3000 - 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 Planning Department Revenue 5750,000 $741,408 5740,000 -- -- 5730,000 — ----- 5720,000 $714,651 $710,000 — $700,000 ----- 5690,000 --_.___ 5684,174 $680,000 --- - — $670,000 -- — $660,000 5650,000 FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIActual —Budget Planning Work Volume 2903 FY 15-16 FY 16-17 FY 17-18 ■ planning Applications a Business License Review ■ Plan Checks Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 278 Planning Services to the Community Planning Economic Development Land Use Entitlements Environmental Review (CEQA) Housing and Community Improvement Programs Public Information Development Review Historic Preservation Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 279 Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Public Works Services Department's mission is to provide efficient stewardship of the City's public works infrastructure. The Department has 4 sections: Facilities: Serving 14 facilities and 8 Fire District facilities (> 1 million sq. ft.); Parks and Landscape: Maintaining 31 parks, Adult Sports Park and baseball stadium, 125 street front miles of landscape, comprehensive inventory of trees, paseos and trails; Street/Fleet/Storm Drain: Care for 533 roadway miles and 3,890 catch basins and 189 vehicles, over 140 On and Off road equipment, graffiti removal, and 214 signal - controlled intersections/crossings (five additional signals anticipated in FY 2019/20); and Administration/Project Management: Manage departmental support services, contracts, safety and risk management, budget, and capital maintenance projects. FY 2019/20 Budget Highlights • Accommodate minimum wage impacts resulting from the Department's heavy dependence on contract labor-intensive services such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services. • Continue to focus on the goal to reduce overall City water consumption. Parks staff have been working steadily on identifying areas where water consumption can be reduced through water audits. • As part of the water saving effort, $800,000 has been set aside in LMDs 2 ($400,000) and 4R ($400,000) specifically for turf removals along with converting existing planter sections with low water use landscape plants and materials. • Continue to replace or repair worn out rubberized surfacing — the rubberized surface at twelve various parks will be replaced. • Due to the traffic signal infrastructure aging and numbers of vehicles hitting this infrastructure increasing, funding has been provided to replace equipment such as traffic signal cabinets, batteries, controllers, and other frequently impacted equipment. • Begin construction of an urgently needed second warehouse at the Public Works Services Center which will match the existing warehouse but will be designed to support solar panels on the roof. • Other projects include: roof repair at the City Yard; Milliken Underpass Sidewalk Expansion project; refurbish the equestrian main arena; Metrolink canopy painting; replace restroom and storage building roofs at Heritage Park; and design/install new LED ballfield lights at Garcia Park. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 28o Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Preliminary Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 4,819,102 $ 5,278,840 $ 5,561,710 Operations and Maintenance 5,646,988 6,319,670 6,601,730 Capital Outlay - 500,000 475,000 Cost Allocation (887,730) (839,810) (976,160) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 9,578,360 11,258,700 11,662,280 Other Funds Personnel Services 4,276,568 4,692,770 4,830,370 Operations and Maintenance 9,274,518 10,809,270 11,815,760 Capital Outlay 235,455 1,210,000 2,939,850 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 24,771 142,570 142,570 Transfer Out 245,970 278,650 571,520 Subtotal 14,057,282 17,133,260 20,300,070 All Funds Personnel Services 9,095,670 9,971,610 10,392,080 Operations and Maintenance 14,921,506 17,128,940 18,417,490 Capital Outlay 235,455 1,710,000 3,414,850 Cost Allocation (887,730) (839,810) (976,160) Debt Service 24,771 142,570 142,570 Transfer Out 245,970 278,650 571,520 Total Cost $ 23,635,642 $ 28,391,960 $ 31,962,350 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 128.0 129.0 130.0 Part Time 34.1 34.1 34.1 Total Staffing 162.1 163.1 164.1 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 281 Public Works Services Performance Statistics 2018 Highlights • 372 requests through RC2GO app • 2 days on average to complete RC2GO requests • 3,980 potholes repaired 17,150 sf. of asphalt removed/replaced (460 locations) • 7,127 sf. of asphalt overlays (103 locations) 17,979 sf. of concrete sidewalk removed/replaced (117 locations) • 659 linear ft. of concrete curb & gutter removed/ replaced (33 locations) • 2,897 sf. of concrete drive approach removed/replaced (26 locations) Annual Concrete Repair Project (Contract) • 49,919 square feet of sidewalk removed/replaced 89 67 58 25 . it 11 Q`� Qaa• pS`� Streets After -Hours Call Outs w2017 2018 84 95 79 48 44 56 29 24 I-V a\moi 0, R• Ile Qac Tree Trimming In -House Contractor ■ 2017 2018 ■ 2017 2018 4,846 7,522 10,553 567 423 199 515 27 300 31 353 24 Tree Pruned Trees Trees Tree Pruned Trees Trees Removed Planted Removed Planted 74 67 34 35 Ct: .F PLS J Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 282 Facilities Maintenance City Buildings Fire Stations Public Works Services Services to the Community Public Works Services Parks and Landscape Maintenance Urban Forestry Street Maintenance Traffic Signals and Safety Lighting Water Management I H Street Sweeping Parkways, Medians ILJGraffiti Removal and Trails I I Administration Clerical/ Administration Safety/Training Capital Projects Park FacilitiesStorm Drain Contracts and Amenities Maintenance Park LandscapeI I --I City Fleet I Budget/Finance Maintenance Concrete and Asphalt Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 283 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 284 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 285 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Category The City's Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Fiscal Year 2019/20 will provide needed infrastructure improvements city-wide. The CIP summarizes the projects planned for the upcoming fiscal year by the following categories: Landscaping — Projects include parkway landscape, median islands, plant material replacement, community trail landscape, and open space preservation. Drainage — Projects include the construction of new storm drains, storm drain lateral connections, flood control channels, catch basins, debris racks and other forms of infrastructure that protect the public right-of-way from hazards caused by flooding and severe weather events. Facilities — Projects involve the construction of new buildings or improving, adding on to, or renovating existing buildings and ancillary structures. Miscellaneous — Projects are the capital undertakings that do not qualify for classification into the other project categories. Municipal Utility — Projects are related to the maintenance, expansion, and improvement of the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) distribution system. Parks — Projects that are located in, on, or adjacent to a park or community center facility. Railroad Crossings — High cost, infrequent projects that require large funding commitments, lengthy construction schedules, and inevitably cause some inconvenience to the local community during the construction period. Railroad Crossings are identified in the City's General Plan document. Streets — Projects include resurfacing of local arterial and residential streets in order to extend pavement life and improve driving conditions as well as widening and extension of streets as need dictates via new development, community needs, and the City's General Plan. Traffic — Projects are typically those that will promote safe and efficient traffic circulation per State and local design standards such as new signals, upgrades to intersections, etc. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 286 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Category Following is the total budgeted by category for Fiscal Year 2019/20: Landscaping $ 800,000 Facilities 5,421,000 Miscellaneous 2,287,090 Municipal Utility 1,445,000 Parks 2,494,100 Railroad Crossings 225,000 Streets 57,123,000 Traffic 8.579.460 Total CIP 78,374,650 Note: Funds for these projects come from a variety of sources including development impact fees, State gas taxes, grant funds, and special assessments. These funds are non -General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. The amounts budgeted will fluctuate annually. In addition to CIP project costs, future operational costs are identified in the CIP and will be included in the operational budget in future years, as appropriate. Some of the more significant capital improvement projects in each category are discussed below: The Landscaping category includes water conservation and landscape renovations at LMD 2 and LMD 4R. The Facilities category includes Civic Center carpet and reconfiguration, new west -side public safety facility, Fire District water conservation landscaping and site improvements, Metrolink Station improvements, Paul A. Biane Library second story project, and the Public Works Services Department warehouse expansion. The Miscellaneous category includes protected bike lane on 6th Street, sidewalk improvements on the north side of 91h Street, Day Creek Channel bike trail, wrought iron fencing at LMD 4R, and sidewalk improvements for bus stops at four locations. The Municipal Utility category includes distribution line extension to service new planned commercial warehouse development on 6th Street and 7th Street, line extension to connect RCMU's existing distribution on Arrow Route to the new Etiwanda Avenue grade separation, and Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network. The Parks category includes Etiwanda Creek Park -Phase II, the design and installation of new LED ballfield lighting at Garcia Park, painting of facilities and amenities at various parks, and the replacement of rubberized playground surfacing at various parks. The Railroad Crossings category includes the preliminary design drawings and cost estimates for a grade crossing at 6th Street and the BNSF Railroad Spur that, if constructed, would complete 6th Street between Santa Anita Avenue and Etiwanda Avenue. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 287 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Category The Streets category includes the construction of ADA compliant ramps at various locations citywide, Etiwanda Avenue grade separation project, and local street pavement rehabilitation at various locations. The Traffic category includes advance traffic management systems phases I and 11, upgrading left turn phases at Day Creek Boulevard, and Southwest Cucamonga Class I bike trail project. Details of the cost and funding source(s) for each project budgeted for Fiscal Year 2019/20 are included in the following pages. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 288 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Category / Project Description Funding Source Amount Landscaping LMD 2 Water Conservation and Landscape Renovations LMD 2 $ 400,000 (Multi -Phased Project) LMD 4R Water Conservation and Landscape Renovations (Multi -Phased Project) LMD 4R 400,000 Beautification Total: 800,000 Facilities Central Park - Makeover Capital Reserve 12,000 City Facilities - Roof Replacement and Repairs Capital Reserve 250,000 City Yard - Roof Repair Capital Reserve 70,000 Civic Center - Carpet and Reconfiguration Capital Reserve 525,000 Cultural Center - Courtyard Redesign Capital Reserve 15,000 Cultural Center - Lighting Control System Capital Reserve 15,000 Fire District - East Ave Fire Station 176 Fire Capital Projects 75,000 Fire District - Public Safety Facility Fire Capital Projects 150,000 Fire District - Town Center Station 178 Fire Capital Projects 75,000 Fire District - Water Conservation Landscaping and Site Improvements Fire Capital Projects 1,100,000 LoanMart Stadium - Seating Area Concrete Sealing Sports Complex 15,000 Metrolink Station - Improvements LMD 3B 204,000 Paul A. Biane Library - Second Story Project Library Capital Fund 575,000 Public Works Services Department - Warehouse Expansion Capital Reserve 2,140,000 R.C. Sports Center - Compressed Natural Gas Station AB 2766 160,000 Fire Capital 40,000 200,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 289 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category CatelZory / Project Description Funding Source Facilities Total: Miscellaneous 6th St Cycle Track & Milliken Bike Lane 9th St along north side west of Vineyard Ave - Sidewalk Improvements Barrier Replacements at Flood Control Entrance/Exit Citywide Concrete Repair Day Creek Channel Bike Trail: Jack Benny to Base Line LMD 4R - Wrought Iron Fencing Milliken Ave Underpass - Sidewalk Expansion Pacific Electric Trail- Drainage Improvements Sidewalk Improvements for Bus Stops at Four locations Southeast Corner Foothill Blvd and Etiwanda Avenue - Sidewalk Survey Westerly Sidewalk Improvements along Hellman Ave Municipal Utility - Electrical & Fiber Optics 6th St from W/O Haven Ave to Center Ave - Electric and Fiber Extension 7th St from W/O Haven Ave to RR Tracks - Electric & Fiber Line Ext City Hall East Parking Lot - Electric Line Extension Etiwanda Ave from Arrow Rte to Whittram Ave - Electric Dist Line Ext Citywide Infrastructure Citywide Infrastructure Safe Rts To School Beautification General Fund Measure I Amount 5,421,000 170,690 95,200 90,800 186,000 60,000 500,000 100,000 600,000 Ped Grant/Art 3 403,000 AB 2766 217,000 Municipal Utility 620,000 LMD 4R 385,000 LMD 3B 90,000 LMD 1 50,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 13,000 Ped Grant/Art 3 48,000 61,000 CDBG 7,200 CDBG 57,200 Miscellaneous Total: 2,287,090 Municipal Utility 275,000 Municipal Utility 275,000 Municipal Utility 150,000 Municipal Utility 300,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 290 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Category / Proiect Description Funding Source Amount Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network Fiber Optic Network 445,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 291 Municipal Utility Total: 1,445,000 Parks Etiwanda Creek Park - Phase II Park Development 450,000 Garcia Park - Ball Field Lights LMD 9 500,000 Heritage Park - Equestrian Main Area Refurbish PD 85 50,000 Heritage Park - Replace Restroom & Storage Building Roof PD 85 75,000 Old Town Park - Sports Lighting Foundation LMD 1 50,000 Parks Facility Painting LMD 2 74,300 LMD 4R 148,650 LMD 6 5,000 LMD 9 31,500 LMD 10 34,800 294,250 Paseo Lighting Retrofits LMD 2 242,550 Replace Rubberized Playground Surface LMD 1 313,000 LMD 2 114,000 LMD 4R 45,000 PD85 210,300 CFD 2000-03 150,000 832,300 Parks Total: 2,494,100 Railroad Crossings 6th St at BNSF Spur Crossing west of Etiwanda Avenue Transportation 225,000 Railroad Crossings Total: 225,000 Streets ADA Ramps at Various Locations Measure I 100,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 150,000 250,000 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 291 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Category / Project Description Funding Source Base Line Road Utility Underground Underground Utilities Church St: Haven to Milliken - Pavement Rehab Measure I Etiwanda Ave east side widening from 400' north Whittram Ave Measure I to 300' s/o Arrow Rte CDBG Etiwanda Ave from Foothill Blvd to Wilson Ave - Pavement Rehab Etiwanda Ave Grade Separation Project Grind and Patch Asphalt Pavement at Arterial Intersection Hermosa Ave from Banyan to Wilson - Pavement Rehabilitation Hermosa Ave n/o Fthll to Church St - Widening Highland Ave from Archibald to Haven - Pavement Rehabilitation Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation at Various Locations Youngs Canyon Rd - Extension from Koch Place to Cherry Ave Traffic Advance Traffic Management System - Phase I Advance Traffic Management System - Phase 2 Day Creek: Upgrade LT Phases School Crosswalk Improvements Measure I SB -1 TCEP Citywide Infrastructure Amount 77,000 625,000 550,000 30,000 580,000 50,000 52,150,000 25,000 52,175,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 50,000 Road Maint & Rehab 266,000 Beautification 350,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 150,000 500,000 Road Maint & Rehab 600,000 Measure I 900,000 Road Maint & Rehab 1,000,000 1,900,000 AD 88-2 Etiwanda/Highlnd 50,000 Streets Total: 57,123,000 Transportation 4,039,000 Transportation 2,828,000 Transportation 282,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 47,000 329,000 Transportation 83,500 CDBG 163,800 247,300 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 292 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Category / Proiect Description Funding Source Southwest Cucamonga Class I Bike Trail Project Traffic Signal Battery Back -Up Replacements Vineyard Avenue @ San Bernardino Rd - Traffic Signal Modification AB 2766 Amount 596,160 Equip/Veh Replacement 150,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 150,000 300,000 Transportation 90,000 Fire Capital 150,000 240,000 Traffic Total: 8,579,460 Total Capital Improvement Projects: $ 78,374,650 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 293 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 294 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA APPENDIX Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 295 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 296 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies BUDGETING POLICY ■ The City will adopt an annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1 no later than June 30 of the same year. ■ The adopted budget will be balanced with current year operating expenditures fully funded by current year revenues and identified undesignated/unreserved fund balance. ■ Fund balance reserves of the Operating Budget will be used only for non-recurring expenditures such as capital projects and not for on-going operations. ■ The City Manager is authorized to implement programs as approved in the adopted budget. ■ The City Manager may transfer appropriations between divisions, projects and programs within the same department and fund in order to implement the adopted budget. ■ Quarterly budget reports will be presented to the City Council to provide information on the status of the City's financial condition. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT POLICY ■ Capital projects involve the purchase or construction of major fixed assets such as land, building or permanent improvements including additions, replacements and major alterations having a life expectancy of more than one year and costing $5,000 or more. ■ Capital projects are funded by a variety of sources including Special Funds, Redevelopment Agency, and Special Districts. These funds are non -General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. Prior to its inclusion in the annual budget, a determination must be made that the project is an appropriate use of the funds and that there is sufficient fund balance. ■ The City will identify the estimated costs and potential funding sources for each capital project prior to its submittal to the City County for approval. ■ The City will coordinate the development of the Five -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) with the development of the annual Operating Budget. REVENUE POLICY Recurring revenue growth (inflation) will be used to pay for recurring expenditures. Recurring expenditure increases should not be approved which exceed recurring revenue growth. Any new or expanded programs will be required to identify new funding sources and/or offsetting reductions in expenditures. In addition: ■ The City shall use a conservative approach in projecting revenues. ■ One-time revenues may be used for one-time expenditures. ■ The City shall update its user fees and charges periodically to recover costs of providing that service for which a fee is charged. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 297 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies PURCHASING POLICY Purchasing Limits: Less than $5,000 No bid necessary, may use PCard $5,001 to $50,000 Minimum of three (3) written quotes More than $50,000 Formal bid Contract Signing Limits: $5,000 or less Lead Maintenance Worker $10,000 or less Supervisors $15,000 or less Superintendents $25,000 or less Division Heads/Battalion Chiefs $50,000 or less Department Heads $100,000 or less City Manager $100,001 or more City Council RESERVE POLICY Adequate reserve levels are a necessary component of the City's overall financial management strategy. It is the responsibility of the City Council to maintain a sufficient level of reserve funds to provide for the orderly provision of services to the citizens of the City of Rancho Cucamonga. The City Council has the authority to decide the circumstances under which the reserves can be used. The City Manager and the Finance Director may, from time to time, make recommendations as to the level of reserve funds necessary for prudent fiscal management. Reserve levels shall be reviewed at least annually during the budget process to ensure that they are consistent with the conditions faced by the City. Changes in Economic Circumstances The City's General Fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine month reserve, or 75% of the City General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine month reserve, or 75% of the Fire District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The specific uses of this commitment are 1) the declaration of a state or federal state of emergency or a local emergency as defined in Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code Section 2.36.020; or 2) a change in economic circumstances in a given fiscal year that results in revenues to the City/Fire District being insufficient to cover expenditures for one or more fiscal years. The City Council/Fire Board may, by the affirming vote of four members, change the amount of this commitment and/or the specific uses of these monies. City Facilities' Capital Repair The City's General Fund balance committed for City facilities' capital repair is established at a minimum goal of 50% of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress (excluding infrastructure), building improvements, and improvements other than building for governmental activities. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 298 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies • Fire District Facilities Capital Repair The Fire District's fund balance committed for the Fire District facilities capital repair is hereby committed to a minimum goal of 50% of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress (excluding infrastructure), building improvements, and improvements other than building for public safety -fire activities. ■ Working Capital The City's General Fund balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 5% of the City's General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's fund balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 50% of the District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. ■ Self -Insurance The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of Worker's Compensation, General Liability, and Employment Practices Liability claims is established at a minimum goal of eight times the City's and the District's total yearly SIRs for all types of insurance coverage. ■ PASIS Worker's Compensation Tail Claims The Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of outstanding Worker's Compensation claims remaining after the District's withdrawal from PASIS is established at a goal equal to the most recent fiscal year end Claims Cost Detail Report from the District's third -party administrator plus 15%. ■ Employee Leave Payouts The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for employee leave payouts as valued in accordance with the City's labor contracts as of the last day of the fiscal year. ■ Vehicle and Equipment Replacement The Fire District's fund balance committed for the replacement of fire safety vehicles and equipment as determined based on the District's replacement criteria is established at a minimum goal of 50% of District vehicle and equipment replacement value. ■ Law Enforcement The City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes, including operations, equipment, capital outlay, personnel, and booking fees. The funding goal for this reserve is the equivalent of 100% of the most recently approved Schedule A from the San Bernardino County Sheriff's Department. INVESTMENT POLICY The Statement of Investment Policy shall be reviewed annually to ensure its consistency with the overall objectives of the City and its relevance to Federal, State, and local law; prudent money Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 299 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies management; and financial and economic trends, and submitted to the City Council for approval in December. The policy applies to all funds and investment activities under the direct authority of the City. Financial assets held and invested by trustees or fiscal agents are subject to the regulations established by the State of California pertaining to investments by local agencies as well as the related bond indentures. Cash management and investment transactions are the responsibility of the City Treasurer and/or his designee. Criteria for selecting investments in order of priority are safety, liquidity and yield. The City operates its pooled cash investments under the "Prudent Person Standards." Under the provisions of the City's investment policy and in accordance with Section 53601 of the California Government Code, the City may invest in the following types of investments: • Securities of the U.S. Government, or its agencies • Municipals (Warrants, Notes and Bonds) • Certificates of Deposit (or Time Deposits) • Negotiable Certificates of Deposit • Banker's Acceptances • Commercial Paper • Local Agency Investment Fund (State Pool) Demand Deposits • Joint Powers Authority (JPA) Investment Pool (Short -Term) • Deposit of Funds • Repurchase Agreements (Repos) • Medium Term Corporate Notes • Supranational Securities • Investment Agreements In order to minimize the impact of market risk, it is the intent that all investments will be held to maturity. The City Treasurer shall prepare and submit a monthly investment report to the City Council and City Manager. DEBT MANAGEMENT POLICY I. PURPOSE The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for the following objectives: A. Minimize debt service and issuance costs B. Provide a scheduling component (planning) C. Maintain access to cost-effective borrowing D. Achieve the highest practical credit rating E. Full and timely repayment of debt F. Balance use of pay-as-you-go and debt financing G. Maintain full and complete financial disclosure and reporting H. Ensure compliance with applicable State and Federal laws Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 300 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies II. SCOPE This policy applies to debt issued by the City of Rancho Cucamonga and its related entities, as well as debt issued by the City of Rancho Cucamonga on behalf of other parties. III. GENERAL POLICIES A. Designated Managers of City Debt 1. The Finance Department under the direction of the Finance Director issues and oversees the ongoing administration of all the General Fund and special fund debt programs. These include General Obligation Bonds, lease purchase obligations, tax allocation bonds, revenue obligations, Mello -Roos and special assessment obligations. Other programs are added from time to time as new debt instruments are developed. B. Method of Sale. The City may utilize any methods of sale identified below. 1. There are two methods of issuing debt obligations, a competitive sale and a negotiated sale. In a competitive sale, underwriters submit sealed bids and the underwriter or underwriting syndicate with the lowest True Interest Cost (TIC) is awarded the sale. In a negotiated sale, the underwriter or underwriting syndicate is selected through a Request for Proposal (RFP) process. The interest rate and underwriter's fee are negotiated prior to the sale, based on market conditions. 2. When determining whether to use a competitive or negotiated sale, the following criteria should be used by the Finance Director to evaluate issuer and financial characteristics: a. Market familiarity: The City can generally sell most issues through a competitive sale since investors and underwriters are familiar with its credit quality. The Finance Director should consider whether a successful sale will require extensive pre -marketing to investors. A negotiated sale may be appropriate if extensive pre -marketing to investors is advantageous. b. Credit strength: The higher the credit quality of the City, the less likely the need for a negotiated sale due to the demand for high quality municipal bonds. A competitive bidding may be appropriate with the credit rating above "A". c. Policy goals: If the City chooses a negotiated sale for a policy reason, the City should then clearly specify the rationale and criteria for the selection of the underwriters to avoid the appearance of favoritism. Generally, the City should make a policy decision to proceed with a negotiated sale when the composition and distribution of bonds for a particular financing would be advantageous. d. Type of Debt Instrument: Familiar debt instruments would be better suited to competitive sales. New types of instruments may require an education process that is more conducive to a negotiated sale. Thus, as the market becomes more familiar with the City's debt instruments, the need to educate the market diminishes. e. Issue Size: If the bond amount is too small or too large, then the City should consider a negotiated sale. A small bond sale may not attract market attention Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 301 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies without significant sales effort while a large sale may be difficult for the market to absorb without the pre -sale activity offered by the negotiated sale process. f. Market Conditions: When the market has interest rate stability, flexibility in the timing of the sale is not critical. However, the timing of the sale is critical when there is a volatile market. If this is the case, then a negotiated sale could be more appropriate. g. Story Bonds: When bonds are unique or have a "story" associated with them, then the pre -marketing process is essential and suitable for a negotiated sale due to the additional explanation. 3. A variation of a negotiated sale, a private placement or direct placement, allows the City to sell bonds directly to a limited number of investors. Private placements are not subject to the same laws and regulations that apply to registered offerings. IV. DEBT CAPACITY A. Debt Affordability 1. The determination of how much indebtedness the City should incur will be based on the long-term financial plan. This plan should evaluate the long-term borrowing needs of the City and the impact of planned debt issuances on the long-term affordability of all outstanding debt. 2. The long-term financial plan should integrate with the City's Capital Improvement Program and include all presently known City financings to be repaid from the General Fund and relevant special funds. 3. The affordability of the incurrence of debt will be determined by calculating various debt ratios (itemized below) that would result after issuance of the debt and analyzing the trends over time. B. Ceilings for Debt Affordability 1. Debt Ratios. Direct debt includes all debt that is repaid from the General Fund or from any tax revenues deposited into special funds not supporting revenue bonds, such as General Obligation bonds and city-wide parcel tax bonds. "General Revenues" consist primarily of the General Fund, as well as the revenues to the special funds supporting direct debt. Ratio Ceiling Total Direct Debt Service as % of General Fund Revenues 10% a. The debt ceiling may be exceeded if there is a guaranteed new revenue source for the debt payments. Generally, this is common for Public Enterprise Revenue Bonds. 2. Rapidity of Debt Repayment. To prevent backloading debt service payments and provide additional debt capacity through relatively rapid retirement of outstanding debt, debt issuances will be structured to reach a target of 50% of debt being repaid within 15 years. a. Back loading of debt service will be considered acceptable when one or more events occur that make debt service payments in early years impracticable or prohibitive. The Finance Director may make findings for any of the following: 1. Natural disasters, extraordinary, or unanticipated external factors. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 302 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies 2. The benefits derived from the debt issuance can clearly be demonstrated to be greater in the future than in the present period. 3. Such structuring is beneficial to the City's aggregate overall debt payment schedule. 4. Such structuring will allow debt service to more closely match project revenues during the early years of the project's operation. C. Monitor Impact on City Taxpayer of All Fees and Taxes 1. In addition to the analysis of the City's debt affordability, the Finance Director will review the impact of debt issuance on City taxpayers. This analysis will incorporate the City's tax levy, other jurisdictions' tax levies, additional taxes for voter - approved debt, and assessments and fees used by the City or related agencies to service revenue bonds. V. REFINANCING OUTSTANDING DEBT A. Types of Refundings (as applicable by Federal and state law): 1. Current Refunding: A refunding of bonds within 90 days of the bond's first optional redemption or call date. 2. Advance Refunding: A refunding that occurs more than 90 days in advance of the first optional redemption or call date of the refunded bonds. B. Monitor Potential Savings 1. Potential savings available by refinancing outstanding debt of the City should be evaluated on a present value basis by using either a percent of maximum call option value or percentage of the refunded par amount. All costs and benefits of the refinancing should be considered. C. Target Savings Amounts 1. A present value analysis must be prepared by the Finance Department or the City's general financial advisors to identify the economic effect of any proposed refunding. To proceed with a refinancing, either of two methodologies may be used to analyze the targeted savings: a. The net present value savings as a percentage of the refunded par amount with a minimum average savings of 3% for any one refunding transaction. 1. For an advance refunding, the threshold goal will be 5% net present value savings. D. Other Considerations: 1. A refunding may be executed for other than economic purposes, such as to restructure debt, to change the type of debt instrument, or to retire a bond issue and indenture for more desirable covenants. The Finance Director may recommend this type of refunding. VI. DEBT USES AND LIMITATIONS A. Legal Restrictions 1, The City must adhere to Section 18 of article XVI of the California Constitution. 2. Exceptions to the terms of Section 18 of article XVI of the California Constitution include: Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 303 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies a. Obligations of Special District Funds which are not legally enforceable against the City's General Fund or its tax revenues. The City has developed separate guidelines that serve as minimum requirements for the issuance of Mello -Roos Obligations. b. Obligations imposed by law, such as tort damages or state and federal mandates that may exceed current revenues. c. Certain property or equipment leases and service contracts. B. Long -Term Fixed -Rate Debt 1. Debt should be used to finance essential capital assets such as facilities, real property, and certain equipment where it is appropriate to spread the cost of the asset over more than one budget year. Projects that are not appropriate for spreading costs over future years will not be debt financed. 2. Under no circumstances will long-term debt be used to fund City operations or maintenance. 3. The uses of long-term debt include: a. Equipment Financing: Lease obligations are a routine and appropriate means of financing capital equipment. However, lease obligations also have the greatest impact on debt capacity and budget flexibility. Therefore, efforts will be made to fund capital equipment with pay-as-you-go financing where feasible, and only the highest priority equipment purchases will be funded with lease obligations. All equipment with a useful life of less than five (5) years shall be funded on a pay-as-you-go basis. b. Lease Financing of Real Property; Lease financing for facilities and real property is appropriate if the City desires to finance them from existing revenue sources, and not through voter -approved bonds secured by an increase in property taxes. Such financings will be structured in accordance with the above Other Lease Obligations paragraph. c. Identified Repayment Source: The City will, when feasible, issue debt with a defined revenue source to preserve the use of General Fund -supported debt for projects with no stream of user -fee revenues. Examples of revenue sources include voter -approved taxes, user fees, and other appropriate revenues. d. Use of General Obligation Bonds: Voter -approved General Obligation Bonds provide the lowest cost of borrowing to finance the acquisition or improvement of real property, and provide a new and dedicated revenue source in the form of additional ad valorem taxes to pay debt service. In recognition of the difficulty in achieving the required two-thirds voter -approval to issue General Obligation Bonds, such bonds will be generally limited to facilities that provide wide public benefit and that have generated broad public support. e. Use of Revenue Bonds: To preserve General Fund debt capacity and budget flexibility, revenue bonds will be preferred to General Fund -supported debt when a distinct and identifiable revenue stream can be identified to support the issuance of bonds. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 304 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies C. Variable Rate and Short -Term Debt 1. Generally, the City will not issue variable interest rate debt instruments. The Finance Director may decide to issue variable-rate debt when a synthetic fixed rate through a swap agreement is determined to be a viable and cost-effective alternative, subject to the provisions of the Derivatives section below. 2. Uses of short-term debt: a. Tax and Revenue Anticipation Notes: Borrowing for cash flow purposes using tax and revenue anticipation notes is often desirable to manage the timing mismatch between revenues and expenditures over the course of a fiscal year. b. Bond Anticipation Financing_ In certain circumstances, it may be appropriate for the City to issue short-term obligations to finance a capital project, with this obligation refunded with a more conventional long-term financing. c. Commercial Paper: Commercial Paper (CP) is a short-term obligation with maturities ranging from 1 to 270 days. It is often used as interim financing until a project is completed to take advantage of lower interest rates. Once a project is completed, the Finance Director may recommend refunding CP with a long- term financing obligation, if appropriate. VII. STRUCTURE OF CITY DEBT INSTRUMENTS A. General Obligation Bonds: 1. The final maturity of General Obligation bonds will be limited to the shorter of the average useful life of the asset financed or 30 years. 2. Principal will be amortized in equal annual amounts or faster to meet the rapidity of debt repayment goals. The bonds should be callable in no later than 10 years. B. Other Lease -Purchase Obligations: 1. The final maturity of equipment obligations will be limited to the average useful life of the equipment to be financed. 2. The final maturity of real property obligations will be determined by the size of the financing, 10 to 15 years for small issues, 20 to 25 years for large issues and 30 years for exceptional projects or those with a direct revenue component, such as a special tax. 3. Principal will generally be amortized to result in level annual lease payments; however, more rapid principal amortization may occur where permissible to meet debt repayment goals. 4. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. C. Revenue Obligations: 1. The final maturity of bonds or other debt obligations secured by enterprise or other special revenues will be determined by the expected useful life of the financed project and the revenues available to repay the debt. 2. Principal amortization will be appropriate for the project cash flows, based on the useful life of the project and other revenue bonds outstanding. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. D. Special Tax Obligations (excluding Mello -Roos Special Taxes): 1. The final maturity of special tax obligations will be limited to 30 years. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 305 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies 2. Principal will be amortized as quickly as feasible, with a preference for equal annual principal payments. 3. The obligation should have optional redemption provisions that set out terms in the bond documents which give the City the right to call all or a portion of an outstanding issue of bonds, prior to their stated dates of maturity at a specified price. a. The City should include these terms in the event a property owner intends to make a prepayment of special taxes to reduce their overall tax burden. 4. The obligations should be callable in no later than 10 years. E. Mello -Roos and Special Assessment Obligations: 1. These obligations, although repaid through special taxes levied on a specific group of taxpayers, constitute overlapping indebtedness of the City, and have an impact on the overall level of debt affordability. 2. The City has developed separate guidelines for the issuance of Mello -Roos and Special Assessment Obligations. F. Capitalized Interest: 1. Capitalized interest increases the amount of debt to be issued and, therefore, will be avoided unless deemed beneficial from a credit standpoint, as in the case of lease -purchase obligations. 2. Interest on General Obligation Bonds will not be capitalized. 3. Interest on lease -purchase obligations will be capitalized for a maximum of 18 months following a conservatively based estimate of project completion to provide a cushion for project slippage. G. Payment Dates: 1. It is preferable that new debt service payments occur in September and March to align with past debt issuances. VIII. INVESTMENT OF BOND PROCEEDS 1. All investments of bond proceeds shall adhere to the City's Investment Policy, approved periodically by the City Council. IX. CONDUIT DEBT 1. Conduit financing are securities issued by the City to finance a project of a non-governmental third party, such as a non-profit organization or other private entity. 2. The City may sponsor conduit financings for those activities that may have a public purpose and are consistent with the City's overall service and policy objectives. 3. The City will not in any way pledge the City's credit in any form. 4. No City funds shall be pledged to support the conduit debt and no appropriation will be made in the event of a default of conduit debt. X. DERIVATIVES A. Use of Derivatives 1. The City may use derivative instruments to mitigate interest rate risk as specified in Section 5922(a) of the Government Code of the State of California. The Finance Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 3o6 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies Director will recommend the use of these instruments only in a manner consistent with the Government Code and when the following findings can be made: a. The instrument reduces exposure to changes in interest rates in the context of a financing or the overall asset/liability management of the City; or b. The instrument achieves a lower net cost of borrowing with respect to the City's debt. 2. As required by the Government Code, the City Council must determine that the instrument will reduce the amount or duration of payment, result in a lower cost of borrowing, or enhance the relationship between risk and return. 3. Derivative instruments will not be used for speculative purposes. B. Methods of Procurement 1. The Finance Director will solicit and procure derivative instruments by competitive bid whenever feasible. 2. A negotiated transaction should only be used if the Finance Director determines that due to the size or complexity that a competitive bid is impractical and a negotiated transaction. Such findings will be based on advice from an independent financial advisor and with the assistance of the City Attorney. a. The independent financial advisor should make findings on the terms and conditions of the derivative instrument and the fair market value of such agreement. C. Aspects of Risk Exposure 1. Before entering into a derivative instrument, the Finance Director should evaluate the risk inherent to the transaction. The risks to be evaluated should include: a. Amortization Risk: The mismatch of the expiration of the underlying obligation and the derivative instrument. b. Basis Risk: The mismatch between the actual variable rate debt service and variable rate index used to determine the derivative instrument. c. Credit Risk: The occurrence of an event modifying the credit rating of the counterparty. d. Counterparty Risk: The failure of the counterparty to make its required payments. e. Rollover Risk: The potential need to find a replacement counterparty as part of the overall plan of finance if the derivative instrument does not extend to the final maturity of the underlying variable rate bonds. f. Tax Events Risk: The risk created by potential changes to Federal and State income tax codes on the interest rates to be paid by the City on its variable rate bonds. g. Termination Risk: The possibility that, upon a default by the counterparty, the City may be required to make a large payment to the counterparty if the derivative instrument is terminated prior to its scheduled maturity pursuant to its terms. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 307 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies D. Counterparty 1. A counterparty, or the entity who takes the other side of the derivative instrument, exists for every derivative agreement. The risk that the counterparty will default on its obligation must be mitigated. Therefore, a counterparty should meet the following standards: a. At least two of the counterparty's credit ratings are rated at least "AaY or "AA - or equivalent, by any two of the nationally recognized rating agencies (i.e. Moody's, Standard and Poor's, or Fitch); or b. The payment obligations of the counterparty are unconditionally guaranteed by an entity with such a credit rating. 2. A counterparty should be collateralized at levels and with securities acceptable to the Finance Director if the payment obligations are not unconditionally guaranteed. E. Termination 1. Prior to making any termination payment due to the default of a counterparty, the Finance Director will evaluate whether it is financially advantageous for the City to obtain a replacement counterparty to avoid making such termination payment. F. Legality 1. The City Attorney must receive an opinion reasonably acceptable to the market from a nationally recognized law firm that any derivative instrument that the City enters, is a legal, valid and binding obligation of the City. XI. CONTINUING DISCLOSURE AND ADMINISTRATION A. Continuing Disclosure 1. The City will comply with Rule 15(c)2-12 of the Securities and Exchange Commission by filing an annual report that provides certain financial information and operating data relevant to investors in City obligations. a. The City will covenant to provide its annual disclosure report no later than 270 days following the end of the fiscal year to the Electronic Municipal Market Access (EMMA) site maintained by the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board (MSRB). b. The City will issue a material event notice in accordance with the provisions of Rule 15(c)2-12 of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prior to the issuance of any material event, the Finance Director may convene a meeting of the Mayor, City Manager, City Attorney and policymakers or outside professionals as appropriate, to discuss the materiality of any event and the process for equal, timely and appropriate disclosure to the marketplace. B. Arbitrage Rebate Compliance 1. The City will comply with all of its tax certificates for tax-exempt financings by monitoring the arbitrage earned on bond proceeds and by rebating all positive arbitrage, pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 148. The Finance Director may choose to hire an arbitrage consultant to prepare the calculations required by the Internal Revenue Service. Contractor payments shall be made from either the General Fund or from the special fund for which the calculation was made. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 3o8 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Financial Policies C. Ratings 1. The City will secure underlying ratings on all newly issued obligations from at least one national rating agency, if deemed beneficial for the financing. a. Some forms of debts, such as equipment leases and private placements, will not require ratings. 2. The Finance Director shall meet with a rating agency, either in person or via conference call as deemed appropriate by the financing team, that rates City debt issues. 3. The Finance Director shall ensure prompt delivery to a rating agencies of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) and adopted budgets when requested. 4. Certificates of Substantial Completion on projects financed with long term obligations shall be delivered to the rating agencies and Bond Insurer, as relevant. 5. Any changes in ratings will be promptly noticed to the City Manager and the City Council. XII. FINANCIAL CONSULTANTS A. General 1. The Finance Director will be responsible for recommending the financial consultants and professionals based on prior experience, recommendations, or a Request for Proposals (RFP) or Request for Qualifications (RFQ) process, whichever is most appropriate given the circumstances. B. Independent Financial Advisors 1. The City will utilize an independent financial advisory team to assist in the structuring of its debt offerings, to conduct its competitive bond sales, and to assist with a negotiated bond sale to ensure that interest rates are appropriate. C. Bond Counsel Services 1. The City will select bond counsel teams for its current bond programs. 2. As -needed bond counsel teams will be selected for those issuances that do not fall into any other categories of City debt obligations. D. Underwriters 1. The City will select the underwriting firm to provide the City with market knowledge, assist with credit analysis and preparation, premarketing of bonds, pricing and sale of bonds, and trading of bonds, as applicable. E. Trustee 1. The Finance Director shall have the discretion to select a commercial banking firm as trustee, either through a request for qualifications process or by relying on existing banking relationships. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 309 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Legal Debt Margin Pursuant to State of California Government Code Section 43605, the City's legal bonded indebtedness shall not exceed 15% of the assessed value of all real and personal property in the City. However, this provision was enacted when assessed valuation was based upon 25% of market value. Effective with the 1981/82 fiscal year, each parcel is now assessed at 100% of market value (as of the most recent change in ownership for that parcel). Although the statutory debt limit has not been amended by the State since this change, the percentages presented in the computation below have been proportionately modified to 3.75% (25% of 15%) for the purposes of this calculation in order to be consistent with the computational effect of the debt limit at the time of the State's establishment of the limit. The City's debt limit, as illustrated in the June 30, 2018 Comprehensive Annual Report, is $936,104,692. The calculation is included below. Legal Debt Margin Calculation for Fiscal Year 2017/18: Assessed value Debt limit (3.75% of assessed value) Debt applicable to limit: General obligation bonds Legal debt margin $ 24,962,791,775 936,104,692 $ 936,104,692 Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 310 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Audit An examination of systems, procedures, programs and financial data. The end product of an audit is a report issued by an independent auditor describing how well a local government's financial statements describe its financial condition and the results of its operations. Accrual Basis of Revenues are recognized when both measurable and available; Accounting: expenditures are recorded when services have been substantially performed or goods have been received and the liabilities incurred. Adopted Budget: The official budget as approved by the City Council at the start of each fiscal year. Ad Valorem Tax A state or local government tax based on the value of real property as "According to its determined by the county tax assessor. value": Amended Budget: The adopted budget as amended by the City Council through the course of a fiscal year. Appropriations: A legal authorization granted by a legislative body to make expenditures and to incur obligations for specific purposes. An appropriation is usually limited in amount and to the time when it may be expended. Assessed Valuation: A municipality's property tax base stated in dollars based on real estate and/or other taxable business property for the purposes of taxation, sometimes expressed as a percent of the full market value of the taxable property within a community. Balanced Budget: A budget in which planned expenditures do not exceed planned funds available. Bond: A security whereby an issuer borrows money from an investor and agrees and promises, by written contract, to pay a fixed principal sum on a specified date (maturity date) and at a specified rate of interest. Budget: A plan of financial operation comprised of estimated expenditures for a given period (usually a single fiscal year) and the proposed means of financing the expenditures (through revenues). Capital Budget: A budget which focuses on capital projects to implement the Capital Improvement Program. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 311 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Capital Improvement A plan for capital improvements to be implemented each year over a Program: number of years to meet capital needs arising from the assessment of long- term needs. It sets forth the estimated cost for each project and specifies the resources required to finance the projected expenditures. Capital Improvement The budget unit to group activities and costs necessary to implement a Project: specific capital improvement and/or acquisition. A project can include the construction, acquisition, expansion, replacement, or rehabilitation of a physical facility or improvement. Projects often include planning and design, land acquisition, and project management costs related to such facilities and improvements. Capital Projects Used to account for financial resources for the acquisition or construction Funds: of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust funds. Debt Service Funds: Account for the accumulation of resources set aside to meet current and future debt service requirements (payments) on general long-term debt. Department: A major organizational group of the City with overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. Depreciation Expiration in the service life of capital assets attributable to wear and tear, deterioration, action of the physical elements, inadequacy or obsolescence. Division: An organizational subgroup of a department. Encumbrance: The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase goods, which have not yet been received, or services that have yet to be rendered. Enterprise Funds: Use to account for self-supporting operations such as the Municipal Utility. Expenditures: Decreases in net financial resources. Expenditures include current operating expenses which require the current or future use of net current assets, debt service and capital outlays. Expenses: Decreases in net total assets. Expenses represent the total cost of operations during a period regardless of the timing of related expenditures. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 312 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Fiscal Year: A 12 -month period to which the annual operating budget applies and at the end of which an entity determines its financial position, the results of its operations, and adopts a budget for the coming year. The City of Rancho Cucamonga's fiscal year is from July 1 to June 30. Fixed Assets: Equipment costing $5,000 or more, including tax, with a useful life longer than one year, and not qualifying as a capital improvement project. Includes automotive equipment, office equipment, office furniture, acquisitions, landscaping improvements, etc. Full -Time Equivalent The conversion of part-time employee hour to an equivalent of a full-time (FTE): position. For example: one person working 20 hours a week for a year would be 0.5 FTE. Fund: An independent fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts, recording resources, related liabilities, obligations, reserves and equities segregated for the purpose of carrying out specific activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions or limitations. Fund Balance: The equity (assets minus liabilities) of governmental fund and fiduciary fund types. Generally Accepted Uniform minimum standards of and guidelines for financial accounting Accounting Principles and reporting. They govern the form and content of the basic financial (GAAP): statements of an entity. GAAP encompasses the conventions, rules, and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practices at a particular time. They include not only broad guidelines of general application, but also detailed practices and procedures. GAAP provides a standard by which to measure financial presentations. GFOA: Government Finance Officers Association Governmental The independent organization that establishes and improves standards of Accounting Standards accounting and financial reporting for U.S. state and local governments. Board (GASB) Governmental Funds: Typically are used to account for tax -supported (governmental) activities. These include the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, Capital Projects Funds, and Debt Service Funds. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 313 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Interfund Transfers: Defined as "flows of assets" (such as good or services) without equivalent flows of assets in return and without requirement for repayments. Internal Service Account for the goods or services provided by one fund and/or department Funds: to another fund and/or department on a cost reimbursement basis. Investment Grade: A rating issued by the three major bond rating agencies, Moody's, Standard & Poor's, and Fitch, rated BBB, Baa or Better. Many fiduciaries, trustees, and some mutual fund managers can only invest in securities with an investment grade rating. Modified Accrual The accrual basis of accounting where revenues are recognized when they Basis: become both "measurable" and "available" to finance expenditures of the current period. All governmental funds and agency funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Object Code: The classification of expenditures in terms of what is bought and paid for grouped into categories. Overlapping Debt: The proportionate share of the general obligation bonds of local governments located wholly or in part within the limits of the reporting unit of government, that must be borne by property owners within the unit. Personnel Expenses: Compensation paid to or on behalf of City employees for salaries and wages, overtime and benefits. Proprietary Funds: Account for records of operations similar to those found in a business, such as internal service funds and enterprise funds. Revenue: Moneys that the City receives as income such as tax payments, fees from specific services, receipts form other governments, fines, forfeitures, grants, shared revenues and interest income. Special Revenue Account for the revenue derived form specific taxes or other earmarked Funds: revenue sources (other than expendable trusts or for major capital projects) that are restricted by law or administrative action to expenditures for specified purposes. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 314 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Taxes: Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit. This term does not include specific charges made against particular persons or property for current or permanent benefits such as special assessments. Neither does the term include charges for services rendered only to those paying such charges as, for example, user charges. Underfill: Filling an authorized position with a related classification that has a lower salary range. Reasons to consider an underfill include, but are not limited to: the department's internal promotional program would be enhanced; there are no qualified candidates to fill said vacant position; or a critical departmental reason exists. User Charges: Payments made by users or customers of publicly provided services that benefit specific individuals. These services exhibit "public good" characteristics. Examples of user charges are fees paid for recreational activities, building fees, etc. Working Capital: The cash available for day-to-day operations of an organization. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 315 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget List of Acronyms ADA Americans with Disabilities Act HHW Household Hazardous Waste AQMD Air Quality Management District HR Human Resources BERT Business Emergency Response HVAC Heating, Ventilating, and Air Training Conditioning BYB2RC Bring Your Business 2 Rancho IAQ Indoor Air Quality Cucamonga IESBDC Inland Empire Small Business C.A.N.I.N.E. Campus Awareness, Narcotic Development Center Intervention, Narcotic Education IPM Integrated Pest Management CAFR Comprehensive Annual Financial KIDS Kids Interactive Discovery Space Report LED Light -Emitting Diode CAL -ID RAN California Identification System LMD Landscape Maintenance District Remote Access Network PCI Pavement Condition Index CDBG Community Development Block PD Park District Grant PEPRA Public Employees' Pension Reform Act CERT Community Emergency Response PERS Public Employees Retirement Training System CFD Community Facilities District PSVN Public Safety Video Network CIP Capital Inprovement Project RCLS Rancho Cucamonga Library CNG Compressed Natural Gas Services CONFIRE Consolidated Fire Agencies, Joint RCMU Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Power Authority Utility CPI Consumer Price Index REGIS Rancho Enterprise Geographic CPR Cardiopulmonary Resusitation Information Systems CSD Community Services Department ROPS Recognized Obligation Payment CVWD Cucamonga Valley Water District Schedule EIR Environmental Impact Review SANBAG San Bernardino Associated ESRI Environmental Systems Research Governments Institute SBCERA San Bernardino County Employee FLSA Fair Labor Standards Act Retirement Association FTE Full Time Equivalent SBOE California State Board of FY Fiscal Year Equalization GFOA Government Finance Officers SCE Southern California Edison Association SLD Street Lighting District GIS Geographic Information Systems TOD Transit Oriented Development GOTMD Greater Ontario Tourism TOT Transient Occupancy Tax Marketing District VLF Vehicle License Fees HdL Hinderliter de Llamas Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 316 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description GENERAL FUND 001 General Fund - The general operating fund of the City which accounts for all general tax receipts and fee revenue not allocated by law, Council policy or contractual agreement to other funds. General Fund expenditures include operations traditionally associated with activities which are not required to be accounted for or paid by another fund. OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 Reimb St/County Parking Cit - Established for the tracking of revenues and expenditures related to State and San Bernardino County surcharges on parking citations. 006 CVWD Reimbursements - Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed street repairs within the City on behalf of Cucamonga Valley Water District. 008 County of S.B. Reimbursements - Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed storm drain facility maintenance on behalf of the San Bernardino County Flood Control District. 016 Comm Dev Technical Services - Established to account for the City's General Plan Update Fee as well as funds that have been set aside for Economic and Community Development Special Services. 017 Law Enforcement Reserve - Established to account for the funding and use of the City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes. 018 Traffic Safety - Established to account for vehicle code fines collected to fund the City's contracted crossing guard services. 019 Info Technology -Development - Established to account for fees collected to fund the internal cost of providing information technology services for the Community Development Departments. 020 City Technology Fee - Established to account for fees collected to fund a future replacement of the City's land management system. 022 Mobile Home Park Program - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the City's mobile home park inspection program. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 317 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 023 SB1186 Cert Access Special Program - Established to account for the $1.00 State mandated fee imposed on any applicant for a business license, equivalent or renewal, including the payment to the State of 30% of the fee collected as well as expenditures to fund increased certified access specialist (CASp) services for the public and to facilitate compliance with construction -related accessibility requirements. 025 Capital Reserve - Established to account for key reserves of the General Fund including City infrastructure, City facilities capital repairs, and self-insurance. 073 Benefits Contingency - Established to account for the accumulation of resources for the future payment of employee leave benefits paid to employees upon separation from the City. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds account for revenues derived from specific sources which are required by law or administrative regulation to be accounted for in a separated fund. Funds included are: 100 Assessment Districts Admin - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the management of all City assessment districts. 101 AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center - Established to acquire the necessary infrastructure from the developer after the completion and acceptance of the approved improvements. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds pursuant to the provisions of the Improvement Act of 1915. 105 AB2766 Air Quality Improvement - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2766 which imposed an additional registration fee on motor vehicles. These revenues are to be used to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles and for related planning, monitoring, enforcement, and technical studies (Vehicle Code Section 9250.17 and Health and Safety Code Chapter 7, Part 5 of Division 26, commencing with Section 44220). 110 Beautification - Established to account for fees collected to provide proper landscaping and irrigation systems after parkway and median improvements are made. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 318 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 111 Park Land Acquisition - Established to account for the park land acquisition development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park sites. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 112 Drainage Fac/General - Established to account for fees charged developers for purposes of defraying the actual or estimated costs of constructing planned drainage facilities. 113 Community/Rec Center Develpmnt - Established to account for community and recreation center impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 114 Drainage-Etiwanda/San Sevaine - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of regional and mainline flood control projects. 115 Henderson/Wardman Drainage - The Henderson/Wardman Drainage fund is a developer impact fee supported fund for the construction of storm drain improvements in the Henderson/Wardman drainage area. 116 Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area North of Base Line Road for the construction of Master Plan Storm Drain projects. 118 Upper Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of secondary mainline flood control projects. 119 Park Improvement - Established to account for park improvement impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 120 Park Development - Established to account for the residential park development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park or recreational sites. 122 South Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for Development Impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south of Foothill Blvd for the construction of the Master Plan Storm Drain. 123 Library Impact Fee - Established to account for library impact fees charged to developers. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 319 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 124 Transportation - Established to account for fees charged for the construction and expansion of City streets and highways which provide additional capacity and safety. 125 Animal Center Impact Fee - Established to account for animal center impact fees charged to developers. 126 Lower Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south between Foothill Blvd. and Base Line Road for the construction of master plan storm drain projects. 127 Police Impact Fee - Established to account for police impact fees charged to developers. 128 Etiwanda No. Equestrian Facility - Established to account for in lieu fees collected for the Etiwanda North Specific Plan for the future construction of an equestrian facility. 129 Underground Utilities - Established to account for fees collected from developers for future undergrounding of overhead utilities. 130 LMD #1 General City - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 131 LMD #2 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 132 LMD #3A Hyssop - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 133 LMD #313 Medians - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 134 LMD #4R Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 135 LMD #5 Tot Lot - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 320 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 136 LMD #611 Caryn Community - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 137 LMD #7 North Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 138 LMD #8 South Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 139 LMD #9 Lower Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 140 LMD #10 Rancho Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 141 LMD #1 Capital Replacement - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for LMD #1. 151 SLD #1 Arterial - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 152 SLD #2 Residential - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 153 SLD #3 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 154 SLD #4 Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 155 SLD #5 Caryn Community - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 321 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 156 SLD #6 Industrial Area - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 157 SLD #7 North Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 158 SLD #8 South Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 170 Gas Tax 2105/PropllI - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of State gasoline taxes provided the financing. 172 Gas Tax 2106-2107 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of state gasoline taxes provided the financing. 174 Gas Tax R&T7360 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of state gasoline taxes provided the financing. 176 Measure 11990-2010 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 177 Measure 12010-2040 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 182 AB 2928 Traffic Congest Relief - Established fund to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2928. The purpose of the Traffic Congestion Program was to provide funding for transportation projects that would relieve congestion, connect transportation systems, and provide for better goods movement. 186 Foothill Blvd Maintenance - Established to account for funding provided by Cal Trans as part of their relinquishment of Foothill Boulevard to the City of Rancho Cucamonga. This limited funding source will be utilized to repair and maintain portions of Foothill Boulevard. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 322 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 188 Integrated Waste Management - Established to account for AB939 recycling fee revenues from the City's refuse haulers and can only be used for the City's Household Hazardous Waste Disposal program. Assembly Bill 939 is a law that was passed by the State of California that mandates that all cities divert a specified percentage of their solid waste from their landfills in accordance with established deadlines. 190 Prop 42 -Traffic Congestion Mit - Established to account for gasoline sales tax revenue received from the State of California for transportation purposes, including city and county street and road repairs and maintenance. Proposition 42, a legislative constitutional amendment, permanently dedicated revenues from this sales tax on gasoline to transportation infrastructure needs. 194 Proposition 113 State Funding - Proposition 1B (Prop 1B) provides state funding to cities and counties to fund the maintenance and improvement of local transportation facilities. The funding is allocated based on population. 195 State Asset Seizure - Established to account for the funds received from the State for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 196 CA Asset Seizure 15% - Established to account for 15% of State Asset Seizure (Fund 195) designated for the sole purpose of funding programs designed to combat drug abuse and divert gang activity pursuant to the provisions of Health & Safety Code Section 11489(b)(2)(A)(i). 197 Federal Asset Seizure - Established to account for the funds received from the Federal government for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 198 Citywide Infrastructure Impry - This fund was established to account for reimbursement revenue received from various local, State and Federal agencies and utilities for capital improvement projects completed in the City. The accumulated funds will be used for future capital improvement projects as authorized by the City Council. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 323 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 204 Community Development Blk Grant - Established to account for grants received from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. These revenues must be expended to accomplish one of the following objectives: elimination of slum or blight; or benefit to low and moderate income persons by providing loans and grants to owner -occupants and rental property owners to rehabilitate residential properties. 209 Federal SAFETEA-LU - Established to account for the Safe, Accountable, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Federal funding for surface transportation projects. 211 Prop 113 - SLPP - Established to account for the State -Local Partnership Program utilizing Proposition 113 bond proceeds to fund eligible transportation projects. Funds are allocated through formula and competitive sub -programs. 214 Pedestrian Grant/Art 3 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received for the construction of facilities provided for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicycles. 218 Public Resrce Grnts/Healthy RC - The City had received and will continue to receive from various funding sources for the Healthy Cities concept, which was adopted by the Council in March 2008, as a means of integrating health concerns into a holistic approach to improving the overall quality of life in the community. 225 CA Recycle/Litter Reduction Grant - Established to account for a grant from the State Department of Conservation. This grant will fund a program that will emphasize the collection and recycling of beverage containers at large venues, public areas, residential communities or schools. 226 Used Oil Recycling Grant - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. 227 Used Oil Recycling Program - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 324 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 234 Safe Routes To School Program - The Safe Routes to School Program fund is a grant fund for monies provided by the State of California. The state funds are administered through Caltrans as part of the California Department of Health Services' "Safe Routes to School Program" and are available for transportation projects that increase the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists. 235 Prop 84 Park Bond Act - Prop 84 provides state funding, on a competitive basis, to local governments for the creation of new parks and recreation opportunities. The Statewide Park Program legislation requires projects to meet six eligibility requirements. The fund was established to account for the financial activities associated with the design and construction of the neighborhood park in southwest Rancho Cucamonga. 250 Recreation Services - Established to account for the wide variety of classes, special events, and activities sponsored by the Community Services Department. 255 Victoria Gardens Cultural Center - Established to account for the various activities that the Community Services Department facilitates at the Victoria Gardents Cultural Center. 258 Senior Outreach Grant - Established to account for funds passed through the San Bernardino County Department of Aging and Adult Services from the California Department of Aging to provide free recreation classes and programs for senior citizens in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. These recreation activities focused on physical, social, psychological, educational, and recreational needs of older persons. The City provided an in-kind match of $1,200 in the form of marketing, staff oversight, and supplies. 281 Fire Fund - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received by the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in the course of that agency's fire protection services. The source of revenue is primarily from property taxes. 282 Community Facilities Dist 85-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 283 Community Facilities Dist 88-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 325 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 285 Fire Technology Fee Fund - Established to set aside funds for technology equipment replacement. 288 Fire Protection Capital Fund - Established to account for capital maintenance and repairs as well as purchases of fixed assets for the Fire District separate from the Fire District's Fire Fund which accounts for general maintenance and repairs. 290 Library Fund - Established to account for services provided by the City of Rancho Cucamonga Library. Funding for this service is made possible through a transfer of San Bernardino County library tax revenues to the City of Rancho Cucamonga for library purposes. 291 CA State Library - This "Family Place" training grant from the California State Library provided funding for two Library staff to attend a one-week training that will enable them to develop special programs at the Biane Library and the Family Resource Center. This grant has no matching requirements. 292 Staff Innovation Fd (CA St Lb) - Established to account for the grant money awarded by California State Library. The purpose of the grant is to provide training for innovative writing skills for future grant writers. 299 Library Development Fund - Established to account for activities taking place in the newly developed second floor of the Biane Library, which is currently under construction. The second floor will serve as a dramatic programming space for the entire community, with a wide variety of programming geared toward science, art and early literacy. 301 The Big Read Library Grant - Established to account for the grant money receiving from the National Endowment for the Arts. The purpose of the grant is to emphasize a city wide media campaign through guest lectures, group discussions, film showings, and a community theater performance of a designated book. 302 Library Services & Tech. Act - Established to account for grant revenues and expenditures associated with funding provided by the federal Library Services and Technology Act, which is administered in California by the State Librarian. 329 Library Capital Fund - Established as the capital fund for the construction of the Biane Library second floor tenant improvement project. 354 COPS Program Grant -State - Established to account for a grant awarded as the result of the approval of State Assembly Bill 3229. The grant is a one-year award with no matching fund requirements. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 326 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 361 Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) - Established to account for the revenues and expenditures associated with Federal JAG grants. 370 OTS -"Drink, Drive, Lose" Grant - This grant was awarded by the State of California Office of Traffic Safety to provide supplementary funding for overtime costs incurred during sobriety checkpoints. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the number of victims killed and injured as a result of alcohol -involved crashes. 373 COPS Secure Our Schools Grant Fund — Established to account for the grant money use in partnership with public schools to improve school safety. 374 Cops Hiring Program Grant - This is a multi-year grant awarded by U.S. Department of Justice to provide partial supplementary funding to hire a new sworn officer. The grant must be used to enhance community policing activities. 380 Homeland Security Grant- Fire - This grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program is administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training cost funding for national security. There are no matching funds required for this grant. 381 Homeland Security Grant- Police - The grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMD's) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training costs funding for national security. There are no matching funds required for this grant. 383 Emergency Management Performance Grant - This grant from FEMA is used to fund a volunteer coordinator for the City's Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program. 396 Housing Successor Agency - Established to account for assets of the former Redevelopment Agency's Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund. The source of revenue in the fund is primarily from interest received from the notes and loans receivable. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 327 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 838 AD 91-2 Redemption -Day Canyon - Established to account for assessments received under the Improvement Bond Act of 1915. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. 847 PD 85 Capital Replacement Fund - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for PD 85. 848 PD 85 Redemption Fund - Established to account for assessments received under the Refunding Act of 1984 for 1915 Improvement Act Bonds and Landscape/Lighting Act of 1972. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. 868 CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance - This fund is used for the maintenance of parks and parkways located within the Community Facilities District No. 2000-03. The District is located south of Summit Avenue on the east and west sides of Wardman Bullock Road. CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Projects Funds are used to account for financial resources for the acquision or construction of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust funds. 602 AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello - Established to account for the receipt and disbursement of funds used in the construction and installation of public capital drainage facilities, together with appurtenant work and incidental expenses, to serve and provide drainage protection to property located within Assessment District No. 84-1 (Day Creek Drainage System). Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 612 CFD 2001-01 - This CFD was established to fund the necessary infrastructure (streets, storm drains, sewer, water, landscaping, and traffic signals) integral to the proposed mall located at Foothill Blvd. and the I-15 Freeway. The improvements are located south of Base Line Rd., primarily north of Foothill Blvd., primarily east of Day Creek Channel, and west of Etiwanda Ave. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 328 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 615 CFD 2003-01 Cultural Center - Established to account for the portion of the costs associated with the development of the City's Cultural Arts Center that is being funded by Community Facilities District (CFD) 2003-01. Financing for the CFD will be provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 617 CFD 2004-01 Rancho Etiwanda Es - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to the proposed public financing district. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 680 CFD 2006-01 Vintner's Grove - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. 681 CFD 2006-02 Amador On Route 66 - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 329 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description ENTERPRISE FUNDS Enterprise Funds are used primarily to account for "business -like" activities that are primarily financed through user charges 700 Sports Complex - Established to account for personnel and operating costs directly associated with the operation of the baseball facility, which is the home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. 702 REGIS Connect - Established to account for costs associated with the development of the Rancho Cucamonga Enterprise GIS Connect Program which provides services to the City and agency partners that are in need of their expertise. 705 Municipal Utility - Established to account for the costs of labor and materials used in the operation, maintenance, construction and consumption of electric services to certain major commercial/industrial developments within the City. 706 Utility Public Benefit Fund - Established to account for 2.85% of electric retail revenues to fund qualifying energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, research and demonstration projects and services to low income electricity customers. 711 Fiber Optic Network Fund - Established to account for costs associated with the City's existing utility, information technology and traffic fiber conduits, and leases for fiber access. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Internal service funds are used to account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department or agency to other departments or agencies of the government and to other government units, on a cost reimbursement basis. 712 Equip/Vehicle Replacement - Established to account for the accumulation of user charges to various City departments and the costs associated with replacing the City's vehicles and equipment. 714 Comp Equip/Tech Replcment Fund - Established to account for the accumulation of resources and the costs associated with replacing the City's data processing equipment and maintaining current technology. Fiscal Year 2019/20 Preliminary Budget Page 330