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Budget 2017-18�/O-//, ANNIVERSARY eDITION 00*1 C 14ty Of CHO UCAMONGA California CAL YEAR )17/18 ADOPTED BUDGET CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET About the cover.... On November 30, 2017, the City of Rancho Cucamonga will celebrate its 40t' anniversary as a city. The pictures on this year's budget cover showcase some of the highlights of the City's development. 1 — Freedom Courtyard: The Freedom Courtyard, which opened in 2013, is a public -use facility designed by the community for the community. City staff partnered with the community to design and fundraise, creating a reflective area to commemorate and pay tribute to the past, present and future members of the United States Armed Forces. 2 — Virginia Dare Winery: Driving down Route 66, our proud past is prominently reflected in the Virginia Dare Winery, in production from 1912-1962. Today, it is one of the City's historic sites, serving as a business center featuring professional and medical offices. 3 — Victoria Gardens Cultural Center: Dedicated in August 2006, the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center is the City's premier venue for cultural and performing arts programs including performing arts classes and workshops; community theatre programs; volunteer opportunities; and award winning professional theatre and exciting headline artists on the beautiful and intimate Lewis Family Playhouse stage. 4 — Pacific Electric Trail: The City joined together with surrounding cities to develop a multi -purpose 20- mile long trail following the Southern Pacific railroad corridor. The Pacific Electric Trail provides recreational opportunities for cyclists, pedestrians, runners, and equestrians. Promoting Healthy RC, residents and visitors are able to exercise on a protected trail that provides convenient access to jobs, public facilities, and shopping. 5 — Epicenter and Adult Sports Park: A beautiful 52-acre sports complex, the Epicenter and Adult Sports Park is an ideal venue for a wide variety of events. It is also home to the Class A minor league baseball team, the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. 6 — Los Amigos Park: The City of Rancho Cucamonga was presented with the prestigious Helen Putnam Award for Excellence for the City's community engagement efforts in developing Los Amigos Park. Opened in April 2017, the park has animal sculptures with misters, two playground areas, a basketball court, and a small skate area. It was designed with special attention to sustainability. Although the only green space in the park is a half -acre field, there is a bio-retention basin to catch storm water runoff and a reuse of lumber throughout. 7 — Solar RC: The City has invested in solar infrastructure projects throughout the City to demonstrate its commitment to renewable energy as well as generate budget savings through reduced energy costs. This picture showcases the solar parking canopy at Central Park. 8 — Rancho Cucamonga All -Risk Training Center: The regional All -Risk Training Center will maximize current and future skills/capabilities of not only Rancho Cucamonga Fire District personnel, but also our Rancho Sheriff, City Personnel and other public safety organizations and regional public safety partners. The Training Center will also provide a realistic environment for our local teams of trained citizen volunteers (CERT) and offer a meeting location for public education and for other civic organizations. 9 — Goodman Logistics Center: Goodman Logistics Center is a two -building logistics distribution center totaling 1,589,946 square feet located in Rancho Cucamonga. Completed in June 2015, the facility is currently 100% leased to Georgia Pacific, a U.S. company based in Atlanta, Georgia, a leading manufacturer of paper products and building supplies. This Class A logistics campus typifies providing flexible, high quality, modern industrial space in a strategic location, capable of meeting customer's needs. The Goodman Logistics Center is situated with great access to the I-10 Freeway, a primary transport route to the Ports of Los Angeles/Long Beach and Ontario International Airport in the heart of the Inland Empire West Market. CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Introduction 1 City Manager's Executive Summary 3 Attachment A — Department Budgets 41 Attachment B — 2017 City Council Goals 65 GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award 69 General Information 71 City Officials 73 Organization Chart 75 Functional Units by Fund Type 77 Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga 79 Population by Age 80 Educational Attainment 81 Principal Employers 82 Principal Sales Tax Remitters 83 Budget Guide 85 Budget Process 86 Budget Process Flow Chart 88 Summaries of Financial Data 89 Financial Summary — Operating Budget 90 Financial Summary — All Funds 91 Notes to Financial Summary 92 Budget Summary 93 Special District Summary 94 Landscape Maintenance Districts, Street Lighting Maintenance Districts, and Other Maintenance Districts — Changes in Fund Balance 96 Revenue Summaries 99 Revenue and Resource Estimates 101 Revenue Summary by Category — Operating Budget 106 Revenue Detail — Operating Budget 108 Revenue Summary by Category — All Funds 114 Revenue Detail — All Funds 116 Revenues by Fund 137 Expenditure Summaries 141 Expenditure Summary by Department — Operating Budget 142 Expenditure Summary by Category — Operating Budget 143 Expenditure Detail — Operating Budget 144 Expenditure Summary by Department — All Funds 152 Expenditure Summary by Category — All Funds 153 Expenditure Detail — All Funds 154 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Summaries of Financial Data (continued) Expenditures by Fund 183 Funded Positions by Department — Summary 187 Funded Positions by Department — Detail 188 Fund Balance Summaries 197 Spendable Fund Balances 199 Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances 203 Departmental Budget Details 207 (i' avPrn a n rP City Council Overview of Department 208 FY 2017/18 City Council Priorities 208 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 209 Three -Year Staffing Summary 209 City Clerk Overview of Department 210 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 210 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 211 Three -Year Staffing Summary 211 City Treasurer Overview of Department 212 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 212 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 213 Three -Year Staffing Summary 213 City Management Overview of Department 214 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 214 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 215 Three -Year Staffing Summary 215 Performance Statistics 216 Services to the Community 217 Police Overview of Department 218 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 218 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 219 Three -Year Staffing Summary 219 Performance Statistics 220 Services to the Community 221 Fire District Overview of Department 222 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 222 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 223 Three -Year Staffing Summary 223 Performance Statistics 224 Services to the Community 225 Animal Care and Services Overview of Department 226 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 226 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 227 Three -Year Staffing Summary 227 Performance Statistics 228 Services to the Community 229 Civic and Cultural Services Records Management Overview of Department 230 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 230 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 231 Three -Year Staffing Summary 231 Performance Statistics 232 Services to the Community 233 Community Services Overview of Department 234 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 234 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 235 Three -Year Staffing Summary 235 Performance Statistics 236 Services to the Community 237 Library Services Overview of Department 238 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 238 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 239 Three -Year Staffing Summary 239 Performance Statistics 240 Services to the Community 241 Administrative Services Administration/Procurement Overview of Department 242 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 242 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 243 Three -Year Staffing Summary 243 Performance Statistics 244 Services to the Community 245 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Page Finance Overview of Department 246 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 246 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 247 Three -Year Staffing Summary 247 Performance Statistics 248 Services to the Community 249 Human Resources Overview of Department 250 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 250 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 251 Three -Year Staffing Summary 251 Performance Statistics 252 Services to the Community 253 Innovation and Technology Overview of Department 254 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 254 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 255 Three -Year Staffing Summary 255 Performance Statistics 256 Services to the Community 257 Economic and Community Development Administration Overview of Department 258 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 258 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 259 Three -Year Staffing Summary 259 Performance Statistics 260 Services to the Community 261 Building and Safety Overview of Department 262 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 262 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 263 Three -Year Staffing Summary 263 Performance Statistics 264 Services to the Community 265 Engineering Services Overview of Department 266 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 266 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 267 Three -Year Staffing Summary 267 Performance Statistics 268 Services to the Community 269 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Table of Contents Planning Page Overview of Department 270 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 270 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 271 Three -Year Staffing Summary 271 Performance Statistics 272 Services to the Community 273 Public Works Services Overview of Department 274 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights 274 Three -Year Expenditure Summary by Funding Source/Category 275 Three -Year Staffing Summary 275 Performance Statistics 276 Services to the Community 277 Capital Improvement Program 279 Summary by Category 281 Detail by Category with Funding Source(s) 283 Appendix 287 Financial Policies 289 Long -Term Debt 293 Glossary of Budget Terms 294 List of Acronyms 299 Description of Funds by Fund Type 300 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 1 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 2 MEMORANDUM CITY MANAGERS OFFICE RANCHO CUCAMONGA Date: June 22, 2017 To: Mayor and Members of the City Council By: John R. Gillison, City Manager Subject: PREPARING FOR THE 21ST CENTURY: FISCAL YEAR (FY) 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET "Poised for New Success" There was an interesting article recently on CNBC entitled 'A Things Millionaires Do That The Middle Class Doesn't." The main point in the article was that becoming a millionaire starts with your mindset, and then is actualized when you act like a millionaire. It was excerpted from a book written by Keith Cameron Smith who spent two years working with and studying the ultra -rich. The four ideas were: 1) Millionaires talk about ideas not things. 2) Millionaires take calculated risks. 3) Millionaires invest in others through things like philanthropy. 4) Millionaires diversify their income stream. How are these principles and concepts applicable to the City of Rancho Cucamonga? In many ways, the long-term investment strategies (fiscal, infrastructure, management) of cities are similar to that of individuals. The most successful communities are those that focus on the bigger picture and long-term goals. Let's examine how so. Talk about ideas, not things. Things (objects, buildings, experiences) most often focus you on the minutiae of the present. They occupy your time in the here and now. But as technology has shown us, the world is changing at an ever increasing pace. The implications are that being focused too much on what is happening today can leave one unprepared for the changes just over the horizon. Millionaires are often highly creative people who focus their time on new ideas and things that have not yet, but might one day soon, come into being. This helps them accept change and transition better and prepares them to be more successful in the world of the future than others might be. Cities are similar. Every year laws change and there are new hurdles at the state and federal level. We too grapple with changing technology, changing service demands, and new needs that never existed previously. The most successful local governments are the ones who focus on ideas - ideas for the future, and ways to position themselves to be even more successful than they are presently. Those local governments who are overly concerned with the details and demands of today to the exclusion of everything else, often find themselves least prepared to cope with the future and most uncomfortable with change and transition. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 3 Millionaires take calculated risks. Most of us live in fear of risking too much. We are content to stay in our lane and not move outside our comfort zone. Studies have shown that those with a higher tolerance for risk taking often reap greater rewards because they overcome their fear with knowledge and, as a result, achieve a greater reward. Put another way, we all recall the phrase "Nothing ventured, nothing gained." Taking a calculated risk, when you are aware of the consequences, is often the only way to make substantial forward progress which is non - incremental in nature. So too, in many ways, operates the province of local government. Funding for pension costs, maintenance and replacement of infrastructure, and planning for what a city will look like (and should look like) in 25 years takes vision and foresight. The challenges of today are not the challenges of tomorrow. And the successful strategies of today eventually are no longer successful in a changing world. The history of Rancho Cucamonga is illustrative. Planning for large amounts of traffic volume from a vibrant industrial base, building cultural and civic amenities like a minor league baseball stadium and a Cultural Center, and understanding and adapting to the changing demands of the retail and food service industries, takes planning and foresight. Many of the things implemented in the 1980's and 1990's were often unheard of in those days, but now are the fundamental building blocks of a world -class community. Rancho Cucamonga was ahead of its time. Our early leaders armed themselves with knowledge and took calculated risks with the results that we all enjoy today. Rancho Cucamonga still employs that same philosophy: looking ahead, planning for the future, taking informed and calculated risks with the goal of ensuring we remain a world -class community. Millionaires invest in others through things like philanthropy. This is the basic law of reaping and sowing. As you invest in others, so too will you eventually see the results of your labor. Time, money, and talents are like seeds; they bear fruit only after lots of attention. A good example of this on the civic side is Healthy RC. Healthy RC has been a successful City -community partnership since 2008, receiving national recognition for its work to improve community health. This City Council initiative was originally conceived as a grass -roots citizen led effort to improve the health and well-being of those residents in some of the more under -privileged areas of the community. Subsequently expanded citywide with a focus on inclusiveness and compassion, the Healthy RC partnership is comprised of dedicated residents, community organizations, and public and private entities to make Rancho Cucamonga the healthiest and happiest community in Southern California. Millionaires diversify their income stream. Having multiple sources of income is profitable and smart on many levels. Diversification helps with safety and security of investment. It improves manifold your chances of larger returns from one of your "many" investments. Diversification also requires delegation. Successful individuals know that no one person can do everything perfectly, and they find those who are experts in their subject matter areas. So too has Rancho Cucamonga diversified since its earliest inception. Financial reviews of the City most frequently note how diversified our revenue stream is. We receive moderate amounts of property tax, sales tax, transient occupancy tax, and several other revenues (a total of seven major streams) which make up over 90% of our revenue base. This is unlike many agencies which are overly reliant on property tax, or sales tax (auto malls), or one or two key revenues. When those revenues dip cyclically (as always happens in a recession), those agencies are hurt tremendously. Similarly, the physical development of Rancho Cucamonga is diversified. We have heavy industry on the east side of the 1-15 freeway, light industry and logistics south of Arrow Route, offices along the Haven Avenue corridor, general retail along Foothill Boulevard, Base Line Road, and 19th Street, with key nodes near the freeway. Large lot single family residential is north of Banyan, medium lot residential is between Banyan Street and 19th Street, small lot residential is between 19th Street and Church Street, with most multi -family residential south of Church Street. As a result, the community has always proven resilient despite the changing demographics and Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 4 economic trends of nearly a half -century since incorporation. As the City plans for the future, we are mindful of the importance of this diversification, and our Economic Development Strategic Plan, as well as specific economic development and financial investment activities, continues to be on a model of prudent diversification. Because the City is diversified, takes calculated and informed risks while focusing on long-term ideas and goals and investing in its population, Rancho Cucamonga is poised for new success in the 21 st century. The results we see today are the fruits of yesterday's labor. The City Council, and under their enlightened leadership, the efforts of the management team and dedicated employees of Team RC, are focused on yielding results tomorrow. We focus on how services are changing and what our five year strategic service plans are for the future. Tremendous efforts are under way to modernize and imbue our General Plan, Development Code, and Municipal Code with a solid foundation and high degree of flexibility so we can thrive in the new "gig economy" and fast changing technological environment of the early 21st century. The Fiscal Year 2017/18 budget is one which aims to make key strategic investments, through things like the purchase of street lights, expansion of solar power, workforce reorganization, high-speed data infrastructure, and development and implementation of a fiber master plan, in those assets which will prove most profitable in the world we are building for tomorrow. Local Economic Forecast Meanwhile, even as we focus on tomorrow, staff remains mindful of where we have been and how far we have come. Over the last several years the City of Rancho has seen many changes. In the 2006-2008 time frame, the City was growing its retail and employment base, along with housing, at levels never before seen. With the advent of the Great Recession from 2008-2010, the City contracted significantly, saw significant drops in retail sales, property taxes, employment in the City, and a virtual cessation of new construction. As the Nation slowly recovered from the recession, the City also slowly began its recovery. But that recovery has been slow up until now. The Great Recession wiped away a tremendous amount of wealth. FY 2016/17 was the first year that sales tax and property tax exceeded the pre -Recession peak in FY 2007/08. Put another way, it has taken nine (9) years to recover what was lost in the recession, during which time utilities, contract costs and other fixed overhead costs have continued to rise. Last year we recognized fully that by virtually any economic measure, the recession had ended; jobs were growing, employment was up, wages were on the rise, and the economy was showing positive growth. This year, we see the "recapturing of lost gains" is finally over and the City is poised for greater success and new heights it has not reached before. With a low crime rate, excellent education system, and growing source of employment, the City was recently ranked among the Top 50 places in the United States to start a family. Rancho Cucamonga was also recently named as one of the 20 best cities in the U.S. to find a job in, coming in at #6 on the list just behind San Francisco. The job growth in the Inland Empire over the last year was 3.2%, the second highest rate of any county in the state of California. Translated more locally, in March of 2017, Rancho Cucamonga's unemployment rate decreased to 3.8%. Not only is anything below 5% considered full employment, but this rate is nearly 2/3 less than where we were at this time just five years earlier. It is expected that for the next five years the City will see similar or lower rates of unemployment. Statistically, the City is seeing year over year employment growth of almost 6%. Employment generated by firms in the City of Rancho Cucamonga increased by 23% from 2010 to 2015. The City itself has become a net jobs producer with the estimated growth in employment over the next five years anywhere between 30% and 45%. Put another way, in 2015 Rancho Cucamonga had just over 73,000 jobs in the City, and by 2020 we expect there to be at or above 88,000 jobs in the City. Fiscal Year 2017A8 Adopted Budget Page 5 Comparison of Unemployment Rates 12% 10.00% 10% 8.80% 8% I.rsO% 6.60% 6.70% 5.80% 6°% 5.00% 5.20% 4.30% 3.80% 4% 2% 0% March 2013 March 2014 March 2015 March 2016 March 2017 ■ County Unemployment ■ City Unemployment The jobs being generated by businesses in Rancho Cucamonga are well paying jobs as well. The average payroll per employee working for a business in the City amounted to $42,187 for 2015, some 13.7% ahead of where it was in 2011 (full and part time positions). Median annual household income in the City is nearly $60,000 per year. Some of the highest paying economic sectors in Rancho Cucamonga include Management Services ($72,384 annual salary), Wholesale Trade ($60,270), Finance/Insurance ($65,506) and Manufacturing and Professional Services (approximately $59,000). Currently, the strongest core economic sectors in the City that bring in money from outside the City are Manufacturing, Administrative Support, and Restaurant/Hotel, with the Retail Trade and Health Care as two of the top support sectors that primarily cater to residents located in the City. Manufacturing, Hotel/Restaurant, Transportation/Warehouse, and Retail Trade have been experiencing strong job growth over the last five years. Looking forward, the City has an approved Economic Development Strategic Plan that focuses on specific target industries where there is a nexus between existing Rancho Cucamonga assets and opportunities for strong future growth. These areas include the key sectors Manufacturing, Professional/Scientific and Technical Services, and Retail/Accommodation/Food Services. Retail/Accommodation/Food Services is the most logical and easily explainable given the City's substantial physical assets along Foothill Boulevard and at Victoria Gardens. Rancho Cucamonga has become the desired location for upscale hotels, shopping, and dining for the Inland Empire. This remains a focus area, however, as we continue to move our hotel, retail, and dining venues into ever more profitable margins, with a wider diversity of offerings to appeal to all consumers and a cornucopia of enjoyable experiences not offered anywhere else in the local area. Perhaps more interesting is the Manufacturing and Professional/Scientific and Technical Services. While we wait for the natural absorption of the glut of Class A and Class B office space in the Inland Empire (still at least two to three fiscal years out) which is fundamental to future growth in health care, social assistance, and other office type uses (also key sectors in our Economic Development Strategic Plan), we see opportunities now for growth in Manufacturing and Professional/Scientific and Technical Services. A recent comparative analysis of employment by sectors comparing Rancho Cucamonga to Irvine revealed some interesting insights. Irvine has increased shares of Manufacturing (3% higher) and Professional/Scientific/ Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 6 Technical Services (10%) compared to Rancho Cucamonga. Yet they are lower in terms retail and construction sectors by nearly 4% in each area. Looking overall at the two agencies, we can see how targeting the Manufacturing and Professional/Scientific and Technical Services sectors for growth will help to lower our dependence on construction (a lower paying industry highly dependent on growth) as well as ensure we don't become overly reliant on consumer retail which is also very cyclical in nature. Education is the best economic policy there is. Tony Blair The discussion of which employment sectors are key to Rancho Cucamonga's success in the future is not an idle one. It is extraordinarily relevant and tied to both education of the workforce and commuting patterns. The following two charts illustrate that point, and why Rancho Cucamonga is looking at the heart of Orange County for clues about the future direction of the heart of the Inland Empire Educational Attainment LA County Orange Inland Ventura County Empire County Less than high school diploma High school graduate Some college, no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Median Household Income RIVE 16f scbw of sugms M.W Adararstrairpr 21.9% 15.9% 20.4% 17.1 % 21.2% 17.3%a 26.8% 18.4% 19.2% 20.5% 25.1 % 23.6% 6.8% 7.6% 7.7% 8.2% 20.2% 25.1 % 12.9% 20.9% 10.7% 13.7% 7.2% 11.9% $59,134 $78,428 $56,048 $80,032 feW W cronoAt FW"* ( ih! D"e"Mom As the above chart illustrates, higher degrees of post graduate education are tied to increasing median household income. Further, as the next chart illustrates, as the City matures and increases opportunities in the employment sectors which better fit with our educated workforce, these changes will improve commuting patterns: Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 7 Live In... Work in LA OC RV SB VN LA 4,050,061 182,262 54,006 132,235 68,408 OC 178,536 1,195,005 71,355 34,568 1,052 RV 14,131 14,301 587,446 60,089 275 SB 55,014 12,369 92,082 550,372 378 VN 35,996 476 489 :1$49 296,273 Rest of CA 25,793 20,603 46,661 6,449 14,018 Total 4,359,531 1,425,016 852,039 784,362 380,404 Work in Home 92.9% 83.9% 68.9% 70.2% 77.9% County RIVERSI it Along these lines, the City will be aided by our partners at the Alta Loma School District, Central School District, Etiwanda School District, Cucamonga School District, Chaffey Joint Union High School District, and Chaffey Community College District who are working diligently to ensure that these organizations have solid foundations on which to accomplish their goals and objectives. One hallmark of a great city is a world -class educational system. Where strong schools thrive, property values are maintained and families desire to live and raise their children. We want to create a seamless transition from elementary to high school to higher education to the actual workplace for those individuals seeking careers in the target industries. Programs that are coordinated with our educational partners will help to develop employees for areas like health care, social assistance, professional, scientific, and technical services. Building the Community of Tomorrow Another way Rancho Cucamonga is creating economic success today, and tomorrow, is focusing on the core elements of a world class community. A recent study showed that Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials all share the common values of children and marriage. The difference is that Baby Boomers and Generation X typically placed them in the following order: 1) Marriage; 2) House; 3) Children and secondary was career. Millennials rank them equally: 1) Career; 1) Children and 1) Marriage. House does not appear on the list. As a result, only 13% of millennials own a home, and yet 81 % expected that by now they would own a home. Cost is certainly a factor. With standard loans requiring 10% down, and FHA loan limits for San Bernardino County now sitting at $379,500, the prospect of owning a home in Rancho Cucamonga is increasingly remote for most millennials. Add to that the fact that millennials have a strong desire to be near community and urban activities, and prefer resort -like amenities in their living environments with close proximity to employment centers that offer maximum job flexibility, and Rancho Cucamonga faces a challenge in attracting some of its desired economic sectors when the employees most likely to work in those sectors are unable or unwilling to live here. These macroeconomic trends are driving a huge shift towards rental housing, particularly in more urban and coastal environments in Los Angeles and Orange Counties. Accordingly, the City is looking to create the community amenities, including housing, which will be attractive to millennials, thereby creating a more full spectrum of housing options for all generations. New projects that provide options on the rental and for sale side are all being considered, reviewed, and, in many cases, approved. In all cases, these projects include those typical urban resort like amenities, public gathering spaces, 3rd place spaces, highly designed Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 8 landscape and architectural aesthetics, and walkable, pedestrian -friendly safe communities with nearby dining, retail and service establishments that cater to this demographic. Examples highlighted later in this transmittal rneeaoge include new residential projects at East Avenue and Foothill Bou|8v8nd, Hermosa Avenue and Foothill Bou|evand, Haven Avenue and Church Straat, and, of course, the master planned community of Empire Lakes. New retail and food service offerings include Haven City Market, the City'8 ever expanding "Brew Mile" or local breweries, and Punch Bowl Social which recently opened at Victoria Gardens replacing Toby Keith's. New leisure opportunities include the Citv'a recently opened Los Amigos F,ark, the upcoming Sports Center on Rochester and the recently approved (and soon to begin construction) GOALS soccer complex at the Epicenter. By creating and combining the components which make up the environment where Mi||annia|oincreasingly choose tolive, the City iocreating acommunity which will attract these younger buyers and renters from the coastal mnaae where they are currently choosing tmreside. SOUTHERN CALIFORNM- NEW SINGLE -FAM I LY HOMES BY GEOGRAPHIC AREAS 50.000 45,000 durtng the Housing Bubble 40,000 35,000 25,000 Urbarmedkeasys the Wand Areas 15,000 10,000 Urbanized —inland Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 9 SOU I HLRN CALIWRNIk NEW APARTMENTS BY GEOGRAPHIC AREA NeW apnnMnti in Mn tar' anaedArea attantd a new peak WOvei .� 11-d V Rancho Cucamonga remains below its historic pricing high points of the early 2000's, and offers relative affordability versus the Los Angeles and Orange County region. COMPARISON OF HOUSING PRICE TRENDS SINCE 2000 RANCHO CUCAMONGA VERSUS LOS ANGELES - ORANGE COUNTY REGION 180% 160% 140% 120 % 100% 80% 601A 40% 20'% __......... 1( 0% o o c c ■ LA-OC Region Rancho Cucamonga _.. _... 194%._ _ _. _..._ ........ _.. As growth in employment drives housing demand, the City is looking to offer a full spectrum of choices to would be buyers and lure more would be buyers from the urban and coastal areas. Because of our high employment, and relatively built -out status, the City will not be able to meet the demand for new housing; however, this same dynamic will help ensure that real estate in the City remains a strong commodity for years to come. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page io CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA: CUMULATIVE CHANGE IN EMPLOYMENT AND HOUSING DEMAND -SUPPLY SINCE 2000 80,000 70,000 J 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 -10,000 20,000 0°o,f`� ,e'` -+--Employment Growth since 2000 -*-Potential Household Demand Growth since 2000 Potential Building Permit Supply Growth since 2000 -*-Cumulative Supply minus Demand since 2000 In the Inland Empire rental market, Rancho Cucamonga already has the highest rents and lowest vacancy rate of any community. Inland Empire Apartment Market Qi-05 to q4-16 1,300 !rl 1,100 ry 1,000 900 $00 Cr a 3 C8 2�a3aa RIVERM CAost of Rent —vacancy Rate 9 Submarket 7 6 North Ontario 5 4 Upland 3 > Victorville 2 1 South Ontario/Chino 0 Rancho Cucamonga Fontana/Rialto San Bernardino Cost of Rent Vacancy Rate YOY YOY Q4-16 Growth Q4-16 Change ts1 t°%a� 4�} (P.P.) 1,389 9.2 3.4 0.4 1,282 7.8 1.9 -1.0 917 5.2 2.9 -0.2 1,544 2.4 49 -1.4 1,581 2.3 1.6 -0.5 1,117 2.2 2.2 -0.5 9515,_"J-0 1.4 -0.4 With these new buyers, and a community designed for higher levels of education and aspiration will also come the employment sectors and employers the City is targeting for future growth. Recently, Rancho Cucamonga was ranked one of the top 50 places in the nation to start a family. This ranking was based on the local educational system, median household income versus Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page ii average cost of initial home purchase, crime statistics and the population of young families in the area. Our goal is to improve even more in those rankings over the next five (5) years. The City's efforts in this regard, however, do not take place in a vacuum. Solar RC Expansion Project Like any business, the City has its Energy Costs Without Solar vs. With Solar challenges with sustaining growth in FY 2017/18 Savings: $129,409 future market shares. Some of those challenges include growth in fixed costs. As an example, natural gas rates have $700,000 increased 55% over the past year. $Smwo Utilities are some of our biggest fixed costs to operate facilities. In order to $3MOW prudently oversee your tax dollars, the $100,01w City Council has directed staff to explore Energy Costs without Solar Energy costs With solar opportunities to reduce fixed costs ■Energy Costs ■Debt Repayment whenever possible. This is why Rancho Cucamonga has invested in Solar RC. In addition to a solar parking canopy on the north parking lot at City Hall, as well as solar panels on the Public Works Administration Building (which offset approximately 80% of the electricity costs), Solar RC was expanded during FY 2015/16 to include solar installations at Central Park, the Epicenter, the Animal Center, and the Banyan and Day Creek Fire Stations. Future expansions include additional panels at the Corporate Yard, Red Hill Park and potentially the east Civic Center parking lot. As illustrated by the graphic above, investments in solar infrastructure projects are continuing to yield net budget savings during this second full year of operations, and will only grow in the ensuing years. Over the last five years, water rates charged to the City have City of Rancho Cucamonga risen an average (tiered rate Annual Water Consumption 2013 vs. 2016 and fixed bi-monthly service Amounts Shown in Hundred Cubic Feet charges) of 32%. At the 1,200,000 direction of the City Council, 961,781 1,044,000 to demonstrate leadership during the recently concluded 8K000 693,651 statewide drought as well as MOW minimize impacts on services 4o4004 to residents, the City staff were challenged with finding 204,400 substantial ways to reduce 0 water use. Although the issue 62413 82416 locally was more a regulatory compliance matter with the State Water Board directives than an overall supply concern, the City nevertheless reduced its water consumption by a tremendous 28% across all accounts. We received $299,200 in turf removal rebate funds over the last several years, and spent over $1 million to convert grass medians, side panels, unused or under-utilized grass areas in the parks and paseos to mulch, cobble, decomposed granite and drought tolerant plants. This work occurred in every area of the City - north, south, east, and west - with the primary activity occurring in LIVID 4R and LIVID 2 as both these areas have sufficient reserves which helped provide initial capital funding for drought tolerant conversions. Most recently, the City finished removing over 75% of the grass at the Civic Center and replacing it with drought tolerant plants. One of the big projects which will help further with water conservation is the replacement of the City's 15+ year old Calsense irrigation system (citywide) with a newer, Internet based, irrigation system. The new system will enable greater Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 12 savings through more precise controls that can be easily changed remotely over the Internet. These continued efforts are important because they create more sustainable long term budgets, reduce cost increases to rate payers, and ensure there is sufficient water to accommodate future growth. Times of transition are strenuous, but I love them. They are an opportunity to purge, rethink priorities, and be intentional about new habits. We can make our new normal any way we want. Kristin Armstrong, 2-time Olympic Medalist and professional road bike racer Rancho Cucamonga is seeing positive economic growth and the most new development and business activity since FY 2006/07. We cannot, however, be laissez-faire about growth solving our problems. Fiscal restraint is key as we transition to a new era of modest economic growth and equally robust cost increases where there is no public appetite for tax increases regardless of reason or amount. It is important that Rancho Cucamonga not balance its budget using one- time growth in development revenues (which are not sustainable) for ongoing costs (like personnel). Maintaining a conservative approach to a balanced budget based on sustainable revenues is fundamental. Continued economic development and growth is also critical to the future of Rancho Cucamonga. As a low -property tax City, which incorporated after Prop 13, Rancho Cucamonga receives approximately 50-66% less comparable property tax than our neighboring jurisdictions. As a result, economic development has always been of primary importance to the City in sustaining our excellent public services and facilities. As we approach buildout, it becomes ever more critical to ensure that each remaining project contributes more revenue to the overall City than it consumes in services and costs. FY 2017118 Budget Changes Change is Inevitable in life, but growth is optional. Growth involves risk, moving from the known to the unknown. True growth rarely occurs by chance, it is the intentional result of greater forces working together. Every budget is in one sense a snapshot in time; a representation of the organization as it exists when that budget was prepared. Unlike a snapshot, which is a static item, fixed in time that never changes, a municipal budget is an organic document. As bills are paid, revenues received, and projects begin, the fiscal year budgets change. Typically those changes occur within a certain fixed corridor or range and, accordingly, the City Council is updated every quarter on those changes. As those changes add up to increasing levels of significance, the City Council receives a twice a year (mid -year and year-end) compilation of budget changes (revenues and expenditures) for review and approval. Just like a Mobius strip, the end of each budget cycle is the beginning of the next cycle and the process continues on once more. The aforementioned comparison is important for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, because the City does not follow zero based budgeting, the budget cycle provides the context within which each year's changes can be understood, and compared to prior years' budgets. Further, most governmental agencies typically change incrementally, and the budget cycle displays that incremental change clearly. Lastly, many of the City Council goals cannot be accomplished within a single given year. Accordingly, those goals are carried over into the following years until complete, and only in the context of the budget cycle, including available funds and personnel, can one see the progress toward those goals. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 13 For FY 2017/18 the top priorities which this budget focuses on include: o Implementation of the 2015 Economic Development Strategic Plan including a focus on southern Rancho Cucamonga with the construction of Empire Lakes Specific Plan, development of the 4th Street and Haven Avenue corridors, and revitalization of our logistics sector o Focus on critical infrastructure projects such as the Street Light purchase, Fiber Master Plan Phase I, and numerous street and road related infrastructure projects o Improvements to public safety and critical community services o Continued development of technology and workforce reorganization The balance of this budget message will focus on each of these priorities in more detail. Specific examples of objectives in each area will be included. These priorities were carefully developed to be consistent with the City Council Goals including: • PUBLIC SAFETY — Proactively develop public safety programs and facilities to meet community needs. • PARKS AND RECREATION DEVELOPMENT— Proceed with planning and development of major parks and recreational projects. • ENHANCING PREMIER COMMUNITY STATUS —As the community matures, undertake programs and projects to enhance Rancho Cucamonga's position as the premier community in our region. • MID AND LONG RANGE PLANNING —Develop mid -range and long-term goals and vision for the City. While we diligently prioritize and plan for the future, some elements of our budget are outside the City's direct control, such as political and policy shifts at the state and federal level. As of this writing, the current proposed federal budget for FY 2017/18 proposed to eliminate most social service and safety net programs including CDBG, Home, SNAP, TANF, IMLS, and NEA. The City has utilized many of these programs to provide services to residents. Of these, the largest is CDBG which is utilized for many programs that help low income residents and seniors. During Fiscal Year 2016/17, the City was allocated $817,218 in funding through the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). This funding, along with rollover funding from prior years, is used to fund various programs which benefit the community as well as fund supporting staff for these programs. For FY 2017/18, CDBG is anticipated to fund 4.13 full-time positions and one part-time position equal to 0.2 FTE. If the funding is eliminated for the programs, the City would eliminate the positions that provide those programs as there would be no more programs to administer. Some personnel, however, may be eligible to move into other vacancies, if they are qualified, interested, and to the extent there are vacancies at the time the programs are ended. The City has also received funding from the National Endowment for the Arts for the Library's Big Read program. The grant funding was used for program supplies and performers and speakers to bring the featured book to life. No staffing was funded by this grant. In anticipation of funding not recurring, the Big Read program has not been rebudgeted for FY 2017/18. In the past, the City has also utilized IMLS and NEA funds for cultural services programs for children and schools. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 14 In the coming months, we will be carefully monitoring the federal budget proposals and be prepared to adjust our budget as necessary once the final federal budget is adopted. Economic Development If we learn anything from the history of economic development, it is that culture makes all the difference. David Landes As a low -property tax City, which incorporated after Prop 13, Rancho Cucamonga receives approximately 50-66% less comparable property tax than our neighboring jurisdictions. As a result, economic development has always been of primary importance to the City in sustaining our excellent public services and facilities. As we approach buildout, it becomes ever more critical to ensure that each remaining project contributes more revenue to the overall City than it consumes in services and costs. At the same time, an old Chinese proverb says that a wise man adapts himself to circumstances as water shapes itself to the vessel that contains it. Rancho Cucamonga is primarily built out and businesses that require large facilities, like logistics and others, will more likely locate in Ontario and Fontana in the future, due to their large areas of undeveloped land. Counterweighting this trend, however, is continuing growth in technology which is driving innovation and contributing to the current economic growth. Rancho Cucamonga is adapting to this change and trying to create the foundation for even greater future economic growth. The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an approved Economic Development Strategic Plan that identifies five target industries. These target industries are: 1. Health Care and Social Assistance; 2. Transportation, Warehousing, and Wholesale Trade; 3. Retail, Accommodation/Food Services; 4. Manufacturing; and 5. Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services. Staff is working hard to attract businesses in these five target industries. Part of that work involves creating the conditions locally which result in the desired business climate, physical environment and community amenities which are attractive to these businesses. Key to that work are current efforts under way to modernize our Development Code, and to create housing and other amenities for prospective employees. The results are beginning to be seen, and here are just a few examples of the activity, innovation and growth occurring at the local level: • Hotel development is booming in Rancho Cucamonga: o A Fairfield Inn and Suites will soon be located on the west side of Pittsburgh Avenue north of 41" Street. This four story hotel will have 105 rooms and is expected to be completed by the fall of 2017. o A Marriott Residence Inn is under construction at the southeast corner of Haven Avenue and 6th Street. The four story hotel will have 126 rooms plus a pad for a future office building. Grading and underground utility installation have begun and completion is expected by the spring of 2018. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 15 o A 108 room Hampton Inn and Suites, which will replace an existing Carrows Restaurant on the southeast corner of Foothill Boulevard and Mayten Avenue, is expected to begin grading by the fall of 2017. o A mixed use project by DR Horton featuring 300+ residential units, several restaurants, and a small 71 room boutique hotel at the southwest corner of Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard is currently going through the entitlement process. o Finally, two more five story hotels of 115 rooms each along with a restaurant building have been tentatively proposed for the northeast corner of Haven Avenue and 4th Street. • New supermarkets are coming to Rancho Cucamonga: o Earlier this year Aldi, a division of Trader Joe's focused on convenience and low prices, opened on Foothill Boulevard adjacent to Barnes and Noble in the Terra Vista Shopping Center. o Recently a second Sprouts location that is over 35,000 square feet opened in the old Alpha Beta location at the southeast corner of 19t' Street and Carnelian Street. This provides the first new supermarket on the west end of town in many years and shows the growing importance of fresh and healthy foods in the City. o Albertson's re -occupied their former location at Vineyard Avenue and Foothill Boulevard after the disastrous, and quickly ended, debut of Haggen in California. o A new Stater Bros. supermarket is under construction at the northwest corner of Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard. With a total building area of 100,135 square feet, the project will include a 15,207 square foot CVS and two drive through restaurants in addition to the supermarket. Expanded housing opportunities are under construction or going through entitlement: o The Empire Lakes project was approved last year to replace a financially failing 160-acre golf course with up to 3,450 new single and multi -family homes, including for sale and rent, attached, and detached. The development is transit oriented, walkable, and urban in scale and feel with 120,000 square feet mixed use non- residential between 4th Street and 6th Street and another 100,000 square feet of mixed use non-residential between 6th Street and the Metrolink Station. Expected selling prices are between $300,000 and into the high $400,000 range, and rents are expected between $1,500 and $2,000 per month. Units are targeted towards seniors seeking move down housing and desiring smaller properties which are one story or elevator served, first time housing buyers such as single urban professionals seeking entry level housing, and two -income married couples just starting out. This exciting development, a first of its kind for the Inland Empire, should help draw new employers whose work force fits this target demographic. Grading will begin in the summer of 2017 with the first units expected to go on sale in late spring of 2018. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 16 o A separate, but equally exciting project, is in the discussion phases for the Metrolink Station, where the City is working with SANBAG on the development of a transit -oriented mixed use project. Creative Housing Associates is the developer for the project and has extensive experience in residential and commercial mixed use developments. They have partnered with Abode Housing which provides workforce housing options and Laemmle Theaters. Staff is in the middle of an Exclusive Negotiation Agreement between the City, SANBAG, and Creative Housing Associates for the development of the site. o A 182 unit mixed use multi -story housing project known as the Vintner is currently under construction at the northeast corner of Hermosa Avenue and Foothill Boulevard. o A 193 unit mixed use multi -story housing project has been approved for the northwest corner of East Avenue and Foothill Boulevard. o A 200+ unit mixed use project is going through the entitlement process for Haven Avenue and 26t" Street. o A 140 unit mixed use residential project is going through the entitlement process for the southeast corner of Etiwanda Avenue and Foothill Boulevard. o Villa Pacifica, located on Base Line Road behind the Archibald Library, will be expanding their senior community to add an additional 60 units for low income seniors. Construction will begin in the 31d quarter of 2017. o Merrill Gardens, located on Highland Avenue, east of Archibald Avenue, is under construction with 112 residential units for seniors. o A 92 unit senior assisted living residential facility has been approved for the southwest corner of Church Street and Haven Avenue. Construction is expected to begin in the 3Id quarter of 2017. • Restaurant development throughout the City is in full swing: o Victoria Gardens is working on several new fast casual and casual dining locations to be occupied over the next six months. Recently opened locations include Blaze Pizza and Jacks Urban Eats. State, a restaurant focusing on American cuisine, craft beer, and whiskey, will open shortly behind TGI Fridays. Punch Bowl Social, featuring a scratch menu plus music, a full bar and classic games recently opened at the old Toby Keith's as well. o Further west on Foothill Boulevard, a new Shogun restaurant will be opening at Rochester and Foothill in the summer of 2017. The prior location of On The Border has been replaced with a Stonefire Grill which will open in June 2017. And the old China Buffet has been replaced with a Cafe Rio, Jersey Mike's, Tokyo Joe's, and Habit Burger. o Construction is nearing completion for several additional businesses in the Vons/Trader Joe's shopping center at Haven Avenue and the 210 freeway. One of the first stores expected to open is Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf. In addition, a Mod Pizza will be opening as well, bringing this older center to full occupancy. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 17 o The Haven City Market located on Haven Avenue, south of Civic Center Drive, on the site of the former JC Penney outlet is over 50% leased and currently halfway through their tenant improvement project. This 85,600 square foot space will house a large market, farmer's market type vendors, gourmet food shops, retail spaces, a large assembly area inside, and a courtyard outdoors for drinking and dining located on the south side of the building. This project will provide a unique gathering spot, similar to the Anaheim Packing House, and will be centrally located to the mixed use projects on Foothill Boulevard as well as Haven Avenue and 6th Street. It is expected to open in the fall of 2017. • Expanded recreational opportunities are coming soon: o The City of Rancho Cucamonga is under construction on a new Sports Center on the east side of Rochester Avenue, across from Quakes Stadium featuring over 35,000 square feet of indoor multi -purpose recreational space and over 21,000 square feet of outdoor sheltered recreational space. This facility will enhance the basketball, volleyball, and similar recreational opportunities in the City. o The GOALS soccer complex lease featuring 10-12 small sided synthetic soccer fields and a restaurant/clubhouse area at the Epicenter Adult Sports Complex, which will provide additional recreational options for City residents, has broken ground and should be completed by the spring of 2018. Advanced Manufacturing and corporate offices are growing in Rancho Cucamonga: o An advanced manufacturing facility known as XT Green which recycles used carpet will be opening in 2017 in the City. o Tekton opened recently in the City of Rancho Cucamonga which specializes in making custom furniture for major hotel chains. o Phos Chek is an advanced chemical manufacturing facility that makes fire retardant for use in fighting wildland fires. o Evolution Fresh, a division of Starbucks, has an advanced cold pasteurizing juice facility in Rancho Cucamonga that supplies the western United States. o Inland Empire Health Plan is located in Rancho Cucamonga, employing over 5,000 people at their location on 6th Street. o Arrowhead Credit Union will be moving their corporate offices to Haven Avenue joining other locations like Falken Tire/Sumitomo which are already in place. Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. Thomas Edison All of the aforementioned developments help support the strategies contained in the City's Economic Development Strategic Plan approved in March 2015. The Strategic Plan took into account the loss of redevelopment, while recognizing both the changing nature of the marketplace as well as the City's transition to an in -fill and more urban community. In this global marketplace in which we all live, competition is less about trying to do everything better than your neighbor, and more about finding those unique niches and opportunities where we each excel. One of the Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 18 emerging regions in San Bernardino County is the Western Inland Empire, which encompasses Fontana, Rancho Cucamonga, Ontario, Upland, Montclair, Chino, and Chino Hills. The City's Economic Development Plan takes this regional approach and capitalizes on Rancho Cucamonga's unique opportunities to highlight its diverse assets including its own municipal utility, a wide variety of newer housing stock, excellent school systems, outstanding shopping and dining opportunities, and good access to freeways, railroad corridors and a neighboring airport. Additionally, the City is working on new entry level home ownership and rental opportunities in a variety of urban and suburban settings in multiple price points and within walking distance to key retail locations, along with new retail and experience -based retail/food service sectors, to create the kind of community amenities desired by the employees of these prospective target industries. In short, the City is aiming to appeal to both employers and employees as an ideal place to [re]locate. Infrastructure Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure... than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat. Theodore Roosevelt At this point in its history, Rancho Cucamonga is clearly a primarily built out community. The remaining undeveloped lots are largely less than ten acres and most are surrounded on one or more sides by existing development. Why were these lots not developed earlier? In some cases there were unwilling property owners, in other cases it was economically infeasible; the lots may have unique infrastructure or configuration challenges, and in still other cases it was held for future, higher and better investment opportunities. As these remaining sites are slowly developed, each project reminds us that the City is also transitioning in terms of infrastructure. As the City gets ready to celebrate its 40th Anniversary of incorporation, some of our earliest infrastructure is 30+ years old and may be needing refurbishment, replacement, or additional maintenance. A good example of this is the parks and landscaping on the west side of town, most of which were built in the 1980's with the Park District 85 (PD 85) bond, a form of Mello Roos, that was paid off in 2005. With proper maintenance, many of these original improvements have lasted 20+ years but, no different than the roof on your house or the carpet/flooring, the lights and pathways, fencing and bridges, and other improvements are now reaching the end of their life and will need to be replaced. Without a new source of funding (similar to the original PD 85 bond) these improvements will eventually deteriorate or facilities will need to be disposed of. Currently, the West Side Oversight Committee is working with City staff and the City Council to review all west side landscape expenditures and help communicate these pressing concerns to the residents in the affected areas. Some of the needed repair/replacement items that would be addressed, if funding were available, include: a) additional field renovation; b) playground resurfacing; c) pathway lighting replacement; d) shade shelter wood replacement; e) steel fence repair and replacement; e) additional security camera installations; f) pathway resurfacing/replacement; g) bridge replacement; and h) ball field light and pole replacement. Residents interested in assisting in communication and outreach effort are urged to contact the West Side Oversight Committee. For other yet -to -be -built infrastructure, the question becomes whether the remaining increments of development will be sufficient to help fund the remaining projects and/or whether the originally forecast needs and infrastructure still make sense based on the actual pattern of development 30 years later. At the same time, some new facilities are coming to fruition that will require their own level of maintenance to ensure they are in quality condition for years to come. The great challenge for the City is to properly fund both maintenance and repair of existing facilities while continuing to build out the remaining community facilities necessary to serve a resident base of 175,000 — 200,000 people. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 19 Rancho Cucamonga is fortunate because most infrastructure projects are funded by the reserves (General Fund and Special Funds) which have been set aside over the years to ensure the City was able to meet future obligations. These long term planning efforts were challenged in 2012 when the State of California eliminated Redevelopment, seizing $197,000,000 in reserves the City had carefully saved up over 25 years to cover both maintenance and repair as well as construction of future facilities. When the current economic recovery first began, the City Council challenged staff to start replacing those reserves. The FY 2013/14 budget represented the first budget in the City's history in which $508,680 was specifically budgeted to go into General Fund reserves, with the goal of eventually budgeting $1 million annually in reserve contributions. The following is a summary of those budgeted contributions since that time, including this year's final budget recommendation: Budgeted General Fund Fiscal Year Reserve Contribution 2013/14 $ 508,680 2014/15 $ 607,480 2015/16 $ 700,000 2016/17 $1,000,000 2017/18 $1,025,000 Even beyond infrastructure reserves, the City must set aside funds to pay for vehicle replacement, new vehicle purchases, technology replacement, new technology purchases, as well as regular maintenance of facilities including painting, carpet, landscaping, roofing, and office furniture. Failure to do so, as some agencies have experienced, results in a need to choose between operating funds for utilities or personnel versus replacement and repair of the items noted above. Rancho Cucamonga is well managed under a fiscally conservative City Council and has a long history of continuing to also set additional funds aside for the items noted above. These practices have been challenged as the City finds the pace of repairs accelerating (result of natural aging), the pace of technology accelerating, and the need to ensure the various special district and funds (like landscape districts) remain self-sustaining without undue reliance on the General Fund. The City will never truly replace the Redevelopment reserves; however, it is a positive sign that the City has begun the process of rebuilding them and remains committed year after year. Without the reserves, the City would not have the funding needed to pay for critical repair and maintenance of existing infrastructure, as well as the development of new infrastructure. The following are just some of the key infrastructure projects for FY 2017/18: • Construction of a $2 million Phase 1 of a Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optic Network to provide for a Public -Private partnership involving high speed broadband access to maximize economic development and attract new businesses to the City's aging logistics area. This project is designed to pay for itself and ultimately provide a new source of operating revenue to the City. Replacement of the leased Family Sports Center with the City's own Gymnasium on the east side of Rochester, just opposite of Quakes Stadium. This $13.14 million project is under construction presently and estimated to be complete in the spring of 2018. The Sports Center relocation will include 3 indoor courts and ancillary space totaling 35,000 square feet as well as 3 new outdoor sheltered courts totaling 21,600 square feet. It will serve over 130,000 visitors per year. This new facility will be better designed for the designated activities without the compromises inherent in using an old retail (Gemco) building and better parked for these highly used programs which accommodate more than 100,000 users each year. In addition, the new facility will use less water and electricity, and it will save the City more than $300,000 in rental payments each year that would have been paid if the City had otherwise been forced to take over the current lease, which was reaching the end of its time period and had been previously paid for by Redevelopment. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 20 • Installation of the $3.9 million Cucamonga Storm Drain Upper Phase 3 on Amethyst from Base Line Road to 19th Street which will improve drainage, enhance traffic circulation, improve pedestrian safety and remove private properties from a flood zone. • The $724,000 undergrounding of overhead utilities along Arrow Route from Bear Gulch to west of Archibald Avenue and $559,000 in similar undergrounding along Base Line Road from Carnelian Street to Archibald Avenue. • $389,500 for replacement of the failing air -wall at Celebration Hall in the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center. These movable walls allow for maximum flexibility and rental use of the facility. • Construction of a new $2.1 million Public Works Services Warehouse at the Corporate Yard. This facility will provide for an indoor workshop for facilities staff for the first time, eliminate leased and unsecure outside storage containers, provide a permanent home for the Animal Center Kitten Nursery, and provide additional solar power to help offset energy use for the entire Corporate Yard. • $725,000 in green bike lanes and bicycle safety enhancements citywide, and another $621,160 in funding for a Class 1 Bike Trail in Southwest Cucamonga, funded from Air Quality Improvement funds. • The purchase of all city street lights from Southern California Edison at a cost of $9.7 million, funded primarily by the street light maintenance districts, and retrofit of those same lights to LED at a cost of $4.1 million. Together, these changes will save $1.5 million per year and reduce the current General Fund subsidy, allowing more funds to be focused on critical public safety needs. • $440,000 for LMD 4R water conservation and landscape renovation projects throughout LMD 4R. These projects reduce water use, reduce landscape maintenance and minimize future rate increases. They are funded from existing rates and reserves in districts, like LMD 4, with adequate revenue to cover the cost of the initial capital improvements. • $600,000 ($500,000 from General Fund monies and $100,000 from Measure I funding) in spending is recommended for concrete replacement, which stood at $200,000 (Measure I funding) in FY 2012/13. These funds will help ensure the City not only stays on top, but starts to get ahead of, replacement of aging sidewalk infrastructure. • $133,800 is included in the Capital Improvement Project budget to fill missing pieces of sidewalk, which the City cataloged over the last several years. • $575,000 is budgeted for the tree maintenance contract, which was increased from $300,000 in FY 2012/13. This will help provide for increased trimming frequency for our significant, mature, and expensive urban forest, which has been particularly hit hard in recent years by the drought, disease and insects. • $100,000 in new or upgraded ADA ramps citywide. Additional funds will be spent wherever street resurfacing projects are completed to bring the ramps in those areas up to current ADA specification. • $538,000 in funding for the design of Etiwanda Creek Park, Phase II expansion to add additional multi -purpose fields on land already owned by the City. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 21 • Over $1 million in funding for new traffic signals, $140,000 in signal upgrades, $320,000 in traffic signal synchronization funding and $650,000 in funds to upgrade existing signals into the City's Intelligent Transportation System. In terms of infrastructure, the single largest infrastructure component the City is responsible for is the network of streets inside our incorporated boundaries. Traditionally, these streets have been largely maintained by all local governments using gas tax revenues. Over the last 10 years, the State has taken already complicated formulas regarding gas tax revenues and added more complexity by diverting and rebalancing what monies went to whom, when and for what. The net result of all these changes has been the continual gradual decline of gas tax revenues to all local agencies. In recent years, however, this gradual decline has become a headlong rush downward thanks to new federal regulations which mandate increased fuel economy and the rise of hybrids, electrics and CNG powered vehicles (which pay little or no Gas Tax). This is highly problematic for all local agencies because Gas Tax had been the primary road infrastructure funding source, thus freeing up many cities' General Fund revenues to focus on public safety. For FY 2017/18, Gas Tax revenues are estimated at $4,880,310 more than the prior year, for the first time reaching over $4 million since FY 2012/13. Think about that: Despite increasing traffic, heavier vehicles, and more miles per car, the City will just now begin receiving revenue equal to what it was receiving a five full years ago. This lack of dedicated revenue for street and road repair is one reason that local streets and roads have been in severe decline, statewide, over the last half -decade. Revenues are estimated to grow by another $2,070,000 per year in FY 2018/19. This is a result of the Governor signing SB 1, which will increase the diesel excise tax, diesel sales tax and gasoline excise tax on November 1, 2017. The bill will also increase Pavement Management PCI vehicle 90 registration 85 costs on s0 -- -- • — — — — .. _ _ January 1, 75 ---- ---- 70 2018 and ._ , 65 Impose a 60 $100 per PCI Thresholds & Treotments Assigned 55 50 year Zero 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 Emission Vehicle fee on July 1, 2020. These _ _Citywide — Arterial -----Secondary funds will be split between the State and Collector—indumial -----local counties/cities, with $15 billion going to local road repairs. Rancho Cucamonga's goal is to maintain our local streets at no less than a 79% Pavement Condition Index (PCI) and to make progress toward a goal of an 85% level. While the increases in Gas Tax revenues anticipated as a result of SB 1 will help us move closer to our initial goal of a 79% PCI over the next ten years, there is still a funding gap in reaching the overall goal. In general, California roads are at 66% PCI level currently and are continuing to decline each year. Based upon the 2016 data, Rancho Cucamonga's combined PCI is 73% with local streets at 71 %. For FY 2017/18, Rancho Cucamonga will be utilizing $3,115,000 in estimated Gas Tax revenues and fund balance, along with $2,649,000 in estimated Measure I revenues, $3,945,000 in estimated Citywide Infrastructure Improvement Fund revenues and fund balance, and $500,000 in General Fund revenues for local streets overlay and slurry seal programs; sidewalk and ramp Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 22 improvements; and transportation related infrastructure projects. Some of the projects in this $10 million plus total include: Foothill Boulevard from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue pavement rehabilitation; Hermosa Avenue from Arrow Route to Foothill Boulevard pavement rehabilitation; • Cucamonga Storm Drain funding for the pavement rehabilitation of Amethyst Street from Base Line Road to 19th Street; Local street overlay and slurry seals; • Jersey Street from Haven Avenue to Rochester Avenue pavement rehabilitation; 6th Street from Milliken Avenue to Charles Smith Avenue pavement rehabilitation; • Hermosa Avenue from north of Foothill Boulevard to Church Street widening and pavement rehabilitation; and • Annual ADA improvements. The City completed its Fiber Optic Broadband Master Plan in May of 2017 in which a business plan was devised to incorporate the City's existing utility, IT, and traffic fiber conduits along with a public/private partnership to provide high speed broadband gigabit service to Rancho Cucamonga. Presently, the City has 25 miles of existing underground conduit, along with an existing 39 miles of traffic conduit, which incorporates a very large infrastructure footprint in the City. The current demand for high speed broadband and connectivity is high and the Internet of Things era has arrived. However, the existing telecom providers have not been meeting this demand. The Master Plan showed that the opportunity to form a gigabit broadband utility is important not only in positioning the City for future economic development, but to attract businesses and commerce into the City. The proposed Master Plan will incorporate a six year - $12 million capital investment plan in which the conduit gaps between the City and traffic conduits will be connected along with a fiber conduit infrastructure expansion of 50 additional miles to key strategic areas throughout the City. In addition, the transit -oriented development of the former Empire Lakes property will be the first planned gigabit community development in the City. We are currently in the Phase 2 development where an RFP has been issued for a private broadband provider to partner up with the City in this venture. Some of the leading public agencies in the United States are working on, or already have, similar Fiber Master Plans. The end result improves property values and desirability for residents, accelerates economic development for high tech businesses, and provides direct and indirect revenues to the City from the buildout of the infrastructure. Public Safety/Community Services Success is walking from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm. Winston Churchill No retreat, baby, No surrender. Bruce Springsteen Along with strengthening reserves to ensure that equipment, vehicles and infrastructure can be replaced when necessary, the City has worked toward shedding the last of the recessionary budget balancing practices which were used as limited time measures to minimize service impacts. For FY 2016/17, the Police Department line item of Projected Budget Savings, which at one time was as high as $500,000, has been reduced to just over $300,000. Originally anticipated to be eliminated this fiscal year, it remains in place because of additional positions added to the Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 23 department. Our long term goal has for many years been to keep deputy to citizen staffing ratios stable. Last year the City committed to add (1) new Sheriff Service Specialist and (4) new deputies, (3) of which were partially grant funded. Although the City did not receive any COPS grant funding, additional funds were budgeted this fiscal year to fully fund all 4 positions, an additional cost increase of nearly $1 million. Further, the City is adding an additional (1) sergeant position and (1) Sheriff Service Specialist position at a total cost of nearly $375,000. Although we would like to add several more deputies, corporal/detectives and another sergeant, the increases in salary and retirement costs for the sworn personnel added nearly $2 million to the base contract costs. With additional raises and retirement costs in FY 2018/19, the City is expecting cost increases between $2 million and $3 million in the base contract alone. For FY 2017/18, total law enforcement costs will exceed $37 million, more than at any point in the City's history. The City is also committed to improving its public safety services by making quantum leaps forward through the implementation of technology to serve as a force multiplier for our public safety personnel. The FY 2017/18 budget continues the City's long-term investments in Automated License Plate Readers (ALPRs), Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) cameras, and other new technologies such as the Internet of Things and GIS applications to track and map trends in real time. For example, ALPRs now line the 210 and 15 freeways on/off ramps and are in place along 41h Street, to be extended along our western border with Upland. This technology is increasingly being used to not only solve crimes but proactively catch wanted felons or recover stolen vehicles. The PSVN system is expanding exponentially, from its original genesis to protect the Victoria Gardens Mall to what will soon be an adjunct to many of our intersection traffic cameras as well as the integration of many other public and private systems including our educational partners and even private residents. Multiplying the power of the camera technology is new software that allows expedited review of hours of footage in mere minutes. Public safety has always been the City Council's highest priority and remains so today. This is one of the reasons why, even with "realignment" and the State pushing inmates out of state prison and into county jails, along with Prop 47 which decriminalized many drug offenses and non-violent felonies to lower level misdemeanors (thus incentivizing those crimes for future criminals who recognize the punishments are now much less severe), the City saw its Part II crimes decrease to fewer than 8,000 (below the 2014 levels) while its Part I crimes decreased to fewer than 4,000, also below 2014 levels. Overall, response times generally stayed equal to 2015 at 4.2 minutes for emergency and critical calls. More information on calls and response times for 2016 are available at https:Hperformance.citvofrc.us/. Still, the City desires to do better. We are increasing funding for our part-time Park Rangers to add one additional 25 hour per week position to the existing two part-time positions. Last year the Park Rangers responded to 922 self -initiated incidents and responded to 1,103 total calls. By focusing on homeless issues, parking enforcement, school resource officer assistance and safer park environments they freed up time for sworn law enforcement to focus on higher priority calls. Our efforts to enhance public safety will be challenged in 2017 with the decriminalization of marijuana and voter approved recreational use. In addition, the State of California is mandating an onerous data collection process known as the Racial Identity Profiling Act (RIPA) which will require all police officer contacts to fill out a form estimated to take 10 — 20 minutes to complete. What will this mean for Rancho Cucamonga? On the low end this will add over $500,000 in costs (lost patrol time) to as much as nearly $3 million in costs at the high end. Further challenging our efforts, is the increase in minimum wage, which will impact the City's Crossing Guard Program for each of the next 5 years as the minimum wage rises to $15.00 per hour from its current rate of $10.50 per hour. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 24 To offset these costs, the City is working with our school partners to ensure that all Crossing Guard locations meet the statewide traffic warrant criteria. This will ensure that funds are concentrated where they are most needed and reflect changing development patterns and pedestrian travel routes which are current, rather than what used to work historically. As important as public safety is how we provide services to some of the most fragile of our residents including seniors and those with special needs. Community Services continues to collaborate and achieve critical partnerships to meet the needs of those underserved and vulnerable in the community. Through partnerships and collaborations, the City of Rancho Cucamonga offers a range of recreational and social opportunities for those residents in our community with developmental and physical disabilities including the Friday Night Fun Club, IncredABLES Classes, Special Events, and Special Olympic teams. This year's budget include funding for a special performance at the Lewis Family Playhouse that provides less stimulus than many of the regular shows. We are excited to be able to provide live performances for all of the community. In conjunction with the YMCA, the Silver Fox Senior Transportation Program will be expanding during FY 2017/18 to add a third bus. This additional bus will allow for an increase of the capacity of the program ridership by 50% and will also allow enough flexibility to add doctor's visits to the route. The additional bus will be 100% subsidized by the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority through Measure I funds received by the YMCA. Anticipated start date of the third bus is fall of 2017. In addition, the YMCA is also leading the efforts of applying through the Federal Transit Authority for additional grant funding to replace the oldest, existing bus operating in the fleet. We anticipate a decision on this grant submission by late 2017 or early 2018. Recipient of a 2016 Helen Putnam Award, the City's 24-hour Kitten Nursery will continue into its third season. Since opening in 2015, the Kitten Nursery has cared for over 2,000 neonatal kittens resulting in increased adoptions of cats. The nursery relies on a combination of City funding, private donations, and volunteer resources. It has reduced euthanasia of cats by over 6% and contributed to the City achieving a combined live placement rate of 90%. This year's budget includes capital funds for a new warehouse building at the Corporate Yard which, if approved, will create a permanent home that includes facilities specifically designed for the Kitten Nursery. Personnel/Technology If you take care of your employees they will take care of your customers and your business will take care of itself. J W Marriott A key focus of any organization is its personnel. Particularly as a local government, Rancho Cucamonga (like other cities) delivers the vast majority of its services through our personnel. In fact, personnel is our single largest expense as we are a service -based business. Finally, nearly ten years later, the City's revenue and expenses are starting to climb above their all-time pre -Recession peaks from FY 2007/08. During that time period, known as the Great Recession, the City's workforce shrank by 25% or over 110 full time equivalent positions. Coming out of the recession, the City Council directed staff to focus on moderating growth in new personnel to help better control personnel related costs. There are two ways the City has chosen to help accomplish this goal. The first is through the continued implementation of new technology which lets existing personnel accomplish the same tasks in less time, take on more tasks Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 25 simultaneously, and emphasize self-service for many other functions. We are leveraging new technologies to serve as force multipliers across the organization, including: • Accela Automation building permit and the Electronic Document Review process. • Automated Public Records request software to streamline recording, tracking and responding to public records requests. • Contract Management, Employee Online and Personnel Action Forms automated processes through OneSolution, the City's financial system. • Expanding the Public Safety Video Network and Automated License Plate Reader systems to ensure that there is an automated, 24-hour technological ring around the City to assist the Police Department in solving crimes. • Implementing new ESRI software to be able to visualize building projects in three dimensions to ensure a better fit with the surroundings • Expanding ESRI collector software for greater mobile field collection of information in real time • Development of business intelligence and spatial reference platforms for all enterprise applications to allow better data visualization and analysis. This is part of the City's larger effort to enhance our Performance Measurement Dashboard which achieved national prominence. There are currently 11 datasets on Open Government on the Dashboard with additional datasets coming for Finance, Library and Public Works this year. This is part of the City's recent addition to the Bloomberg Philanthropies What Works Cities initiative including working with Johns Hopkins University and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government on performance management criteria for contract services. • Completion of a Data Network Infrastructure that provides 1 Gbps city wide and 10 Gbps in the Library facilities. • Installation of Smart Street Lights that provide self -reporting on outages, can monitor and manage power utilization and connect with existing data network infrastructure. Made possible by this modest, sustained revenue growth, the FY 2017/18 budget also continues the trend first begun in FY 2014/15 to improve services to the community through strategic personnel decisions in areas where we will leverage the most benefit for each payroll dollar spent. Rather than simply restoring what was lost during the recession, we are re -engineering our processes and staffing models to get the best return on our investment, and better meet the changing needs of our community. An internal review team looks holistically across departments in considering all these changes, with the goal of minimizing growth of the full-time workforce and prioritizing those changes that improved services, addressed a critical workload issue, made succession planning progress, and were the most cost-effective. Helping to provide opportunities for some of these changes is a generational shift in the workforce. The City commissioned a study about eight years ago which identified what was then an upcoming silver tsunami as many long time employees in the Baby Boom generation reached retirement eligible age around the same time. That tsunami is now upon us. Two years ago, we experienced a total full time turnover of 9.30% and last year we experienced a total full time turnover of 7.98%. Similar numbers are expected this year and next year as we transition to a new work force. Recruiting is becoming ever more a challenge, especially in the highly skilled positions that compete with the private sector which is also experiencing similar turnover. Given the significant projected increases in the cost to provide and maintain CalPERS retirement benefits anticipated over the next five years, management was especially conservative and cautious regarding new personnel growth this fiscal year. A rigorous internal review process of all requests was conducted and, ultimately, only the highest priority items are reflected in the proposed budget. Many of these changes were accomplished through defunding now vacant or unneeded positions, or through reorganizing and shifting expenditures to control net costs. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 26 The result of this process is a modest set of personnel changes and reclassifications at a net cost of approximately $235,000 including salary and benefits ($110,000 of which is General Fund). This expenditure reflects the net addition of seven (7) full-time positions and the net reduction of approximately three (3) FTE part-time positions for the City, contingent upon reaching agreement with the relevant City bargaining groups concerning these changes as a package with other MOU provisions. If agreement on such a package is not reached, these personnel changes will not be implemented. It is important to note that even with the changes noted above, the City still remains at fewer full-time equivalent positions than it had in 2007. The following are the key personnel changes for FY 2017/18: • Increasing the position to full-time for the existing Management Aide in Economic Development in order to support the City's expanded work in this important priority area. • One new full-time position in Public Works to oversee landscape maintenance contracts, and an additional inspector in Engineering to oversee capital projects. • Reorganization of Administrative Services personnel to improve front-line customer service. • The addition of a part-time Animal Services Officer to provide additional coverage for field services. • Reorganizing staff supporting Healthy RC initiatives, primarily using grant funds and savings in operational expenditures. • Several minor changes in Finance and Community Services to better align duties, responsibilities, qualifications, and service to the public. Operating Budgets Our greatest weakness lies in giving up. The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time. Thomas Edison The operating budgets in Rancho Cucamonga are comprised of the following: City General Fund Fire District Operational Funds Library Operational Fund In addition, the complete City budget includes other special funds such as the various special districts funds, developer impact fee funds, and grant funds. Many of these funds are restricted from use for general municipal operations. Operating Budget Comparisons City General Fund. The City General Fund budget, which supports the majority of City services, is made up of a number of major revenue sources. General Fund revenue for FY 2017/18 is projected to be $80,757,570, which is $3,306,720 or 4.27% higher than in FY 2016/17. The City General Fund's top seven revenues include the following and represent 91.70% of total revenues: • Sales Tax • Vehicle License Fees (VLF and Motor Vehicle In Lieu) • Franchise Fees • Property Tax (includes post -RDA property tax and property transfer tax) • Development Fees • Business Licenses • Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 27 Sales Tax The most significant revenue source in the City General Fund is sales tax. Sales tax, which represents 37.82% of total General Fund revenues, continues to grow, as it has for the last several years, but at a modest rate. There are several reasons for this. First and foremost is that, for its population, Rancho Cucamonga has substantial retail outlets and depends primarily on population from surrounding areas to sustain our retailers. As those areas grow and develop, our subsequent growth is diminished. Further, many traditional brick and mortar traditional retailers are struggling with the rise of Amazon, eBay and other internet retailers. Also, with no auto dealerships, the City's sales tax has become increasingly dependent on food and beverage service and experienced based retailers, two key niche areas which distinguish Rancho Cucamonga in general, and Victoria Gardens in particular, from surrounding locales. The sales tax forecast (including Prop 172) for FY 2017/18 is $30,545,700, which is a $1,691,120 or 5.86% increase from FY 2016/17. Although the City has many new food, retail, and service outlets under construction, history has taught us to be prudent in forecasting these new revenues. First, it takes at least three to four quarters (one year) to truly determine what sales tax a new outlet will likely generate. Second, it is nearly impossible to forecast how much is truly new business and how much is diverted business from other locations. Third, there are often delays and errors in reporting to the State Board of Equalization (BOE) and in receiving revenue from the BOE. Accordingly, for all but the largest new retailers, the City does not typically forecast substantial revenue increases for at least one year after new businesses open. It will most likely not be until FY 2018/19 that the City will realize any possible increases from new business locations on Foothill Boulevard, Haven Avenue, and Day Creek Boulevard. Vehicle License Fees and Franchise Fees Vehicle License Fees and Motor Vehicle In -Lieu fees have increased $818,440 or approximately 4.73% from FY 2016/17 primarily due to slight increases in the City's assessed valuation. Unfortunately, this positive uptick is largely offset by an unexpected decrease in franchise fees in the amount of $298,150 or 4.35% from FY 2016/17, primarily due to Southern California Edison charging a smaller on -bill increase than what they originally had approved by the California Public Utilities Commission. Property Tax Another positive local economic indicator is property tax growth. For FY 2016/17 the City saw a strong net taxable value increase of 4.50% overall and an increase in median price for single family residential by more than 5.49%. These gains were consistent with or higher than many other places in San Bernardino County, which is a good sign. Putting the numbers into perspective is key, however. Rancho Cucamonga incorporated after the passage of Proposition 13 and thus receives minimal revenue from property taxes overall, especially in comparison to many of our much older surrounding neighbors such as Ontario, Upland and Fontana. If you take a look at a typical dollar of property tax in Rancho Cucamonga, the City receives $0.05 (allocated between the General Fund and the Library Fund), the County gets about $0.15, various special districts get a total of about $0.20 (including $0.12 to the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District) and Education (K-14) gets about $0.60, as shown in the Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 28 graphic here. Put another way, all the property tax j/�► received by the City ($8.28 million) is not enough to Property Tax Dollar ` pay even half of our yearly Sheriff contract, much Breakdown less fund any other services. In FY 2017/18, ` Property Tax revenues for the City's General Fund are projected to increase a solid $538,900 or 6.13% from FY 2016/17 due to an anticipated $245,140 increase in property transfer tax and also due to the County's annual inflation adjustment combined with new secured properties being added to the tax roll. FuM Randto '. Gicamwpa Development Fees/Business Licenses/Transient `"°°MUld c4a @3 aro HamOccupancy Taxes FnJ Emm NO. Development fees have remained consistent with B the prior year. Business License revenues are MM anticipated to increase slightly by $40,450, or 13 1.54%, due to increased inspection activity. Theme Transient Occupancy Tax has increased $331,J4U, or 9.73%, from FY 2016/17 due primarily to the addition of two new hotels that will be opening during FY 2017/18 as well as the improving local economy and particularly strong hotel industry in Rancho Cucamonga which has occupancies in the 84% range and room rates well over $100 per night. As the local business community strengthens, and tourism increases, transient occupancy tax is one of the City's fastest growing and most important revenues, after sales tax. Overall, most of the City's key revenues continue to grow at modest levels that appear sustainable and likely to continue for several more years. Once again this year, the General Fund operating budget is structurally balanced. There is no planned use of General Fund reserves for operations. Changes in Operating Budget - City General Fund $90,000,000 $80,000,000 $70,000,000 $60,000,000 $50,000,000 $40,000,000 $30,000,000 ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 29 $1,400,000 $1,200,000 000 000 :00 000 .00 000 00 000 00 000 Reduction in Usage of Reserves - City General Fund oti°`1h o��\y� o1��ti� otiA\N ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ■ Economic Circumstances Rsnr a Interest from Fund 025 Insurance Reimb from Fund 025 Fire District and Library Funds. The principal revenue source for the Fire District and Library budgets is property tax. As such, property tax revenues play a more critical role in balancing their respective budgets. As noted earlier, the Fire District's share of each property tax dollar is greater than what the City General Fund and Library Fund receive. This is because, as a post -Proposition 13 city, Rancho Cucamonga is a low property tax city. The Fire District's property tax share pre- dates City incorporation, and the Library Fund receives an additional influx of property tax revenue from a statutory pass -through from the County that was initiated when the City took over Library operations from the County in 1994. The Fire District General Fund Property Tax revenue has increased by $823,340 or 3.48% from FY 2016/17, due to the County's annual inflation adjustment combined with new secured properties being added to the tax roll and positive home buying activity. The same strong fiscal discipline that was in place originally, when redevelopment pass -through dollars were set aside for future capital and facility replacement, remains even after the dissolution of redevelopment. The Fire District will be utilizing approximately $7.90 million of its capital reserves during FY 2017/18 to pay for various capital improvements including the construction of the replacement of San Bernardino Road Fire Station 172 and the construction of the Jersey Station Data Center. Due to the ongoing additional revenues being received from the former Redevelopment Agency, the Fire District is continuing the fee suspension for its Inspection Program that was established in 2013. This program assists the business community by not collecting fees for basic fire permits and initial inspections. This reflects the District's strong commitment to economic development in Rancho Cucamonga. Property Tax revenue for the Fire District's two Community Facilities Districts (CFDs) remained relatively constant compared to FY 2016/17. No increase in CPI was required for either of the CFD's due to the strength of the Fire General Fund. This supports the District's commitment to maintain CFD rates without CPI increases to the extent practical and, where possible, to reduce rates in a prudent manner. See additional discussion below under "Operating Budgets Analysis." Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 30 Changes in Operating Budget - Fire District $40,000,000 $35,000,000 $30,000,000 $25,000,000 $20,000,000 $15,000,000 $10,000,000 A � o°�\o� o°o\yo oti°\yy oti�\y� oti�\y� oti�'\y� h oti�'\yo otio\yA ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti ti Reduction in Usage of Reserves - Fire District $350,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 ' ��`ow �`°� ��\tio otio`1y otitiy� o'��oti�',1� oNA`yh oti�'V oti�`�1 °lA�,��, ti ti ti ti ti ti 1 ti ti Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 31 The Library's Property Tax has increased $114,460 or 2.79% from FY 2016/17. The FY 2017/18 budget continues to include the statutory pass -through payment from the County, formerly paid by the now dissolved Redevelopment Agency. Changes in Operating Budget - Library Fund $6,000,000 $5,000,000 $4,000,000 $3,000,000 $2,000,000 Operating Budgets Analysis The economy continues to improve at a solid and unspectacular, but nevertheless sustainable, pace. Lacking an auto mall or any large warehouse e-distribution centers, Rancho Cucamonga is largely dependent on the growth in general consumer discretionary spending. Similarly, without large areas of land to develop with either new homes or new shopping centers, the City is largely dependent on general property tax growth capped by Proposition 13. Both trends are consistent with what would be expected in a built -out community and have important implications for long- term sustainability. Specifically, lacking large new growth opportunities, it is critical that the City balance its assets and liabilities, both long and short-term, using recurring predictable and reliable revenues. One of the tools we use to track long-term fiscal sustainability is the League of California Cities' California Municipal Financial Health Diagnostic. This tool was created to provide a way for cities to evaluate their overall financial condition using 14 key fiscal indicators. Rancho Cucamonga remains one of a handful of cities in California that have both completed the Financial Health Diagnostic and shared those results publicly. This initiative supports the City Council's goal to increase public transparency and share information regarding the City's sound financial underpinnings. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 32 Financial Health Indicators - Summary Checklist jet Uperatmg deticlt i surplus. I nere are no recurring general operating deficits. General revenues are sufficient to meet the net general Healthy 2. Fund balance. Reserves are sufficient over multiple consecutive years and in Healthy compliance with adopted policy 3. Capital Asset Condition. The county is keeping pace with the aging of its Healthy capital assets. N f0 4. Liquidity. Cash and short-term investments are suffieicent to cover current Health y liabilities (including short-term debt and accounts payable within 60 days) 5. Fixed costs & labor Costs. Fixed costs (including debt service and other contractual obligations), salaries and benefits are stable or decreasing over multiple Caution ears relative to reasonably expected revenue growth. 6. General fund subsidies of other funds. Any general fund subsidies other Caution enterprises or special funds are sustainable and in compliance with adopted policy. 7. Constraints on budgetary discretion. The board of supervisors' authority Healthy to make budget changes is not excessively constrained by charter, contract, or law. 8. Balancing the budget with temporary funds. The use of reserves, selling assets, deferring asset maintenance to balance the general fund has been Healthy limited, prudent and in compliance with adopted policy 9. Balancing the budget with borrowing. The use of short-term borrowing, N internal borrowing or transfers from special funds to balance the general fund has Healthy 0 been limited prudent and in compliance with adopted policy v 10. Balancing the budget by deferring employee compensation costs. c 0 Pension liabilities and other non -salary benefits have been determined; disclosed Healthy -a c and actuarially funded in compliance with adopted policy. R 11. Balancing the budget with backloaded debt service payments. Debt "backloaded" Healthy service payments have not been into future years. IL 12. Funding operating costs with non -recurring revenues. ongoing operating costs are being funded with ongoing rather than temporary revenues (e.g., Healthy from development, etc. 13. Timeliness and accuracy of financial reports. Financial Reports are being filed on time. (CAFR, Annual Audit, State Controller's Financial Transactions Healthy 14. Service level solvency. Public service levels meet the standards and needs Healthy in this community. ffffl The following are some of the key recommendations for the FY 2017/18 Operating Budget: City General Fund Budget. Overall, the FY 2017/18 General Fund Budget is $80,757,570 and for the fifth year in a row does not require the use of General Fund reserves. The operating budget represents a $3,306,720, or 4.27%, increase from FY 2016/17. While the City's revenue picture is strong, we are challenged on the expenditure side with some new cost increases in key areas. One cost driver is a series of minimum wage increases that began in July 2014, when minimum wage was increased to $9 per hour. In January of 2016, the minimum wage rose another 11 % to $10 per hour and in January of 2017 rose to $10.50 per hour, on its way to $15.00 per hour over the next several years. These minimum wage increases have both direct and indirect impacts on the City's budget. Most directly, costs for our 400+ part-time employees have been increasing and will continue to do so as minimum wage increases are phased in. Further, many of our contract providers such as crossing guards and landscape maintenance, just to name a few, are raising their contracts to keep pace with the minimum wage increase. Along with additional costs related to the Affordable Care Act, paid sick leave mandates, Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 33 and looming CalPERS pension increases, these costs are largely driving increases in the City's overall personnel budgets while minimizing discretionary income available for increased services. For FY 2018/19, it will cost the City $102,000 to implement the minimum wage increases. It is also anticipated that our required PIERS employer contribution rate will increase from 16.69% to 24.52% over the next five years. City Miscellaneous Required PERS Employer Contribution 30.00% 25.00% 22,99% 23.93%24.52% 20.97% 20,00% 18.71% 15.85%16.69% 15.00% 12.61%1335%13.47% 14.59% 10.00% 5.00% 0.0000/0 FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY FY 12/13 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 18/19 16/20 20/21 21/22 22/23 Another important City General Fund cost driver is the ongoing fiscal challenges in several of the City's landscape maintenance districts (LMDs), street lighting districts (SLDs), and community facilities districts (CFDs). The City's goal has always been for these special districts to remain fiscally stable without relying on the General Fund for a permanent subsidy. As Measure A showed in 2015, however, there is almost no support in certain parts of the City for assessment increases, despite the high overall satisfaction with City services, quality neighborhoods, and well maintained infrastructure as shown by numerous surveys. Following the voter approved mandate to manage existing and future expenses without going to the residents for additional revenue, the City Council approved a multi -faceted plan. Last year, a series of one-time expenditures of General Fund capital reserves designed to yield savings over time was approved and deployed including adding card readers to sports field lighting so that sports groups can pay for field lights; a solar feasibility study for Red Hill/Heritage and Beryl Parks; reallocating certain administrative costs to the General Fund; funding the Red Hill water feature maintenance partially from the General Fund as a citywide amenity; and providing a General Benefit equivalent payment to PD 85 and LIVID 1 (recurring starting in FY 2016/17), using the same methodology as was used on the east side parks and landscape districts. These one-time expenditures had an over $600,000 impact on the General Fund and Capital Reserves. This year, the City will go out to bid on a possible solar installation at Red Hill Park (the only feasible site). Water saving measures are already in place, to the extent feasible without additional funding for further drought tolerant conversions (plants and irrigation). The West Side Districts have also been largely switched over to contract maintenance to reduce personnel expenses for salaries and PIERS, and are being maintained at the maximum level feasible within the overall budget (C-level). Funding for the maintenance of the new Los Amigos Park is being covered by the General Fund. The total cost to the General Fund of ALL subsidies for the landscape maintenance districts was $328,570 in FY 2015/16, $660,460 in FY 2016/17, and $673,350 in FY 2017/18. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 34 The Police Department's budget will increase $1,752,740 or 4.92% overall due primarily to increased public safety pension and labor costs as well as the potential addition of one (1) new Sergeant and one (1) new Sheriff's Service Specialist (following last year's addition of four (4) new Deputies and one (1) Sheriff's Service Specialist). Overall, the Police Department costs are rising approximately 5-7% a year, making this the City's most significant contract cost increase. Fire District Budget. The recommended FY 2017/18 operating budget for the Fire District is $35,014,090. This is a $1,771,330, or 5.33%, increase over FY 2016/17. The budget is balanced without the use of reserves. The budget also continues to redistribute operating expenses in various areas in order to improve accountability and transparency. Once again, fees for fire inspections are being waived and the two subsidiary community facility districts are holding their assessments level without any new rate increases, all thanks to the strength of the Fire General Fund (which relies on property tax). To that end, the City has taken the California Municipal Health Financial Diagnostic and applied the same tool to the Fire District Budget. As seen below, the results indicate the Fire District is financially stable and healthy. Financial Health Indicators - Summary Checklist . Net uperaung ceTICIT i surplus. i nere are no recurring general nd operating deficits. General revenues are sufficient to meet the net general FM Healthy 2. Fund balance. Reserves are sufficient over multiple consecutive years and in Healthy compliance with adopted policy. 3. Capital Asset CondltlOn. The county is keeping pace with the aging of its Healthy capital assets. N l6 4. Liquidity. Cash and short-term investments are suffieicent to cover current Health Y liabilities (including short-term debt and accounts payable within 60 days). 5. Fixed costs & labor costs. Fixed costs (including debt service and other contractual obligations), salaries and benefits are stable or decreasing over multiple Caution ears relative to reasonablyexpected revenue growth. 6. General fund subsidies of other funds. Any general fund subsidies other Healthy enterprises or special funds are sustainable and in compliance with adopted policy. 7. Constraints on budgetary discretion. The board of supervisors' authority Healthy to make budget changes is not excessively constrained by charter, contract, or law 8. Balancing the budget with temporary funds. The use of reserves, selling assets, deferring asset maintenance to balance the general fund has been Healthy limited prudent and in compliance with adopted policy. 9. Balancing the budget with borrowing. The use of short-term borrowing, N internal borrowing or transfers from special funds to balance the general fund has Healthy 0 been limited prudent and in compliance with adopted policy. 10. Balancing the budget by deferring employee compensation costs. 0 Pension liabilities and other non -salary benefits have been determined, disclosed Healthy a c and actuarially funded in compliance with adopted policy. w 11. Balancing the budget with backloaded debt service payments. Debt Healthy service payments have not been "backloaded" into future years. 12. Funding operating costs with non -recurring revenues. Ongoing operating costs are being funded with ongoing rather than temporary revenues e. P 9 9 9 9 P Y ( 9: Health Y from development, etc. 13. Timeliness and accuracy of financial reports. Financial Reports are being filed on time. (CAFR, Annual Audit; State Controller's Financial Transactions Healthy 14. Service level solvency. Public service levels meet the standards and needs Healthy in this community. mm Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 35 Library Budget. The FY 2017/18 Library budget is $5,163,710 which represents an increase of $432,980, or 9.15%, from FY 2016/17. Similar to the Fire District, Library revenues are primarily property tax related. City Operating Budgets City General Fund, Fire District Funds and Library Funds $2,638,670 - Special Districts $512,000 r% $5,223,800 ■ Governance $ 5,163, 710 $14,053,430 $810,680 $1,848,380 $2,421,460 '01$1,829,760 $1o,819,800 $3,236,220 Specialization and Organization are the basis of human progress. Charlotte Perkins Gilman ■ Records Mgmt. • Community Services Library Services ■ Admin. Services ■ Econ. and Comm. Dev. ■ Building & Safety Services ■ Engineering Services ■ Planning ■ Public works Services ■ Animal Care & Services ■ Police ■ Fire There are thirty-five special assessment districts in the City, and these districts play a key role in the City's budget. In Rancho Cucamonga's early days, a key decision was made to have new development pay its own way. Thus, whether it was infrastructure such as streets, new parks, trails or other public improvements, virtually all new development in the City was part of one or more special districts created to help ensure that sufficient funds, over and above property tax, were collected to fund police, library, community services, public works, and the many other general services of the City. Most of these districts were created prior to Proposition 218 in 1996, and thus have no index to adjust for rising costs. In the early years, the City Council would review each district's budget annually and, if necessary, adjust assessments by small incremental amounts to keep pace with expenses. Once Prop 218 passed, the ability to increase rates now rested with the property owners who paid the assessments in each district. Without an index to adjust for rising costs, many of these districts were fiscally stable only so long as they were growing and adding new properties. That growth has largely ended and the City is now mostly built out, and, as a result, many districts have started to show significant signs of financial stress. In order to ensure that each district can strive to remain financially self-sufficient, staff has brought forward plans to systematically address these problems in the troubled districts. In November 2015, the City of Rancho Cucamonga placed Measure A on the ballot. Measure A would have created a new Community Facilities District to replace PD 85 and LIVID 1, two old landscape districts on the City's west side. The average resident would have seen their annual rate increase by a total of $60 (from $30 to $90) with modest increases thereafter of less than $3 per year. This measure was overwhelmingly rejected by 78% of the voters on the West -side in a record turnout. Accordingly, the City's West -side Districts (PD 85, LIVID 1, and SLD 2) budgets Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 36 were balanced through the measures described earlier in this message, resulting in balanced budgets but with significant, unsustainable reductions in the levels of maintenance and virtually no capital improvements or replacements of any kind. With the failure of Measure A, these districts will continue in this condition for the foreseeable future. The City provides a General Benefit equivalent payment to PD 85 and LIVID 1, using the same methodology as was used on the east side parks and landscape districts. The percent of General Fund contribution (approximately 9%) is capped to provide equity with the East -side Districts who have previously increased their local assessments to maintain higher service levels. While the General Fund's contributions of $673,350 in FY 2017/18 provide some interim financial stability, there still remains a need to address the long-term service level stability of PD 85 (Heritage and Red Hill Parks), LIVID 1 (8 parks and various green spaces/trails), and SLD 2 (local street lights). Without a permanent long-term solution to the complex equation of balancing a dedicated landscape and lighting district created and funded on 1985 revenues but facing FY 2017/18 costs (33 years difference), the overall future of the West -side Districts remains uncertain. LIVID 1 and PD 85 pay between $30 and $93 per year in assessments to maintain at a C-minus level some of the largest and oldest sports parks (Heritage, Beryl and Red Hill) and neighborhood parks in the City. This compares to the $300 to $500 per year paid in the rest of the City to maintain generally smaller parks at an A -level. Put another way, if PD 85 and LIVID 1 were more self- sustaining, the City would be able to afford between one to two more police officers to enhance public safety. Additionally, the list of deferred and unfunded maintenance items continues to grow, and includes: • Ball field lighting replacement at Old Town Park, Red Hill Park, and Heritage • Playground resurfacing at Old Town Park, Heritage, Church Street Park, Hermosa Park, Bear Gulch Park and Red Hill Park • Shade shelter and amphitheater repair and replacement at Old Town Park, Heritage Park, Golden Oak Park and Red Hill Park • Bridge repair and replacement at Heritage Park • Restroom repair at various parks • Walking and jogging path resurfacing at various parks • Fence repair and replacement at various parks • Ball field/soccer field rehabilitation and renovation at various parks A new approach will eventually be needed to ensure fiscal stability for the West -side parks and landscape districts. To that end, the West -side Citizens' Oversight Committee was formed and has begun its work reviewing the PD 85, LIVID 1, and SLD 2 budgets, including revenue and expenses. In four of the City's newer districts, rate increases are recommended this year and in one district, a rate decrease is recommended for FY 2017/18. It should be noted that rate increases are only recommended where they are necessary to maintain a structurally balanced budget for those districts. Increases, when needed, provide fiscal stability and help to avoid the structural imbalances down the road that plague other districts, particularly those that have no mechanism for regular rate adjustments. Several factors, such as increasing costs of maintenance and essential utilities, when out -paced by assessment revenues lead to these imbalances. In special districts rates can be adjusted as costs increase. These additional funds go back into these districts to preserve high quality maintenance levels, and to allow for investments in infrastructure maintenance and improvements such as the installation of drought -tolerant Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 37 landscaping, park and playground repairs, concrete replacement on sidewalks and paseos, and care of the urban forest. The following changes are recommended: • LMD 2 (Victoria Neighborhood Parks and Landscape Maintenance District) — An increase of 2.7% to the maximum tax is recommended, which is an increase of $12.98 per home, per year. This increase is primarily being driven by utility costs and funding for more drought tolerant landscape conversions which will reduce long term water use. • LMD 4R (Terra Vista) — A decrease of 5.0% to the actual tax, which results in a decrease of $20.90 per home, per year. This decrease in the actual rate is primarily being driven by savings from the completed installation of drought tolerant design in the street medians. LMD 6R (Caryn Communities) — An increase of 2.7% to the maximum tax is recommended, which results in an increase of $10.92 per home, per year. Modest increases will likely be needed in this small district each year, as it continues to recover from its previous deficit position and years of deferred maintenance. In addition to the rate increase for property owners, this district will receive a transfer in of $52,460 from the General Fund. This is an amount equivalent to 7% of the expenditure budget, and while not legally required, is the estimated amount equivalent to the "general benefit" provided to those that do not own property in this district. LMD 9 (Lower Etiwanda) —The Council may recall that several years ago, rates in this district were dramatically reduced due to an excess amount of fund balance that had accumulated in this fund. With that fund balance nearly spent down to the level set by policy for our LMD's, it is now time to restore annual rates to the normal level so that revenues more nearly equal expenditures. This will result in an increase of $60 per home, per year. Future increases will be necessary over time, however, those increases will be gradual to avoid future spikes in the rates. • CFD 2000-03 (Rancho Summit parks) — An increase of 2% to the maximum tax is recommended, which results in an increase of $24.80 per home, per year. In order to begin to close an existing budget gap and recover from the deficit position before reserves are depleted, regular rate increases will continue to be needed in future years. While the list of fiscally -troubled districts has dwindled as the City has addressed and is addressing many of the major ones, there is still work to do in the future. Most notably, LMD 7 remains in a deficit position, and rate increases in this district will require property owner consideration in the near future. Capital Improvement Program (CIP) The CIP contains priorities for improvements to the City's infrastructure over a five to ten year period of time. It is annually reviewed and updated and its implementation is dependent upon the availability of capital and special funds. Since these special funds are legally restricted, they must remain separate from and cannot be utilized for general operating costs. While these special funds can be eroded by economic conditions, the fiscal impacts are different from those in the operating funds. Capital projects often span many years, as they move from design and environmental review to plan check and ultimately construction. Ongoing investment in pavement rehabilitation, Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) projects, traffic signal and system improvements as well as facilities maintenance and improvements form the core of the annual CIP. The FY 2017/18 CIP once again devotes significant resources toward these activities, the key highlights of which were described earlier in this transmittal letter. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 38 Fiscal Summary The FY 2017/18 Budget is a product of past and continuing fiscal discipline enhanced by a recovering economy. The following is a summation of all FY 2017/18 City Budgets: City General Fund $ 80,757,570 Library Services $ 5,163,710 Fire Protection District $ 50,704,730 Special Funds including CIP $110,785,460 Summary The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. Eleanor Roosevelt The western valley portion of San Bernardino County is at a cross roads in its development. Its agricultural days are now a historical remnant of a bygone era, memorialized in books, monuments and key projects. At the same time, its robust days of suburban growth are beginning to wind down as the remaining land west of the 15 freeway is quickly being developed. And yet, the same area is only just seeing the faintest signs of an early urban development wind. Like the lightest of breezes that stirs flags at the top of the pole before the stronger winds are felt by people on the ground, so too are Montclair, Upland, and now Rancho Cucamonga just beginning to see the first traces of multi -story, transit oriented, walkable urban development. As north Orange County and the eastern San Gabriel Valley reach critical mass in their urban life -cycle, those development trends will push north and east, finding their nexus in the western Inland Empire area of San Bernardino County. Rancho Cucamonga knows how critical it is to prepare for the future, as it was created to be the City with a plan. A world class community where excellence is expected and success always comes after hard work, regardless of their place in the dictionary. Modernization of the City's General Plan, Development Code, and Municipal Code has been under way for several years now. With a new Economic Development Strategic Plan, the City has a clear set of goals for a healthy economic future. By reinvesting in infrastructure and focusing on all the elements of a world class community (housing, schools, leisure, shopping, fiscal sustainability, public safety, community health and vitality), Rancho Cucamonga is sowing the seeds today so that the residents of tomorrow will reap the benefits. In addition to the City Council Goals, the key guiding principles for staff in developing and providing services, programs, goals, objectives, and a budget document that corresponds to all of those elements, are the Vision Statement, Mission Statement, and Values for all City employees. Collectively, the City employees are referred to as Team RC which reflects the value and emphasis the City places on teamwork as the desired mode for delivery of services. Team RC has adopted a Vision and Mission Statement, as well as Values, all of which have been approved by the City Council. The Vision Statement, Mission Statement, and Values are: Vision Statement Team RC exceeds expectations of those we serve with pride in the delivery of quality services and programs in an environment of employee excellence and innovation, empowered by inspired leadership, opportunity and a collaborative spirit. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 39 Mission Statement Team RC delivers superior service to all who live, work and play in our community. Values — S.P.I.R.I.T. SERVICE: We are committed to providing a superior level of services and going above and beyond individual duties to better serve both fellow team members and the community. PEOPLE: Our respect for each other is demonstrated by empowering and valuing one another while also encouraging personal growth and enhanced health and wellbeing. We embrace a healthy life/work balance and are continuously striving to ensure the highest quality of life for our employees. INDIVIDUAL EXCELLENCE: Individual excellence is achieved through recognizing workforce strengths. It is fostered through individuals who possess a strong work ethic, sense of pride and commitment, and who value honesty, integrity and personal growth. RANCHO WAY: The Rancho Way is fostered through maintaining a high level of professionalism, producing quality work products and striving to retain the public's trust through fiscal discipline and accountability. INNOVATION: Embrace and appreciate technology; use technology to bring innovation and a creative spirit to our current work and to help anticipate the challenges of tomorrow. TEAMWORK: Teamwork is encouraged and reinforced through collaboration, communication and leadership at all levels. Unwavering unity, common goals and a positive attitude are embodied by all. Looking ahead, we need to plan as carefully for the last phases of the City's development as those before us did for the first 39 years, seeking to ensure that our high development standards are continued and that long-term fiscal sustainability of the organization remains at the forefront. Gone are the days when the City viewed itself in isolation. Rancho Cucamonga, its City Manager, and the entire Executive Team are fully committed to preparing for the future and investing in the world -class community Rancho Cucamonga continues to aspire to be. Our goal is not simply to be the premier city in the Inland Empire, but to be one of the premier cities in California. As we embark on the FY 2017/18 fiscal year, we are proud to work for a world class community, poised for new and higher levels of success over the next 39 years. Fiscal Year 2017A8 Adopted Budget Page 40 Attachment A Department Budgets Police Department We strive to ensure the City of Rancho Cucamonga is a safe community to live, work and play. In the tide of State level changes surrounding reducing prison population, we look to innovative strategies for keeping our citizens safe through community engagement and advanced technologies. Our efforts to `harden the target' will continue with additional community events such as the "Surviving An Active Shooter" training for the community; "Active Shooter Response" training for Police and Fire; Citizen Advisory Committee meetings; expanding our Neighborhood Watch and Crime Free Multi Housing programs; and continued community connections such as "Coffee with a Cop". We will use grant funding to deploy additional teams for park and trail patrols, warrant sweeps, and sex registrant and probation compliance checks. We have previously invested in the Automated License Plate Reader systems and determined them to be extremely effective in solving crime and locating wanted vehicles and people. The effectiveness has justified expanding the systems to the east side of our city this fiscal year, and once achieved we will have encircled the City boundary with these cameras. Our other force multiplier, the Public Safety Video Network, not only helps us capture real time criminal and traffic related activities, but also produces images which help the City reduce liability. We have therefore requested additional system integration into Central Park, the Epicenter, and the EOC and will add monitoring stations to each Fire House. The cameras can be used to monitor events in real time and search for past events of interest. The ALPR database captures and retains images of license plates, allowing investigators to identify and locate wanted people The PSVN cameras can be viewed and adjusted in real time, and it stores data for post -event research Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 41 Even with the dedicated efforts of our law enforcement to leverage community partnerships and technology, crime rates experienced an increase across the West Valley in 2016. Rancho Cucamonga was no exception to this disturbing trend. In 2016, Part I crimes increased, while Part II crimes decreased as indicated on the following chart: CALLS FO SERVICE 2014 4,368 8,139 111,133 R JA FFIC{ LlS/O 13,769 4,390 1,418 2015 4,732 7,142 109,215 15,175 4,837 1,642 2016 4,784 5,714 110,781 15,549 4,439 1,795 Part 1 Crimes: Murder, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, etc. Part 11 Crimes: Forgery, Counterfeit, Fraud, Stolen Property, Vandalism, etc. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Continue to enhance the partnership between the Police Department and community stakeholders. This includes continued meetings with community members during events such as such the Citizen Advisory Committee, Coffee with a Cop, an Open House and service club meetings. Continue to provide community training on Surviving an Active Shooter and conduct threat assessments on critical infrastructure. • Use technology as a force multiplier and continue to expand the Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) and increase ALPR's (Automated License Plate Readers) at strategic intersections throughout the city. Deploy additional personnel into our parks and trail system, and conduct sweeps using grant funds. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 42 Fire Protection District The Fire District is a subsidiary district of the City and has its own statutory funding with the City Council serving as the Fire District Board of Directors. Our mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting and demonstrating a readiness to respond to, and reduce, threats to life and property through the delivery of emergency and non -emergency services and programs in an efficient and effective manner. Three pillars establish the foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services: Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Response and Emergency Management. Leading our risk reduction efforts, the Prevention Bureau reduces risk and eliminates hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction, and public education/community outreach. Additionally, firefighters deliver an efficient and effective emergency response through structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response and technical rescue. The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness and response programs. The Fire District supports these direct services through progressive leadership, personnel management, professional development through high level training, advanced planning, financial administration and logistical support which includes apparatus and facilities maintenance, communications and information technology. Our emergency response and incident mitigation capabilities maintain a cutting edge through innovative, passionate and fiscally responsible program management, which further enhances the quality of life for those served by the District. Last year, the District responded to 15,435 incidents. The Fire District's goal is to deliver all of these programs and services in an effective, efficient and professional manner while maintaining financial stability. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights The All -Risk Regional Training Center will be operational and provide further training as well as educational opportunities to enhance our firefighters' readiness, while also creating opportunities for joint training with our regional partners. In addition, the District will be constructing the new Data Center, on site at the Training Center. In collaboration with Team RC, the District will begin construction on new Fire Station 172. In its new location, Fire Station 172 will also include a Rancho Cucamonga Police Department Sub - Station, access to the Pacific Electric Trail, and an elevated bike path. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 43 • The District will continue to expand training to help prepare the citywide workforce and community for Tactical Response and Purposeful Mass Injury Incidents. • The District is supporting the City Facilities Team in procurement of a backup generator located at the new Rancho Cucamonga Family Sports Center, which will act as an Emergency Evacuation Center in the event of a disaster. • The District will replace an aging 2003 KME Type 1 fire engine. • The District continues to fund proposed operations and capital projects, while holding both Community Facilities District (CFD) assessments at current rates. Additionally, for the fourth (4) full year, Fire Prevention Permit Inspection Fees continue to be suspended. Administrative Services Group The Administrative Services Group consist of Finance (including Treasury Management and Special Districts), Human Resources, Innovation and Technology, and Procurement. Human Resources Department The Human Resources Department oversees the City's human resources and risk management functions. The mission of the Human Resources Department is to recruit, develop, and retain a diverse, engaged, well -qualified and professional workforce that reflects the world -class standards of the community we serve, and to lead City Departments in positive employee relations, talent acquisition, succession planning, and employee engagement. The Human Resources Team provides a wide range of services to City staff in the following areas: Total Compensation which administers salaries, health care, pension and other benefits. Employee and Labor Relations which provides guidance to managers and employees to enhance performance, create a positive work environment, and effective problem -solving of complaints and grievances as well as facilitates labor contract negotiations. Organization and Employee Development which identifies and implements training and employee development opportunities to support employee skill enhancement, innovation and leadership. Talent Acquisition which recruits, selects, public service, excellent skills and the ability to take on increasingly complex roles in their City career. Risk Management, Safety and Workers Compensation which supports workplace safety and actively manages risk, reduces injuries and other potential liabilities and oversees the employee wellness initiative. and onboards employees who have a passion for Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 44 FY 2017/18 Human Resources Budget Highlights The budget reflects the addition of a Risk Analyst as part of a reorganization of the Administrative Services Group and a clarification of contract insurance responsibilities within the City, which shifted a full time position from Procurement to HR. This position will enhance our risk management, safety and workers' compensation program and provide support for Organization and Employee Development. In addition, an Office Specialist I position has been added as part of a reorganization of the Administrative Services Group. Together with a new Office Specialist I in DoIT, these new team members will help improve external and internal customer support across both departments, including telephone coverage and technology customer support. With HR's move to the Garden Level, partnering with DoIT creates efficiencies and opportunities for cross training. The Department will continue to implement the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and/or deal with its repeal and replacement. The key components continue to be the tracking and reporting of ACA information and the updating of City policies and procedures to ensure compliance with the ever changing mandates and deadlines of the program. HR is initiating a new project this year that will utilize innovative sourcing and applicant tracking tools to improve the City's talent acquisition strategies in order to decrease the time to fill vacancies. The Department continues to work at improve onboarding to provide an expeditious, engaging, and meaningful experience. In addition, HR is working to improve the City's current employee performance and goal setting system to make the process more forward -thinking, effective, and meaningful for employees and the organizations. • The Department will continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs. • HR will partner with DoIT and Finance to refine and enhance the employee self- service tool in the existing HRIS system to allow employees better access to benefit and pay information. • HR will strive to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of HR practices and procedures in order to provide better service to internal and external customers. • The Department will use social media and participate in community events as a way to improve outreach for recruitments and the profile of the City. • HR will continue to update City and District's policies to assure compliance with California and Federal reguation. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 45 Finance Department The Finance Department is comprised of five divisions, including Accounting and Financial Reporting, Budget Management, Business Licensing, Special Districts, and Treasury Management. For 29 years running, the Department has received the Government Finance Officers Association's (GFOA) Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting. This award recognizes excellence in financial reporting by state and local governments and is the highest form of recognition in governmental accounting and financial reporting. For the last four years, the Department has received the GFOA's Distinguished Budget Presentation Award, which is the highest form of recognition in governmental budgeting. FY 2017/18 Finance Budget Highlights • In conjunction with DoIT and Human Resources, facilitate the implementation of two new modules for the City's financial system: Contract Management and COGNOS Reporting. Employee Online and Personnel Action Forms modules were implemented during FY 2016/17. • Facilitate the transition to a new vendor to process the City's parking citations and administrative citations, as well as facilitate collection activity for past due accounts. • Implementation of a digital document management system for Business Licensing to facilitate the transition to a paperless work environment to the extent practical. Procurement Division The Procurement Division is responsible for soliciting Requests for Quotes, Bids and Proposals for its internal customer base. Additionally, the processing of City Hall and off -site location mail is conducted in the Procurement Division. Under Municipal Code, the Procurement Division has been vested with the authority for the centralized procurement of commodities and services. Centralization of the procurement process ensures that solicitations are conducted in an impartial, open, fair competitive manner. The Division is also responsible for the establishment of procurement procedures that generate solicitation results for commodities or services that offer the best value at the most competitive price to the City. FY 2017/18 Procurement Budget Highlights • The Procurement team is looking at and working on ways to streamline the Division's internal processes. This includes enhancing procedures that determine how and what type of solicitation is done. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 46 • The Division will roll out its online Procurement Requisition in this fiscal year, implementing another process that brings the Division a step closer to being paperless and more environmentally friendly. • Purchasing 101 Workshops will continue with training events for the Procurement Division's internal and external customer base. • The acceptance of RFP responses and their evaluation will be moving to an electronic process conducted directly in the PlanetBids bidding system that is already utilized by the Procurement Division. This new feature is at no additional cost to the City. Department of Innovation and Technology The Department of Innovation and Technology manages the core technology platforms for the City of Rancho Cucamonga and facilitates the effective and innovative use of technology across the organization to serve our community. Our Department provides the following services to the City: • Data network design, operation and security • Enterprise application management, including cloud and server based systems • Voice -over -Internet -Protocol (VoIP) telephone system administration, management and service • Procurement and management of electronic devices including desktop, mobile, and shared platforms • Data science & visualization including Business Intelligence, mobile dashboard, and Geographic Information Systems platforms, including the Rancho Enterprise Geographic Information Systems (REGIS) team that develops regional GIS capabilities through business partnerships with other public agencies FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Migration of the City's e-mail and internal communications services to Microsoft cloud based platforms to improve resiliency, performance and accessibility. • Further development of paper -reduction and e-commerce practices including electronic retention of business license documentation, paperless personnel action processing, digital contract management and procurement. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 47 Development and deployment of enhanced public services applications such as GIS based citizen reporting tools and interactive digital maps. Continued expansion of open government and performance reporting using the current public performance dashboard and the addition of expanded tools such as interactive maps and data visualization tools and continue strategic partnerships for open governance with the White House Police Data Initiative and Bloomberg Philanthropies What Works Cities initiative. • Complete the implementation of the ultra -high speed internet project for the Archibald and Biane Libraries, providing up to 10 Gbps internet access at library sites using the California Research and Education Network (CALREN). • Improve data recovery, loss mitigation, efficiency and security by migrating data retention to a hybrid of on -premise disk and cloud based services. Animal Care and Services The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an innovative Animal Services Department whose mission is Building a Community in which every Adoptable Pet Finds a Home. The Animal Services Department cares for more than 5,000 homeless pets annually and responds to more than 7,500 calls for service related to stray animals, rescues, and animal welfare. The Department oversees the following program areas: Animal Care: General animal care, adoptions, reuniting lost pets with owners and kennel and facility maintenance. Community and Information Programs: Volunteer programs, foster care, fundraising, community outreach, social media and community information/education. Field Services: Animal pickup, rescues, investigations, rabies control, animal licensing, enforcement of animal regulations, co -exiting with wildlife and community education. Veterinarian Services: Veterinary treatment for animals housed at the Center, contracts for outside veterinary services for emergency and after hour care and specialized care; teaching hospital for Veterinary and Veterinary Assistant students. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 48 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • The Veterinary Services Department is focusing on offering no cost and low cost spay and neuter opportunities in targeted portions of the community. They will also continue their free spay and neuter program for both unowned community cats and pet cats belonging to residents. • The Department continues to improve the placement rate for neonatal kittens (1 day old to 8 weeks old) through the opening of a 24/7 kitten nursery. The kitten nursery is staff -run and largely volunteer supported. A Pet Cadet Program (for volunteers between the ages of 12 and 16) was implemented to expand the number of volunteers and youth educational opportunities. This program is made possible due to expanded fundraising opportunities and reallocation of other existing funds. • A capital project is budgeted to build large dog play yards at the City owned property located at Rochester and Arrow, nearly adjacent to the Animal Center. The new play yards will allow the Animal Center to expand its dog behavior and enrichment program, keeping the dogs healthier and mentally fit while they await adoption. City Clerk/Records Management Department As a partner in democracy, the City Clerk's Office/Records Management Department promotes community involvement and awareness and supports the City Council, staff and the citizens of Rancho Cucamonga by coordinating the legislative process and administering City elections. Governed by provisions of state, election, and municipal codes, the Department serves to preserve and protect the legislative history of the City. As a service department, staff assists the public, elected officials, and the City organization with a number of important activities, including accurately preparing and processing agendas, and administering the Citywide records management program including records storage and destruction. The City Clerk's Office administers the coordination of City elections, including the filing of Candidate Disclosure Statements and Statements of Economic Interests as required by law. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Implement an electronic Agenda Management System. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 49 • Implement an automated Public Records Request program to streamline recording, tracking, and responding to public records requests. • Update Records Management Manual and Retention Schedules and provide staff training. • Update City Council Candidate Handbook and plan, coordinate, and disseminate information on City Council Districts in preparation of November 2018 election. • Expand the number of document types (minutes/ordinances/resolutions) available to the public on the City's Website. • Assist in initiating additional scanning projects, including training, in various City Departments to help reduce the volume of records stored. • Update City's Conflict of Interest Code. City Management The City Manager is the administrative head of day-to-day city government, equivalent to the Chief Executive Officer of a private corporation. The City Manager is assisted by three Deputy City Managers and other staff to ensure there is adequate span -of -control and oversight for all thirteen departments and 500+ employees. The City Manager enforces municipal codes, directs daily operations of the City, makes recommendations to the City Council, prepares and monitors the municipal budget, and appoints and supervises all City department heads and employees. Rounding out City Management are key personnel who together help staff the Legislative Affairs and Performance Management Programs, all with the Communications, Healthy RC, and Community Improvement Divisions. Legislative Affairs Staff provides support for the City Council's active role in the League of California Cities as well as all Federal and State legislative and policy activities of the City Council. Mayor Dennis Michael continues to be active in the League of California Cities serving as Immediate Past oAft President on the Executive Committee. Council Member Spagnolo is 40 serving his second year as President of the League's Inland Empire Division and Mayor Pro Tern Kennedy serves as Vice Chair of the League's Legislative Task Force. Key staff and elected/appointed officials also serve on statewide League policy committees. Performance Management The City Manager's Office is leading the development of the City's online performance dashboard system. The dashboard displays public safety data and community and cultural services data. It is in the process of being expanded to include performance data for all city operations including community development, governance and finance, and health and sustainability. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 50 In Fiscal Year 2016/17, the City was selected to join the What Works Cities Initiative, a government improvement program conducted by experts from John Hopkins University and Harvard University. What Works Cities is a national initiative sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies designed to elevate and accelerate cities' use of data and evidence to engage citizens, improve decision -making, make governments more effective, and better people's lives. Rancho Cucamonga is one of 100 cities chosen to participate in this yearlong program, which will be a focus in FY 2017/18. Communications The Communications Division goal for the City is to become the "go to source" for information on happenings, development, events and efforts in the City - building trust and responsiveness so our residents and the media look to the City for facts versus speculation on social media. Several opportunities for regional and national exposure aided to enhance the City and leadership image and staff will continue to capitalize on positive recognition and the many times our leadership are recognized as leaders in the government profession. In early 2017, the division received the Award of Merit for the Most Effective Social / New Media from the California Association of Public Information Officials 2017 Awards of Excellence for its social strategies campaign utilizing Facebook Live streaming Q&A session with our City Attorney and whiteboard animation video which garnered tens of thousands people reached. Staff will continue to utilize this timely and cost effective method for sharing the story of our many departments, City news, events and updates. social Media7 The Division continues to be the City lead for our State of the City presentation, and fosters positive relationships with key agency partners and business relationships for added community value, contribution and engagement with our Rancho Cucamonga Chamber, Cucamonga Valley Water District, Ontario Convention & Visitors Bureau, Victoria Gardens, Chaffey College and many business partners. To improve the transparency of the City and the goal of the Division, the Division will be completing and implementing a Strategic Communication Plan in FY 2017/18. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 51 Healthy RC In March 2017, City Council adopted the Healthy RC Evaluation Plan. The Evaluation Plan, developed in partnership with community members and Healthy RC's community stakeholders, builds on the foundation for community health improvement that was laid by the Healthy RC Strategic Plan. Highlights of the Evaluation Plan included a number of positive downward trends. Environmental Sustainability The City's Environmental Sustainability Program enjoyed significant milestones in FY 16/17 with the completion of the Solar RC Expansion Project and the Sustainable Community Action Plan as well as leveraging key partnerships in order to advance sustainability in the community. Solar power systems totaling almost two Megawatts (MW) were installed at five municipal facilities as part of the SolarRC Expansion Project. Together, these solar power systems will prevent 33,788 metric tons of carbon dioxide from entering the air over a 25 year period. This is the equivalent of taking 7,100 cars off the road. The City is expected to save more than $6 million in energy costs over the life of the system. For FY 2017/18 the launch of the SolarRC Expansion Project Phase 2.0, will add solar installation for up to five additional City facilities for possible solar installation. Staff is already working on evaluating the five additional City facilities for possible solar installation. Staff is preparing a Request for Proposal in order to see what the solar market can offer the City. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 52 The Sustainable Community Action Plan (Plan) was adopted by the City Council in April 2017 after an 18 month process. The Plan serves as a vision for Rancho Cucamonga's sustainable future and articulates the community values and priorities as guiding principles in the sustainability plan. The City of Rancho Cucamonga received a Beacon Platinum Level Spotlight Award for Sustainability Best Practices from the Institute for Local Government and the League of California Cities in October 2016. The Beacon Award recognizes and celebrates California cities that promote sustainability, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, save energy, and adopt policies and programs to address climate change The Platinum Level for which Rancho Cucamonga is , receiving, is the highest level of achievement for Sustainability Best Practices and was accomplished by having robust and active programs in all categories. Community Improvement The Community Improvement Division has continued to build an effective team and begin more pro -active work to enhance the safety and quality of life for all residents and businesses in Rancho Cucamonga. With full staffing and an updated work schedule, coverage has been expanded to provide services six days a week to address issues that occur more often on weekends. An example of the pro -active work is more assertive actions on nuisance properties, including vacant structures. Whether homes or commercial buildings, long-term vacant properties can attract criminal activity or reduce property values in a neighborhood. Community Improvement Officers are utilizing the authority of the Municipal Code and California Health & Safety Code to secure structures, remove hazards such as weeds or stagnant water, and provide for rehabilitation of the property financed by the value of the property. These efforts stabilize neighborhoods and support commUNITY by mitigating the negative factors. In FY 2017/18, we will continue Community Improvement efforts to proactively respond to nuisance properties and vacant structures. In 2016, the State of California recognized the profession by establishing training standards and a certification procedure for employees enforcing municipal codes. Evidencing the existing strong commitment to employee development in the City, two officers have already received the designation of Certified Code Enforcement Officer and all others are on track to receive certification by 2018. Community Services The Community Services Department offers high quality recreational and cultural programs and manages public recreational facilities for Rancho Cucamonga residents, enhancing the quality of life for individuals of all ages. Department activities are coordinated through seven Divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 53 Arts/Playhouse Operations, Seniors and Human and oversees park development activities including the planning, design, and renovation of parks and facilities. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights Upgraded Ticketing System at the Lewis Family Playhouse - Beginning with the 2017/18 Season, the Lewis Family Playhouse will have an upgraded ticketing system to accommodate all the ticketing needs for the Playhouse and other events (such as 4th of July Spectacular) now and in the future. New features of the upgraded Tickets.com system will include print at home tickets or purchased tickets that can also be saved to your smartphone. It will interact with the LFP Mobile App, and allow subscribers to purchase their subscriptions online (a feature not currently available with the existing system). There are many new features that will help the Box Office staff and our patrons purchase and manage their tickets needs more efficiently. Cultural Center Courtyard Redesign - After a series of meetings with Victoria Gardens Representatives, City Staff and design consultants over the past several months, plans for a newly designed Courtyard are soon to be underway. The concepts aim to create a more inviting and usable space with shade and seating, a permanent stage for outdoor performances, an expanded Cultural Center Cafe, and a more visible Box Office windows are low all part of the desired elements for the redesign. Exterior painting is also part of the project which will put a fresh new, contemporary look to the facility and complement the redesigned Courtyard. Additionally, plans to provide a covered work area behind the theatre are also being explored in the project. Major League Softball Inc. (MLS) - As part of a diversified adult sports program, the Community Services Department partnered with Major League Softball Inc., provide year-round adult softball leagues to the community. League games take place at the Epicenter Sports Complex Monday through Friday evenings and on Sunday mornings and afternoons. This partnership has been very successful since the launch in 2016. Where MLS hosted their very first season in Rancho Cucamonga, bringing in 132 teams. The overall partnership has been very successful. Net revenue of $103,000 is anticipated from this program in FY 2017/18. Movies in the Park at Los Amigos - For Summer of 2017, Movies in the Park will add an additional night at the City of Rancho Cucamonga's newest park, Los Amigos. On Monday nights from July 10th — August 1st residents can enjoy a movie under the stars in the southwest portion of Rancho Cucamonga. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 54 Korean Baseball - The City of Rancho Cucamonga is excited to have the Korean baseball team, NC Dinos, back at LoanMart Field. The NC Dinos returned to Rancho Cucamonga for the conclusion of their spring training. Approximately 120 players and personnel from the NC Dinos took over LoanMart Field for 3 weeks, training and holding games against other Korean baseball teams also training in the surrounding area. Park Rangers - The Park Ranger program continues to provide the support needed to the community at large in Rancho Cucamonga. The goal of the Park Ranger program has been to enhance the City of Rancho Cucamonga's public safety initiative by protecting and preserving parklands and open space, enforcing regulations, providing community education, and promoting parks and open space as a vital community amenity. With the addition of a third Park Ranger position, the City will have the means to increase Park Ranger Patrol time from 50 to 75 hours per week, as well as provide more geographical coverage on a daily basis. This will also assist the Rancho Cucamonga Police Department by decreasing the critical time in which deputies spend on lower -level calls and will dramatically increase the ability to dedicate valuable resources to higher level calls critical to the overall safety of the community as the population continues to grow and usage of parks and open spaces steadily rises. RC Sports Center — Construction of the new RC Sports Center began on April 17, 2017. The new RC Sports Center is located in Parking Lot G across the street from LoanMart Stadium on Rochester Avenue. The Sports Center will feature three indoor basketball/volleyball courts, concession area with cafe seating, multi -purpose room, staff area and three outdoor covered basketball/volleyball courts. This project is approximately 55,000 square feet. There are 255 working days allocated to this project. Partnership with Goals Soccer Centers, Inc. — The City entered into a public private partnership, leasing approximately 4 acres of land at the Epicenter Sports Complex to develop, operate and maintain, on a long term basis, a "next generation" recreational sports park featuring at least 10 floodlit, synthetic grass "small -sided" soccer fields. Once open in 2018, the Goals Center will offer a variety of sporting activities for participants of all ages including drop in recreational play, instructional sessions aimed at various skill levels, skills competitions, youth and adult tournaments, summer and holiday camps, activities aimed at both youth and adult soccer development and a number of leagues catering to participants of all ages and abilities. The facility includes a 4,000 square -foot, modern pavilion that features professionally -styled men's and women's locker rooms and a sports cafe/multi- purpose room complete with Wi-Fi and flat screen televisions featuring live domestic and international soccer games. Improved Friday Night Fun Clubs - In an effort to improve the programming provided to our special needs community, City staff enhanced the Friday Night Fun Clubs offered on a monthly basis. Friday Night Fun Clubs will now give participants more of an experience. Friday Night Fun Clubs included an evening watching the Quakes play a game, an evening with the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Department and a night of bowling. In the past, Friday Night Fun Clubs were held at Central Park with a fun activity. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 55 • Special Needs Prom - In collaboration with the San Bernardino County Superintendent of Schools, the City of Rancho Cucamonga provided the special needs community with a prom all of their own! Participants enjoyed an evening of dancing, dinner and carriage rides at Central Park. Prom participants were entertained by the Colony High School dance team and live band. • Senior Transportation — In conjunction with the YMCA, the Silver Fox Senior Transportation Program will be expanding during FY 2017/18 to add a third bus. This additional bus will allow for increase of the capacity of the program ridership by 50% and will also allow enough flexibility to add doctor's visits to the route. The additional bus will be 100% subsidized by the San Bernardino County Transportation Authority through Measure I funds received by the YMCA. The anticipated start date of the third bus is fall of 2017. In addition, the YMCA is also leading the efforts of applying through the Federal Transit Authority for additional grant funding to replace the oldest, existing bus operating in the fleet. We anticipate a decision on this grant submission by late 2017 or early 2018. Youth/Teen Programs —The 2017 summer shifts into high gear with the launch of our Specialty Camp series. This exciting, innovative and creative program will offer experiences for campers geared to challenge the unique imaginations and interests of each camper through various activities geared towards S.T.E.A.M., nature, socialization and life skills. These specifically themed camps created by our youth programs team will change weekly and will cater towards unconventional camp expectations. There will also be the ever -popular Camp Cucamonga Junior, Kinder Camp, Camp Kahuna and TRAC Summer Camp for children ranging in ages of 3 to 15. Launching in the fall of 2017 will be the newly branded Teen Recreation Activity Club (T.R.A.C.). This program will move away from the traditional, passive drop -in model to a more engaging and active schedule of programs focused on leadership, job skills, life skills, and hands-on experiences working in local government. The goal will be to expand departments in the City, such as Special Needs, Healthy RC, City Clerk's Office, and many more. Economic and Community Development Group The Economic Development Group plays a key role in the fiscal health of the City. At its heart, economic development is about building a healthy local economy in order to have a healthy community. Economic Development provides services that assist in business retention, attraction and expansion, job creation, and expansion of public infrastructure. The City's Economic Development Strategic Plan offers new strategies and improves on existing activities in order to remain competitive in today's environment. It also ensures that the City is positioned for success in a new emerging economy and marketplace. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 56 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights Business Support: The Inland Empire Small Business Development Center (IESBDC) provides a vital role for new and existing business owners. The City in conjunction with the IESBDC provides Rancho Cucamonga business owners and entrepreneurs with technical assistance designed to improve their competitive standing in the marketplace. Ongoing education is also provided by the IESBDC on a monthly basis. This service is free to Rancho Cucamonga businesses and entrepreneurs. Business Retention: The Business Visitation Program is directed at the City's business retention efforts. Staff has developed a contact list of the top sales tax generators, top employers, Fortune 500 companies, and long tenured companies in order to target business visitations. With the support of other City departments, staff reaches out to businesses on the list and meets with them individually to assure the City is meeting the needs of each business enterprise. Communication: The City will continue its efforts to rebrand the existing marketing handouts including its communications portals such as its website, newsletter, and social media presence. The staff continues to implement the strategies outlined in the Economic Development Strategic Plan to expand job growth and encourage retail expansion. This budget year staff, in conjunction with DoIT and the Communications Manager, will focus on updating the Economic Development website and related links. • Data and Technology: Economic Development staff will continue its work with the GIS staff to develop an application for mobile devices and desk top computers that contains business analytics as well as site selection tools for economic development. Work will also continue to develop site selection data useful for attracting new incoming businesses. Planning Department The Planning Department's primary responsibilities are developing and implementing comprehensive plans that reflect the goals and policies of the City. Ensuring the long term success of the community through effective management of the City's growth. Conducting detailed analysis of all development proposals to verify consistency with the City's Goals and Policies. And working with other City Department's to build and maintain a high quality, balanced, and sustainable community for the Rancho Cucamonga residents, businesses, and visitors. The Planning Department has experienced a high number of visits and calls to the Public Counter over the last fiscal year. The volume of development applications submitted to the City for review has been steady. As the amount of readily available vacant land within Rancho Cucamonga Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 57 diminishes, development has shifted towards "in -fill" development. In -fill development requires increased coordination between the City, the applicant, and stakeholders within the community to ensure compatibility with existing development and consistency with the community's expectations. Furthermore, new environmental regulations require more detailed analysis of development applications and more frequent engagement with regulatory agencies. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights The Planning Department is currently reviewing several applications for mixed use development including projects at major street intersections such as "Day Creek Square"' at Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard, "Town Square - West" at Foothill Boulevard and Milliken Avenue, and "Rancho Cuvee" at Foothill Boulevard and Etiwanda Avenue. Staff is also meeting weekly with developers to discuss the design/technical details and the review process for the initial development applications for the recently approved Empire Lakes project. These projects have been enabled by the Department's efforts that are being completed in phases, to create development standards for mixed use development and establishing areas in the City suitable for mixed use and transit -oriented development (TOD). These ongoing efforts are critical to achieving the City's long term goals for sustainable development. In the future, Staff will begin work on determining the ideal locations for mixed use "villages" and developing more site -specific standards that will apply to them. In mid-2015, the City contracted with Sargent Town Planning to initiate the preparation of the North Eastern Sphere Annexation Specific Plan (NESASP) to establish the pre -zoning and potential annexation of the 4,115 acre project area. The project area extends from Haven Avenue, easterly to the City's boundary with Fontana, and from the northerly City limits to the National Forest boundary. The entirety of the project will include the development of a project specific plan, General Plan Amendment, Zoning Map Amendment, Etiwanda North Specific Plan Amendment, and all related environmental documentation. Initial design considerations maintain the northerly 2,915 acres as open space/conservation areas, and a "residential village" and conservation areas within the approximate 1,200 acre southerly portion. Early concepts include a mix of residential product types, a central commercial "town center", and public uses and amenities arranged in a compact and walkable land use pattern. During 2016, City staff and the Consultant Team have had several meetings with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to present the project design and elicit comments regarding potential environmental constraints. Pre -zoning is tentatively scheduled to be completed by early 2018 and annexation following through mid to late 2018. The Planning Department will be organizing a multi -discipline group to coordinate preparation for the 2020 Census. The first activity will be the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) that will take place in late 2017/early 2018 to ensure that all addresses are included in the Census master list that will be used to mail out the 2020 Census. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 58 • Staff will begin pre -work needed to in advance of a General Plan Update. Work will include identifying changes or updates needed within the existing General Plan, brainstorming future development patterns and incorporating the recently adopted Sustainable Community Action Plan into the General Plan goals and policies. • The 2017/18 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Annual Action Plan will be based on the Federal appropriation. Due to change in administration, allocations have yet to be announced. It is anticipated that CDBG funding will decrease 13 to 14% from the previous fiscal year. The CDBG program provides vital housing programs and services to low -and -moderate income families. Some of these programs include the Home Improvement Program, Wheelchair Ramps, Sidewalk Repair, Graffiti Removal Program, and restoration of the Etiwanda Depot. It also allows assistance to various public service providers including those administered by outside organizations such as Foothill Family Shelter, House of Ruth, and Camp Fire. Building and Safety Services Department Building and Safety Services enforces a series of nationally recognized standards and construction codes as well as mandates from the state regulatory agencies, in matters pertinent to building construction, grading, drainage, water quality and permit process. In addition, Building and Safety Services also enforces compliance to codes as it relates to energy, ADA laws, places of assembly, and housing requirements. Field inspections and safety assessments are performed by field inspectors. Plan checking is accomplished by in-house plan check staff and through the use of contract engineers, if needed, in order to meet the goal of quality service to the development community. The Department provides plan checks and inspection for compliance of California Fire Code and all fire, life and safety inspection activities. The Building and Safety Services Department, in partnership with the community: • Supports the community's construction projects through plan checking, permit and inspection services to meet the requirements of building and construction codes, state mandated regulations and municipal codes. • Works with other City departments to develop regulations and conditions FOR construction projects through the entitlement process. • Coordinates and assist other City departments in managing building and structural capital improvement projects and enforcing ADA regulations for City facilities. • Provide emergency responses and damage assessment during and after disaster events. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 59 FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • This year, the department worked closely with the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board to implement new State requirements for septic systems (LAMP). There were new regulations to be adopted by the City Council in June 2017. The City will continue to maintain the half -acre minimum lot size for residential properties with septic systems instead of using the State's mandate of 2.5 acres. • Additional funds were allocated to the Department for contract services for outside consultants to provide assistance in plan check and inspection for large, complex projects. • This is a year of transition for the Building and Safety Services Department. An interim Building and Safety Director was hired while the recruitment for a permanent Director is completed. • The department continues to provide opportunities for training new and existing staff on technical code requirements. This training is critical to proper implementation of the new State Code changes that became effective January 1, 2017. Public Works Services Department The Public Works Services Department's mission is to provide efficient stewardship of the City's public works = infrastructure. The Department has 4 sections: Facilities:. Serving 14 facilities and 8 Fire District buildings (over 1 � million square feet); Parks and Landscape: Maintaining 30 parks (Los Amigos Park was added in April 2017), Adult Sports Park and baseball stadium, 125 street front miles of landscape, 72,000 trees, paseos and trails; StreetlFleet/Storm Drain: Care for 532 roadway miles and 4,171 catch basins and 197 vehicles, 146 On and Off road equipment, 205 signal -controlled intersections/crossings, and graffiti removal; and, Administration/Project Management: Manage departmental support services, contracts, safety and risk management, budget, and capital maintenance projects. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Minimum wage impacts continue to be the largest reason for budget increases in the Public Works budget due to the heavy dependence on contract labor-intensive services such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services. • Public Works will continue to focus on the goal to reduce overall City water consumption. Parks staff have been working steadily on identifying areas where water can be reduced or eliminated in low traffic turf areas. • As part of the water saving effort, $550,000 has been set aside in LMDs 2 ($110,000) and 4R ($440,000) specifically for turf removals along with converting existing planter sections with low water use landscape plants and materials. • Work will continue into FY 2017/18 to complete a city-wide tree inventory that will improve the tree trimming process and improve the efficiency of the tree crew. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 6o • Public Works staff will also continue to replace or repair worn out rubberized surfacing at various parks. • With the good fortune of rain returning to the Inland Empire, so too do the roof leaks and repairs needed. During the new fiscal year, the roof system will be replaced at Lions West in addition to repairs being made at Lions East, the Animal Care and Adoption Center, and the Cultural Arts Center. • Other new facilities projects for this year include: the repair and maintenance of the parking deck at the Civic Center; replacement of the carpeting on the upper level rotunda area and main staircase at the Civic Center; the replacement of the moveable room divider wall in Celebration Hall at the Cultural Center. Engineering Services Department The Engineering Services Department strives to ensure that Rancho Cucamonga has the vital infrastructure in place to maintain its standing as the premiere community in the region. There are six sections in the Engineering Services Department. The Administration and Budget Section provides imperative management and fiscal support to all five Engineering Sections and is responsible for the City's Capital Improvement Project budgets. The Land Development Section is responsible for conditioning new development projects to install street improvements and collection of development impact fees, plan checking street improvement plans and the issuance of all permits within the public rights -of -way. The Transportation Management Section oversees the City's traffic and transportation systems, and investigates and provides recommendations on matters related to traffic safety. The Capital Project Management Section designs and manages the construction of City -funded projects. The Environmental Programs Section is working collaboratively for an environmentally safe, healthy and sustainable community today and for future generations. The Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) Section is dedicated to the operation and administration of the City's electrical distribution system. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Pavement rehabilitation of Foothill Blvd from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue. • Haven Avenue community trail improvements along the west side from Wilson Avenue to Vivienda Street. • Construction of the Upper Cucamonga storm drain improvements that captures drainage flows crossing 19th Street, before going south on Amethyst Street and joining the previously completed phases of the Upper Cucamonga storm drain by Hellman Avenue. • Design, construct, and implement an Intelligent Transportation System. This will decrease maintenance, improve staff efficiency, and improve signal timing coordination. The project will install conduit, fiber optic cable, and other network devices to connect the City's traffic signals to the City's Traffic Management Center. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 61 • Design and construction of two new traffic signals, located at 6th Street & Hellman Avenue and East Avenue & Highland Avenue. Other traffic related projects include flashing yellow arrow upgrades along Day Creek Boulevard, the installation of safety lights at Terra Vista Parkway & Spruce Avenue, and a pedestrian hybrid beacon installation, "the HAWK", along Base Line Road & Lion Street. • Upgrade recycling/trash receptacles at local schools and Chaffey Community College. • Implementation of Phase II of the Mandatory (businesses generating 4 or more cubic yards of organics). Community outreach and education on recycling and sustainability to Elementary schools. • Construction of 2 small line extension projects adding additional electric and dark fiber conduits, cabling and vaults to our existing backbone system. • RCMU plans to replace almost 600 old commercial meters with new technologically advanced smart meters in order to reduce meter reading costs. Organics Recycling Program • Implementation of Phase II of the Mandatory Organics Recycling Program (businesses generating 4 or more cubic yards of organics). Community outreach and education on recycling and sustainability to Elementary schools. Library Services The Rancho Cucamonga Public Library strives to inform and enrich our community by providing access to traditional and technologically innovative resources. The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable, service -oriented staff. These efforts were recognized nationally when the Library was awarded the National Medal for Museum and Library Services, the nation's highest honor that can be bestowed upon a library or a museum. Programs and services offered at the Archibald Library and Paul A. Biane Library include: • Children's services, including weekly and special event programs, performing and cultural arts programs, Homework Center, and Reading Enrichment Center. • Adult and children's information services. • Adult and family literacy services. • Teen and tween services and programming. • Public -access computers and free computer classes. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 62 The Library also offers outreach services, featuring bookmobile service to children and delivery service to the homebound and infirmed elderly. A full service Virtual Library provides 24/7 access to eBooks, research databases, online homework tutoring, downloadable music, and local history information. New sensory story times offer programs targeted specifically to special needs patrons, and our popular passport acceptance agency continues to meet a fast-growing demand for passport services in the community. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Further development of the RC Kids Discovery Space on the 2nd floor of the Paul A. Biane Library and kick off new Phase I programming including superhero costume design and construction classes, robotics challenges, and a STEAM petting zoo. • Purchase a new, state-of-the-art bookmobile. • Utilize Collection HQ, a new software created specifically for libraries that will help to analyze circulation statistics, trends and patterns to make data -driven decisions in the area of collection management. • Offer high-speed internet (both wired and wireless) to the public via CENIC (the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California.) Users will experience connectivity speeds which are 5,000 times faster than the current speeds. • Continue to examine and fine-tune lineup of story times and programs — 23 weekly children's story times, increase lineup of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) programs, and continue to pilot new special needs programming. • Increase materials collections, in both print and online formats, with new and updated titles at both Libraries. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 63 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 64 Attachment B 2017 CITY COUNCIL GOALS These 2017 goals were developed at the January 2017 City Council goal -setting session. As noted, many of these programs and projects are multi -year in nature, in order to develop and implement. PUBLIC SAFETY Proactively develop public safety programs and facilities to meet community needs. PS-1 By March 2017, explore the feasibility of additional measures that allow the Police Department to limit pedestrian access during the Thoroughbred holiday lights display. Police (prior year Council Goal) PS-2 By December 2017, continue to build/expand the Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) to include most major public facilities in town as well as the City perimeter. Police (prior year Council Goal) PS-3 By December 2016, in partnership with Police, Fire, and Public Works, develop a safety plan for Archibald Library, Biane Library, Central Park, Lions East and West, and the Family Resource Center. The safety plan could include increased staff training, recommendations for enhanced video surveillance, and an action plan in the event of an emergency. Library, Community Services, and Police (prior year Council Goal) PS-4 By March 2018, award a contract for the construction of the re -build of the San Bernardino Road Station (172), which will include a Police Department substation, at the new location at the northwest corner of Vineyard and San Bernardino Road. Fire PS-5 By December 2017, continue to "Harden the Target" through community training/education/meetings. Conduct Active Shooter Response training at every campus with school staff (AB 58 2014). Police PS-6 By June 2017, focus efforts on reducing of mail and package thefts through enhanced patrols, elevating public awareness; and exploring options with developers and the Post Master regarding location and security of the community mailboxes. Police PARKS AND RECREATION DEVELOPMENT Proceed with planning and development of major parks and recreational projects. PR-1 By March 2015, develop a plan for enhancements to the Cultural Center Courtyard that include shade and seating, directional signage from parking areas and design work for future capital improvements. Community Services, Library, City Manager's Office, and Planning (prior year Council Goal) PR-2 By March 2018, complete the survey and environmental review, develop a site plan, and establish a rough cost of development for Etiwanda Creek Park. Community Services PR-3 By June 2018, complete the construction and begin occupancy of the new community RC Sports Center; increase the City's disaster resiliency with the RCSC serving as the primary evacuation center during a catastrophic event. Community Services PR-4 By June 2018, conduct the public input process for a new Central Park Master Plan. Community Services Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 65 ENHANCING PREMIER COMMUNITY STATUS As the community matures, undertake programs and projects to enhance Rancho Cucamonga's position as the premier community in our region. EP-1 By June 2011, negotiate updated joint use agreements with the elementary school districts. Community Services (prior year Council Goal) EP-2 By March 2016, complete the design drawings for a proposed widening of Hellman Avenue at the Metrolink tracks, including a Traffic Signal at 8th Street, and construct the improvements. Engineering (prior year Council Goal) EP-3 By December 2017, position the City to improve its issuer credit rating from the current AA (by S&P) to AA+ or AAA in the next three years. Finance (prior year Council Goal) EP-4 By June 2016, develop a Public Art Master Plan to consider how significant art pieces can be incorporated into future public and private development, to include funding options for both art installation and long-term maintenance. City Manager's Office and Planning (prior year Council Goal) EP-5 By March 2017, amend the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code regarding Construction Permits for Excavations and Pavement Cuts. Put in place an Ordinance establishing a moratorium against certain types of pavement cuts that contribute to early pavement degradation. Engineering EP-6 By December 2017, complete Phase 1 of the City fiber broadband feasibility study and begin Phase 2 of the study by issuing a Request for Information (RFI) seeking a private partner to be a potential service provider in marketing and delivering broadband services to end users. Engineering EP-7 By June 2017, plan and host a Healthy RC open -streets -type pilot signature event that brings the community together to celebrate and highlight Rancho Cucamonga's heritage, diversity, culture, and quality of life for its residents and visitors. City Manager's Office, Community Services, and Engineering EP-8 By July 2017, develop programming that includes piloting multi -day or week classes for the Biane Library 2nd Floor. Library MID AND LONG RANGE PLANNING Begin efforts to develop mid -range and long-term goals and vision for the City. ML-1 By January 2014, develop and present to City Council a long term financial plan for the fiscal sustainability of the City's special districts (LMD's, SLD's, CFD's). Administrative Services (prior year Council Goal) ML-2 By September 2013, review areas with industrial zoning along arterials for possible rezoning to permit more commercial/office uses. Example of one such area is Rochester/Jack Benny by Quakes Stadium. Planning and Community Development (prior year Council Goal) ML-3 By March 2014, review the City's long term objectives for the entire 6,000 acre Sphere area and identify development, mitigation, preservation and annexation potential. City Manager's Office and Community Development (prior year Council Goal) ML-4 By May 2016, review the City's zoning districts and evaluate/investigate creating overlay districts or specific plan areas that will create villages or development districts in order to revitalize underperforming or underutilized areas and create synergy amongst the varying land uses. Planning (prior year Council Goal) ML-5 By June 2016, review the possibility of an open data technology system that provides access to the City's budget and financial information in order to promote local government transparency and public trust. Finance and City Manager's Office (prior year Council Goal) ML-6 By December 2015, work with the community to develop a recommendation for an updated Vision Statement for the City Council's consideration. City Manager's Office (prior year Council Goal) ML-7 By December 2017, participate in the Bloomberg Philanthropies' What Works Cities Initiative and complete the Scope of Work to advance the City's performance analytics and results -driven contracting capacity. City Manager's Office Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 66 ML-8 By June 2018, building upon existing performance metrics, develop additional tools, such as business intelligence dashboards and interactive reporting, to visualize and interpret Citywide data in order to enhance understanding and decision making across applicable service categories. Department of Innovation $ Technology ML-9 By December 2017, develop a holistic data and network security strategy that protects the City's information assets, guards against network incursions, and ensures continuity of operations. Department of Innovation 8 Technology ML-10 By December 2020, develop and implement a plan to significantly reduce the City's total water consumption using the 2013/14 consumption rates as the baseline. Public Works Services OTHER OBJECTIVES: Begin multi -year process of revising and/or implementing major City documents and systems, including: * None at the present time. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 67 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 68 GOVERNMENT FINANCE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Distinguished Budget Presentation Award PRESENTED TO City of Rancho Cucamonga California For the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2016 Executive Director The Government Finance Officers Association of the United States and Canada (GFOA) presented a Distinguished Budget Presentation Award to the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California for its annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2016. In order to receive this award, a governmental unit must publish a budget document that meets program criteria as a policy document, operations guide, financial plan, and communications device. This award is valid for a period of one year only. We believe our current budget continues to conform to program requirements and will be submitted to GFOA to determine its eligibility for another award. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 69 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 70 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA GENERAL INFORMATION Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 71 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 72 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Name L. Dennis Michael Lynne Kennedy William J. Alexander Sam Spagnolo Diane Williams City Officials City Council Mayor Mayor Pro -Tern Council Member Council Member Council Member Administration and Department Heads City Manager Deputy City Manager/Civic and Cultural Services Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services Deputy City Manager/Economic and Community Development City Attorney Treasurer City Clerk Animal Services Director Building and Safety Services Director City Clerk Services Director Community Services Director Engineering Services Director/City Engineer Finance Director Fire Chief Human Resources Director Innovation and Technology Director Library Director Police Chief Public Works Services Director Term Expires 2018 2020 2018 2020 2018 John R. Gillison Elisa C. Cox Lori Sassoon Jeff Bloom James L. Markman James Frost Janice C. Reynolds Veronica Fincher Vacant Linda Troyan Jennifer Hunt-Gracia Jason Welday Tamara L. Layne Mike Costello Robert Neiuber Darryl Polk Julie Sowles Danielle Boldt Bill Wittkopf Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 73 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 74 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Organization Chart t-itizens of Rancho Cucamonga City Clerk I I City Council City City Manager City Treasurer Administrative Civic and Police Economic and Services Cultural Services Department Community Admin/Procurement Development Fire Community District Finance Services Animal Care Human Library and Services Resources Services Community Innovation and Records Improvement Technology Management Building and Engineering FPublic Works Planning I Safetv Services Services Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 75 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 76 Gen S80,757,570 Governance Police Animal Care and Services Administrative Services Finance Human Resources Economic and Comm. Dev. Building and Safety Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Community Services nds CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Functional Units by Fund Type Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Governance Comm Dev Technical Services Police Reimb St/County Parking Cit Law Enforcement Reserve Traffic Safety Administrative Services Info Technology -Development City Technology Fee Capital Reserve Finance Benefits Contingency Human Resources Capital Reserve Economic and Comm. Dev. Comm Dev Technical Services City Technology Fee Building and Safety Comm Dev Technical Services City Technology Fee Mobile Home Park Program SB1186 Cert Access Special Program Engineering Services Comm Dev Technical Services City Technology Fee Capital Reserve Planning Comm Dev Technical Services City Technology Fee Public Works Services CVWD Reimbursements County of S.B. Reimbursements Capital Reserve Community Services Capital Reserve $247,411,470 $127,399,540 Assessment Districts Admin AB2766 Air Quality Improvement Beautification Drainage Facilities Park Development Transportation Etiwanda No. Equestrian Facility Underground Utilities Landscape Maintenance Districts LMD #1 Capital Replacement Street Light Maintenance Districts Gas Tax Measure I AB 2928 Traffic Congestion Relief Foothill Blvd Maintenance Integrated Waste Management Prop 42-Traffic Congestion Mitig. Proposition 1B State Funding Asset Seizure - State and Federal Citywide Infrastructure Imprv. Community Dev. Block Grant Federal Safetea-LU Prop I - SLPP Pedestrian Grant/Art 3 Public Resrce Grants/Healty RC CA Recycle/Litter Reduction Grant Used Oil Recycling Safe Routes to School Program Prop 84 Park Bond Act Recreation Services Victoria Gardens Cultural Center Library Fund Library Development CA State Library Staff Innovation (CA ST LB) The Big Read Library Gant COP'S Program Grant - State Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) COPS Hiring Program Grant Dept of Homeland Security Grant Housing Sucessor Agency AD 91-2 Redemption -Day Canyon PD 85 Redemption Fund PD 85 Capital Replacement CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance Fire Protection District $450 AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello CFD 2001-01 CFD 2003-01 Cultural Center CFD 2004-01 Rancho Etiwanda Est CFD 2006-01 Vintner's Grove Sports Complex REGIS Connect Municipal Utility Utility Public Benefit al Service Equipment Nehicle Replacement Computer Equip/Tech Replacement Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 77 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 78 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga General Information: The City of Rancho Cucamonga currently has an estimated population of 176,699 and encompasses approximately 40.2 square miles. It is located between the cities of Upland to the west, Ontario to the south, Fontana to the east and is in the western section of San Bernardino County which is in the southern part of the State of California. The local economy includes a diverse business base of office, light manufacturing and distribution, and retail which emphasizes the City's efforts at attracting and retaining sales tax generating businesses to help provide a stable financial base. Government: The City of Rancho Cucamonga (the City) was incorporated in 1977 as a general law city under the provisions of the Government Code of the State of California, and operates under the Council - Manager form of city government. The City officials elected at large include a Mayor and four City Council members, a City Clerk and a City Treasurer. The Mayor and Council members are elected on a staggered basis for a term of four years. There is no limit on the number of terms an individual can serve as Mayor or as Council members. The Mayor and City Council appoint the City Manager and City Attorney. Population (per California State Department of Finance): 2006-172,322 2007-173,916 2008-175,627 2009-177,051 2010-178,904 2011-169,498 2012-171,058 2013-172,299 2014-174,064 2015-175,251 2016-177,324 2017-176,699 Number of Registered Voters (San Bernardino County Registrar of Voters): 86,956 Capital Asset Statistics (per June 30, 2016 CAFR): Police: Stations: 1 Patrol units: 63 Public Works: Streets (miles): 532 Streetlights: 16,744 Traffic signals: 224 Fire: Fire Stations: 7 Parks and Recreation: Parks: 31 Acreage: 343 Community centers: 6 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 79 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Population by Age 2010 (Census), 2017 (est), and 2022 (est) Total 165,269 0-4 6.2% 5-9 6.8% 10 - 14 7.7% 15 - 24 15.6% 25 - 34 14.4% 35 - 44 15.0% 45 - 54 15.7% 55 - 64 10.8% 65 - 74 4.7% 75 - 84 2.3% 85 + 0.9% Total 176,699 0-4 5.9% 5-9 6.2% 10 - 14 6.7% 15 - 24 13.9% 25 - 34 16.1% 35 - 44 14.1% 45 - 54 14.0% 55 - 64 12.4% 65 - 74 7.0% 75 - 84 2.6% 85 + 1.0% Total 184,498 0-4 6.0% 5 - 9 6.0% 10 - 14 6.3% 15 - 24 12.1% 25 - 34 16.4% 35 - 44 15.4% 45 - 54 12.8% 55 - 64 12.1% 65 - 74 8.4% 75 - 84 3.4% 85 + 1.1% Source: Esri Community Profile (U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2017 and 2022. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 8o CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Educational Attainment Current Year u Total 118,954 Less than 9th Grade 3.8% 9th - 12th Grade, No Diploma 5.2% High School Graduate 18.0% GED/Alternative Credential 2.7% Some College, No Degree 27.9% Associate Degree 9.2% Bachelor's Degree 20.7% Graduate/Professional Degree 12.6% Source: Esri Community Profile (U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010 Summary File 1. Esri forecasts for 2017. Esri converted Census 2000 data into 2010 geography.) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 81 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Principal Employers Current Year and Nine Years Ago* 2016 2007 Number of Employer Employees' Rank Inland Empire Health Plan QEHP) 1,450 1 Chaffey Community College 1,335 2 Etiwanda School District 1,025 3 Amphastar Pharmaceutical 880 4 City of Rancho Cucamonga 855 5 Southern California Edison 800 6 Alta Loma School District 650 7 Big Lots Distribution Center 605 8 Mercury Insurance Company 595 9 Central School District 527 10 West Coast Liquidators n/a n/a Frito-Lay, Inc. n/a n/a CMC Steel Fabricators n/a n/a Percent of Percent of Total Number of Total Employment Employees' Rank Employment 1.57% n/a n/a n/a 1.44% 1,516 1 1.87% 1.11% 1,267 2 1.56% 0.95% 880 3 1.09% 0.92% 842 4 1.04% 0.86% 800 5 0.99% 0.70% 750 6 0.92% 0.65% n/a n/a n/a 0.64% 606 7 0.75% 0.57% n/a n/a n/a n/a 565 8 0.70% n/a 561 9 0.69% n/a 517 10 0.64% Note: "Total Employment" as used above represents the total employment of all employers located within city limits. ' Includes full-time and part-time employees. *Only the top ten employers for each year presented have data displayed. If a company did not rank in the top ten employers for both years presented, then one of the two years will state "n/a". Source: June 30, 2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 82 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Principal Sales Tax Remitters Current Year and Nine Years Ago 2016 2007 Business Name Business Category Business Name Business Cateeory Apple Electronics/Appliance Stores Ameron International Contractors Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World Sporting Goods/Bike Stores Ameron Steel Pipe Contractors Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Apple Electronics/Appliance Stores Chevron Service Stations Best Buy Electronics/Appliance Stores Costco Discount Department Stores Chevron Service Stations Home Depot Lumber/Building Materials Circuit City Electronics/Appliance Stores JC Penney Department Stores Costco Discount Department Stores Jeromes Home Furnishings Dan Reshaw Mobil Service Stations Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings Home Depot Lumber/Building Materials Lowes Lumber/Building Materials JC Penney Department Stores Macys Department Stores Kayo Oil Service Stations Meadowbrook Meat Company Food Service Equip./Supplies Living Spaces Furniture Home Furnishings Monoprice Fulfillment Centers Lowes Lumber/Building Materials NIC Partners Electrical Equipment Macys Department Stores Parallon Supplies Chain Solutions Medical Biotech Mervyns Department Stores Phos-Check Fire Retardants Drugs/Chemicals Novartis Animal Health Medical/Biotech Ralphs Grocery Stores Liquor Sears Department Stores Sears Department Stores Shell/Texaco Service Stations Tamco Heavy Industrial Southwire Energy/Utilities Target Discount Department Stores Tamco Heavy Industrial Tesoro Refining & Marketing Service Stations Target Discount Department Stores Vector Resources Contractors Walmart Discount Department Stores Verizon Wireless Electronics/Appliance Stores Walters Wholesale Electric Plumbing/Electrical Supplies Walmart Discount Department Stores West End Material Supply Lumber/Building Materials Walters Wholesale Electric Plumbing/Electrical Supplies Wickes Home Furnishings * Firms listed alphabetically Source: June 30, 2016 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 83 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 84 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Budget Guide The purpose of the City of Rancho Cucamonga's budget is to serve as a "blueprint" for providing City services and as a working financial plan for the fiscal year. It also represents the official organization plan, by which, City policies, priorities, and programs are implemented. It provides the means to communicate to the residents, businesses, and employees how the City's financial sources are used to provide services to the community. The budget includes both the operating costs to manage the City and the capital improvement projects that the City plans to undertake during the fiscal year. The budget is organized by fund, by department, and by account. A fund is defined as a fiscal accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts recording cash and other financial resources, together with all related liabilities and balances, which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities in accordance with special regulations, restrictions, or limitations. A department (e.g., Administrative Services) is an organizational unit with divisions (e.g., Purchasing). "Line" accounts provide the details of the type of expenditure that each department/division spends — e.g., salaries, benefits, supplies, and so forth. The budget document can be broken down into the following sections: Introduction: This section includes the City Manager's executive summary to the City Council and describes what is in the budget, including budget issues and policies that lead to the development of the budget. It also includes the City's GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award. General Information: This section includes a listing of City Officials; a City-wide Organization Chart; a Functional Units by Fund Type chart; various demographic and economic data for the City; a Budget Guide; and a description of the Budget Process. Summaries of Financial Data: This section provides a variety of financial analyses such as multi -year revenue comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; multi -year expenditure comparisons for the operating budget and the total budget; and the beginning and ending fund balances for each fund. Departmental Budget Details: This section divides the document by department. It starts with City Council. The reader will find a narrative of the department describing each division and each program within that department; current year budget highlights; multi -year comparisons of expenditures by funding source and category; multi -year summaries of budgeted full and part time staffing; performance statistics; and services to the community. Capital Improvement Program: This section provides a summary of the capital improvement projects planned for the year including their descriptions, funding sources, and the estimated cost of each project. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 85 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Budget Process The City's budget process begins in January. The City Manager outlines the goals and directives for the development of the coming year's budget based on the results of the semi-annual Council goal setting workshops. Finance distributes the budget calendar, instructions, forms, and budget worksheets to the departments. Public Works Services coordinates the departmental building modification and vehicle replacement requests. Engineering coordinates the capital improvement project requests. After the departments have input their budget requests, Finance compiles the data and calculates the total amount requested including estimated revenues and projected fund balances. The City Manager and Finance Director hold departmental budget meetings. Subsequently, the City Manager makes his recommendations and Finance prepares the proposed budget document. The City Manager submits the proposed budget to City Council. The Council conducts a budget study session; sets a public hearing; and adopts the budget prior to the beginning of the fiscal year. After the budget is adopted, staff integrates the budgetary data into the City's accounting system. Month -end reports are distributed to the departments to monitor budget performance throughout the year. Capital Improvement Projects Budget Process: The City maintains a rolling Five -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP). In February each year, the Engineering Services Department solicits proposals from the other City departments for inclusion in the coming year's capital improvement projects budget. Around the same time, the Finance Department provides Engineering Services the estimated fund balances available for appropriation for CIP. These fund balances usually come from Special Revenue Funds and Capital Projects Funds. Both these fund types are earmarked for specific uses. Engineering Services staff then prepares the Capital Improvement Project form, which provides detailed information about the proposed capital improvement project. Typically, a project costing $5,000 or more (with some exceptions depending on the type of project) is categorized as a capital improvement project. During the departmental budget meetings, the City Manager and staff conduct a "walkthrough" of the various proposed projects. After the City Manager's evaluation of what will be included in the proposed budget, the CIP is submitted to the Planning Commission to determine if the projects conform to the General Plan. The proposed CIPs relating to parks are also submitted to the Parks and Recreation Commission for comments and recommendations. Budget amendments: Supplemental appropriations, when required during the fiscal year, require approval by the City Council. Although supplemental appropriations can occur throughout the fiscal year, a comprehensive update to budgeted figures occurs once per year as part of the Amended Budget process which is presented to the City Council in May each fiscal year. Budget changes within each department or between accounts are approved by the City Manager and/or the respective department head depending on the dollar threshold of the budget change. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 86 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Budget Process Basis of budgeting: The City uses the modified accrual basis in budgeting governmental funds. This means that obligations of the City, including outstanding purchase orders, are budgeted as expenses and revenues are recognized when they are both measurable and available to fund current expenditures. For proprietary funds, the budget is prepared on a full accrual basis. This means expenses are recognized when incurred and revenues are recognized when due the City. Depreciation expense is not included in budgeting for proprietary funds but the full purchase price of equipment is included in the budget. Basis of accounting: The City uses the modified accrual basis of accounting for governmental funds. Revenues are recorded when measurable and available to fund current expenditures. Expenditures are recorded when the services are substantially performed or the goods have been received and the liabilities have been incurred. The City's proprietary funds use the full accrual basis of accounting; revenues are recorded when earned and expenses are recorded when incurred. Budgetary control is maintained at the department level within each fund. The City also maintains an encumbrance accounting system budgetary control. Estimated purchase amounts are encumbered prior to the release of purchase orders to vendors. At fiscal year end, all operating budget appropriations lapse. Open encumbrances are reported as reservations of fund balances at fiscal year end. Budgetary Data: Annual budgets are legally adopted for all funds on a basis consistent with generally accepted accounting principles, except for the following funds for which no budget is proposed for FY 2017/18: Special Revenue Funds: AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center Community/Rec Center Development Library Impact Fee Police Impact Fee SB 140 Various Grant Funds Capital Projects Funds: ADs 82-1, 86-2 Park Land Acquisition Park Improvement Animal Center Impact Fee General City Street Lights Henderson/Wardman Drainage CFDs 2000-01, 2003-01, 2004-01, 2006-02 The following Flow Chart describes the City's annual budget process. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 87 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget January FINANCE Analyze and Project Revenue Estimates February FINANCE Present Mid -Year Budget Review March/April CITY MANAGER/ FINANCE DIRECTOR Budget Meetings with Departments May 1 CITY MANAGER Submit Proposed Budget to City Council Budget Process February DEPARTMENTS Early January Submit Budget Requests to Finance Department BUDGET KICK-OFF February/March April/May FINANCE Prepare Proposed Budget June CITY COUNCIL/ CITY MANAGER Conduct Budget Study Session FINANCE Review and Analyze Budget Requests/ Finalize Revenue Projections May ENGINEERING/ PUBLIC WORKS CIP presented to Planning Commission June CITY COUNCIL Hold Public Hearing and Adopt Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 88 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 89 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY - OPERATING BUDGET Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Description Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $ 98,706,562 $ 99,562,610 $103,597,090 Licenses & Permits 4,044,696 4,161,040 4,210,180 Fines & Forfeitures 952,317 836,040 931,710 Use of Money & Property 878,917 902,880 965,060 Charges for Services 3,142,160 3,338,440 3,391,150 Intergovernmental 157,863 177,150 190,950 Other 7,530,999 4,099,580 4,681,230 Transfer In 2,366,399 2,548,200 2,736,120 Total Revenues $117,779,913 $115,625,940 $120,703,490 Expenditures By Department: Governance: City Council $ 111,291 $ 128,160 $ 123,930 City Clerk 1,873 1,940 1,910 City Treasurer 8,638 12,150 12,230 City Management 1,880,308 2,218,720 2,500,600 Total Governance $ 2,002,110 $ 2,360,970 $ 2,638,670 Public Safety: Fire District $ 33,337,847 $ 33,242,760 $ 35,014,090 Police 32,922,454 35,610,630 37,363,370 Animal Care Services 2,924,837 3,155,980 3,236,220 Total Public Safety $ 69,185,138 $ 72,009,370 $ 75,613,680 Civic and Cultural Services: Records Management $ 540,005 $ 490,530 $ 512,000 Community Services 4,530,255 5,025,020 5,223,800 Library Services 3,768,717 4,730,730 5,163,710 Total Civic and Cultural Services $ 8,838,977 $ 10,246,280 $ 10,899,510 Administrative Services: Administration/General Government $ 9,378,757 $ 7,440,240 $ 7,436,020 Finance 1,400,207 1,749,550 1,883,970 Human Resources 650,468 827,840 1,009,580 Innovation and Technology 2,436,685 3,526,360 3,723,860 Total Administrative Services $ 13,866,117 $ 13,543,990 $ 14,053,430 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 443,229 $ 737,080 $ 810,680 Building and Safety Services 1,622,965 2,019,300 1,848,380 Engineering Services 2,351,039 2,267,690 2,421,460 Planning 1,896,184 1,884,240 1,829,760 Public Works Services 8,552,551 10,355,420 10,819,800 Total Economic and Community Development $ 14,865,968 $ 17,263,730 $ 17,730,080 Total Expenditures $108,758,310 $115,424,340 $120,935,370 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures $ 9,021,603 $ 201,600 $ (231,880) See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page go CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SUMMARY - ALL FUNDS Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget Revenues By Category: Taxes $ 121,485,674 $ 121,176,660 $ 126,631,900 Licenses & Permits 4,353,409 4,420,100 4,469,240 Fines & Forfeitures 1,328,323 1,316,710 1,289,220 Use of Money & Property 6,478,320 5,193,850 5,628,210 Charges for Services 18,074,317 19,224,340 19,938,490 Intergovernmental 24,248,243 17,091,140 15,817,610 Development Fees 4,016,732 3,957,000 3,632,000 Other 15,136,164 6,071,210 22,959,250 Transfer In 11,246,103 7,690,220 7,438,890 Total Revenues $ 206,367,285 $ 186,141,230 $ 207,804,810 Expenditures By Department: Governance: City Council $ 111,291 $ 128,160 $ 123,930 City Clerk 1,873 1,940 1,910 City Treasurer 8,638 12,150 12,230 City Management 1,953,107 2,268,450 2,510,330 Total Governance $ 2,074,909 $ 2,410,700 $ 2,648,400 Public Safety: Police $ 34,254,762 $ 36,979,230 $ 38,862,340 Fire District 41,446,183 58,271,970 50,737,950 Animal Care Services 2,924,837 3,155,980 3,236,220 Total Public Safety $ 78,625,782 $ 98,407,180 $ 92,836,510 Civic and Cultural Services: Records Management $ 540,005 $ 490,530 $ 512,000 Community Services 10,221,978 13,671,010 11,899,540 Library Services 5,615,151 5,091,180 5,393,080 Total Civic and Cultural Services $ 16,377,134 $ 19,252,720 $ 17,804,620 Administrative Services: Administration/General Government $ 16,230,652 $ 18,332,460 $ 30,042,870 Finance 5,271,852 5,596,530 20,158,070 Human Resources 650,468 827,840 1,009,580 Innovation and Technology 4,054,985 5,048,190 4,828,100 Total Administrative Services $ 26,207,957 $ 29,805,020 $ 56,038,620 Economic and Community Development: Administration $ 624,398 $ 1,273,160 $ 1,057,200 Building and Safety Services 1,626,715 2,063,450 1,892,740 Engineering Services 32,071,116 50,289,120 39,785,800 Planning 3,031,774 11,028,010 8,249,940 Public Works Services 21,706,997 26,018,160 27,097,640 Total Economic and Community Development $ 59,061,000 $ 90,671,900 $ 78,083,320 Total Expenditures $ 182,346,782 $ 240,547,520 $ 247,411,470 Excess of Revenues Over (Under) Expenditures $ 24,020,503 $ (54,406,290) $ (39,606,660) See Notes to Financial Summary Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 91 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA NOTES TO FINANCIAL SUMMARY Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget The accompanying Financial Summary reports provide a snapshot of the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California's operating budget as well as the organization as a whole. The City's operating budget is comprised of the General Fund (Fund 001), the Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281,282, 283), and the Library Fund (Fund 290). Financial Summary — Operating Budget: 2015/16 Actual: Generally, revenues for the Operating Budget were higher than anticipated and expenditures were less than anticipated. The primary cause of overall operating revenues exceeding operating expenditures was the Fire District's receipt of a one-time distribution from the Public Agency Self -Insurance System (PASIS) in the amount of $3,709,808 for the Fire District's share of the now dissolved entity. PASIS facilitated payments of the Fire District's workers compensation claims. Effective for Fiscal Year 2015/16, the Fire District's workers compensation insurance is handled through the Public Agency Risk Sharing Authority of California (PARSAC), which is the same JPA that handles the City's insurance. 2016/17 Adopted and 2017/18 Adopted: The City's goal is to adopt a balanced Operating Budget with the exception of the planned use of reserves. For FY 2016/17, there was no planned use of reserves; however, for FY 2017/18, the Library Fund included the planned use of reserves in the amount of $231,880 to fund the replacement of the Library's popular Bookmobile. The use of reserves by the Library Fund for FY 2016/17 was offset by an anticipated contribution to reserves in the amount of $184,650 for Community Facilities District (CFD) 85-1 (Fund 282). This contribution to reserves will be utilized in a future year to replace certain capital assets within the CFD. All other Fire District Operational Funds were balanced for FY 2016/17. For FY 2017/18, the City adopted balanced budgets for the General Fund and the Fire District Operational Funds. Financial Summary — All Funds: 2015/16 Actual: Revenues increased slightly from the prior year overall, with some shifting of revenues between categories. Revenues from taxes increased $6,695,805 or 5.8% due to growth in the City's assessed valuation and new secured properties being added to the tax roll for property taxes as well as healthy economic activity resulting in additional sales tax revenue. Intergovernmental revenues increased $8,076,293 or 49.9% due to reimbursements from various governmental agencies for their share of operating and capital projects for general infrastructure improvements throughout the City, such as the Base Line/I-15 Interchange project. Expenditures increased slightly from the prior year as well. Notable changes from the prior year include the current year property purchases for the Fire District's Fire Station 178 and relocation of the San Bernardino station. 2016/17 Adopted and 2017/18 Adopted: The Operating Budget is incorporated into this schedule. In addition to the discussion noted above regarding the Operating Budget, many of the other City funds have capital outlay expenditures budgeted which are funded by resources accumulated over a period of time. This can result in overall expenditures exceeding revenues in a given year, depending on the level of capital improvement activity. The Capital Improvement Program (CIP) section of this document details out the projects budgeted for FY 2017/18 and includes the funding sources. Some of the larger items included in the CIP include the Citywide Street Light Acquisition ($9,779,290) and Citywide Street Light LED Retrofit ($4,121,440), both of which will be funded by an interfund advance from the Capital Reserve Fund; the relocation of the San Bernardino Fire Station ($9,420,000); and the construction of the Cucamonga Storm Drain Upper Phase 11($3,900,000). Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 92 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N N V� O N 01 00 00 7 O 00 'n o0 01 h 0o O+ ^� 17 oO V N a, 00 V Vl F" kn 7 O M t-- "D 7 ^-� vi D; '!i M N t` [� N \O '� �--� vi l� t` M 00 Cl N h O N 69 69 bA 6s 69 cl W 'n O\ N O T t- N Obi o0M ��O _h 'n�C, 00 Cto WI I* IS 69 6s 6s 69 M O O O O O O O O O O O O O O y 'n O O 00 It O W O\ O1 t- M O N 'O .. 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LO v� w o abi od o V) 3 W In, a0U rn Im w Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 93 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Special Districts Summary The City of Rancho Cucamonga has eleven Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), eight Street Lighting Maintenance Districts (SLDs) as well as several other Special Districts such as one Benefit Assessment District (AD), various Community Facilities Districts (CFDs), and one Park and Recreation District (PD). Three of these other Special Districts provide funding for maintenance of specific public improvements within the City — AD 91-2, PD-85, and CFD 2000-03. Those Special Districts, along with the various LMDs and SLDs, are summarized below and in the following schedule to identify those Special Districts with fiscal sustainability issues that will need to be addressed in future years. When the LMDs were established, they were created in conjunction with new development coming into the City, and were intentionally designed to ensure that each district bore the costs of the maintenance of the infrastructure that provides special benefit to the property owners. The assessments received for LMDs are utilized only for the maintenance and operation of parks and other landscaping within the boundaries of each district. Maintenance and operation includes, but is not limited to, turf, ground cover, planter beds, shrubs, plants and trees, landscape lighting, irrigation systems, electrical energy for irrigation controllers, insect/disease control, graffiti removal, hardscapes, entry signs, sound walls and all appurtenant facilities. The City utilizes current year assessment revenues, prior year carryovers, and (in some cases) contributions from the General Fund to meet each district's annual expenses. The budgeted contributions from the General Fund for FY 2017/18 are $123,740 for LMD #1, $293,490 for LMD #2 and $52,460 for LMD #6R. The SLDs provide street light coverage throughout the general city and planned communities. Each year the assessments received are earmarked for the maintenance and operation of street lights, traffic signals and appurtenant facilities. This maintenance and operation includes the cost and supervision of street lighting maintenance, including repair, removal or replacement of all or any part of any improvement providing for lighting within these Districts. The budgeted contribution from the General Fund for FY 2017/18 is $350,170 for SLD #2 and $105,100 for SLD #7. The deficit fund balance for SLD #5 will also be addressed in future years through a phased -in approach. PD-85 was originally created to provide funds to finance the cost of construction, maintenance, operation and debt service payments for Heritage Community Park and Red Hill Community Park. Heritage Community Park is a 40-acre facility located on the southwest corner of Hillside Road and Beryl Street. Red Hill Community Park is 42 acres and is located on the southwest corner of Base Line Road and Vineyard Avenue. The District's boundary includes all of the City of Rancho Cucamonga with the general exception of land east of the Deer Creek Channel and the Victoria, Caryn and Terra Vista Planned Communities. The annual assessments levied and collected are dedicated to the ongoing maintenance and operation and periodic capital improvement expenditures for the parks. The budgeted contribution from the General Fund for FY 2017/18 is $203,990. AD 91-2 was formed for the protection of certain properties with the construction of a 27+ acre-foot desilting basin and a 1,460+ linear foot concrete drainage channel. Annual assessments provide funding for the annual maintenance of these basins. CFD 2000-03 was formed to build certain public facilities in the Rancho Summit housing tracts within the City. Annual assessments from Special Tax B provide for the maintenance of these public Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 94 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Special Districts Summary facilities which include parks and parkways. The FY 2017/18 Budget includes a 2% increase in the annual assessments. Following is a summary of changes in fund balances for each of the districts mentioned above. The summary includes prior years' actuals for revenues and expenditures, with a break out of support from other funds, along with budgeted revenues and expenditures for FY 2017/18. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 95 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS, STREET LIGHTING MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS, AND OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS CHANGES IN FUND BALANCE FY 2015/16 Fund Balance Actual Support From Actual Fund Balance Fund # Fund Name 6/30/2015 Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2016 LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 130 LMD, #1 GENERAL CITY 620,155:' 1,270,029 941,457 131 LMD #2 VICTORIA 2,808,795'' 3,388,063 328,570 3,220,583 132 LMD #3A HYSSOP 40,922''1 4,333 5,658 133 LMD #313 MEDIANS 1,175,045 1,329,509 786,638 134 LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 3,617,571 2,903,425 2,093,643 135 LMD #5 ANDOVER 70,048 3,188 30,608 136 LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 228,556 475,498 387,009 137 LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 825,375 1,006,860 867,267 138 LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 65,793 33,561 30,436 139 LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 2,119,187 204,879 471,369 140 LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 965,544 596,813 476,093 141 LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 0 STREET LIGHTING DISTRICTS 151 SLD #1 ARTERIAL 734,031 815,324 1,044,540 152 SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 191,571 367,035 350,170 710,133 153 SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,186,664 373,363 348,564 154 SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 507,813 172,653 143,248 155 SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (32,564) 43,586 77,771 156 SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 397,926 139,241 117,322 157 SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA (50,819) 125,819 105,100 226,039 158 SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,024,185 101,639 92,352 OTHER MAINTENANCE DISTRICTS 838 AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 847 PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT 848 PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 868 CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 33,454 1,306,715 429,084 55,369 1,114,497 424,797 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 96 FY 2016/17 Estimated FY 2017/18 Estimated Estimated Support From Estimated Fund Balance Budgeted Support From Budgeted Fund Balance Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2017 Revenues Other Funds Expenditures 6/30/2018 1,277,070 3,339,030 4,120 1,083,620 2,919,370 2,930 484,210 981,710 33,470 193,490 585,330 180 815,160 397,830 367,470 180,820 44,210 143,650 129,560 93,590 33,100 230 1,263,910 445,590 121,360 276,640 31,880 50,000 90,000 350,170 105,100 116,800 230,580 1,213,790 3,791,020 6,770 1,213,980 2,821,500 7,840 503,220 1,049,730 40,500 576,370 592,870 40,000 1,039,240 699,730 345,430 165,660 80,170 125,710 217,250 95,600 57,120 41,260 1,625,210 488,530 1,305,510 123,410 1,362,480 1,199,808 3,441,420 293,490 4,136,170 2,728,235 4,170 8,570 32,547 1,082,550 1,046,920 1,623,186 2,779,140 2,735,910 4,568,452 2,910 9,970 30,658 497,350 52,460 515,610 364,115 986,910 50,000 1,136,830 847,027 34,940 36,560 60,268 321,850 660,250 1,131,416 592,480 613,980 1,057,224 480 90,000 40,000 100,660 5,032,430 5,286,260 26,905 4,959,490 350,170 5,403,390 153,183 2,134,400 2,137,070 1,230,833 1,087,910 1,241,780 398,509 445,690 488,910 (145,929) 761,960 775,060 424,685 1,407,220 105,100 1,532,100 (48,309) 411,190 423,260 2,019,392 33,090 28,270 44,966 690 116,800 40,000 153,260 1,305,950 203,990 1,322,070 1,262,469 454,140 498,080 387,528 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 97 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 98 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Revenue Summaries Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 99 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 100 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates The City receives a multitude of revenue from many sources, most of which must be accounted for separately and their identity kept intact. Revenue projections in the Fiscal Year 2017/18 Preliminary Budget are estimated using historical information, expert analysis, data collected from the State Controller, the State Department of Finance, the League of California Cities, the San Bernardino County Auditor -Controller's Office, and numerous financial indicators. Utilizing historical revenue data, a general sense of the economic status of the local community, and other indicators noted above, the City's budget staff produce a financially conservative picture of the near future. Concurrent with the near -term revenue projections, City budget staff, using the same data and historical data noted above, keep a running five-year forward projection that we use in conjunction with our near -term estimates to help guide the agency's medium and long-term planning for expenditures. Major Revenues of Funds Operating Budget. The City's Operating Budget, which is comprised of the City General Fund, Fire District Operational Funds, and City Library Fund, is primarily supported by seven key revenue sources. These key revenue sources include: sales tax, vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in Lieu of VLF), franchise fees, property tax, development fees, business licenses, and transient occupancy tax. Sales Tax. California sales tax is imposed on the total retail price of any tangible personal property (excluding a variety of state mandated exemptions), while use tax is imposed on the purchaser for eligible transactions when sales tax has not been collected. The sales and use tax rate in San Bernardino County is currently 7.75%, of which Rancho Cucamonga receives 1% from the California State Board of Equalization (SBOE) for transactions occurring within the City. The City also receives its share of the Proposition 172 half -cent public safety sales tax from the County of San Bernardino in addition to the amount distributed directly by the State. The City works closely with its sales tax consultant, HdL Companies, in projecting sales tax revenue. Based on HDL's analysis of the trend in year-to-date tax receipts, macroeconomic conditions (done in collaboration with its partner Beacon Economics) and an examination of local business data, the consultant anticipates the City will receive sales tax revenue of $30.5 million for FY 2017/18, a $1.7 million or 5.9% increase over the FY 2016/17 budget. Vehicle license fees (VLFand Property Tax in lieu of VLF). The majority of this revenue source is Property Tax in lieu of VLF and is a result of the VLF for property tax swap of 2004 which was part of the state -local budget agreement. Growth in this revenue source is based on the increase in the City's assessed valuation of the properties within the City. This was a change from the growth factor used for VLF which was the change in the City's population. The City works closely with its property tax consultant, HdL Coren & Cone, to project the growth in the City's assessed valuation. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page io1 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates SB89 of 2011 eliminated, effective July 1, 2011, Vehicle License Fee (VLF) revenue allocated under California Revenue and Taxation Code 11005 to cities. As a part of the Legislature's efforts to solve the state's chronic budget problems, the bill shifted all city VLF revenues to fund law enforcement grants that previously had been paid by a temporary state tax and — prior to that — by the state general fund. The League of California Cities challenged this action in court as a Constitutional violation. Unfortunately, in March 2013, the petition was denied. Staff will continue to track any new developments in this area regarding potential appeals, etc. Cities should expect zero VLF revenues on a go forward basis unless and until there is a change in law. The City receives a small amount of VLF in Excess from the State which is allocated under Revenue and Taxation Code Section 11001.5(b). Half of these revenues go to counties and half go to cities apportioned on a population basis. Overall revenues for vehicle license fees (VLF and Property Tax in lieu of VLF) are projected to be $18,113,300 which is a $818,440 or 4.7% increase from the FY 2016/17 budget. Franchise fees. The City receives franchise fees for gas, electric, refuse, and cable providers within the City as "rent" for the use of the streets and rights of way within our municipality. Revenues are projected based on estimated population increases (based on the State Department of Finance's population estimates adjusted for the impact of the projected date of build -out in the City), anticipated rate changes, and known changes in activities communicated by the respective service providers. Franchise fees are projected to be $6,553,060 which is a $298,150 or 4.4% decrease from FY 2016/17. Property tax. Property tax is an ad valorem (value -based) tax imposed on real property such as land, buildings, and tangible personal property. Property tax revenue is collected by the County of San Bernardino and allocated according to State law among cities, counties, school districts, and special districts. Rancho Cucamonga property owners pay a basic tax equal to 1 % of the assessed value on real property. The City's share of this property tax dollar is approximately 5.11 cents (shared between the City General Fund and City Library Fund) and the Fire District's share of this property tax dollar is approximately 12.48 cents, for a total of 17.59 cents for the City's operating budget. The City works with its property tax consultant in projecting property tax revenue, an estimate made with four factors in mind: property turnover rate, pricing and appeals exposure, new construction activity, and Proposition 13's annual inflation adjustment. After considering these factors, the City's consultant has projected that Rancho Cucamonga's property tax revenue will increase 4.68%. Property tax revenues for the City General Fund (including post -RDA property tax revenue) have increased overall by $293,760 or 4.0% from FY 2016/17, with property transfer taxes projected to increase by $245,140 or 26.7%. The Library's property tax has increased by $114,460 or 2.8% from FY 2016/17 and continues to include the statutory pass -through payment from the County of San Bernardino, formerly paid by the now dissolved Redevelopment Agency. The Fire District General Fund property tax revenue has increased by $823,340 or 3.5% from FY 2016/17, partially due to the County's annual inflation adjustment combined with new secured properties being added to the tax roll and positive home buying activity. Additionally, a larger percentage of the Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 102 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates post -RDA property tax revenues are being allocated to the Fire General Fund resulting in a corresponding decrease in these revenues being allocated to the District's Capital Reserve Fund. Property tax revenue for the Fire District's two Community Facilities Districts (CFDs) increased by $22,880 or .3% from FY 2016/17. The District continues to be committed to maintaining CFD rates without CPI increases to the extent practical and, where possible, to reduce rates in a prudent manner. Development fees. Development fees are collected through the Community Development departments and are projected based upon known or anticipated development projects within the City. Depending on what phase a project is in for a given fiscal year, the corresponding Building and Safety, Engineering, or Planning Fees are adjusted accordingly. Based on input received from the Community Development departments, development fees are projected to increase by $9,000 (excluding special services fees) or .2%, from FY 2016/17. Business licenses. The City taxes businesses for the privilege of conducting business within the City. The amount of the tax is determined based on either gross receipts or gross payroll for the business. Business Licenses revenues are projected to increase $40,450 or 1.5% from FY 2016/17. Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT). TOT is a 10% tax applied to the cost of hotel or other lodging stays of less than 30 days. Factors influencing TOT revenues include business and leisure travel and room rate increases. Additionally, the City anticipates the opening of two new hotels during FY 2017/18 that will contribute to increased revenues for part of the year. The growth factor applied to this revenue source is the Consumer Price Index (CPI) as published by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics to anticipate potential room rate increases as well as increased travel due to a slightly improving economy. The Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) is projected to increase $331,340 or 9.7% from FY 2016/17. The revenues discussed above total $109,988,400 and represent 91.1% of the City's Operating Budget and 52.9% of the City's overall budget. Other Funds. Revenues for the other City funds are comprised of various taxes, charges for services, intergovernmental, and other sources. Property taxes are collected for the City's various Landscape Maintenance Districts (LMDs), Street Lighting Districts (SLDs), and various special districts. These property tax revenues total $14,245,520, or 6.9%, of the City's overall budget. The amounts of the assessments have been calculated in accordance with the governing regulations and are assessed on a per parcel or per dwelling unit basis. Certain special districts have a provision for an annual CPI increase, but the majority of the special districts do not have such a provision. All revenues collected are legally restricted for use in the respective special districts only. Additional property tax revenues are reflected in the Fire Protection Capital Fund in the amount of $7,444,820, or 3.6%, of the City's overall budget. These property tax revenues represent the tax increment that was collected by the Redevelopment Agency in prior years for Fire District Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 103 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Revenue and Resource Estimates capital expenditures. Due to the elimination of the Redevelopment Agency on February 1, 2012, these revenues are now distributed directly to the Fire District and will be used for the same capital expenditure purposes. Charges for services are received for Community Services recreational and community activities, in the amount of $2,183,410, as well as for the City's Municipal Utility, in the amount of $11,968,320, which provides electrical service to a portion of the City. Together, these revenues represent 6.8% of the City's overall budget. All charges for services are set by fee resolutions which are approved by the City Council and comply with all State laws regarding fees and taxes including Proposition 26. Intergovernmental revenues include the various State Gas Tax revenues as well as grant income received. The State provides revenue estimates during the City's budget process and grant income is projected based on the amount applied for. Intergovernmental revenues represent $15,738,270, or 7.6%, of the City's overall budget. Included in other revenues is the interfund advance from the Capital Reserve Fund to the Street Light Maintenance District funds in the amount of $14,105,220 for the acquisition of streetlights from Southern California Edison and LED lighting retrofits. Other sources of revenue include interest earnings, reimbursements from other funds, and transfers in. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 104 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 105 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Intergovernmental Other Charges for SPrvir.Pc 2.81° erIn Use of Money & P 0.80% Fines & Forfeitures 0.77% Licenses & Permit! 3.49% Taxes: Property Tax** $ 62,756,790 Sales Tax 30,545,700 Franchise Fees 6,553,060 Transient Occupancy Tax 3,737,450 Admissions Tax 4,090 Subtotal -Taxes 103,597,090 Licenses & Permits 4,210,180 Fines & Forfeitures 931,710 Use of Money & Property 965,060 Charges for Services 3,391,150 Intergovernmental 190,950 Other 4,681,230 Transfer In 2,736,120 Total Operating Budget $ 120,703,490 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001), Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and City Library Fund (Fund 290). **Includes Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF in the amount of $18,033,960 for the City General Fund (Fund 001). Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 1o6 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001 - GENERAL FUND TAXES $ 65,148,696 $ 64,595,300 $ 67,669,100 LICENSES & PERMITS 4,023,498 4,141,160 4,190,300 FINES & FORFEITURES 714,678 614,340 705,010 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 212,415 385,500 401,590 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 2,948,348 3,182,660 3,167,870 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 148,496 152,150 165,950 OTHER 2,454,353 2,785,340 2,827,270 TRANSFER IN 1,294,800 1,594,400 1,630,480 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 76,945,284 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 281 - FIRE FUND TAXES $ 22,714,836 $ 23,681,880 $ 24,505,220 LICENSES & PERMITS 21,198 19,880 19,880 FINES & FORFEITURES 71,210 41,700 66,700 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 489,533 366,410 409,380 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 7,464 12,820 5,820 OTHER 4,956,943 1,123, 820 1,656,040 TRANSFER IN 74,323 0 0 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 28,335,507 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 TAXES $ 5,803,797 $ 5,955,300 $ 5,984,420 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 47,269 34,710 30,140 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 678 1,800 1,800 OTHER 4,383 0 0 TRANSFER IN 0 0 16,090 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,856,127 $ 5,991,810 $ 6,032,450 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES $ 1,200,573 $ 1,234,730 $ 1,228,490 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY (264) 0 0 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 0 560 560 OTHER (14,561) 0 0 TRANSFER IN 997,276 953,800 1,089,550 TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,183,024 $ 2,189,090 $ 2,318,600 290 - LIBRARY FUND TAXES $ 3,838,660 $ 4,095,400 $ 4,209,860 FINES & FORFEITURES 166,429 180,000 160,000 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 129,964 116,260 123,950 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 185,670 140,600 215,100 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 9,367 25,000 25,000 OTHER 129,881 190,420 197,920 TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND $ 4,459,971 $ 4,747,680 $ 4,931,830 TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 117,779,913 $ 115,625,940 $ 120,703,490 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 107 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 001 - GENERAL FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 4107 Property Transfer Tax 4111 Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Bic 4120 Sales and Use Tax 4121 Prop 172-Half Cent Sales Tax 4122 Sales Tax In -Lieu (Triple Flp) 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 4126 Admissions Tax 4130 Franchise Fee -Gas & Electric 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid. Refuse 4132 Franchise Fee -Comm. Refuse 4133 Franchise Fee -Cable 4135 Franchise Fee -Towing Services TOTAL TAXES LICENSES & PERMITS 4201 Business Licenses 4207 Building Permits 4208 Bldg Pmt-Strong Motion Fees 4209 Mobile Home Permit 4210 Bldg Permits-SB 1473(90% to CA) 4215 Animal Licenses 4216 Parking Permits 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 4232 Business Licenses -Penalties TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS FINES & FORFEITURES 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 4302 Parking Citations 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 4308 General Ordinance Fines 4309 False Alarm Fees 4310 Loud Party Ordinance Fines 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 2015/16 Actual $ 3,833,623 156,767 84,566 290,999 99,477 786,112 1,065,015 16,638,217 1,784,026 24,650,919 507,094 5,744,180 3,055,397 4,063 2,586,477 1,029,723 1,374,060 1,457,981 n 2016/17 Adopted Budget 4,010,590 168,180 94,070 334,210 188,140 653,220 916,750 17,223,880 1,890,780 28,305,450 549,130 0 3,406,110 3,580 2,927,710 1,031,210 1,389,760 1,502,530 n 2017/18 Adopted Budget 4,216,500 172,430 93,010 320,060 109,410 852,210 1,161,890 18,033,960 1,869,330 30,001,810 543,890 0 3,737,450 4,090 2,510,470 1,030,610 1,478,320 1,458,660 75 O00 $ 65,148,696 $ 64,595,300 $ 67,669,100 $ 2,492,030 $ 2,523,370 $ 2,562,230 1,100,941 1,200,000 1,200,000 4,271 0 9,000 5,472 2,970 2,500 661 780 780 292,530 310,000 310,000 360 150 150 952 650 810 12,691 10,920 11,090 113,590 92,320 93,740 $ 4,023,498 $ 4,141,160 $ 4,190,300 $ 52,397 $ 80,080 $ 32,340 273,302 253,420 233,730 143,190 144,160 170,110 1,470 1,440 1,830 56,264 35,790 161,690 45,625 38,020 54,220 0 100 100 142,430 61,330 50,990 $ 714,678 $ 614,340 $ 705,010 $ 330,040 $ 302,950 $ 325,860 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 1o8 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 4442 Gain/Loss on Investment TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees 4508 Planning Fees 4509 Planning- Special Services Fee 4510 Engineering Fees 4511 Engineering - Special Services 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4560 Fingerprint Fees 4563 Candidates Filing Fees 4564 Returned Item Charge 4570 Sale of Printed Materials 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 4634 Animal Impound Fees 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 4638 Microchipping Fee 4639 Rabies Vaccination Fee 4640 Vaccination Services TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4701 Motor Vehicle In -Lieu Fees 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL OTHER 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 112,928 0 33,356 32,480 25,331 50,070 (289,240) 0 _ $ 212.415 $ 385.500 $ $ 1,051,173 684,174 4,244 938,173 0 (71) 0 29,488 0 840 15,908 519 151,723 10,425 10,124 21,295 16,325 5,255 15 8,737 $ 2,948,347 $ 980,000 700,000 440,000 760,000 50,000 0 0 29,630 13,590 460 14,980 0 130,000 9,000 10,000 20,000 14,000 4,500 0 6,500 $ 3,182,660 2017/18 Adopted Budget 0 25,660 50,070 n 401.590 980,000 700,000 440,000 760,000 50,000 0 600 22,420 0 670 14,180 0 130,000 9,000 11,000 21,000 15,000 7,500 0 � cnn S 3.167.870 $ 70,457 $ 70,980 $ 78,039 81,170 _ $ 148.496 $ 152.150 $ 4901 Other Revenue $ 812,104 $ 667,660 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 80,541 82,660 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 130,117 869,210 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 284,012 0 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 119,180 95,410 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 6,430 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 828,324 863,970 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 74 0 TOTAL OTHER $ 2,454,352 $ 2,785,340 TRANSFER IN 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 $ 39,450 $ 37,140 8188 Transfer In -Fund 188 0 350,170 79,340 86,610 165.950 713,880 82,660 816,820 0 146,750 3,220 863,940 200,000 n $ 2,827,270 $ 39,170 350,170 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page log City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 8705 Transfer In -Municipal Utility 1,255,350 1,207,090 1,241,140 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 1,294,800 $ 1,594,400 $ 1,630,480 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 76,945,282 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 281 - FIRE FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 14,782,186 $ 15,198,750 $ 16,091,400 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 595,691 667,970 693,360 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 422,790 375,460 460,240 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 151,940 155,020 165,390 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 375,457 301,350 408,710 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 536,776 447,820 590,210 4110 Homeowners Exemption 168,131 170,660 168,130 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA 5,681,866 6,364,850 5,927,780 TOTAL TAXES $ 22,714,837 $ 23,681,880 $ 24,505,220 LICENSES & PERMITS 4211 Fire Permits $ 21,198 $ 19,880 $ 19,880 TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS $ 21,198 $ 19,880 $ 19,880 FINES & FORFEITURES 4309 False Alarm Fees $ 0 $ 1,500 $ 1,500 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 396 3,200 3,200 4316 Weed Abatement 70,814 37,000 62,000 TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES $ 71,210 $ 41,700 $ 66,700 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 285,007 $ 274,870 $ 314,080 4402 Unrealized Gain 117,655 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 89,456 91,540 95,300 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 1,486 0 0 4442 Gain/Loss on Investment (4,070) 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ 489,534 $ 366,410 $ 409,380 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4501 Plan Check Fees $ 2,808 $ 7,500 $ 3,500 4546 FSD Fees 0 140 140 4548 D.U.I. Recovery 0 280 280 4549 Hazmat Recovery 0 900 900 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees 4,656 4,000 1,000 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 7,464 $ 12,820 $ 5,820 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ 3,736,837 $ 12,700 $ 10,100 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 100 0 0 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 12,763 19,000 19,000 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 577,361 441,800 591,800 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 629,883 650,320 1,031,740 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 110 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Artua1 RurlaPt Rudaet 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 0 0 3,400 TOTAL OTHER $ 4,956,944 $ 1,123,820 $ 1,656,040 TRANSFER IN 8380 Transfer In - HSG Fire F380 $ 74,323 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 74,323 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 28,335,510 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 5,753,955 $ 5,908,080 $ 5,940,580 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 38,616 36,220 36,220 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 11,226 11,000 7,620 TOTAL TAXES $ 5,803,797 $ 5,955,300 $ 5,984,420 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 37,226 $ 34,710 $ 30,140 4402 Unrealized Gain 10,043 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ 47,269 $ 34,710 $ 30,140 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4552 CFD Annexation Fees $ 678 $ 1,800 $ 1,800 TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES $ 678 $ 1,800 $ 1,800 OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ 4,383 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL OTHER $ 4,383 $ 0 $ 0 TRANSFER IN 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund $ 0 $ 0 $ 16,090 TOTAL TRANSFER IN $ 0 $ 0 $ 16,090 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,856,127 $ 5,991,810 $ 6,032,450 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 1,181,402 $ 1,208,320 $ 1,217,140 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 15,301 18,860 9,290 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,870 7,550 2,060 TOTAL TAXES $ 1,200,573 $ 1,234,730 $ 1,228,490 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings $ (269) $ 0 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 6 0 0 TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY $ (263) $ 0 $ 0 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4552 CFD Annexation Fees $ 0 $ 560 $ 560 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page ill City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2015/16 Actual TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES OTHER 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL OTHER TRANSFER IN 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund TOTAL TRANSFER IN TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 290 - LIBRARY FUND TAXES 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc TOTAL TAXES FINES & FORFEITURES 4312 Library Fines and Fees TOTAL FINES & FORFEITURES USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4410 Media Rentals 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income TOTAL USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY CHARGES FOR SERVICES 4512 Library Card & Merchndse Sales 4515 Information Service Fees 4565 Passport Processing Fees 4567 Passport Photo Fees 4570 Sale of Printed Materials 4690 Contract Classes -Library 4691 Program Revenue -Library TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES INTERGOVERNMENTAL 4740 Grant Income TOTAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL OTHER 4901 Other Revenue $ (14,561) $ 2016/17 2017/18 Adopted Adopted Budget Budget 0 $ 0 0 $ 0 $ 997,276 $ 953,800 $ 1,089,550 $ 2,183,025 $ 2,189,090 $ 2,318,600 $ 3,511,239 $ 3,689,840 $ 3,863,750 86,057 89,120 94,650 46,422 49,850 51,060 54,602 99,700 60,060 0 26,550 0 140,340 140,340 140,340 $ 3,838,660 $ 4,095,400 $ 4,209,860 $ 166,429 $ 180,000 $ 160,000 $ 166,429 $ 180,000 $ 160,000 $ 42,313 $ 36,260 $ 41,950 19,943 0 0 67,708 80,000 80,000 0 0 2,000 $ 129,964 $ 116,260 $ 123,950 $ 15 $ 0 $ 0 508 600 600 125,887 95,000 120,000 31,773 21,000 30,000 27,487 24,000 24,000 0 0 25,500 0 0 15,000 $ 185,670 $ 140,600 $ 215,100 $ 9,367 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ 9,367 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 $ (119) $ 420 $ 420 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 112 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 4907 Private Contributions Library 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds TOTAL OTHER TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 130,000 130,000 0 60,000 0 0 Q 170 Q21 Q ion n')n $ 4,459,971 $ 4,747,680 $ 117,779,915 $ 115,625,940 2017/18 Adopted Budget 130,000 65,000 2,500 $ 197,920 $ 4,931,830 $ 120,703,490 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 113 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Revenue Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Other 11.05% Development Fees 1.75%_ Intergovernmental 7.61 % Charges for Services 9.59% Use of Money &--.- Property 2.71 % Fines & Forfeitures 0.62% Licenses & Permits 2.15% Transfer In 3.58% Taxes $ 126,631,900 Licenses & Permits 4,469,240 Fines & Forfeitures 1,289,220 Use of Money & Property 5,628,210 Charges for Services 19,938,490 Intergovernmental 15, 817,610 Development Fees 3,632,000 Other 22,959,250 Transfer In 7,438,890 Total All Funds Budget $ 207,804,810 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 11.4 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2015/16 Actual 2016/17 Adopted Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA TAXES $ 84,520,296 $ 84,146,400 $ 87,468,950 LICENSES & PERMITS 4,332,211 4,400,220 4,449,360 FINES & FORFEITURES 1,257,113 1,275,010 1,222,520 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 5,402,699 4,481,230 4,733,850 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 18,065,857 19,208,160 19,929,310 INTERGOVERNMENTAL 24,248,243 17,091,140 15,817,610 DEVELOPMENT FEES 4,016,732 3,957,000 3,632,000 OTHER 10,103,195 4,947,390 21,295,770 TRANSFER IN 10,174,505 6,736,420 6,333,250 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 162,120,851 $ 146,242,970 $ 164,882,620 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TAXES $ 36,965,378 $ 37,030,260 $ 39,162,950 LICENSES & PERMITS 21,198 19,880 19,880 FINES & FORFEITURES 71,210 41,700 66,700 USE OF MONEY & PROPERTY 1,075,569 712,620 894,360 CHARGES FOR SERVICES 8,460 16,180 9,180 OTHER 4,946,765 1,123,820 1,663,480 TRANSFER IN 1,071,598 953,800 1,105,640 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 44,160,178 $ 39,898,260 $ 42,922,190 TOTAL ALL FUNDS BUDGET $ 206,281,029 $ 186,141,230 $ 207,804,810 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 115 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001 - GENERAL FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,833,623 $ 4,010,590 $ 4,216,500 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 156,767 168,180 172,430 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 84,566 94,070 93,010 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 290,999 334,210 320,060 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 99,477 188,140 109,410 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 786,112 653,220 852,210 4107 Property Transfer Tax 1,065,015 916,750 1,161,890 4111 Property Tax In -Lieu of VLF 16,638,217 17,223,880 18,033,960 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 1,784,026 1,890,780 1,869,330 4120 Sales and Use Tax 24,650,919 28,305,450 30,001,810 4121 Prop 172-Half Cent Sales Tax 507,094 549,130 543,890 4122 Sales Tax In -Lieu (Triple Flp) 5,744,180 0 0 4125 Transient Occupancy Tax 3,055,397 3,406,110 3,737,450 4126 Admissions Tax 4,063 3,580 4,090 4130 Franchise Fee -Gas & Electric 2,586,477 2,927,710 2,510,470 4131 Franchise Fee-Resid. Refuse 1,029,723 1,031,210 1,030,610 4132 Franchise Fee -Comm. Refuse 1,374,060 1,389,760 1,478,320 4133 Franchise Fee -Cable 1,457,981 1,502,530 1,458,660 4135 Franchise Fee -Towing Services 0 0 75,000 4201 Business Licenses 2,492,030 2,523,370 2,562,230 4207 Building Permits 1,100,941 1,200,000 1,200,000 4208 Bldg Pmt-Strong Motion Fees 4,271 0 9,000 4209 Mobile Home Permit 5,472 2,970 2,500 4210 Bldg Permits-SB 1473(90% to CA) 661 780 780 4215 Animal Licenses 292,530 310,000 310,000 4216 Parking Permits 360 150 150 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 952 650 810 4231 Business Licenses-P/Y 12,691 10,920 11,090 4232 Business Licenses -Penalties 113,590 92,320 93,740 4301 Vehicle Code Fines 52,397 80,080 32,340 4302 Parking Citations 273,302 253,420 233,730 4306 Vehicle Release Fees 143,190 144,160 170,110 4307 Citation Proof of Corr Fees 1,470 1,440 1,830 4308 General Ordinance Fines 56,264 35,790 161,690 4309 False Alarm Fees 45,625 38,020 54,220 4310 Loud Party Ordinance Fines 0 100 100 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 142,430 61,330 50,990 4401 Interest Earnings 330,040 302,950 325,860 4402 Unrealized Gain 112,928 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 33,356 32,480 25,660 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 25,331 50,070 50,070 4442 Gain/Loss on Investment (289,240) 0 0 4501 Plan Check Fees 1,051,173 980,000 980,000 4508 Planning Fees 684,174 700,000 700,000 4509 Planning- Special Services Fee 4,244 440,000 440,000 4510 Engineering Fees 938,173 760,000 760,000 4511 Engineering - Special Services 0 50,000 50,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 116 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4554 Park Maintenance Fees (71) 0 0 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 0 0 600 4560 Fingerprint Fees 29,488 29,630 22,420 4563 Candidates Filing Fees 0 13,590 0 4564 Returned Item Charge 840 460 670 4570 Sale of Printed Materials 15,908 14,980 14,180 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 519 0 0 4630 Animal Adoption Fees 151,723 130,000 130,000 4631 Animal Spay/Neuter Fees 10,425 9,000 9,000 4633 Animal Boarding Fees 10,124 10,000 11,000 4634 Animal Impound Fees 21,295 20,000 21,000 4636 Owner Surrender Fees 16,325 14,000 15,000 4638 Microchipping Fee 5,255 4,500 7,500 4639 Rabies Vaccination Fee 15 0 0 4640 Vaccination Services 8,737 6,500 6,500 4701 Motor Vehicle In -Lieu Fees 70,457 70,980 79,340 4710 Homeowners Property Tax Relief 78,039 81,170 86,610 4901 Other Revenue 812,104 667,660 713,880 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 80,541 82,660 82,660 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 130,117 869,210 816,820 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 284,012 0 0 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 119,180 95,410 146,750 4915 Bad Debt Recovery 0 6,430 3,220 4917 RDASA Admin Allowance 828,324 863,970 863,940 4918 Housing SA Admin Allowance 200,000 200,000 200,000 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 74 0 0 8006 Transfer In -Fund 006 39,450 37,140 39,170 8188 Transfer In -Fund 188 0 350,170 350,170 8705 Transfer In -Municipal Utility 1,255,350 1,207,090 1,241,140 TOTAL 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 76,945,282 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 4303 Parking Cit Surcharge -State $ 8,636 $ 8,840 $ 9,960 4304 Parking Cit Surchrge-County 6,477 6,190 7,470 4305 Parking Cit Surcharge-Cnty Crt 25,908 26,520 29,880 4402 Unrealized Gain 64 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 45,879 46,840 44,360 TOTAL 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 86,964 $ 88,390 $ 91,670 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 2,164 $ 0 $ 0 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 395,055 300,000 325,000 TOTAL 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS $ 397,219 $ 300,000 $ 325,000 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 65 $ 0 $ 0 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 111,217 93,300 93,300 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 0 2,750 2,750 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 41,040 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 117 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS $ 152,322 $ 96,050 $ 96,050 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 24,545 $ 25,320 $ 24,820 4402 Unrealized Gain 8,253 0 0 4518 General Plan Update Fee 28,535 30,790 30,790 TOTAL 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND $ 61,333 $ 56,110 $ 55,610 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 84,862 $ 98,150 $ 92,910 4402 Unrealized Gain 31,826 0 0 TOTAL 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE $ 116,688 $ 98,150 $ 92,910 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 4301 Vehicle Code Fines $ 334,985 $ 439,120 $ 310,200 4401 Interest Earnings 351 0 0 4402 Unrealized Gain (2) 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 0 0 58,920 TOTAL 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY $ 335,334 $ 439,120 $ 369,120 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 5,887 $ 6,490 $ 6,410 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,091 0 0 4519 Information Technology Revenue 146,409 158,000 158,000 TOTAL 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT $ 154,387 $ 164,490 $ 164,410 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,153 $ 1,300 $ 970 4402 Unrealized Gain 288 0 0 4517 Technology Fee -Permit 171,035 179,000 182,000 TOTAL 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 172,476 $ 180,300 $ 182,970 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 4218 Mobile Home Lot Fees -City $ 14,916 $ 14,910 $ 14,910 4219 Mobile Home Lot Fees -State 3,150 3,150 3,150 4401 Interest Earnings 1,298 1,210 1,400 4402 Unrealized Gain 491 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 1,120 1,120 1,120 TOTAL 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM $ 20,975 $ 20,390 $ 20,580 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 4401 Interest Earnings $ 232 $ 240 $ 350 4402 Unrealized Gain 96 0 0 4650 SB1186 Cert Access Spec Prog 8,424 7,620 7,730 TOTAL 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG $ 8,752 $ 7,860 $ 8,080 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 610,536 $ 722,390 $ 746,260 4402 Unrealized Gain 199,874 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 118 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4901 Other Revenue 55,977 0 0 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 50,000 182,500 0 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 317 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 700,000 1,000,000 1,025,000 TOTAL 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE $ 1,616,704 $ 1,904,890 $ 1,771,260 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 4401 Interest Earnings $ 47,741 $ 49,100 $ 45,360 4402 Unrealized Gain 13,683 0 0 TOTAL 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY $ 61,424 $ 49,100 $ 45,360 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,143 $ 6,490 $ 6,400 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,413 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 985,981 991,260 951,600 TOTAL 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 995,537 $ 997,750 $ 958,000 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 116 $ 130 $ 130 4402 Unrealized Gain 32 0 0 TOTAL 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER $ 148 $ 130 $ 130 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,968 $ 7,510 $ 8,820 4402 Unrealized Gain 3,416 0 0 4740 Grant Income 448,461 212,200 1,696,970 TOTAL 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT $ 459,845 $ 219,710 $ 1,705,790 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 16,551 $ 14,970 $ 9,440 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,011 0 0 4801 Beautification Fees 200 0 0 TOTAL 110 - BEAUTIFICATION $ 20,762 $ 14,970 $ 9,440 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 775 $ 1,440 $ 1,990 4402 Unrealized Gain 325 0 0 4801 Beautification Fees (3,221) 0 0 4818 Park Land Acq Impact Fee 83,449 130,000 130,000 TOTAL 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION $ 81,328 $ 131,440 $ 131,990 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 4401 Interest Earnings $ 23,278 $ 20,940 $ 17,440 4402 Unrealized Gain 7,551 0 0 4806 Storm Drain Fees 246,926 400,000 100,000 TOTAL 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL $ 277,755 $ 420,940 $ 117,440 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 239 $ 510 $ 710 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 119 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 108 0 0 4822 Community/Rec Ctr Impact Fee 27,871 50,000 50,000 TOTAL 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT $ 28,218 $ 50,510 $ 50,710 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 5,357 $ 7,180 $ 4,980 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,302 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 173,628 75,000 75,000 TOTAL 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 180,287 $ 82,180 $ 79,980 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 3,812 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ 3,812 $ 0 $ 0 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 24,713 $ 24,220 $ 24,650 4402 Unrealized Gain 8,452 0 0 4807 Secondary Regional Fee 206,878 75,000 75,000 TOTAL 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 240,043 $ 99,220 $ 99,650 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 6,510 $ 6,600 $ 6,560 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,194 0 0 TOTAL 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 8,704 $ 6,600 $ 6,560 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 358 $ 730 $ 1,020 4402 Unrealized Gain 163 0 0 4819 Park Improvement Impact Fee 40,855 70,000 70,000 TOTAL 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT $ 41,376 $ 70,730 $ 71,020 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 4401 Interest Earnings $ 143,442 $ 149,780 $ 145,210 4402 Unrealized Gain 51,532 0 0 TOTAL 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 194,974 $ 149,780 $ 145,210 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,345 $ 7,610 $ 7,560 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,481 0 0 TOTAL 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 9,826 $ 7,610 $ 7,560 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,196 $ 2,310 $ 3,260 4402 Unrealized Gain 936 0 0 4814 Library Impact Fee 130,105 50,000 50,000 TOTAL 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE $ 133,237 $ 52,310 $ 53,260 124 - TRANSPORTATION 4401 Interest Earnings $ 202,566 $ 215,170 $ 245,840 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 120 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 81,674 0 0 4820 Regional Transportation Fee 1,143,464 1,140,000 1,140,000 4821 Local Transportation Fee 1,873,591 1,860,000 1,860,000 4901 Other Revenue 648,072 0 0 TOTAL 124 - TRANSPORTATION $ 3,949,367 $ 3,215,170 $ 3,245,840 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 469 $ 530 $ 730 4402 Unrealized Gain 194 0 0 4815 Animal Center Impact Fee 28,066 15,000 15,000 TOTAL 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE $ 28,729 $ 15,530 $ 15,730 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 6,912 $ 7,020 $ 6,980 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,332 0 0 TOTAL 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 9,244 $ 7,020 $ 6,980 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 995 $ 1,120 $ 1,720 4402 Unrealized Gain 430 0 0 4816 Police Impact Fee 63,034 40,000 40,000 TOTAL 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE $ 64,459 $ 41,120 $ 41,720 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 4401 Interest Earnings $ 7,720 $ 8,000 $ 7,950 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,598 0 0 TOTAL 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. $ 10,318 $ 8,000 $ 7,950 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 4401 Interest Earnings $ 120,447 $ 139,360 $ 137,750 4402 Unrealized Gain 45,589 0 0 4813 Underground Utilities Fee 0 50,000 25,000 TOTAL 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES $ 166,036 $ 189,360 $ 162,750 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 1,211,240 $ 1,223,220 $ 1,228,530 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 10,275 11,900 11,900 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,879 2,000 2,000 4401 Interest Earnings 7,904 7,220 10,000 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,041 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 27,995 24,910 24,910 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4,863 4,450 4,450 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 658 1,000 1,000 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 0 0 22,290 4901 Other Revenue 148 100 100 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 26 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 0 121,360 123,410 TOTAL 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY $ 1,270,029 $ 1,396,160 $ 1,428,590 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 121 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 4740 Grant Income 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 133 - LMD #311 MEDIANS 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4216 Parking Permits 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 133 - LMD #3B MEDIANS 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals TOTAL 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 3,174,743 $ 3,268,930 $ 3,372,930 29,912 29,730 29,730 9,688 5,000 5,000 32,001 27,070 31,760 15,264 0 0 3,005 2,000 2,000 526 0 0 122,924 0 0 328,570 276,640 293,490 $ 3,716,633 $ 3,609,370 $ 3,734,910 $ 3,724 $ 3,670 $ 3,730 460 480 440 149 0 0 $ 4,333 $ 4,150 $ 4,170 $ 1,010,980 $ 815,170 $ 813,720 4,608 9,730 9,730 1,292 970 970 289,796 240,000 240,000 15,534 15,220 17,790 6,788 0 0 510 340 340 $ 1,329,508 $ 1,081,430 $ 1,082,550 $ 2,823,606 $ 2,856,100 $ 2,714,850 12,733 12,500 12,500 3,938 1,250 1,250 41,795 38,800 47,960 18,210 0 0 2,474 2,080 2,080 668 500 500 $ 2,903,424 $ 2,911,230 $ 2,779,140 $ 2,493 $ 2,460 $ 2,470 538 620 440 158 0 0 $ 3,189 $ 3,080 $ 2,910 $ 467,169 $ 477,140 $ 490,090 3,480 3,500 3,500 835 350 350 2,720 2,080 3,410 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 122 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,294 0 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 0 31,880 52,460 TOTAL 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY $ 475,498 $ 514,950 $ 549,810 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 903,640 $ 934,120 $ 934,130 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 9,681 9,610 9,610 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,207 2,250 2,250 4401 Interest Earnings 8,508 7,940 9,130 4402 Unrealized Gain 3,841 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 28,380 25,660 25,660 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 602 540 540 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 0 0 5,590 8868 Transfer In -Fund 868 50,000 50,000 50,000 TOTAL 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 1,006,859 $ 1,030,120 $ 1,036,910 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 32,367 $ 32,330 $ 33,840 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 152 350 350 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 29 30 30 4401 Interest Earnings 747 730 720 4402 Unrealized Gain 266 0 0 TOTAL 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 33,561 $ 33,440 $ 34,940 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 171,041 $ 170,240 $ 300,150 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 923 1,000 1,000 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 154 380 380 4401 Interest Earnings 22,347 21,590 17,820 4402 Unrealized Gain 7,220 0 0 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 2,344 2,000 2,000 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 849 500 500 TOTAL 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA $ 204,878 $ 195,710 $ 321,850 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 553,352 $ 549,610 $ 549,620 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 6,026 5,500 5,500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 2,025 1,250 1,250 4401 Interest Earnings 10,623 10,230 11,340 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,267 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 14,700 7,500 7,500 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 1,599 4,740 4,740 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 1,917 2,000 2,000 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 0 0 7,030 4901 Other Revenue 2,215 3,500 3,500 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 89 0 0 TOTAL 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA $ 596,813 $ 584,330 $ 592,480 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 123 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 300 $ 480 8130 Transfer In -Fund 130 0 90,000 90,000 TOTAL 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 0 $ 90,300 $ 90,480 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 778 $ 830 $ 830 4402 Unrealized Gain 266 0 0 TOTAL 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS $ 1,044 $ 830 $ 830 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 799,642 $ 803,640 $ 805,570 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 5,658 5,500 5,500 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,549 1,250 1,250 4401 Interest Earnings 5,883 5,830 2,380 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,122 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 469 1,000 1,000 4930 Advances from Other Funds 0 0 4,216,730 TOTAL 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL $ 815,323 $ 817,220 $ 5,032,430 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 360,869 $ 392,640 $ 368,300 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 3,161 3,480 3,480 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 748 550 550 4401 Interest Earnings 0 160 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 937 0 0 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 1,320 1,000 1,000 4930 Advances from Other Funds 0 0 4,586,160 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 0 350,170 350,170 8170 Transfer In -Gas Tax 350,170 0 0 TOTAL 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL $ 717,205 $ 748,000 $ 5,309,660 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 350,213 $ 350,380 $ 351,930 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 3,479 3,510 3,510 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 1,377 350 350 4401 Interest Earnings 13,543 13,980 13,590 4402 Unrealized Gain 4,750 0 0 4930 Advances from Other Funds 0 0 1,765,020 TOTAL 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA $ 373,362 $ 368,220 $ 2,134,400 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 163,488 $ 173,190 $ 162,370 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 952 1,600 1,600 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 335 160 160 4401 Interest Earnings 5,780 5,950 5,100 4402 Unrealized Gain 2,099 0 0 4930 Advances from Other Funds 0 0 918,680 TOTAL 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA $ 172,654 $ 180,900 $ 1,087,910 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 124 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4930 Advances from Other Funds TOTAL 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4808 Developer Energizing Fee 4930 Advances from Other Funds TOTAL 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4930 Advances from Other Funds 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 8174 Transfer In -Fund 174 TOTAL 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4930 Advances from Other Funds TOTAL 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 170 - GAS TAX 2105/PROP111 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4720 Gas Tax 2105-Prop 111 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt TOTAL 170 - GAS TAX 2105/PROP111 172 - GAS TAX 2106-2107 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4721 State Gas Tax-2106 4722 State Gas Tax-2107 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 43,783 $ 43,700 $ 43,710 314 440 440 76 70 70 (587) 0 0 0 0 401,470 $ 43,586 $ 44,210 $ 445,690 $ 132,130 $ 133,550 $ 133,530 654 750 750 188 130 130 4,542 9,400 4,540 1,630 0 0 98 0 0 0 0 623,010 $ 139,242 $ 143,830 $ 761,960 $ 124,856 $ 127,860 $ 127,870 1,362 1,300 1,300 328 400 400 (727) 0 0 0 0 1,277,650 0 0 105,100 105,100 105,100 0 $ 230,919 $ 234,660 $ 1,512,320 $ 70,002 $ 69,730 $ 70,250 386 700 700 65 100 100 23,304 23,990 23,640 7,882 0 0 0 0 316,500 $ 101,639 $ 94,520 $ 411,190 $ 33,798 $ 35,100 $ 0 11,853 0 0 977,282 1,087,150 0 2,505 0 0 $ 1,025,438 $ 1,122,250 $ 0 $ 1,573 $ 770 $ 0 2,310 0 0 597,907 535,450 0 1,272,555 1,509,680 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 125 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 4723 State Gas Tax-2107.5 TOTAL 172 - GAS TAX 2106-2107 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4720 Gas Tax 2105-Prop 111 4721 State Gas Tax-2106 4722 State Gas Tax-2107 4723 State Gas Tax-2107.5 4725 Gas Tax R&T7360 4727 State GF Loan Repmt-HUTA TOTAL 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 176 - MEASURE I 1990-2010 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 176 - MEASURE I 1990-2010 177 - MEASURE I 2010-2040 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4715 Measure I Local St Allotment 4901 Other Revenue TOTAL 177 - MEASURE I 2010-2040 178 - SB 140 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 178 - SB 140 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 4726 Road Maint & Rehab Acct Rev TOTAL 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 4134 Integrated Waste Mgmt Fee 4220 Other Licenses & Permits 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4590 Administrative Fee-C&D Program 4901 Other Revenue 4923 Misc. Other Financing Sources TOTAL 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget 10,000 10,000 0 $ 1,884,345 $ 2,055,900 $ 0 $ 42,927 $ 38,610 $ 80,190 14,431 0 0 0 0 1,018,610 0 0 620,010 0 0 1,315,890 0 0 10,000 894,159 410,560 704,660 0 0 200,520 $ 951,517 $ 449,170 $ 3,949,880 $ 8,932 $ 9,480 $ 3,370 1,811 0 0 $ 10,743 $ 9,480 $ 3,370 $ 54,103 $ 47,620 $ 57,160 21,060 0 0 2,813,919 2,762,470 3,029,740 6,797 0 0 $ 2,895,879 $ 2,810,090 $ 3,086,900 $ 138 $ $ 138 $ 0 $ 0 0 $ 1,010,620 n m i nin can 0 $ 0 $ 1,201,892 $ 1,210,490 $ 1,254,470 850 1,000 1,000 26,098 25,890 31,830 11,200 0 0 28,251 33,000 33,000 739,317 275,000 525,000 27,500 0 0 $ 2,035,108 $ 1,545,380 $ 1,845,300 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 126 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,428 $ 2,710 $ 2,430 4402 Unrealized Gain 773 0 0 TOTAL 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT $ 3,201 $ 2,710 $ 2,430 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,736 $ 2,860 $ 2,850 4402 Unrealized Gain 926 0 0 TOTAL 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING $ 3,662 $ 2,860 $ 2,850 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,997 $ 1,450 $ 1,570 4402 Unrealized Gain 445 0 0 4740 Grant Income 20,540 0 0 TOTAL 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 22,982 $ 1,450 $ 1,570 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 4401 Interest Earnings $ 59 $ 50 $ 90 4402 Unrealized Gain 22 0 0 4740 Grant Income 3,625 0 0 TOTAL 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 3,706 $ 50 $ 90 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE 4401 Interest Earnings $ 1,323 $ 840 $ 190 4402 Unrealized Gain 89 0 0 4740 Grant Income 5,885 0 0 TOTAL 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE $ 7,297 $ 840 $ 190 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 4401 Interest Earnings $ 213,736 $ 170,610 $ 295,070 4402 Unrealized Gain 100,204 0 0 4745 Other Intergov'tl Reimbursemnt 9,539,195 3,400,000 1,250,000 4901 Other Revenue 105,311 0 0 TOTAL 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV $ 9,958,446 $ 3,570,610 $ 1,545,070 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 705 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 820,535 1,151,140 835,300 4741 Program Income 0 350,000 350,000 TOTAL 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT $ 821,240 $ 1,501,140 $ 1,185,300 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 4401 Interest Earnings $ 4,686 $ 28,740 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 11 0 0 4740 Grant Income 3,626,616 3,951,810 2,127,750 TOTAL 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 3,631,313 $ 3,980,550 $ 2,127,750 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP 4401 Interest Earnings $ 3,224 $ 11,430 $ 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 11 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 127 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4740 Grant Income 980,083 19,920 19,920 TOTAL 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP $ 983,318 $ 31,350 $ 19,920 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 4740 Grant Income 56,022 46,940 0 TOTAL 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 $ 56,022 $ 46,940 $ 0 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 141 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 72,560 40,000 9,730 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 10,000 9,510 9,510 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 218 220 360 TOTAL 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC $ 82,919 $ 49,730 $ 19,600 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 201 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 53,182 68,910 50,070 TOTAL 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT $ 53,383 $ 68,910 $ 50,070 226 - USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 53 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 0 15,240 0 TOTAL 226 - USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT $ 53 $ 15,240 $ 0 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 4401 Interest Earnings $ 212 $ 260 $ 230 4402 Unrealized Gain 128 0 0 4740 Grant Income 52,673 52,810 40,260 TOTAL 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM $ 53,013 $ 53,070 $ 40,490 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 4740 Grant Income 198,649 148,560 178,070 TOTAL 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM $ 198,649 $ 148,560 $ 178,070 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 4740 Grant Income $ 218,994 $ 5,320 $ 0 TOTAL 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT $ 218,994 $ 5,320 $ 0 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIER 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 42 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIER $ 42 $ 0 $ 0 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 4401 Interest Earnings $ 35,875 $ 33,770 $ 29,420 4402 Unrealized Gain 11,903 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 994,027 712,620 702,770 4439 Other Rental/Lease Inc.-ANet 35,286 0 0 4520 Recreation Fees 1,609,138 2,064,880 2,103,960 4522 Processing Fees 58,297 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 128 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4523 Web Sales Fees 4,655 0 0 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 23,453 26,000 26,000 4581 Ticket Sales 882,433 47,850 50,950 4586 Advertising Revenue 2,783 2,500 2,500 4588 Theatre Rental Ticket Sales 6,686 0 0 4591 Recreation Fees - ActiveNet 270,141 0 0 4592 Sale of Tax Items - ActiveNet 72 0 0 4596 Advertising Revenue -ActiveNet 150 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 169,100 129,360 136,760 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 273,081 100,580 106,040 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 1,803 20,800 17,890 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 23,311 0 0 4945 Contrib/Fundraising -ActiveNet 155 0 0 4946 Fee Revenue - ActiveNet (5,996) 0 0 TOTAL 250 - RECREATION SERVICES $ 4.396.353 $ 3,138,360 $ 3,176,290 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 50 $ 5,510 4402 Unrealized Gain 1,562 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 0 352,500 351,250 4520 Recreation Fees 0 48,440 63,520 4522 Processing Fees 0 61,350 56,180 4571 Sale of Taxable Items 0 1,700 1,300 4581 Ticket Sales 0 677,890 787,000 4586 Advertising Revenue 0 11,500 11,500 4901 Other Revenue (8) 49,900 52,500 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 0 130,350 133,750 8250 Transfer In Recreation Service 400,000 0 0 TOTAL 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER $ 401,554 $ 1,333,680 $ 1,462,510 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 4401 Interest Earnings $ 0 $ 30 $ 30 TOTAL 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS $ 0 $ 30 $ 30 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 3,511,239 $ 3,689,840 $ 3,863,750 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 86,057 89,120 94,650 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 46,422 49,850 51,060 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 54,602 99,700 60,060 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 0 26,550 0 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 140,340 140,340 140,340 4312 Library Fines and Fees 166,429 180,000 160,000 4401 Interest Earnings 42,313 36,260 41,950 4402 Unrealized Gain 19,943 0 0 4410 Media Rentals 67,708 80,000 80,000 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 0 0 2,000 4512 Library Card & Merchndse Sales 15 0 0 4515 Information Service Fees 508 600 600 4565 Passport Processing Fees 125,887 95,000 120,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 129 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4567 Passport Photo Fees 31,773 21,000 30,000 4570 Sale of Printed Materials 27,487 24,000 24,000 4690 Contract Classes -Library 0 0 25,500 4691 Program Revenue -Library 0 0 15,000 4740 Grant Income 9,367 25,000 25,000 4901 Other Revenue (119) 420 420 4907 Private Contributions Library 130,000 130,000 130,000 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 0 60,000 65,000 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 0 0 2,500 TOTAL 290 - LIBRARY FUND $ 4,459,971 $ 4,747,680 $ 4,931,830 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 351 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 7,017 0 0 TOTAL 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY $ 7,368 $ 0 $ 0 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 4401 Interest Earnings $ 2,564 $ 2,290 $ 2,560 4402 Unrealized Gain 962 0 0 4740 Grant Income 6,688 6,800 71,950 TOTAL 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) $ 10,214 $ 9,090 $ 74,510 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 179 $ 120 $ 520 4402 Unrealized Gain 76 0 0 4575 Exhibit Sales 34,000 20,000 20,000 TOTAL 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND $ 34,255 $ 20,120 $ 20,520 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 75 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 16,041 15,000 0 4909 RC Library Foundation Support 10,000 5,000 0 TOTAL 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT $ 26,116 $ 20,000 $ 0 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 138 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT $ 138 $ 0 $ 0 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 117 $ 0 $ 0 4901 Other Revenue 6,029 0 0 TOTAL 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 $ 6,146 $ 0 $ 0 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 35,084 $ 26,050 $ 14,460 4402 Unrealized Gain 6,624 0 0 TOTAL 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND $ 41,708 $ 26,050 $ 14,460 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 130 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 3,122 359,273 $ 0 200,000 $ 0 200,000 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE $ 362,395 $ 200,000 $ 200,000 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 204 $ 0 0 $ 0 47,000 4740 Grant Income 0 TOTAL 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) $ 204 $ 0 $ 47,000 370 - OTS-"DRINK,DRIVE,LOSE" GRANT 0 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 53 $ 0 $ TOTAL 370 - OTS-"DRINK,DRIVE,LOSE" GRANT $ 53 $ 0 $ 0 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 43 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT $ 43 $ 0 $ 0 374 - COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT 0 4740 Grant Income $ 12,500 $ 135,000 $ 0 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 150,730 367,580 TOTAL 374 - COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT $ 163,230 $ 502,580 $ 0 380 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE 0 4402 Unrealized Gain $ 1 $ 0 $ 0 4740 Grant Income 82,255 32,280 TOTAL 380 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE $ 82,356 $ 32,280 $ 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 68,070 4740 Grant Income 0 0 0 8354 Transfer In -COPS 9,3 82 5 ,4 TOTAL 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE $ 92,796 $ 0 $ 68,070 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 0 4401 Interest Earnings $ 442 33442 $ 0 33,450 $ 33,220 4740 Grant Income , TOTAL 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 33,412 $ 33,450 $ 33,220 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 435,292 $ 72,640 $ 80,960 4401 Interest Earnings 0 0 4402 Unrealized Gain , 301,851 51 12,000 12,000 4901 Other Revenue 4,,0 0 0 4936 Contribution fr Property Owner 0 8623 Transfer In-2007 Housing Bonds 4,17373,409 0 TOTAL 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 8,936,776 $ 84,640 $ 92,960 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 144 $ 160 $ 160 4401 Interest Earnings 0 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 43 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 131 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 612 - CFD 2001-01 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 612 - CFD 2001-01 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 4401 Interest Earnings TOTAL 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 4401 Interest Earnings TOTAL 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 4126 Admissions Tax 4402 Unrealized Gain 4411 Special Event Rental 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4426 Stadium Lease -Minimum Rent 4520 Recreation Fees 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4562 Maintenance Fees 4580 Stadium Security Reimbursement 4583 Baseball Security Reimb. 4901 Other Revenue 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 187 $ 160 $ 160 $ 12,787 $ 13,260 $ 13,160 4,313 0 0 $ 17,100 $ 13,260 $ 13,160 $ 5,645 $ 5,870 $ 5,840 1,906 0 0 $ 7,551 $ 5,870 $ 5,840 $ 17 $ 0 $ 0 21 0 0 $ 38 $ 0 $ 0 $ 19 $ 0 $ 0 $ 19 $ 0 $ 0 $ 67 $ 60 $ 60 11 0 0 $ 78 $ 60 $ 60 79 $ 196,385 $ 4,559 6,750 77,017 93,000 81,807 8,104 0 6,493 34,150 38,545 502 1,767,464 0 $ 30 0 $ 30 80 $ 80 0 0 80 $ 80 90,000 $ 0 4,000 43,530 98,000 106,160 0 0 7,000 34,150 47,320 0 2,222,910 90,000 0 4,000 178,920 103,000 103,350 0 3,220 0 34,150 47,320 0 2,050,490 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 132 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 702 - REGIS CONNECT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4670 REGIS Connect Service Fees 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 702 - REGIS CONNECT 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4601 Monthly Srvc Fee -Electric Util 4602 Commodity Fee -Electric Util. 4603 New Srvc Activation Fee-Util. 4604 Dist Line Ext Fee-Elec Utility 4605 Wholesale Energy Sales & Cntrt 4608 Standby Demand Fee 4610 Late Fee -Electric Utility 4621 Med Supp Assist (Contra -Rev) 4622 Economic Dev (Contra -Revenue) 4735 ARB-Cap and Trade Revenue 4901 Other Revenue 4915 Bad Debt Recovery TOTAL 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4609 Public Benefit Fund-Elec Util 4740 Grant Income TOTAL 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 4921 Long -Term Debt Proceeds TOTAL 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4901 Other Revenue 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 2,314,776 $ 2,653,070 $ 2,614,450 $ 614 $ 130 $ 400 269 0 0 82,300 105,280 105,280 22,000 0 0 $ 105,183 $ 105,410 $ 105,680 $ 91,683 $ 113,090 $ 112,450 36,303 0 0 558,150 560,000 590,000 9,914,8 87 10,600,000 10,912,000 7,514 15,000 15,000 140,090 200,000 200,000 263,288 150,000 150,000 91,320 91,320 91,320 12,085 10,000 10,000 (68) 0 0 (112,836) 0 0 193,891 320,000 320,000 1,238 10,000 10,000 403 0 0 $ 11,197,948 $ 12,069,410 $ 12,410,770 $ 7,751 $ 6,690 $ 6,310 2,566 0 0 268,287 300,000 300,000 51,418 0 0 $ 330,022 $ 306,690 $ 306,310 $ 41,108 $ 42,140 $ 52,530 13,815 0 0 $ 54,923 $ 42,140 $ 52,530 0 0 39,670 0 0 7,280 0 0 2,150,000 $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,196,950 $ 74,354 $ 81,380 $ 57,560 25,874 0 0 (5) 0 0 251,730 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 133 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4540 Intragovernmental User Fees 4911 Reimbursement from Other Funds 8001 Transfer In -General Fund 8020 Transfer In -Fund 020 8124 Transfer In -Transportation I'd TOTAL 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4401 Interest Earnings 8848 Transfer In -Fund 848 TOTAL 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 4554 Park Maintenance Fees 4555 Sports Field User Grp Rentals 4556 Sports Lighting Fees 4901 Other Revenue 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 8001 Transfer In -General Fund TOTAL 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 4401 Interest Earnings 4402 Unrealized Gain TOTAL 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 2015/16 Actual 251 QS't $ 34,571 10,457 24,363 235,450 55,680 305,980 166,180 7,850 $ 840,531 $ 31,982 416 103 709 nA� AA U, . $ 0 Y 11 $ 1,144,778 10,299 3,651 10,470 4,805 122,068 8,378 (75) 0 422 1,919 n $ 418,246 3,295 1,084 4,542 1,917 e a14 M'd 2016/17 2017/18 Adopted Adopted Budget Budget $ 81,380 $ 57,560 $ 24,910 $ 27,960 0 0 70,270 0 261,190 349,180 0 0 0 0 179,000 182,940 $ JSJ,S7U JbU,UZSU $ 31,860 $ 31,870 500 500 150 150 650 570 0 0 $ 33,160 $ 33,090 $ 450 116,800 T 117 1Gn $ 1,122,190 11,500 2,500 10,600 0 107,450 6,500 650 0 500 0 230,580 1 aW A7n $ 436,390 3,600 1,250 3,950 0 $ 445,190 $ 690 116,800 e 11 7 a4n $ 1,123,840 11,500 2,500 13,790 0 107,450 6,500 650 39,220 500 0 203,990 1 5no Qan $ 445,130 3,600 1,250 4,160 Y ANa 1 ul l Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 134 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 162,120,845 $ 146,242,970 $ 164,882,620 R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281 - FIRE FUND 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 14,782,186 $ 15,198,750 $ 16,091,400 4102 Property Taxes-CY Unsecured 595,691 667,970 693,360 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 422,790 375,460 460,240 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 151,940 155,020 165,390 4105 Property Taxes -Supplemental 375,457 301,350 408,710 4106 Property Taxes -Unitary 536,776 447,820 590,210 4110 Homeowners Exemption 168,131 170,660 168,130 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA 5,681,866 6,364,850 5,927,780 4211 Fire Permits 21,198 19,880 19,880 4309 False Alarm Fees 0 1,500 1,500 4313 Other Fines & Forfeitures 396 3,200 3,200 4316 Weed Abatement 70,814 37,000 62,000 4401 Interest Earnings 285,007 274,870 314,080 4402 Unrealized Gain 117,655 0 0 4419 Other Rental/Lease Income 89,456 91,540 95,300 4440 Sale of Fixed Assets 1,486 0 0 4442 Gain/Loss on Investment (4,070) 0 0 4501 Plan Check Fees 2,808 7,500 3,500 4546 FSD Fees 0 140 140 4548 D.U.I. Recovery 0 280 280 4549 Hazmat Recovery 0 900 900 4553 Fire Maintenance Fees 4,656 4,000 1,000 4901 Other Revenue 3,736,837 12,700 10,100 4905 Contributions/Fundraising 100 0 0 4913 State Mandate Reimbursement 12,763 19,000 19,000 4914 Non -Abated Reimbursements 577,361 441,800 591,800 4916 Reimbursement from OPEB Trust 629,883 650,320 1,031,740 4941 Other Revenue - ActiveNet 0 0 3,400 8380 Transfer In - HSG Fire F380 74,323 0 0 TOTAL 281 - FIRE FUND $ 28,335,510 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 5,753,955 $ 5,908,080 $ 5,940,580 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 38,616 36,220 36,220 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 11,226 11,000 7,620 4401 Interest Earnings 37,226 34,710 30,140 4402 Unrealized Gain 10,043 0 0 4552 CFD Annexation Fees 678 1,800 1,800 4901 Other Revenue 4,383 0 0 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund 0 0 16,090 TOTAL 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 5,856,127 $ 5,991,810 $ 6,032,450 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 4101 Property Taxes-CY Secured $ 1,181,402 $ 1,208,320 $ 1,217,140 4103 Property Taxes-PY Sec & Unsec 15,301 18,860 9,290 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 135 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenue Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 4104 Property Taxes-Penalties/Int. 3,870 7,550 2,060 4401 Interest Earnings (269) 0 0 4402 Unrealized Gain 6 0 0 4552 CFD Annexation Fees 0 560 560 4901 Other Revenue (14,561) 0 0 8281 Transfer In -Fire Fund 997,276 953,800 1,089,550 TOTAL 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,183,025 $ 2,189,090 $ 2,318,600 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 4401 Interest Earnings $ 231 $ 250 $ 300 4402 Unrealized Gain 85 0 0 4517 Technology Fee -Permit 318 1,000 1,000 TOTAL 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 634 $ 1,250 $ 1,300 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 4112 Property Tax- Post RDA $ 6,708,065 $ 6,158,350 $ 7,444,820 4113 Property Tax- Post RDA Res Blc 538,107 0 0 4401 Interest Earnings 391,543 311,250 454,540 4402 Unrealized Gain 147,171 0 0 4901 Other Revenue 0 0 7,440 TOTAL 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND $ 7,784,886 $ 6,469,600 $ 7,906,800 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 44,160,182 $ 39,898,260 $ 42,922,190 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 206,281,027 $ 186,141,230 $ 207,804,810 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 136 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 -GENERAL FUND $ 76,945,283 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 76,945,283 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 86,964 $ 88,390 $ 91,670 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 397,219 300,000 325,000 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 152,322 96,050 96,050 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 61,334 56,110 55,610 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 116,688 98,150 92,910 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 335,334 439,120 369,120 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 154,386 164,490 164,410 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 172,476 180,300 182,970 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 20,975 20,390 20,580 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 8,753 7,860 8,080 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 1,616,703 1,904,890 1,771,260 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 61,425 49,100 45,360 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 3,184,579 $ 3,404,850 $ 3,223,020 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 995,537 $ 997,750 $ 958,000 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 148 130 130 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 459,845 219,710 1,705,790 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 20,762 14,970 9,440 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 81,328 131,440 131,990 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 277,755 420,940 117,440 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 28,218 50,510 50,710 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 180,287 82,180 79,980 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 3,812 0 0 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 240,043 99,220 99,650 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 8,704 6,600 6,560 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 41,376 70,730 71,020 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 194,973 149,780 145,210 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 9,826 7,610 7,560 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 133,237 52,310 53,260 124 - TRANSPORTATION 3,949,365 3,215,170 3,245,840 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 28,729 15,530 15,730 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 9,245 7,020 6,980 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 64,460 41,120 41,720 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 10,318 8,000 7,950 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 166,036 189,360 162,750 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,270,029 1,396,160 1,428,590 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,716,633 3,609,370 3,734,910 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 4,333 4,150 4,170 133 - LMD #3B MEDIANS 1,329,509 1,081,430 1,082,550 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 2,903,425 2,911,230 2,779,140 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 3,188 3,080 2,910 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 475,498 514,950 549,810 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,006,860 1,030,120 1,036,910 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 137 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 33,561 33,440 34,940 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 204,879 195,710 321,850 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 596,813 584,330 592,480 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 90,300 90,480 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 1,044 830 830 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 815,324 817,220 5,032,430 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 717,205 748,000 5,309,660 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 373,363 368,220 2,134,400 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 172,653 180,900 1,087,910 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 43,586 44,210 445,690 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 139,241 143,830 761,960 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 230,919 234,660 1,512,320 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 101,639 94,520 411,190 170 - GAS TAX 2105/PROPI 11 1,025,438 1,122,250 0 172 - GAS TAX 2106-2107 1,884,345 2,055,900 0 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 951,517 449,170 3,949,880 176 - MEASURE I 1990-2010 10,743 9,480 3,370 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 2,895,880 2,810,090 3,086,900 178 - SB 140 138 0 0 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 0 0 1,010,620 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 1,139 0 0 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 2,035,108 1,545,380 1,845,300 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 3,201 2,710 2,430 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 3,662 2,860 2,850 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 22,981 1,450 1,570 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 3,705 50 90 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE 7,297 840 190 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 9,958,445 3,570,610 1,545,070 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 821,240 1,501,140 1,185,300 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 3,631,313 3,980,550 2,127,750 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP 983,318 31,350 19,920 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 56,022 46,940 0 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 82,919 49,730 19,600 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 53,384 68,910 50,070 226 - USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 53 15,240 0 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 53,012 53,070 40,490 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 198,649 148,560 178,070 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 218,994 5,320 0 239 - FEDERAL GRANT FUNDS-DREIER 42 0 0 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 4,396,353 3,138,360 3,176,290 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 401,554 1,333,680 1,462,510 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS 0 30 30 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4,459,970 4,747,680 4,931,830 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 7,369 0 0 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 10,215 9,090 74,510 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 34,255 20,120 20,520 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 26,116 20,000 0 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 138 0 0 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 6,146 0 0 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 41,708 26,050 14,460 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 362,395 200,000 200,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 138 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 204 0 47,000 370 - OTS-"DRINK,DRIVE,LOSE" GRANT 53 0 0 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT 43 0 0 374 - COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT 163,230 502,580 0 380 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE 82,356 32,280 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 92,796 0 68,070 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 33,412 33,450 33,220 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 8,936,776 84,640 92,960 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 33,454 33,160 33,090 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 117,250 117,490 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,306,715 1,492,470 1,509,940 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 429,084 445,190 454,140 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 66,770,593 $ 49,574,370 $ 62,578,370 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 186 $ 160 $ 160 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 17,100 13,260 13,160 612 - CFD 2001-01 7,551 5,870 5,840 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 38 0 0 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 19 0 0 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 78 60 60 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 6 0 30 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 79 80 80 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 25,057 $ 19,430 $ 19,330 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,314,776 $ 2,653,070 $ 2,614,450 702 - REGIS CONNECT 105,182 105,410 105,680 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 11,197,949 12,069,410 12,410,770 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 330,022 306,690 306,310 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 54,922 42,140 52,530 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 0 0 2,196,950 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 14,002,851 $ 15,176,720 $ 17,686,690 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 351,953 $ 81,380 $ 57,560 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 840,531 535,370 560,080 TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 1,192,484 $ 616,750 $ 617,640 TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND $ 162,120,847 $ 146,242,970 $ 164,882,620 $ 28,335,507 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 5,856,127 5,991,810 6,032,450 2,183,024 2,189,090 2,318,600 634 1,250 1,300 7,784,886 6,469,600 7,906,800 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 139 City of Rancho Cucamonga Revenues by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 44,160,178 $ 39,898,260 $ 42,922,190 TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 44,160,178 $ 39,898,260 $ 42,922,190 TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 206,281,025 $ 186,141,230 $ 207,804,810 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 140 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Expenditure Summaries Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 141 Building & Safety Services 1.53% Econ. and Comm. Dev. 0.67% Innovation & Technology_ 3.08% Human Resources 0.83% Finance. 1.56% Administrative Services 6.15% Library Services 4.27% City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Expenditure Summary by Department Operating Budget* Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Engineering Services 2.00% \ I Plannir 1.51 °/ Community Services—/ 1 4.32% Records Management 0.42% Public Works Services 8.95% Governance 2.18% Animal Care and Services 2.68% . Police 30.90% Fire District 28.95% Governance $ 2,638,670 Police 37,363,370 Fire District 35,014,090 Animal Care and Services 3,236,220 Records Management 512,000 Community Services 5,223,800 Library Services 5,163,710 Administrative Services 7,436,020 Finance 1,883,970 Human Resources 1,009,580 Innovation & Technology 3,723,860 Econ. and Comm. Dev. 810,680 Building & Safety Services 1,848,380 Engineering Services 2,421,460 Planning 1,829,760 Public Works Services 10,819,800 Total Operating Budget $ 120,935,370 *Operating Budget is comprised of the City General Fund (Fund 001), Fire District Operational Funds (Funds 281, 282, and 283), and City Library Fund (Fund 290). Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 1.42 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE COST ALLOCATION TRANSFER OUT TOTAL GENERAL FUND 281 -FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE DEBT SERVICE TRANSFER OUT TOTAL FIRE FUND 282 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 -COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 290 -LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE TOTAL LIBRARY FUND TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 25,167,834 $ 26,809,050 $ 28,062,120 46,711,267 51,130,620 53,769,440 1,289,883 30,000 0 28,730 41,170 41,960 (5,113,450) (5,161,110) (5,378,980) $ 71,651,778 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 $ 19,334,288 $ 18,251,840 $ 19,386,440 4,476,391 5,235,410 5,765,180 149,099 805,460 405,780 997,276 953,800 1,105,640 $ 5,405,645 $ 4,922,750 $ 5,160,990 $ 6,183,265 $ 5,807,160 $ 6,032,450 $ 1,946,040 $ 1,975,020 $ 2,089,960 $ 2,197,528 $ 2,189,090 $ 2,318,600 $ 2,761,040 $ 3,339,290 $ 3,495,260 998,490 1,297,690 1,387,800 0 82,030 267,000 $ 108,758,342 $ 115,424,340 $ 120,935,370 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 143 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 001-GENERAL FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 5061 - Employee Development 5065 - Coffee Fund 5091 - PERS Prefunding 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5151 - Postage 5152 - Computer Software 5160 - Membership Dues 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5201 - O & M/Volunteer Program 5204 - O & M/Facilities 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5210 - O & M/Crime Prevention 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5217 - Technical Investigative Costs 5220 - Cellular Technology 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 5253 - Vehicle Collision Repair 5255 - Gasoline 5256 - Diesel Fuel 5257 - CNG Fuel 5260 - O&M/Animal Care 5262 - O&M/Community & Info Programs 5263 - O&M/Field Services 5264 - O&M/Veterinarian Services 5265 - O&M/Kitten Nursery 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5283 - Depreciation -Computer Equip $ 14,616,170 $ 16,445,900 $ 17,091,340 331,015 369,930 374,680 2,067,217 2,358,850 2,317,040 6,639,056 7,964,650 8,286,340 17,516 30,000 35,000 126,689 202,000 210,500 3,011 4,500 5,000 1,774,000 0 0 (406,840) (566,780) (257,780) $ 25,167,834 $ 26,809,050 $ 28,062,120 $ 249,522 $ 315,490 $ 389,620 179,073 280,180 330,670 3,257 7,230 6,930 207,495 244,250 245,150 96,694 88,120 88,160 62,767 50,690 26,180 136,585 150,570 161,040 48,058 67,520 19,430 200,645 233,000 208,350 1,379,486 1,762,100 1,708,800 20,000 20,000 20,000 437,781 500,370 479,870 9,470 0 0 20,010 30,000 26,000 40,830 11,630 24,600 27,568 95,710 100,210 127,076 148,870 151,780 415,299 514,350 515,850 15,695 37,000 35,000 2,870 135,000 125,000 429,524 560,000 490,000 22,285 20,000 20,000 17,485 11,500 14,400 129,510 123,330 123,330 1,054 2,000 5,500 4,613 5,000 5,000 216,501 137,000 137,000 0 20,000 23,000 25,395 30,430 30,430 235,450 261,190 349,180 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 144 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 40,238 46,000 46,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 400,000 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 36,664,069 39,598,500 42,079,310 5303 - Contract Serv/Reimbursable 89,967 518,420 518,420 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 1,320,939 1,597,800 1,716,600 5310 - Tree Maintenance 534,131 600,000 665,000 5312 - Legal Services 563,737 383,660 404,920 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 11,277 24,320 24,320 5360 - Contract Serv/Animal Care 22,466 29,820 26,820 5362 - Contract Serv/Comm & Info Prgm 2,345 5,990 2,490 5363 - Contract Serv/Field Services 12,778 16,500 16,500 5364 - Contract Serv/Vet Services 54,192 73,400 73,400 5365 - Cont Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 24,430 15,000 15,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 236,444 220,510 32,840 5401 - Gas Utilities 95,212 101,150 101,150 5402 - Water Utilities 325,892 404,470 442,020 5403 - Electric Utilities 1,213,512 1,303,970 1,294,970 5405 - Internet Services 0 0 119,340 5410 - Property Insurance 197,954 209,840 214,030 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 105,885 118,740 115,830 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 25,485 0 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment 8,320 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 46,711,271 $ 51,130,620 $ 53,769,440 CAPITAL OUTLAY 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land $ 440,000 $ 0 $ 0 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 0 10,000 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 16,071 20,000 0 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 52,582 0 0 5650 - Capital Project 1,181,230 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (400,000) 0 0 TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY $ 1,289,883 $ 30,000 $ 0 DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense $ 19,335 $ 23,160 $ 21,760 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 9,395 18,010 20,200 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 28,730 $ 41,170 $ 41,960 COST ALLOCATION 5990 - Cost Allocation Plan Offset $ (5,113,450) $ (5,161,110) $ (5,378,980) TOTAL COST ALLOCATION $ (5,113,450) $ (5,161,110) $ (5,378,980) TRANSFER OUT 9008 - Transfer Out -Fund 008 $ 41,040 $ 0 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 145 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 9018 - Transfer Out - Traffic Safety 0 0 58,920 9025 - Transfer Out -Capital Reserve 700,000 1,000,000 1,025,000 9130 - Transfer Out-LMD1 0 121,360 123,410 9131 - Transfer Out-LMD2 328,570 276,640 293,490 9136 - Transfer Out-LMD6R 0 31,880 52,460 9152 - Transfer Out-SLD2 0 350,170 350,170 9157 - Transfer Out-SLD7 0 0 105,100 9374 - Transfer Out -Fund 374 150,730 367,580 0 9700 - Transfer Out -Sports Complex 1,767,464 2,222,910 2,050,490 9702 - Transfer Out-REGIS Connect 22,000 0 0 9712 - T/O Equipment/Vehicle Replacem 251,730 0 0 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 305,980 0 0 9848 - Transfer Out -Fund 848 0 230,580 203,990 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT $ 3,567,514 $ 4,601,120 $ 4,263,030 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 71,651,782 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 281-FIRE FUND PERSONNEL SERVICE 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 12,195,521 $ 12,518,620 $ 13,372,010 5005 - Overtime Salaries 3,235,811 3,928,780 4,058,020 5010 - Part Time Salaries 120,889 179,960 148,020 Fringe Benefits 7,343,068 8,545,700 9,082,560 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 126 10,000 10,000 5082 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (4,716,390) (4,922,750) (5,160,990) 5083 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 88-1 (1,946,040) (1,975,020) (2,089,960) 5091 - PERS Prefunding 3,134,745 0 0 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (33,442) (33,450) (33,220) TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 19,334,288 $ 18,251,840 $ 19,386,440 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 27,231 $ 29,990 $ 29,670 5102 - Training 80,588 146,270 164,590 5105 - Mileage 743 450 750 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 28,053 33,380 34,430 5151 - Postage 10 800 300 5152 - Computer Software 2,131 840 640 5155 - Public Relations/Educ Material 26,388 36,750 36,750 5160 - Membership Dues 5,259 8,690 8,460 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 2,994 7,390 5,130 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 5,774 9,770 6,760 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 272,616 327,340 310,490 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 0 110,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 0 0 1,700 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 146 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5220 - Cellular Technology 32,839 40,300 40,300 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 147,695 139,860 139,860 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 0 2,500 5255 - Gasoline 23,076 35,770 35,770 5256 - Diesel Fuel 48,605 91,480 80,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 23,348 26,100 31,500 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 69,014 75,690 79,430 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 22,245 37,870 42,070 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 24,421 30,450 33,150 5300 - Contract Services 769,478 993,320 1,014,600 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 0 0 241,500 5312 - Legal Services 75,203 50,000 50,000 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 1,598 2,500 2,500 5321 - Fire Incident Costs 76 2,500 2,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 29,234 33,170 33,170 5401 - Gas Utilities 7,224 8,890 9,030 5402 - Water Utilities 13,567 19,730 15,810 5403 - Electric Utilities 62,724 83,210 75,450 5410 - Property Insurance 0 0 75,650 5411 - Other Insurance 0 0 4,760 5416 - General Liability Insurance 96,794 243,380 222,250 5500 - Assessment Administration 0 22,200 42,520 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,077,780 2,189,380 2,264,880 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 166,390 175,190 175,190 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 290,180 332,750 341,120 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 46,562 0 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (3,450) 0 0 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 4,476,390 $ 5,235,410 $ 5,765,180 DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense $ 145,796 $ 115,100 $ 91,980 5701 - Principal Repayments 654,417 684,870 308,010 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 3,303 5,490 5,790 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (654,417) 0 0 TOTAL DEBT SERVICE $ 149,099 $ 805,460 $ 405,780 TRANSFER OUT 9282 - Transfer Out-CFD 85-1 9283 - Transfer Out-CFD 88-1 TOTAL TRANSFER OUT TOTAL FIRE FUND 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 0 $ 0 $ 16,090 997,276 953,800 1,089,550 $ 997,276 $ 953,800 $ 1,105,640 $ 24,957,053 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 147 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget PERSONNEL SERVICES Fringe Benefits 0 0 0 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 4,716,390 $ 4,922,750 $ 5,160,990 5091 - PERS Prefunding 689,255 0 0 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 5,405,645 $ 4,922,750 $ 5,160,990 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 198 $ 1,120 $ 1,120 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 15 140 140 5160 - Membership Dues 0 80 80 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 220 220 480 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 3,624 5,500 3,910 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 18,344 20,970 16,140 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 69,527 69,940 69,940 5255 - Gasoline 10,289 17,160 17,160 5256 - Diesel Fuel 23,520 50,060 43,800 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5,965 6,000 6,000 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 3,983 15,640 15,640 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 3,036 3,130 3,130 5300 - Contract Services 343,017 367,300 355,100 5400 - Telephone Utilities 15,288 18,920 18,920 5401 - Gas Utilities 5,145 6,220 6,360 5402 - Water Utilities 9,678 13,020 10,580 5403 - Electric Utilities 46,302 55,350 51,240 5416 - General Liability Insurance 978 2,370 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 218,490 231,270 251,720 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 777,619 $ 884,410 $ 871,460 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,183,264 $ 5,807,160 $ 6,032,450 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 PERSONNEL SERVICES Fringe Benefits 0 0 0 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 1,946,040 $ 1,975,020 $ 2,089,960 TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES $ 1,946,040 $ 1,975,020 $ 2,089,960 OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees $ 1,226 $ 1,920 $ 1,280 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 3,748 4,000 4,000 5300 - Contract Services 76,507 80,240 87,190 5400 - Telephone Utilities 10,402 11,190 11,190 5401 - Gas Utilities 1,408 1,880 1,970 5402 - Water Utilities 4,349 4,850 5,040 5403 - Electric Utilities 11,969 13,970 13,560 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 148 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 141,880 96,020 104,410 TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE $ 251.489 $ 214.070 $ 228.640 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 290-LIBRARY FUND PERSONNEL SERVICES 5000 - Regular Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries TOTAL PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5152 - Computer Software 5160 - Membership Dues 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - 0 & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5220 - Cellular Technology 5300 - Contract Services 5400 - Telephone Utilities 5402 - Water Utilities 5403 - Electric Utilities 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment TOTAL OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE 5700 - Interest Expense 5703 - Capital Lease Payment TOTAL DEBT SERVICE TOTAL LIBRARY FUND $ 2.197.529 $ 2.189.090 $ 2.318.600 $ 1,355,766 $ 1,626,480 $ 1,679,340 731,263 866,140 933,510 $ 2,087,029 $ 2,492,620 $ 2,612,850 674,012 846,670 882,410 $ 23,639 $ 28,350 $ 31,050 0 2,000 6,000 853 2,100 1,000 18,935 22,550 22,550 1,387 5,800 5,800 2,847 6,380 6,380 596,948 724,940 735,870 6,805 30,000 40,000 5,528 1,510 66,000 831 1,010 1,010 189,014 309,460 305,800 11,057 10,500 10,500 5,150 5,040 5,040 64,586 70,050 65,000 70,910 78,000 85,800 1 0 0 $ 1,672,503 $ 2,144,360 $ 2,270,210 $ 0 $ 0 $ 250,000 0 0 9,000 0 82,030 8,000 $ 0 $ 82,030 $ 267,000 $ 631 $ 0 $ 0 8,557 11,720 13,650 $ 9,188 $ 11,720 $ 13,650 $ 3.769.720 $ 4.730.730 $ 5.163.710 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 149 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail Operating Budget Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET $ 108,758,348 $ 115,424,340 $ 120,935,370 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 150 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 151 Innovation and Technology 1.95% Human Resources 0.41 % City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Expenditure Summary by Department All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Public Works Services 10.95% Finance J 1 8.15% Administrative Services 12.14% Governance 1.07% Police _ 15.71 % Governance Police Fire District Animal Care and Services Records Management Community Services Library Services Administrative Services Finance Human Resources Innovation and Technology Econ. and Comm. Dev. Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Total All Funds Budget Fire District 20.51 % nal Care and Services 1.31 % Records Management 0.21 % N—Community Services 4.81 % Library Services 2.18% $ 2,648,400 38,862,340 50,737,950 3,236,220 512,000 11,899,540 5,393,080 30,042,870 20,158,070 1,009,580 4,828,100 1,057,200 1,892,740 39,785,800 8,249,940 27,097,640 $ 247,411,470 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 152 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Summary by Category All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE COST ALLOCATION TRANSFER OUT TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT PERSONNEL SERVICES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE CAPITAL OUTLAY DEBT SERVICE TRANSFER OUT TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 40,631,753 $ 43,862,240 $ 46,064,450 87,989,338 83,933,710 98,553,090 10,733,074 52,326,700 49,846,160 722,044 643,320 1,288,770 (5,113,450) (5,161,110) (5,378,980) 6,075,419 6,736,420 6,333,250 $ 141,038,178 $ 182,341,280 $ 196,706,740 $ 26,685,973 $ 25,149,610 $ 26,637,390 6,429,528 7,355,020 7,512,900 7,046,728 23,942,350 15,043,020 149,099 805,460 405,780 997,276 953,800 1,105,640 $ 41,308,604 $ 58,206,240 $ 50,704,730 $ 182,346,782 $ 240,547,520 $ 247,411,470 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 153 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA 001-GENERAL FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 14,616,170 $ 16,445,900 $ 17,091,340 5005 - Overtime Salaries 331,015 369,930 374,680 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,067,217 2,358,850 2,317,040 Fringe Benefits 6,639,056 7,964,650 8,286,340 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 17,516 30,000 35,000 5061 - Employee Development 126,689 202,000 210,500 5065 - Coffee Fund 3,011 4,500 5,000 5091 - PERS Pref ending 1,774,000 0 0 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (406,840) (566,780) (257,780) 5100 - Travel and Meetings 249,522 315,490 389,620 5102 - Training 179,073 280,180 330,670 5105 - Mileage 3,257 7,230 6,930 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 207,495 244,250 245,150 5151 - Postage 96,694 88,120 88,160 5152 - Computer Software 62,767 50,690 26,180 5160 - Membership Dues 136,585 150,570 161,040 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 48,058 67,520 19,430 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 200,645 233,000 208,350 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,379,486 1,762,100 1,708,800 5201 - 0 & M/Volunteer Program 20,000 20,000 20,000 5204 - 0 & M/Facilities 437,781 500,370 479,870 5207 - 0 & M/Capital Supplies 9,470 0 0 5210 - 0 & M/Crime Prevention 20,010 30,000 26,000 5215 - 0 & M/Computer Equipment 40,830 11,630 24,600 5217 - Technical Investigative Costs 27,568 95,710 100,210 5220 - Cellular Technology 127,076 148,870 151,780 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 415,299 514,350 515,850 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 15,695 37,000 35,000 5253 - Vehicle Collision Repair 2,870 135,000 125,000 5255 - Gasoline 429,524 560,000 490,000 5256 - Diesel Fuel 22,285 20,000 20,000 5257 - CNG Fuel 17,485 11,500 14,400 5260 - O&M/Animal Care 129,510 123,330 123,330 5262 - O&M/Community & Info Programs 1,054 2,000 5,500 5263 - O&M/Field Services 4,613 5,000 5,000 5264 - O&M/Veterinarian Services 216,501 137,000 137,000 5265 - O&M/Kitten Nursery 0 20,000 23,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 25,395 30,430 30,430 5283 - Depreciation -Computer Equip 235,450 261,190 349,180 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 40,238 46,000 46,000 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 400,000 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 36,664,069 39,598,500 42,079,310 5303 - Contract Serv/Reimbursable 89,967 518,420 518,420 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 1,320,939 1,597,800 1,716,600 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 154 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5310 - Tree Maintenance 534,131 600,000 665,000 5312 - Legal Services 563,737 383,660 404,920 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 11,277 24,320 24,320 5360 - Contract Serv/Animal Care 22,466 29,820 26,820 5362 - Contract Serv/Comm & Info Prgm 2,345 5,990 2,490 5363 - Contract Serv/Field Services 12,778 16,500 16,500 5364 - Contract Serv/Vet Services 54,192 73,400 73,400 5365 - Cont Srv-Spay/Neuter Program 24,430 15,000 15,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 236,444 220,510 32,840 5401 - Gas Utilities 95,212 101,150 101,150 5402 - Water Utilities 325,892 404,470 442,020 5403 - Electric Utilities 1,213,512 1,303,970 1,294,970 5405 - Internet Services 0 0 119,340 5410 - Property Insurance 197,954 209,840 214,030 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 105,885 118,740 115,830 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land 440,000 0 0 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 0 10,000 0 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 16,071 20,000 0 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 52,582 0 0 5650 - Capital Project 1,181,230 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (400,000) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 19,335 23,160 21,760 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 9,395 18,010 20,200 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 25,485 0 0 5990 - Cost Allocation Plan Offset (5,113,450) (5,161,110) (5,378,980) 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment 8,290 0 0 9008 - Transfer Out -Fund 008 41,040 0 0 9018 - Transfer Out - Traffic Safety 0 0 58,920 9025 - Transfer Out -Capital Reserve 700,000 1,000,000 1,025,000 9130 - Transfer Out-LMD1 0 121,360 123,410 9131 - Transfer Out-LMD2 328,570 276,640 293,490 9136 - Transfer Out-LMD6R 0 31,880 52,460 9152 - Transfer Out-SLD2 0 350,170 350,170 9157 - Transfer Out-SLD7 0 0 105,100 9374 - Transfer Out -Fund 374 150,730 367,580 0 9700 - Transfer Out -Sports Complex 1,767,464 2,222,910 2,050,490 9702 - Transfer Out-REGIS Connect 22,000 0 0 9712 - T/O Equipment/Vehicle Replacem 251,730 0 0 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 305,980 0 0 9848 - Transfer Out -Fund 848 0 230,580 203,990 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 71,651,752 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 003-REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 86,900 $ 88,390 $ 91,670 TOTAL REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 86,900 $ 88,390 $ 91,670 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 155 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2015/16 Actual 2016/17 Adopted Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget 006-CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 72,444 $ 94,250 $ 93,220 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 0 0 Fringe Benefits 32,165 44,300 43,810 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 35,917 43,000 48,700 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 8,493 10,000 10,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,000 1,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 500 500 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 39,450 37,140 39,170 TOTAL CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS $ 188,469 $ 230,190 $ 236,400 008-CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 5300 - Contract Services TOTAL CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 16-COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5300 - Contract Services 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip TOTAL COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 017-LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 5152 - Computer Software 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 018-TRAFFIC SAFETY 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment TOTAL TRAFFIC SAFETY 019-INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT $ 82,132 $ 93,300 $ 0 $ 82,132 $ 93,300 $ 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,400 0 8,050 6,000 0 3,000 3,000 0 0 2,000 13,980 330,000 51,000 0 16,000 0 $ 13,980 $ 357,050 $ 63,400 $ 0 $ 0 $ 135,000 0 0 50,000 2,220 2,240 5,210 5,598 0 267,000 43,771 0 0 89,924 0 150,000 $ 141,513 $ 2,240 $ 607,210 $ 418,389 $ 435,000 $ 365,000 3,050 4,120 4,430 (30) 0 0 4? 1 4n9 01 419 120 369.410 $ 123,850 $ 134,250 $ 124,760 12'A RSn R 114 250 � 124.760 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 156 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 020-CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 1,010 $ 30 $ 180 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 166,180 179,000 182,940 TOTAL CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND $ 167,190 $ 179,030 $ 183,120 022-MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 3,150 $ 5,150 $ 5,150 5300 - Contract Services 0 31,000 31,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 300 3,650 3,860 TOTAL MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM $ 3,450 $ 39,800 $ 40,010 023-SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 5102 - Training $ 0 $ 700 $ 700 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 3,600 3,600 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 300 50 50 TOTAL SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG $ 300 $ 4,350 $ 4,350 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 3,306 $ 0 $ 20,000 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,491 21,720 0 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 4,500 35,320 22,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 0 1,500 0 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 24,897 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 110,876 190,000 60,000 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 23,500 0 0 5312 - Legal Services 0 200,000 0 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 11,820 20,000 20,000 5411 - Other Insurance 7,988 8,810 29,700 5416 - General Liability Insurance 297,703 304,480 337,820 5417 - General Liability Claims 561,345 500,000 500,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 24,710 30,240 36,330 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land 1,896,350 0 0 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 476,373 1,235,000 858,500 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 0 150,000 0 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 25,449 500,000 30,000 5650 - Capital Project 391,409 3,991,500 2,266,390 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (24,897) 0 0 5930 - Advances to Other Funds 0 0 14,105,220 TOTAL CAPITAL RESERVE $ 3,837,820 $ 7,188,570 $ 18,285,960 073-BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 1,104,247 $ 680,000 $ 897,300 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,930 5,630 7,020 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 157 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 100-ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 5000 - Regular Salaries Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5151 - Postage 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5220 - Cellular Technology 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN 105-AB2766 AIR OUALITY IMPROVEMENT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 110-BEAUTIFICATION 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) TOTAL BEAUTIFICATION 112-DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 5000 - Regular Salaries Fringe Benefits 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) TOTAL DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 114-DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 2015/16 Actual $ 1.108.177 $ 2016/17 2017/18 Adopted Adopted Budget Budget 685,630 $ 904,320 $ 112,599 $ 138,740 $ 146,360 49,711 64,610 68,190 2,549 2,750 6,500 14,444 10,140 6,000 2,369 600 300 870 1,500 1,500 1,918 13,400 21,000 2,476 3,440 0 14,287 29,510 33,690 6,138 4,500 0 104,848 150,660 158,000 744,100 537,400 516,460 $ 1,056,309 $ 957,250 $ 958,000 $ 24,077 $ 21,160 $ 21,160 1,449 1,380 1,410 790 560 1,790 0 0 20,000 0 190,000 535,000 88,328 128,810 1,459,470 $ 114,644 $ 341,910 $ 2,038,830 $ 631,269 $ 0 $ 0 710 860 850 631,269 935,470 500,000 (631,269) 0 0 $ 631,979 $ 936,330 $ 500,850 $ 34,941 $ 39,740 $ 30,470 15,514 18,680 14,320 212,322 0 0 38,239 50,000 50,000 5,990 6,720 7,600 290,200 910,000 905,000 (212,322) 0 0 $ 384,884 $ 1,025,140 $ 1,007,390 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 158 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 229,004 $ 0 $ 0 5300 - Contract Services 0 25,000 25,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 280 430 400 5650 - Capital Project 229,004 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (229,004) 0 0 TOTAL DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE $ 229,284 $ 25,430 $ 25,400 115-HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 270 $ 300 $ 0 TOTAL HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE $ 270 $ 300 $ 0 116-ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 7,939 $ 20,290 $ 20,460 Fringe Benefits 3,525 9,540 9,620 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 104,144 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 0 150,000 150,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,470 1,640 4,120 5650 - Capital Project 104,144 100,000 100,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (104,144) 0 0 TOTAL ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 117,078 $ 281,470 $ 284,200 118-UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 150 160 380 TOTAL UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 150 $ 25,160 $ 25,380 120-PARK DEVELOPMENT 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 77,263 $ 85,340 $ 78,220 Fringe Benefits 34,304 40,110 36,760 5100 - Travel and Meetings 857 2,100 2,100 5102 - Training 0 500 500 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 47 200 200 5152 - Computer Software 0 390 0 5160 - Membership Dues 145 150 240 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 0 100 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 453 1,200 500 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 8,370 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 23,330 50,000 5,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 11,910 10,790 3,570 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 80,000 0 5650 - Capital Project 599,932 3,275,000 1,343,890 TOTAL PARK DEVELOPMENT $ 756,611 $ 3,545,880 $ 1,470,980 122-SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 159 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 90 250 $ 180 TOTAL SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 90 $ 250 $ 180 124-TRANSPORTATION 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 535,641 $ 561,130 $ 607,860 Fringe Benefits 237,246 263,220 285,190 5152 - Computer Software 3,336 0 0 5160 - Membership Dues 115 150 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 518 0 0 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 28,312 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 330 0 0 5312 - Legal Services 13,506 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 75,010 76,740 81,150 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land 273,000 0 0 5650 - Capital Project 730,583 5,058,690 2,185,940 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (28,312) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 22,430 61,630 61,630 9714 - Transfer Out - Comptr Eq Rplc 7,850 0 0 TOTAL TRANSPORTATION $ 1,899,565 $ 6,021,560 $ 3,221,770 126-LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 5300 - Contract Services $ 0 $ 25,000 $ 25,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 150 170 390 TOTAL LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE $ 150 $ 25,170 $ 25,390 128-ETIWANDA NO, EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 190 $ 190 $ 190 TOTAL ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. $ 190 $ 190 $ 190 129-UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 14,740 $ 17,730 $ 3,310 5650 - Capital Project 0 1,383,930 130,000 TOTAL UNDERGROUND UTILITIES $ 14,740 $ 1,401,660 $ 133,310 130-LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 16,191 $ 16,090 $ 17,230 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,950 5,000 5,000 Fringe Benefits 7,544 8,410 8,990 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 46,006 52,600 65,000 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 2,300 2,300 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 2,000 2,000 2,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 800 2,800 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 2,386 2,000 2,000 5300 - Contract Services 406,941 492,310 578,960 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 16o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 2,933 6,000 7,600 5310 - Tree Maintenance 49,875 50,000 52,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 2,311 2,790 2,790 5402 - Water Utilities 205,373 290,000 290,000 5403 - Electric Utilities 71,058 82,950 87,100 5500 - Assessment Administration 65,870 65,870 66,090 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 60,020 43,420 40,960 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 40,500 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 0 0 660 9141 - Transfer Out -Fund 141 0 90,000 90,000 TOTAL LMD #1 GENERAL CITY $ 941,458 $ 1,212,540 $ 1,362,480 131-LMD #2 VICTORIA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 506,887 $ 524,970 $ 553,780 5005 - Overtime Salaries 171 1,090 1,090 5010 - Part Time Salaries 65,816 90,220 90,220 Fringe Benefits 230,815 259,880 274,010 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 57,844 66,550 75,850 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 4,925 5,000 5,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 200 200 5300 - Contract Services 1,169,293 1,193,370 1,317,630 5310 - Tree Maintenance 130,560 130,560 163,340 5400 - Telephone Utilities 266 1,330 440 5402 - Water Utilities 648,054 752,410 752,410 5403 - Electric Utilities 72,812 113,690 95,590 5500 - Assessment Administration 34,870 34,870 36,060 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 223,250 269,020 265,170 5504 - Interfund Allocation 75,020 70,000 75,180 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 0 17,000 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 238,000 13,200 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 400,000 TOTAL LMD #2 VICTORIA $ 3,220,583 $ 3,751,160 $ 4,136,170 132-LMD #3A HYSSOP 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 794 $ 500 $ 500 5300 - Contract Services 3,264 3,670 4,780 5402 - Water Utilities 832 1,000 1,000 5403 - Electric Utilities 618 890 940 5500 - Assessment Administration 50 50 50 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 100 640 1,300 TOTAL LMD DA HYSSOP $ 5,658 $ 6,750 $ 8,570 133-LMD #311 MEDIANS 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 53,682 $ 58,780 $ 75,550 5010 - Part Time Salaries 13,564 21,600 21,600 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 161 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget Fringe Benefits 25,748 31,210 39,280 5152 - Computer Software 495 500 500 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 9,435 10,500 10,500 5204 - O & M/Facilities 17,228 14,000 11,500 5300 - Contract Services 377,323 475,000 531,700 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 101,418 113,420 120,300 5310 - Tree Maintenance 4,100 22,290 23,410 5400 - Telephone Utilities 575 640 760 5402 - Water Utilities 105,539 110,960 110,960 5403 - Electric Utilities 44,721 62,360 58,720 5500 - Assessment Administration 6,270 6,270 6,570 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 21,070 30,410 35,570 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5,470 0 0 TOTAL LMD #3B MEDIANS $ 786,638 $ 957,940 $ 1,046,920 134-LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 564,638 $ 631,400 $ 676,020 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 1,050 1,050 5010 - Part Time Salaries 35,800 47,280 47,280 Fringe Benefits 254,186 304,100 325,300 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 105,369 93,050 93,050 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5,996 6,000 6,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,700 1,700 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 3,665 3,750 3,750 5300 - Contract Services 560,747 707,330 445,580 5310 - Tree Maintenance 70,583 71,400 74,970 5400 - Telephone Utilities 696 3,030 820 5402 - Water Utilities 263,594 325,000 325,000 5403 - Electric Utilities 26,080 34,580 34,320 5500 - Assessment Administration 22,990 22,990 22,080 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 179,300 213,750 221,990 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 0 17,000 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 10,000 0 5650 - Capital Project 0 435,000 440,000 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (1,093) 0 0 TOTAL LMD #4R TERRA VISTA $ 2,092,551 $ 2,911,410 $ 2,735,910 135-LMD #5 ANDOVER 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 1,718 $ 1,810 $ 1,850 5010 - Part Time Salaries 316 840 840 Fringe Benefits 810 1,000 1,020 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,003 800 800 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 0 70 70 5300 - Contract Services 512 1,090 1,630 5402 - Water Utilities 369 710 710 5403 - Electric Utilities 316 480 510 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 162 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5500 - Assessment Administration 220 220 250 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 110 790 2,290 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 25,235 0 0 TOTAL LMD #5 ANDOVER $ 30,609 $ 7,810 $ 9,970 136-LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 11,701 $ 12,300 $ 12,760 Fringe Benefits 5,085 5,640 5,860 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 8,208 10,000 10,900 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 0 200 5300 - Contract Services 197,136 215,240 233,220 5310 - Tree Maintenance 35,650 27,000 28,350 5402 - Water Utilities 90,837 175,970 175,970 5403 - Electric Utilities 7,531 9,170 9,630 5500 - Assessment Administration 7,020 7,020 7,030 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 23,840 32,490 31,690 TOTAL LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY $ 387,008 $ 494,830 $ 515,610 137-LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 118,526 $ 120,360 $ 128,920 5010 - Part Time Salaries 8,364 13,160 13,160 Fringe Benefits 52,944 58,510 62,680 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 25,060 32,800 33,700 5204 - O & M/Facilities 956 210 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 1,029 0 2,200 5300 - Contract Services 293,343 322,210 395,810 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 0 790 2,750 5310 - Tree Maintenance 6,950 7,090 7,450 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,228 1,390 820 5402 - Water Utilities 249,012 351,220 356,470 5403 - Electric Utilities 22,222 33,740 29,180 5500 - Assessment Administration 15,430 15,430 16,910 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 72,200 82,860 84,600 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 0 0 680 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (600) 0 0 TOTAL LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 866,664 $ 1,039,770 $ 1,136,830 138-LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 3,606 $ 3,830 $ 3,940 Fringe Benefits 1,547 1,730 1,790 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,600 2,000 1,000 5300 - Contract Services 7,186 12,430 9,780 5310 - Tree Maintenance 4,300 4,300 3,720 5402 - Water Utilities 4,027 6,050 6,050 5403 - Electric Utilities 950 1,440 1,520 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 163 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,050 1,050 1,110 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 6,170 7,650 7,650 TOTAL LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 30,436 $ 40,480 $ 36,560 139-LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 160,440 $ 190,570 $ 204,090 5010 - Part Time Salaries 15,255 21,200 21,200 Fringe Benefits 72,455 92,860 99,420 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 17,707 23,000 29,860 5220 - Cellular Technology 912 1,370 1,370 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,200 1,200 5300 - Contract Services 68,521 110,080 123,030 5310 - Tree Maintenance 28,379 31,070 32,630 5402 - Water Utilities 35,882 42,140 51,140 5403 - Electric Utilities 7,308 9,630 10,120 5500 - Assessment Administration 9,100 9,100 8,010 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 35,410 41,520 53,780 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 0 9,400 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 15,000 5650 - Capital Project 20,000 0 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (500) 0 0 TOTAL LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA $ 470,869 $ 573,740 $ 660,250 140-LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 131,892 $ 151,480 $ 159,600 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 1,050 1,050 5010 - Part Time Salaries 25,226 31,110 31,110 Fringe Benefits 60,933 76,240 80,340 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 11,802 45,500 18,750 5204 - O & M/Facilities 2,030 2,550 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 1,200 1,900 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 500 500 5300 - Contract Services 83,368 111,080 111,540 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 2,211 2,250 3,950 5310 - Tree Maintenance 10,000 10,000 10,500 5402 - Water Utilities 75,590 95,470 95,470 5403 - Electric Utilities 16,141 24,260 21,200 5500 - Assessment Administration 4,260 4,260 4,330 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 52,640 61,460 67,990 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 0 3,600 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 0 0 650 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (64) 0 0 TOTAL LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 141-LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 476,029 $ 618,410 $ 613,980 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 164 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 40,000 $ 10,000 5300 - Contract Services 0 0 30,000 TOTAL LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 0 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 151-SLD #1 ARTERIAL 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,562 $ 13,830 $ 14,110 Fringe Benefits 6,021 6,500 6,630 5102 - Training 46 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 50 50 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5,718 7,990 7,990 5220 - Cellular Technology 962 1,000 1,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 500 500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,735 1,500 1,500 5403 - Electric Utilities 818,415 816,920 574,120 5500 - Assessment Administration 160,940 160,940 160,890 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 37,090 51,630 50,470 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 4,255,000 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 34,870 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 178,950 TOTAL SLD #1 ARTERIAL $ 1,044,539 $ 1,061,040 $ 5,286,260 152-SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 5300 - Contract Services $ 667 $ 670 $ 670 5403 - Electric Utilities 666,986 675,070 498,950 5500 - Assessment Administration 37,400 37,400 40,030 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,080 3,390 3,400 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 4,632,010 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 37,240 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 191,090 TOTAL SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL $ 710,133 $ 716,530 $ 5,403,390 153-SLD #3 VICTORIA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,562 $ 19,340 $ 18,910 Fringe Benefits 6,021 9,090 8,890 5102 - Training 1 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 30 30 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 8,899 9,940 9,940 5403 - Electric Utilities 279,491 274,150 184,200 5500 - Assessment Administration 35,640 35,640 36,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,920 6,530 8,350 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 1,782,670 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 14,330 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 73,550 TOTAL SLD #3 VICTORIA $ 348,564 $ 354,900 $ 2,137,070 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 165 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 154-SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,562 $ 19,340 $ 18,910 Fringe Benefits 6,021 9,090 8,890 5102 - Training 1 190 190 5160 - Membership Dues 30 30 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 1,663 4,940 4,940 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 500 1,000 5403 - Electric Utilities 95,371 87,930 96,440 5500 - Assessment Administration 22,970 22,970 22,050 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,630 4,120 5,710 5650 - Capital Project 0 20,000 1,037,860 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 7,460 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 38,280 TOTAL SLD #4 TERRA VISTA $ 143,248 $ 169,110 $ 1,241,780 155-SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 4,268 $ 4,350 $ 4,440 Fringe Benefits 1,895 2,040 2,090 5102 - Training 1 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 30 30 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5,425 8,990 8,990 5403 - Electric Utilities 57,672 57,260 38,480 5500 - Assessment Administration 7,020 7,020 7,020 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 1,460 1,690 2,190 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 405,480 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 3,260 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 16,730 TOTAL SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY $ 77,771 $ 81,560 $ 488,910 156-SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 13,562 $ 19,340 $ 18,910 Fringe Benefits 6,021 9,090 8,890 5102 - Training 1 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 30 30 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,673 6,940 6,940 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 400 800 5403 - Electric Utilities 86,104 83,210 67,370 5500 - Assessment Administration 5,600 5,600 5,900 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,330 4,250 5,760 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 629,240 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 5,060 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 25,960 TOTAL SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA $ 117,321 $ 129,040 $ 775,060 157-SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 166 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5000 - Regular Salaries 13,562 $ 13,830 14,110 Fringe Benefits 6,021 6,500 6,630 5102 - Training 1 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 30 30 50 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 2,748 4,940 4,940 5403 - Electric Utilities 179,108 170,840 126,090 5500 - Assessment Administration 20,810 20,810 21,380 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,760 4,120 4,670 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 1,290,430 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 10,380 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 53,240 TOTAL SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA $ 226,040 $ 221,250 $ 1,532,100 158-SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 12,140 $ 17,890 $ 17,240 Fringe Benefits 5,390 8,410 8,100 5102 - Training 1 180 180 5160 - Membership Dues 25 30 40 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 3,900 4,940 4,940 5403 - Electric Utilities 57,446 55,240 42,240 5500 - Assessment Administration 10,030 10,030 8,720 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,420 3,350 5,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 321,040 5700 - Interest Expense 0 0 2,570 5701 - Principal Repayments 0 0 13,190 TOTAL SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA $ 92,352 $ 100,070 $ 423,260 170-GAS TAX 2105/PROP111 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 250,125 $ 284,470 $ 0 Fringe Benefits 109,424 131,620 0 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 559 610 0 5300 - Contract Services 134,671 210,860 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 35,910 42,400 0 9152 - Transfer Out-SLD2 350,170 0 0 TOTAL GAS TAX 2105/PROPIll $ 880,859 $ 669,960 $ 0 172-GAS TAX 2106-2107 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 745,180 $ 814,670 $ 0 5005 - Overtime Salaries 6,578 10,500 0 5010 - Part Time Salaries 74,938 88,340 0 Fringe Benefits 341,266 396,400 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 3,610 2,700 0 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 6,911 7,500 0 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 2,034 2,200 0 5300 - Contract Services 35,672 36,000 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 167 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5403 - Electric Utilities 251,661 522,080 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 131,540 157,730 0 TOTAL GAS TAX 2106-2107 1.599.390 S 2.038.120 S 0 174-GAS TAX R&T7360 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 21,049 $ 21,550 $ 1,124,520 5005 - Overtime Salaries 0 0 8,000 5010 - Part Time Salaries 0 0 88,340 Fringe Benefits 9,346 10,130 540,900 5102 - Training 0 0 2,780 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 0 0 620 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 0 0 8,110 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 0 0 2,200 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 1,121,519 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 25,000 25,000 296,860 5403 - Electric Utilities 0 0 270,800 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,170 4,610 223,910 5650 - Capital Project 1,361,449 1,374,000 2,115,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,121,519) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 9,820 9,920 9,920 9157 - Transfer Out-SLD7 105,100 105,100 0 TOTAL GAS TAX R&T7360 $ 1,535,934 $ 1,550,310 $ 4,691,960 176-MEASURE I 1990-2010 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 354,676 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 490 440 660 5650 - Capital Project 702,548 400,000 400,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (354,676) 0 0 TOTAL MEASURE I 1990-2010 $ 703,038 $ 400,440 $ 400,660 177-MEASURE I 2010-2040 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 168,434 $ 180,950 $ 204,730 5005 - Overtime Salaries 2,860 9,900 14,300 Fringe Benefits 74,360 84,600 95,780 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 1,739,153 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 945,230 954,450 1,144,550 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 24,410 30,110 35,410 5650 - Capital Project 1,834,353 4,070,000 2,150,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,739,153) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 64,650 33,740 33,740 TOTAL MEASURE I 2010-2040 $ 3,114,297 $ 5,363,750 $ 3,678,510 179-ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 5650 - Capital Project $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,000,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 168 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT $ 0 $ 0 $ 1,000,000 182-AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 80 $ 80 $ 80 TOTAL AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF $ 80 $ 80 $ 80 186-FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 20 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE $ 20 $ 0 $ 0 188-INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 560,489 $ 615,890 $ 620,480 5005 - Overtime Salaries 43,549 50,000 50,000 5010 - Part Time Salaries 17,165 13,880 13,880 Fringe Benefits 247,407 283,280 287,980 5100 - Travel and Meetings 485 1,500 1,500 5102 - Training 284 500 500 5105 - Mileage 0 100 100 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 1,678 2,000 2,000 5160 - Membership Dues 485 920 920 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 13,615 25,500 28,200 5204 - O & M/Facilities 42 1,000 1,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 0 1,460 1,000 5220 - Cellular Technology 0 960 1,440 5300 - Contract Services 140,320 141,860 137,300 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 0 2,000 2,000 5310 - Tree Maintenance 0 0 45,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 137,350 132,220 134,250 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 0 350,170 350,170 TOTAL INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT $ 1,162,869 $ 1,623,240 $ 1,677,720 190-PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 109,000 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 190 250 160 5650 - Capital Project 109,000 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (109,000) 0 0 TOTAL PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT $ 109,190 $ 250 $ 160 194-PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 70 $ 60 $ 70 TOTAL PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING $ 70 $ 60 $ 70 195-STATE ASSET SEIZURE Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 169 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 3,819 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 490 800 5,670 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 57,116 0 0 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 133,841 64,520 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (3,819) 0 0 TOTAL STATE ASSET SEIZURE $ 191,447 $ 65,320 $ 5,670 196-CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 30 $ 20 $ 60 TOTAL CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% $ 30 $ 20 $ 60 197-FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 40 $ 30 $ 1,860 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 99,779 0 0 TOTAL FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE $ 99,819 $ 30 $ 1,860 198-CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 0 $ 0 $ 15,020 5005 - Overtime Salaries 333 0 0 Fringe Benefits 0 0 7,060 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 7,790 12,500 12,500 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 725,122 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 0 25,000 25,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,440 5,720 12,430 5650 - Capital Project 994,898 10,170,000 4,275,000 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (725,122) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 27,680 33,360 33,360 TOTAL CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV $ 1,033,141 $ 10,246,580 $ 4,380,370 204-COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 237,026 $ 272,500 $ 281,800 5010 - Part Time Salaries 8,000 6,890 6,770 Fringe Benefits 103,374 127,210 131,970 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 27,320 32,840 47,780 5650 - Capital Project 217,549 1,462,380 1,470,820 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment 252,964 0 0 TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT $ 846,233 $ 1,901,820 $ 1,939,140 209-FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 3,631,313 $ 0 $ 0 5650 - Capital Project 3,631,313 5,091,000 2,127,750 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (3,631,313) 0 0 TOTAL FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU $ 3,631,313 $ 5,091,000 $ 2,127,750 Fiscal Year 201.7/18 Adopted Budget Page 170 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 211-PROP 1B - SLPP 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 980,083 $ 0 $ 0 5650 - Capital Project 980,083 19,920 19,920 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (980,083) 0 0 TOTAL PROP 1B - SLPP $ 980,083 $ 19,920 $ 19,920 214-PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) $ 22,917 $ 0 $ 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 20 340 0 5650 - Capital Project 60,796 46,600 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (22,917) 0 0 TOTAL PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 $ 60,816 $ 46,940 $ 0 218-PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 5010 - Part Time Salaries $ 0 $ 34,490 $ 0 Fringe Benefits 1,343 500 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 9,135 14,740 9,730 5300 - Contract Services 47,770 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 14,550 0 0 TOTAL PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC $ 72,798 $ 49,730 $ 9,730 225-CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 3,473 $ 3,400 $ 4,600 5100 - Travel and Meetings 1,130 1,600 1,600 5102 - Training 1,150 1,200 1,200 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 34,935 50,000 29,760 5300 - Contract Services 12,340 12,140 12,340 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 360 570 0 TOTAL CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT $ 53,388 $ 68,910 $ 49,500 226-USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 15,240 $ 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment 54 0 0 TOTAL USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT $ 54 $ 15,240 $ 0 227-USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 5005 - Overtime Salaries $ 17,406 $ 15,000 $ 16,000 5010 - Part Time Salaries 125 0 0 Fringe Benefits 20 0 0 5100 - Travel and Meetings 0 1,300 0 5102 - Training 0 700 0 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 34,882 35,440 23,650 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 370 610 570 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 171 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 234-SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment TOTAL SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 235-PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 250-RECREATION SERVICE 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5650 - Capital Project 9255 - Transfer Out -Fund 255 TOTAL RECREATION SERVICES 255-VG CULTURAL CENTER 5000 - Regular Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget W, 5? MIA 01 51 (Kol � A() ??n $ 34,745 $ 0 $ 19,810 4,189 0 3,430 4,307 37,400 57,280 0 20,000 30,000 14,460 0 0 0 0 90,800 114,970 0 0 $ 172,671 $ 57,400 $ 201,320 $ 506 $ 3,000 $ 0 106,948 2,000 0 0 320 0 924,215 0 0 $ 1,031,669 $ 5,320 $ 0 $ 531,474 $ 556,920 $ 548,850 0 1,000 1,000 1,349,056 1,273,210 1,444,560 313,137 351,740 357,200 3,351 5,270 4,220 508 0 0 432,935 327,940 317,730 0 33,500 20,000 2,010 0 0 1,614,083 718,360 727,200 41,010 41,010 41,010 42,207 0 0 0 250,000 0 400,000 0 0 $ 4,729,771 $ 3,558,950 $ 3,461,770 $ 0 $ 70,780 $ 113,800 3,049 293,880 297,350 0 49,650 70,680 0 500 500 0 117,500 129,920 0 792,900 888,760 0 0 5,740 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 172 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL VG CULTURAL CENTER 290-LIBRARY FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5102 - Training 5105 - Mileage 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 5152 - Computer Software 5160 - Membership Dues 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - 0 & M/Computer Equipment 5220 - Cellular Technology 5300 - Contract Services 5400 - Telephone Utilities 5402 - Water Utilities 5403 - Electric Utilities 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5700 - Interest Expense 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment TOTAL LIBRARY FUND 291-CA STATE LIBRARY 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL CA STATE LIBRARY 292-STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB 5010 - Part Time Salaries Fringe Benefits 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget $ 3,049 $ 1,325,210 $ 1,506,750 $ 1,355,766 $ 1,626,480 $ 1,679,340 731,263 866,140 933,510 674,012 846,670 882,410 23,639 28,350 31,050 0 2,000 6,000 853 2,100 1,000 18,935 22,550 22,550 1,387 5,800 5,800 2,847 6,380 6,380 596,948 724,940 735,870 6,805 30,000 40,000 5,528 1,510 66,000 831 1,010 1,010 189,014 309,460 305,800 11,057 10,500 10,500 5,150 5,040 5,040 64,586 70,050 65,000 70,910 78,000 85,800 0 0 250,000 0 0 9,000 0 82,030 8,000 631 0 0 8,557 11,720 13,650 1 0 0 $ 3,768,720 $ 4,730,730 $ 5,163,710 $ 1,262 $ 0 $ 0 270 0 0 913 0 0 4,071 0 15,000 0 0 3,000 860 580 0 $ 7,376 $ 580 $ 18,000 $ 2,994 $ 15,000 $ 0 453 1,410 0 5,578 5,000 0 20,962 15,000 0 2,824 5,000 72,620 1,240 2,480 1,890 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 173 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget TOTAL STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) $ 34,051 $ 43,890 $ 74,510 301-THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 310-PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment TOTAL PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 329-LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 354-COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 5100 - Travel and Meetings 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 9381 -Transfer Out -Fund 381 TOTAL COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANWAGI 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment TOTAL JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 374-COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT 5300 - Contract Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT 380-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment $ 4,428 $ 10,000 $ 0 11,019 9,470 0 670 530 0 $ 16,117 $ 20,000 $ 0 $ 20 $ 0 $ 0 $ 270 $ 980 $ 1,510 0 16,040 0 0 205,000 135,350 1,788,600 73,960 0 $ 0 $ 0 $ 5,000 0 16,000 0 96,629 240,000 300,000 2,060 14,900 3,000 36,435 0 0 59,482 0 0 $ 194,606 $ 270,900 $ 308,000 $ 40 $ 0 $ 0 0 0 47,000 $ 40 $ 0 $ 47,000 $ 161,730 $ 502,580 $ 0 1,500 0 0 $ 9,791 $ 0 $ 0 3,925 0 0 570 0 0 15,527 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 174 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 0 32,280 0 9281 - Transfer Out -Fire Fund 74,323 0 0 TOTAL HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE $ 104,136 $ 32,280 $ 0 381-HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,070 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 33,314 0 66,000 TOTAL HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE $ 33,314 $ 0 $ 68,070 383-EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 5723 - Misc Contributions to Fire $ 33,442 $ 33,450 $ 33,220 TOTAL EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT $ 33,442 $ 33,450 $ 33,220 396-HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 450 $ 450 5245 - Subsidies To Low/Mod Housing 81,900 80,400 80,400 5300 - Contract Services 7,267 0 0 5620 - Project Improvement Costs 0 6,960,910 4,200,000 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 200,000 200,000 200,000 TOTAL HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY $ 289,167 $ 7,241,760 $ 4,480,850 602-AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 3,490 $ 290 $ 310 TOTAL AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 3,490 $ 290 $ 310 612-CFD 2001-01 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 130 $ 130 $ 140 TOTAL CFD 2001-01 $ 130 $ 130 $ 140 617-CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 5725 - Other Expenditures $ 16,000 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES $ 16,000 $ 0 $ 0 680-CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 5650 - Capital Project $ 0 $ 100,000 $ 0 5705 - Defeasance of Bonds 606,871 0 0 TOTAL CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE $ 606,871 $ 100,000 $ 0 681-CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 5705 - Defeasance of Bonds $ 1,964 $ 0 $ 0 TOTAL CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 $ 1.964 $ 0 $ 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 175 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2015/16 Actual 2016/17 Adopted Budget 2017/18 Adopted Budget 700-SPORTS COMPLEX 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 765,185 $ 860,540 $ 855,770 5005 - Overtime Salaries 20,894 37,280 37,280 5010 - Part Time Salaries 242,777 275,130 286,650 Fringe Benefits 366,212 441,820 441,860 5080 - Pension Expense (29,278) 0 0 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 278 300 300 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 91,172 96,600 96,600 5203 - O & M/Complex Maintenance (468) 0 0 5204 - O & M/Facilities 49,352 52,760 52,760 5206 - O & M/Recreation Programs 6,064 0 200 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 1,500 1,500 1,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 8,046 9,500 9,500 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 20,300 16,000 16,000 5299 - Depreciation Expense 431,884 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 96,556 94,740 101,770 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 139,289 177,910 198,140 5305 - Contract Serv/Recreation Prgs 25,488 0 1,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 3,050 3,780 4,070 5401 - Gas Utilities 6,578 9,930 9,930 5402 - Water Utilities 91,276 116,750 116,750 5403 - Electric Utilities 276,764 327,160 327,160 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 25,000 25,000 25,000 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 54,889 75,000 0 5650 - Capital Project 2,346,372 0 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (2,401,262) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 25,196 31,370 29,620 TOTAL SPORTS COMPLEX $ 2,663,114 $ 2,653,070 $ 2,612,360 702-REGIS CONNECT 5100 - Travel and Meetings $ 6,154 $ 13,000 $ 22,020 5102 - Training 1,579 9,000 7,230 5105 - Mileage 0 0 3,000 5152 - Computer Software 594 6,000 1,000 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 3,923 3,900 6,400 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 2,758 4,200 4,200 5300 - Contract Services 5,000 1,260 1,260 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 120 1,100 3,590 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 44,914 127,620 127,620 TOTAL REGIS CONNECT $ 65,042 $ 166,080 $ 176,320 705-MUNICIPAL UTILITY 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 227,625 $ 236,580 $ 256,700 5010 - Part Time Salaries 27,401 65,120 65,120 Fringe Benefits 103,961 115,460 125,190 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 176 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5080 - Pension Expense (39,261) 0 0 5100 - Travel and Meetings 1,761 5,250 5,250 5102 - Training 895 42,000 42,000 5105 - Mileage 498 0 0 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 968 1,000 1,000 5152 - Computer Software 100 0 39,000 5160 - Membership Dues 14,338 16,780 17,060 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 1,620 1,620 1,620 5209 - O & M/Electric Utility 6,284,553 6,612,300 5,567,300 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 0 0 1,700 5220 - Cellular Technology 60 0 20,890 5299 - Depreciation Expense 755,010 0 0 5309 - Contract Srvc/Electric Utility 455,407 806,350 840,350 5312 - Legal Services 40,790 40,000 30,000 5400 - Telephone Utilities 3,019 7,500 7,500 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 153,930 151,880 208,300 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 26,140 85,000 160,000 5650 - Capital Project 1,081,737 941,500 2,451,200 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (1,099,412) 0 0 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 37,760 37,760 37,760 5899 - Clearing Acct-Electric Utility (446) 0 0 5900 - Bad Debt Expense -Electric Util 26,710 0 0 9001 - Transfer Out -General Fund 1,255,350 1,207,090 1,241,140 TOTAL MUNICIPAL UTILITY $ 9,360,514 $ 10,373,190 $ 11,119,080 706-UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 97,728 $ 101,970 $ 104,700 Fringe Benefits 42,807 47,220 48,500 5160 - Membership Dues 1,209 2,090 2,120 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 0 200 200 5209 - O & M/Electric Utility 150,121 290,000 330,000 5300 - Contract Services 26,859 100,000 100,000 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 12,530 12,370 15,980 TOTAL UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708-RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead TOTAL RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 711-FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 5300 - Contract Services 5650 - Capital Project TOTAL FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 712-EOUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 331,254 $ 553,850 $ 601,500 $ 0 $ 930 $ 1,200 $ 0 $ 930 $ 1,200 $ 0 $ 0 $ 100,000 0 0 2,050,000 $ 0 $ 0 $ 2,150,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 177 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 138,022 $ 198,850 155,850 5204 - O & M/Facilities 2,524 0 0 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 0 25,000 0 5299 - Depreciation Expense 782,587 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 79,042 95,510 49,500 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 11,870 0 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 3,710 16,170 32,030 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 918,850 968,930 429,000 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 240,841 60,000 140,000 5650 - Capital Project 96,928 750,000 0 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (912,661) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 4,741 0 0 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 64,312 69,480 73,280 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (64,312) 0 0 TOTAL EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 1,366,454 $ 2,183,940 $ 879,660 714-COMP EOUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 5152 - Computer Software $ 598,334 $ 259,490 $ 114,280 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 40,200 10,640 14,590 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 29,764 54,750 78,700 5299 - Depreciation Expense 520,245 0 0 5300 - Contract Services 131,764 47,700 55,200 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 4,490 19,110 10,590 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 0 0 10,000 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 92,940 340,230 95,700 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) (33,684) 0 0 5700 - Interest Expense 45,355 3,320 0 5701 - Principal Repayments 59,006 62,160 0 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 385,200 424,100 424,100 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (444,206) 0 0 TOTAL COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND $ 1,429,408 $ 1,221,500 $ 803,160 838-AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 33,519 $ 33,350 $ 13,860 Fringe Benefits 14,561 15,340 6,360 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,930 1,930 1,940 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5,360 5,610 6,110 TOTAL AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON $ 55,370 $ 56,230 $ 28,270 847-PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 5200 - Operations & Maintenance $ 0 $ 40,000 S 15,000 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 0 2,000 5300 - Contract Services 0 0 23,000 TOTAL PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND $ 0 $ 40,000 $ 40,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 178 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 848-PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 323,262 $ 139,860 $ 143,340 5005 - Overtime Salaries 510 3,680 3,680 5010 - Part Time Salaries 2,179 0 0 Fringe Benefits 143,260 65,430 67,060 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 30,167 103,910 103,910 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 0 2,500 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 4,572 3,000 3,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 1,234 8,000 4,500 5300 - Contract Services 99,592 243,790 266,790 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 651 4,700 14,240 5310 - Tree Maintenance 6,934 18,200 19,120 5400 - Telephone Utilities 8,898 9,570 9,570 5402 - Water Utilities 125,902 148,690 148,690 5403 - Electric Utilities 101,822 123,860 130,050 5500 - Assessment Administration 153,430 153,430 152,220 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 115,780 64,370 48,640 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 0 0 30,000 5650 - Capital Project 0 0 55,000 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 0 0 2,960 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (3,695) 0 0 9847 - Transfer Out -Fund 847 0 116,800 116,800 TOTAL PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND $ 1,114,498 $ 1,207,290 $ 1,322,070 868-CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 5000 - Regular Salaries $ 125,492 $ 130,430 $ 134,170 5010 - Part Time Salaries 3,313 8,890 8,890 Fringe Benefits 55,570 62,680 64,570 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 12,765 25,000 25,000 5204 - O & M/Facilities 2,885 1,000 1,000 5300 - Contract Services 39,803 50,210 47,570 5400 - Telephone Utilities 1,197 1,460 2,260 5402 - Water Utilities 70,152 99,670 99,670 5403 - Electric Utilities 2,629 3,900 4,100 5500 - Assessment Administration 1,980 1,980 1,980 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 59,010 56,950 58,870 9137 - Transfer Out -Fund 137 50,000 50,000 50,000 TOTAL CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 281-FIRE FUND 5000 - Regular Salaries 5005 - Overtime Salaries 5010 - Part Time Salaries $ 424,796 $ 492,170 $ 498,080 $ 141,038,183 $ 182,341,280 $ 196,706,740 $ 12,195,521 $ 12,518,620 $ 13,372,010 3,235,811 3,928,780 4,058,020 120,889 179,960 148,020 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 179 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget Fringe Benefits 7,343,068 8,545,700 9,082,560 5060 - Tuition Reimbursement 126 10,000 10,000 5082 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 85-1 (4,716,390) (4,922,750) (5,160,990) 5083 - Reimb Personnel from CFD 88-1 (1,946,040) (1,975,020) (2,089,960) 5091 - PERS Prefunding 3,134,745 0 0 5093 - Other Funds -Salary Reimbursmnt (33,442) (33,450) (33,220) 5100 - Travel and Meetings 27,231 29,990 29,670 5102 - Training 80,588 146,270 164,590 5105 - Mileage 743 450 750 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 28,053 33,380 34,430 5151 - Postage 10 800 300 5152 - Computer Software 2,131 840 640 5155 - Public Relations/Educ Material 26,388 36,750 36,750 5160 - Membership Dues 5,259 8,690 8,460 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 2,994 7,390 5,130 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 5,774 9,770 6,760 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 272,616 327,340 310,490 5204 - O & M/Facilities 0 0 110,000 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 0 0 1,700 5220 - Cellular Technology 32,839 40,300 40,300 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 147,695 139,860 139,860 5252 - Emergency Equipment & Veh Rntl 0 0 2,500 5255 - Gasoline 23,076 35,770 35,770 5256 - Diesel Fuel 48,605 91,480 80,000 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 23,348 26,100 31,500 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 69,014 75,690 79,430 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 22,245 37,870 42,070 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 24,421 30,450 33,150 5300 - Contract Services 769,478 993,320 1,014,600 5304 - Contract Serv/Facilities 0 0 241,500 5312 - Legal Services 75,203 50,000 50,000 5320 - Hazardous Waste Removal 1,598 2,500 2,500 5321 - Fire Incident Costs 76 2,500 2,500 5400 - Telephone Utilities 29,234 33,170 33,170 5401 - Gas Utilities 7,224 8,890 9,030 5402 - Water Utilities 13,567 19,730 15,810 5403 - Electric Utilities 62,724 83,210 75,450 5410 - Property Insurance 0 0 75,650 5411 - Other Insurance 0 0 4,760 5416 - General Liability Insurance 96,794 243,380 222,250 5500 - Assessment Administration 0 22,200 42,520 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 2,077,780 2,189,380 2,264,880 5510 - Property Tax Admin. Fee 166,390 175,190 175,190 5700 - Interest Expense 145,796 115,100 91,980 5701 - Principal Repayments 654,417 684,870 308,010 5703 - Capital Lease Payment 3,303 5,490 5,790 5704 - Long Term Debt Repymt Contra (654,417) 0 0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 18o City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 5720 - Misc Contributions to City 290,180 332,750 341,120 5901 - Bad Debt Expense -Other 46,562 0 0 5999 - Prior Period Adjustment (3,450) 0 0 9282 - Transfer Out-CFD 85-1 0 0 16,090 9283 - Transfer Out-CFD 88-1 997,276 953,800 1,089,550 TOTAL FIRE FUND $ 24,957,053 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 282-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 4,716,390 $ 4,922,750 $ 5,160,990 5091 - PERS Prefunding 689,255 0 0 5100 - Travel and Meetings 198 1,120 1,120 5150 - Office Supplies & Equipment 15 140 140 5160 - Membership Dues 0 80 80 5161 - Publications & Subscriptions 220 220 480 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 3,624 5,500 3,910 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 18,344 20,970 16,140 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 69,527 69,940 69,940 5255 - Gasoline 10,289 17,160 17,160 5256 - Diesel Fuel 23,520 50,060 43,800 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5,965 6,000 6,000 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 3,983 15,640 15,640 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 3,036 3,130 3,130 5300 - Contract Services 343,017 367,300 355,100 5400 - Telephone Utilities 15,288 18,920 18,920 5401 - Gas Utilities 5,145 6,220 6,360 5402 - Water Utilities 9,678 13,020 10,580 5403 - Electric Utilities 46,302 55,350 51,240 5416 - General Liability Insurance 978 2,370 0 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 218,490 231,270 251,720 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 $ 6,183,264 $ 5,807,160 $ 6,032,450 283-COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 5081 - Reimb Personnel to Fire Fund $ 1,946,040 $ 1,975,020 $ 2,089,960 5165 - Licenses, Permits & Fees 1,226 1,920 1,280 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 3,748 4,000 4,000 5300 - Contract Services -76,507 80,240 87,190 5400 - Telephone Utilities 10,402 11,190 11,190 5401 - Gas Utilities 1,408 1,880 1,970 5402 - Water Utilities 4,349 4,850 5,040 5403 - Electric Utilities 11,969 13,970 13,560 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 141,880 96,020 104,410 TOTAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 $ 2,197,529 $ 2,189,090 $ 2,318,600 285-FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 5501 - Admin./General Overhead $ 0 $ 360 $ 140 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 181 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditure Detail All Funds Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget TOTAL FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288-FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 5152 - Computer Software 5200 - Operations & Maintenance 5207 - O & M/Capital Supplies 5215 - O & M/Computer Equipment 5240 - Operation of Acquired Property 5250 - Vehicle Operations & Maint. 5280 - Equip Operations & Maint 5285 - Safety Gear & Equipment 5290 - Specialized Tools & Equipment 5291 - Equipment Supplies & Repairs 5298 - Operating Cntra Acct (FS only) 5300 - Contract Services 5312 - Legal Services 5501 - Admin./General Overhead 5600 - Capital Outlay -Land 5602 - Capital Outlay -Bldg & Imprvmnt 5603 - Capital Outlay -Equipment 5604 - Capital Outlay -Vehicles 5605 - Capital Outlay -Computer Equip 5606 - Capital Outlay-Furn/Fixtures 5607 - Cap Outlay-Impry Oth Than Bldg 5650 - Capital Project 5699 - Capital Proj Contra Acct (FS) 5720 - Misc Contributions to City TOTAL FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS 2016/17 2015/16 Adopted Actual Budget $ 0 $ 360 $ 42,132 $ 38,220 183,082 203,000 53,226 139,000 13,548 63,000 4,120 5,000 174,412 50,000 47,120 98,000 16,003 76,000 107,539 6,500 12,938 11,300 4,497 0 228,945 92,500 8,518 200,000 17,950 38,250 4,203,295 0 4,497 525,000 322,418 750,000 1,162,131 835,000 0 0 0 250,000 0 400,000 1,358,885 21,182,350 (4,497) 0 10,000 0 $ 7,970,759 $ 24,963,120 2017/18 Adopted Budget $ 140 5,200 136,000 239,000 20,500 1,000 50,000 78,000 16,000 6,500 17,000 0 42,450 0 35,830 0 10,000 594,000 760,000 65,000 499,020 600,000 12,515,000 0 0 $ 15,690,500 $ 41,308,605 $ 58,206,240 $ 50,704,730 $ 182,346,788 $ 240,547,520 $ 247,411,470 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 182 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND DIVISION 001 - NON -DEPARTMENTAL GENERAL $ 6,094,402 $ 5,517,020 $ 5,569,570 002 - NON -DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 1,889,567 165,330 174,480 101 - CITY COUNCIL 111,291 128,160 123,930 102 - CITY MANAGEMENT 896,103 919,890 915,860 103 - CITY CLERK 1,873 1,940 1,910 104 - ANIMAL CARE AND SERVICES 2,924,837 3,155,980 3,236,220 106 - RECORDS MANAGEMENT 540,006 490,530 512,000 107 - HEALTHY RC PROGRAM 367,188 432,990 559,610 108 - COMMUNICATIONS 133,916 231,540 320,670 201 - ADMIN SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 251,983 274,070 285,940 204 - BUSINESS LICENSES 302,596 336,250 425,020 205 - CITY FACILITIES 921,215 1,156,970 1,160,040 206 - FINANCE 1,097,611 1,413,300 1,458,950 207 - GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS 335,516 0 0 209 - INNOVATION & TECHNOLOGY SRVCS 1,796,456 3,266,360 3,390,260 210 - PERSONNEL 495,311 587,890 736,190 211 - PROCUREMENT 221,591 326,850 245,990 212 - RISK MANAGEMENT 155,157 239,950 273,390 213 - TREASURY MANAGEMENT 8,638 12,150 12,230 217 - CITY TELECOMMUNICATIONS 304,714 260,000 333,600 301 - ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DVLPMNT 443,229 737,080 810,680 302 - BUILDING AND SAFETY 1,622,966 2,019,300 1,848,380 303 - ENGINEERING - ADMINISTRATION 321,464 316,380 319,390 305 - ENGINEERING - DEVELOPMENT MGT 675,112 865,770 943,430 306 - ENGINEERING - NPDES 351,024 420,020 401,160 307 - ENGINEERING - PROJECT MGT 767,951 442,400 480,750 308 - ENGINEERING - TRAFFIC MGT 235,488 223,120 276,730 311 - FIRE FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 0 0 251,800 312 - CITY FACILITIES MAINTENANCE 3,063,957 3,714,280 3,799,560 314 - PLANNING 1,881,246 1,862,160 1,812,180 315 - PLANNING COMMISSION 14,938 22,080 17,580 317 - VEHICLE AND EQUIP. MAINT. 835,271 960,260 953,940 318 - STREET MAINTENANCE 2,278,477 2,798,310 2,731,740 319 - PARK MAINTENANCE 2,374,846 2,882,570 3,082,760 322 - COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT 483,102 634,300 704,460 401 - COMMUNITY SRVCS-ADMINISTRATION 4,525,721 5,020,190 5,218,190 420 - PARK AND RECREATION COMMISSION 4,534 4,830 5,610 701 - POLICE -ADMINISTRATION 32,922,454 35,610,630 37,363,370 TOTAL GENERAL FUND OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND $ 71,651,751 $ 77,450,850 $ 80,757,570 $ 86,900 $ 88,390 $ 91,670 188,470 230,190 236,400 82,132 93,300 0 13,980 357,050 63,400 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 183 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 141,513 2,240 607,210 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 421,409 439,120 369,430 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 123,850 134,250 124,760 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 167,190 179,030 183,120 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 3,450 39,800 40,010 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 300 4,350 4,350 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 3,837,821 7,188,570 18,285,960 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 1,108,177 685,630 904,320 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 6,175,192 $ 9,441,920 $ 20,910,630 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 1,056,307 $ 957,250 $ 958,000 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 114,644 341,910 2,038,830 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 631,979 936,330 500,850 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 384,884 1,025,140 1,007,390 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 229,284 25,430 25,400 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 270 300 0 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 117,078 281,470 284,200 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 150 25,160 25,380 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 756,610 3,545,880 1,470,980 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 90 250 180 124 - TRANSPORTATION 1,899,566 6,021,560 3,221,770 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 150 25,170 25,390 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 190 190 190 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 14,740 1,401,660 133,310 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 941,457 1,212,540 1,362,480 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,220,583 3,751,160 4,136,170 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 5,658 6,750 8,570 133 - LMD #313 MEDIANS 786,638 957,940 1,046,920 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 2,092,551 2,911,410 2,735,910 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 30,608 7,810 9,970 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 387,009 494,830 515,610 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 866,667 1,039,770 1,136,830 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 30,436 40,480 36,560 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 470,869 573,740 660,250 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 476,029 618,410 613,980 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 40,000 40,000 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 1,044,540 1,061,040 5,286,260 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 710,133 716,530 5,403,390 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 348,564 354,900 2,137,070 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 143,248 169,110 1,241,780 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY 77,771 81,560 488,910 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 117,322 129,040 775,060 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 226,039 221,250 1,532,100 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 92,352 100,070 423,260 170 - GAS TAX 2105/PROP111 880,858 669,960 0 172 - GAS TAX 2106-2107 1,599,390 2,038,120 0 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 1,535,934 1,550,310 4,691,960 176 - MEASURE I 1990-2010 703,038 400,440 400,660 177 - MEASURE I 2010-2040 3,114,297 5,363,750 3,678,510 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT 0 0 1,000,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 184 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 80 80 80 186 - FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE 20 0 0 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 1,162,869 1,623,240 1,677,720 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 109,190 250 160 194 - PROPOSITION 1B STATE FUNDING 70 60 70 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 191,448 65,320 5,670 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 30 20 60 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE 99,819 30 1,860 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 1,033,140 10,246,580 4,380,370 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 846,233 1,901,820 1,939,140 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU 3,631,313 5,091,000 2,127,750 211 - PROP 1B - SLPP 980,083 19,920 19,920 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 60,816 46,940 0 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC 72,799 49,730 9,730 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT 53,388 68,910 49,500 226 - USED OIL RECYCLING GRANT 54 15,240 0 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 52,803 53,050 40,220 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM 172,671 57,400 201,320 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT 1,031,668 5,320 0 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 4,729,771 3,558,950 3,461,770 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 3,049 1,325,210 1,506,750 290 - LIBRARY FUND 3,768,718 4,730,730 5,163,710 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 7,375 580 18,000 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) 34,050 43,890 74,510 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 16,117 20,000 0 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 20 0 0 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 1,788,870 295,980 136,860 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 194,606 270,900 308,000 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 40 0 47,000 374 - COPS HIRING PROGRAM GRANT 163,230 502,580 0 380 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -FIRE 104,136 32,280 0 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE 33,314 0 68,070 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT 33,442 33,450 33,220 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 289,167 7,241,760 4,480,850 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 55,369 56,230 28,270 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 40,000 40,000 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,114,497 1,207,290 1,322,070 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 424,797 492,170 498,080 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 47,366,995 $ 78,195,530 $ 76,694,810 CAPITAL PROJECTS 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO $ 3,490 $ 290 $ 310 612 - CFD 2001-01 130 130 140 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 16,000 0 0 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 606,871 100,000 0 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 1,964 0 0 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 628,455 $ 100,420 $ 450 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORT$COMPLEX $ 2,663,116 $ 2,653,070 $ 2,612,360 702 - REGIS CONNECT 65,042 166,080 176,320 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 185 City of Rancho Cucamonga Expenditures by Fund Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget 2016/17 2017/18 2015/16 Adopted Adopted Actual Budget Budget 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 9,360,513 10,373,190 11,119,080 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 331,255 553,850 601,500 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 0 930 1,200 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 0 0 2,150,000 TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 12,419,926 $ 13,747,120 $ 16,660,460 INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIP/VEHICLE REPLACEMENT 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 1011y\W.11aa111jam $ 1,366,455 $ 2,183,940 $ 879,660 1,429,408 1,221,500 803,160 $ 2,795,863 $ 3,405,440 $ 1,682,820 $ 141,038,182 $ 182,341,280 $ 196,706,740 $ 24,957,053 $ 25,246,510 $ 26,663,040 6,183,265 5,807,160 6,032,450 2,197,528 2,189,090 2,318,600 0 360 140 7,970,758 24,963,120 15,690,500 $ 41,308,604 $ 58,206,240 $ 50,704,730 $ 41,308,604 $ 58,206,240 $ 50,704,730 $ 182,346,786 $ 240,547,520 $ 247,411,470 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 186 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - SUMMARY ADOPTED DEPARTMENT GOVERNANCE City Council City Clerk City Treasurer City Management PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District Animal Care and Services TOTAL GOVERNANCE TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Community Services Library Services TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Administration/Purchasing Finance Human Resources Innovation and Technology TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 5.0 5.0 5.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 18.0 17.0 18.0 25.0 24.0 25.0 114.0 114.0 115.0 22.0 22.0 22.0 136.0 136.0 137.0 4.0 45.5 27.5 4.0 45.5 27.5 6.0 46.5 27.5 77.0 77.0 80.0 6.0 6.0 5.0 21.0 21.0 21.0 6.0 7.0 9.0 22.0 23.0 23.0 55.0 57.0 58.0 2.0 2.0 3.0 18.0 18.0 16.0 34.0 34.5 37.0 15.0 15.0 14.0 127.0 127.0 128.0 196.0 196.5 198.0 489.0 490.5 498.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 187 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE GOVERNANCE Elected Officials Mayor Councilmember City Clerk City Treasurer ADOPTED Preliminary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 1.0 1.0 1.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Elected Officials 7.0 7.0 7.0 City Management Administrative Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant City Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 City Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Communications Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Improvement Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Improvement Officer I 3.0 2.0 2.0 Community Improvement Officer II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Community Programs Coordinator* 0.0 0.0 1.0 DCM/Civic & Cultural Services 0.0 1.0 1.0 Executive Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Principal Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total City Management 18.0 17.0 18.0 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 25.0 24.0 25.0 PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District Captain Specialist 3.0 3.0 3.0 Emergency Management Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 EMS Administrator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Field Training Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Battalion Chief 4.0 4.0 4.0 Fire Captain 27.0 27.0 27.0 Fire Chief 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Deputy Chief 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Engineer 27.0 27.0 27.0 Fire Equipment Apprentice Mechanic* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Fire Equipment Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Equipment Lead Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Marshall 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fire Prevention Specialist I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Prevention Specialist II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 188 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Fire Prevention Supervisor 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fire Shop Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Firefighter 27.0 27.0 27.0 Management Aide 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist II 3.0 3.0 3.0 Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Administrative Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Fire District 114.0 114.0 115.0 Animal Care and Services Animal Care Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Caretaker 3.0 2.0 2.0 Animal Center Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Handler 2.0 3.0 3.0 Animal License Canvasser 1.0 0.0 0.0 Animal Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Services Dispatcher 1.0 1.0 1.0 Animal Services Officer 3.0 3.0 3.0 Community Programs Specialist 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist II 3.0 3.0 3.0 Senior Animal Services Officer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinarian 0.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Assistant 1.0 1.0 1.0 Veterinary Technician 3.0 3.0 3.0 Total Animal Care and Services 22.0 22.0 22.0 TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 136.0 136.0 137.0 CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Assistant City Clerk 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Clerk Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 City Clerk Records Management Analyst*** 0.0 0.0 1.0 Office Specialist 11*** 1.0 1.0 3.0 Records Coordinator*** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Total Records Management 4.0 4.0 6.0 Community Services Community Services Coordinator 18.0 18.0 18.0 Community Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Services Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Community Services Marketing Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 189 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE Community Services Superintendent Community Services Supervisor Cultural Arts Manager Fund Development Coordinator Management Aide Management Analyst I Management Analyst II Office Specialist II Senior Administrative Secretary Theatre Technician III* Total Community Services Library Services ADOPTED Preliminary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 2.0 2.0 2.0 5.0 6.0 6.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.5 0.5 0.5 2.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 2.0 7.0 6.0 6.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 3.0 3.0 4.0 45.5 45.5 46.5 Assistant Library Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fund Development Coordinator 0.5 0.5 0.5 Librarian I 8.0 8.0 8.0 Librarian II 4.0 2.0 2.0 Library Assistant II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Library Clerk 2.0 2.0 2.0 Library Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Page 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Services Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Library Technician 5.0 5.0 5.0 Senior Administrative Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Librarian 1.0 3.0 3.0 Total Library Services 27.5 27.5 27.5 TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 77.0 77.0 80.0 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Administration/Purchasing Administrative Secretary Buyer I Buyer II DCM/Administrative Services Procurement Manager Procurement & Contracts Analyst*** Procurement Technician Purchasing Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 1.0 0.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 0.0 0.0 Total Admin/Purchasing 6.0 6.0 5.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 190 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Finance Account Clerk 5.0 5.0 5.0 Accountant 1.0 0.0 0.0 Account Technician*** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Accounting Manager 1.0 0.0 0.0 Accounts Payable Supervisor*** 0.0 0.0 1.0 Budget Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Business License Clerk 2.0 2.0 2.0 Business License Program Coordinator** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Business License Program Supervisor* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Business License Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Finance Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Finance Manager 0.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst III 2.0 2.0 2.0 Payroll Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Principal Accountant* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Senior Accountant** 2.0 3.0 2.0 Special Districts Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Finance 21.0 21.0 21.0 Human Resources Human Resources Clerk 1.0 0.0 0.0 Human Resources Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Human Resources Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Human Resources Technician 1.0 3.0 3.0 Management Analyst I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist I* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Risk Management Analyst*** 0.0 0.0 1.0 Senior Risk Management Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Human Resources 6.0 7.0 9.0 Innovation and Technology Deputy Director of Innovation and Technology 1.0 1.0 1.0 GIS Analyst 2.0 2.0 2.0 GIS Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 GIS Technician 3.0 0.0 0.0 Information Technology Analyst I** 4.0 4.0 3.0 Information Technology Analyst II* 1.0 2.0 3.0 Information Technology Specialist I 1.0 0.0 0.0 Information Technology Specialist II 1.0 2.0 2.0 Information Technology Technician** 2.0 2.0 1.0 Innovation and Technology Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist I* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Office Specialist II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 191 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Senior GIS Analyst 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior GIS Technician 1.0 4.0 4.0 Senior Information Technology Analyst 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Innovation and Technology 22.0 23.0 23.0 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 55.0 57.0 58.0 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration DCM/Economic & Community Development 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide* 0.0 0.0 1.0 Management Analyst II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Administration 2.0 2.0 3.0 Building and Safety Services Associate Engineer# 1.0 1.0 0.0 Building Inspection Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Building Safety Manager*** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Building and Safety Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Building Inspector 5.0 5.0 5.0 Office Specialist II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Plans Examiner I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Plans Examiner II*** 0.0 0.0 1.0 Public Service Technician I 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Service Technician II## 2.0 2.0 1.0 Public Service Technician III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Plans Examiner 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Building and Safety Services 18.0 18.0 16.0 Engineering Services Administrative Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Assistant Engineer 5.0 5.0 5.0 Assistant City Engineer 0.0 1.0 1.0 Associate Engineer# 5.0 5.0 6.0 Engineering Services Director/City Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Engineering Technician 4.0 4.0 4.0 Environmental Programs Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Environmental Programs Inspector 2.0 2.0 2.0 Environmental Programs Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Aide 1.0 1.0 1.0 Management Analyst I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst II*** 1.0 1.0 0.0 Office Specialist II 2.0 2.0 2.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 192 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Principal Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Services Technician III*** 1.0 1.0 2.0 Public Works Inspector I* 1.0 1.0 2.0 Public Works Inspector II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Civil Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Supervising Public Works Inspector 1.0 1.0 1.0 Traffic Engineer### 1.0 0.5 1.0 Utilities Division Manager 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Engineering Services 34.0 34.5 37.0 Planning Assistant Planner## 4.0 5.0 4.0 Associate Planner 3.0 3.0 3.0 Office Specialist I 0.0 1.0 1.0 Office Specialist 11 1.0 1.0 1.0 Planning Commission Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Planning Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Planning Technician 1.0 1.0 1.0 Secretary 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Community Improvement Officer 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Planner 2.0 2.0 2.0 Total Planning 15.0 15.0 14.0 Public Works Services Assistant Engineer 1.0 1.0 1.0 Electrician*** 1.0 1.0 2.0 Equipment Operator 5.0 5.0 5.0 Facilities Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fleet Supervisor 1.0 1.0 1.0 Inventory Specialist Equipment/Materials 1.0 1.0 1.0 Lead Maintenance Worker 16.0 15.0 15.0 Lead Mechanic 1.0 1.0 1.0 Maintenance Coordinator" 9.0 9.0 9.0 Maintenance Supervisor 9.0 10.0 10.0 Maintenance Worker 56.0 57.0 57.0 Management Analyst I 2.0 2.0 2.0 Management Analyst III 1.0 1.0 1.0 Mechanic 2.0 2.0 2.0 Office Specialist II 1.0 1.0 1.0 Parks/Landscape Maintenance Superintendent 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Safety Coordinator 1.0 1.0 1.0 Public Works Services Director 1.0 1.0 1.0 Secretary 1.0 1.0 1.0 Senior Electrician 1.0 0.0 0.0 Senior Maintenance Worker 12.0 11.0 11.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 193 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE Signal & Lighting Coordinator Signal & Lighting Technician Streets/Storm Drain Maintenance Superintendent Total Public Works Services ADOPTED Preliminary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 2.0 2.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 127.0 127.0 128.0 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 196.0 196.5 198.0 TOTAL FULL TIME POSITIONS 489.0 490.5 498.0 Changes in staffing levels for Fiscal Year 2017/18 Preliminary Budget *Position approved by City Council but will not be filled pending agreement with Bargaining Groups **Position eliminated and replaced with updated position approved by City Council pending agreement with Bargaining Groups ***Position defunded/funded during FY 2016/17 #Position transferred to Engineering from Building and Safety ##Position defunded in FY 2017/18 ###Position funded for half a year in FY 2016/17 and fully funded in FY 2017/18 ^*Position replaced with Electrician during FY 2016/17; new position approved by City Council in FY 2017/18 but will not be filled pending agreement with Bargaining Groups GOVERNANCE City Management TOTAL CITY MANAGEMENT PUBLIC SAFETY Fire District Animal Care and Services TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES Records Management Community Services Library Services TOTAL CIVIC AND CULTURAL SERVICES 1.8 1.6 1.4 1.8 1.6 1.4 4.1 11.0 4.4 12.5 3.5 12.8 15.1 16.9 16.3 1.3 188.9 36.6 1.3 189.9 36.8 0.0 189.6 36.8 226.8 228.0 226.4 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 194 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA FISCAL YEAR 2017/18 ADOPTED BUDGET FUNDED POSITIONS BY DEPARTMENT - DETAIL ADOPTED Preliminary DEPARTMENT AND POSITION TITLE 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES Purchasing 2.0 2.0 1.0 Human Resources 0.0 0.0 0.5 Finance 1.1 2.3 2.3 TOTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES 3.1 4.3 3.8 ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Administration 0.8 0.8 0.0 Building and Safety Services 0.5 0.5 0.5 Engineering Services 1.9 2.4 1.9 Planning 1.6 0.8 0.8 Public Works Services 32.5 34.1 34.1 TOTAL ECONOMIC AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 37.3 38.6 37.3 TOTAL PART TIME POSITIONS 284.1 289.4 285.2 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 195 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 196 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA SUMMARIES OF FINANCIAL DATA Fund Balance Summaries Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 197 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 198 City of Rancho Cucamonga, California Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Spendable Fund Balances With the implementation of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Statement No. 54, Fund Balance Reporting and Governmental Fund Type Definitions, local governments are required to use new fund balance terminology. As indicated in the Glossary of Budget Terms, fund balance is essentially the difference between the assets and liabilities reported in a governmental fund. There are five separate components of fund balance, each of which identifies the extent to which the City is bound to honor constraints on the specific purposes for which amounts can be spent. • Nonspendable fund balance (inherently nonspendable) • Restricted fund balance (externally enforceable limitations on use) • Committed fund balance (self-imposed limitations on use) • Assigned fund balance (limitation resulting from intended use) • Unassigned fund balance (residual net resources) The first two components listed above are not included in the Spendable Fund Balances report on the following pages due to the nature of their restrictions, with the exception of Special Revenue and Capital Projects Funds. These two fund types have restricted funding sources; however, the budgets presented represent qualifying expenditures that are in line with the restrictions. Therefore, the respective fund balances are presented. The last three components are incorporated into the report for all fund types. For the City's Operating Budget, following are the main components of the committed fund balance included in the fund balance roll forward: Fund 001 — General Fund: Changes in Economic Circumstances $17,794,138 Working Capital $ 4,037,879 Funds 281-283 — Fire District Operating Funds: Working Capital $15,356,772 Changes in Economic Circumstances $ 8,890,876 Employee Leave Payouts $ 3,360,458 All other fund balances in the City's Operating Budget are either committed or assigned. The Operating Budget has no unassigned fund balances. For descriptions of the City's committed fund balance categories, please refer to the City's Financial Policies included in the Appendix to this budget document. The City adopts a balanced Operating Budget each year resulting in minimal overall fluctuations in the fund balance from year to year. In the Other Funds, increases or decreases are dependent upon general fluctuations in recurring revenues such as gas tax; the receipt of new grant funding; or the usage of funding received in prior years for capital expenditures. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 199 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1 2017 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2018 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 -GENERAL FUND $ 32,865,554 $ 79,127,090 $ 1,630,480 $ 4,263,030 $ 76,494,540 $ 32,865,554 TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 32,865,554 $ 79,127,090 $ 1,630,480 $ 4,263,030 $ 76,494,540 $ 32,865,554 OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 4,138 $ 91,670 $ - $ - $ 91,670 $ 4,138 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 798,760 325,000 - 39,170 197,230 887,360 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 28,727 96,050 - - - 124,777 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 2,066,246 55,610 - - 63,400 2,058,456 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 8,197,597 92,910 - - 607,210 7,683,297 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 310 310,200 58,920 - 369,430 - 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 541,686 164,410 - - 124,760 581,336 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 60,493 182,970 - 182,940 180 60,343 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 139,689 20,580 - - 40,010 120,259 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 33,120 8,080 - - 4,350 36,850 025-CAPITAL RESERVE 55,118,862 746,260 1,025,000 - 18,285,960 38,604,162 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 3,064,228 45,360 - - 904,320 2,205,268 TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 70,053,856 $ 2,139,100 $ 1,083,920 $ 222,110 $ 20,688,520 $ 52,366,246 SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 742,147 $ 958,000 $ - $ - $ 958,000 $ 742,147 101 -AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 301,470 130 - - - 301,600 105-AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 1,125,280 1,705,790 - - 2,038,830 792,240 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 960,106 9,440 - 500,850 468,696 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 1,155,706 131,990 - - - 1,287,696 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 2,306,262 117,440 - - 1,007,390 1,416,312 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 449,621 50,710 - - 500,331 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 315,064 79,980 - 25,400 369,644 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 978,077 - - - - 978,077 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 2,044,334 99,650 - - 284,200 1,859,784 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 571,591 6,560 - - 25,380 552,771 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 659,062 71,020 - - - 730,082 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 12,473,563 145,210 - - 1,470,980 11,147,793 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 644,483 7,560 - - 180 651,863 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 423,914 53,260 - - - 477,174 124-TRANSPORTATION 22,789,939 3,245,840 - - 3,221,770 22,814,009 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 86,262 15,730 - - - 101,992 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 607,297 6,980 - - 25,390 588,887 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 232,917 41,720 - - - 274,637 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 677,407 7,950 - - 190 685,167 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 10,702,349 162,750 - - 133,310 10,731,789 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,193,537 1,305,180 123,410 90,000 1,272,480 1,259,647 131 -LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,598,133 3,441,420 293,490 - 4,136,170 3,196,873 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 38,580 4,170 - - 8,570 34,180 133 - LMD #3B MEDIANS 1,828,148 1,082,550 - - 1,046,920 1,863,778 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 4,897,658 2,779,140 - - 2,735,910 4,940,888 135 -LMD #5 ANDOVER 39,175 2,910 - - 9,970 32,115 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 419,982 497,350 52,460 - 515,610 454,182 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,135,275 986,910 50,000 - 1,136,830 1,035,355 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 69,586 34,940 - - 36,560 67,966 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,533,057 321,850 - 660,250 1,194,657 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,164,874 592,480 - - 613,980 1,143,374 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 84,817 480 90,000 - 40,000 135,297 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 70,076 830 - - 70,906 151 - SLD #I ARTERIAL 281,532 5,032,430 - - 5,286,260 27,702 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 200 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1 2017 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2018 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 235,795 4,959,490 350,170 - 5,403,390 142,065 153 -SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,229,099 2,134,400 - - 2,137,070 1,226,429 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 552,727 1,087,910 - - 1,241,780 398,857 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (100,601) 445,690 - - 488,910 (143,821) 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 430,377 761,960 - - 775,060 417,277 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA (34,545) 1,407,220 105,100 - 1,532,100 (54,325) 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,016,618 411,190 - - 423,260 2,004,548 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 8,004,709 3,949,880 - - 4,691,960 7,262,629 176 -MEASURE I 1990-2010 486,323 3,370 - - 400,660 89,033 177 - MEASURE I 2010-2040 4,833,951 3,086,900 - - 3,678,510 4,242,341 178 - SB 140 36,529 - - - - 36,529 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT - 1,010,620 - - 1,000,000 10,620 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 292,870 - - - 80 292,790 186 - FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1,433) - - - (1,433) 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 3,429,653 1,845,300 - 350,170 1,327,550 3,597,233 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 206,301 2,430 - - 160 208,571 194 - PROPOSITION I STATE FUNDING 242,354 2,850 - - 70 245,134 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 124,553 1,570 - - 5,670 120,453 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 6,005 90 - - 60 6,035 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE - 190 - - 1,860 (1,670) 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 27,614,837 1,545,070 - - 4,380,370 24,779,537 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 364,737 1,185,300 - - 1,939,140 (389,103) 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU - 2,127,750 - - 2,127,750 - 211 - PROP 1 B - SLPP 3,049 19,920 - - 19,920 3,049 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 (9,883) - - - - (9,883) 215 - ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GRNT (96) - - - - (96) 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/IIEALTHY RC (14,849) 19,600 - - 9,730 (4,979) 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT - 50,070 - - 49,500 570 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 3,866 40,490 - - 40,220 4,136 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM (69,183) 178,070 - - 201,320 (92,433) 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT (341) - - - (341) 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 2,232,152 3,176,290 - - 3,461,770 1,946,672 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 531,432 1,462,510 - - 1,506,750 487,192 258 - SENIOR OUTREACH GRANT (5,267) - - - - (5,267) 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS - 30 - - - 30 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4,641,441 4,931,830 - - 5,163,710 4,409,561 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 29,575 - - - 18,000 11,575 101 Q'r AT:R TATATl1 IATVVXT T;TI /('A QT T RN - 7d ;IO - - 74.510 - 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 53,041 20,520 - 73,561 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 20,000 - 20,000 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 36,885 - - - 36,885 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 6,128 - - - - 6,128 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 915,726 14,460 - - 136,860 793,326 354 - COP'S PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 437,073 200,000 - 308,000 329,073 356 - JUSTICE ASSIST GRNT (JAG) ARRA 33 - - - 33 361-JUSTICE ASSISTANCEGRANT(JAG) 2,111 47,000 - 47,000 2,111 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT (54) - - - - (54) 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE (37) 68,070 - - 68,070 (37) 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT (28) 33,220 - - 33,220 (28) 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 7,718,778 92,960 - - 4,480,850 3,330,888 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 40,408 33,090 - - 28,270 45,228 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 96,391 690 116,800 - 40,000 173,881 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,342,936 1,305,950 203,990 116,800 1,205,270 1,530,806 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 495,711 454,140 - 50,000 448,080 451,771 TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $145,079,138 $ 61,192,950 $ 1,385,420 $ 606,970 $ 76,087,840 $130,962,698 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 201 City of Rancho Cucamonga Spendable Fund Balances Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Budget Spendable Fund Balance Operating Operating Fund Balance July 1 2017 Revenues Transfers In Transfers Out Expenditures June 30, 2018 CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 13,203 $ 160 $ - $ - $ - $ 13,363 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/1ELLO 1,122,223 13,160 - - 310 1,135,073 606 - AD 86-2 R/C DRAINAGE DISTRICT (41,128) - - - (41,128) 607 - CFD 2000-01 SOUTH ETIWANDA 63 - - - - 63 612 - CFD 2001-01 497,298 5,840 - - 140 502,998 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 175,077 - - - 175,077 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 5,242 - - - 5,242 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 48,456 60 - - 48,516 680 - CFD 2006-01 VINTNER'S GROVE 1,848 30 - - - 1,878 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 6,084 80 - - 6,164 TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 1,828,366 $ 19,330 $ - $ - $ 450 $ 1,847,246 ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX 702 - REGIS CONNECT 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 711 - FIBER OPTIC NETWORK TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT 714 - COMP EQUIPIFECH REPLCMENT FUND TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 -FIRE FUND 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 747,674 $ 563,960 $ 2,050,490 $ - $ 2,612,360 $ 749,764 37,745 105,680 - - 176,320 (32,895) 11,712,811 12,410,770 - 1,241,140 9,877,940 13,004,501 770,383 306,310 - - 601,500 475,193 4,479,198 52,530 - - 1,200 4,530,528 23,642 2,196,950 - - 2,150,000 70,592 $ 17,771,453 $ 15,636,200 $ 2,050,490 $ 1,241,140 $ 15,419,320 $ 18,797,683 $ 2,698,339 $ 57,560 $ - $ - $ 879,660 $ 1,876,239 2,297,262 377,140 182,940 - 803,160 2,054,182 $ 4,995,601 $ 434,700 $ 182,940 $ - $ 1,682,820 $ 3,930,421 $272,593,968 $158,549,370 $ 6,333,250 $ 6,333,250 $190,373,490 $240,769,848 $ 35,456,658 $ 26,663,040 $ - $ 1,105,640 $ 25,557,400 $ 35,456,658 3,084,384 6,016,360 16,090 - 6,032,450 3,084,384 - 1,229,050 1,089,550 - 2,318,600 - 23,452 1,300 - - 140 24,612 34,775,084 7,906,800 - - 15,690,500 26,991,384 $ 73,339,578 $ 41,816,550 $ 1,105,640 $ 1,105,640 $ 49,599,090 $ 65,557,038 $ 73,339,578 $ 41,816,550 $ 1,105,640 $ 1,105,640 $ 49,599,090 $ 65,557,038 $345,933,546 $200,365,920 $ 7,438,890 $ 7,438,890 $239,972,580 $306,326,886 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 202 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July 1, 2017 June 30, 2018 Change Change Reason for Changes >$500.000 and 10% CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA GENERAL FUND 001 - GENERAL FUND $ 32,865,554 $ 32,865,554 $ 0.00% TOTAL GENERAL FUND $ 32,865,554 $ 32,865 554 $ 0.00% OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 - REIMB ST/COUNTY PARKING CIT $ 4,138 $ 4,138 $ 0.00% 006 - CVWD REIMBURSEMENTS 798,760 887,360 88,600 11.09% 008 - CNTY OF S. B. REIMBURSEMENTS 28,727 124,777 96,050 334.35% 016 - COMM DEV TECHNICAL SRVCS FUND 2,066,246 2,058,456 (7,790) -0.38% 017 - LAW ENFORCEMENT RESERVE 8,197,597 7,683,297 (514,300) -6.27% 018 - TRAFFIC SAFETY 310 - (310) -100.00% 019 - INFO TECHNOLOGY -DEVELOPMENT 541,686 581,336 39,650 7.32% 020 - CITY TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 60,493 60,343 (150) -0.25% 022 - MOBILE HOME PARK PROGRAM 139,689 120,259 (19,430) -13.91 % 023 - SB1186 CERT ACCESS SPEC PROG 33,120 36,850 3,730 11.26% 025 - CAPITAL RESERVE 55,118,862 38,604,162 (16,514,700) -29.96% Advance of funds to SLDs-street light purchase 073 - BENEFITS CONTINGENCY 3,064,228 2,205,268 (858,960) -28.03% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time TOTAL OTHER GENERAL FUNDS $ 70,053,856 $ 52,366,246 $ (17,687,610) -25.25% SPECIAL REVENUE 100 - ASSESSMENT DISTRICTS ADMIN $ 742,147 $ 742,147 $ - 0.00% 101 - AD 93-1 MASI COMMERCE CENTER 301,470 301,600 130 0.04% 105 - AB2766 AIR QUALITY IMPROVEMENT 1,125,280 792,240 (333,040) -29.60% 110 - BEAUTIFICATION 960,106 468,696 (491,410) -51.18% 111 - PARK LAND ACQUISITION 1,155,706 1,287,696 131,990 11.42% 112 - DRAINAGE FAC/GENERAL 2,306,262 1,416,312 (889,950) -38.59% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 113 - COMMUNITY/REC CENTER DEVELPMNT 449,621 500,331 50,710 11.28% 114 - DRAINAGE-ETIWANDA/SAN SEVAINE 315,064 369,644 54,580 17.32% 115 - HENDERSON/WARDMAN DRAINAGE 978,077 978,077 - 0.00% 116 - ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 2,044,334 1,859,784 (184,550) -9.03% 118 - UPPER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 571,591 552,771 (18,820) -3.29% 119 - PARK IMPROVEMENT 659,062 730,082 71,020 10.78% 120 - PARK DEVELOPMENT 12,473,563 11,147,793 (1,325,770) -10.63% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 122 - SOUTH ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 644,483 651,863 7,380 1.15% 123 - LIBRARY IMPACT FEE 423,914 477,174 53,260 12.56% 124 - TRANSPORTATION 22,789,939 22,814,009 24,070 0.11 % 125 - ANIMAL CENTER IMPACT FEE 86,262 101,992 15,730 18.24% 126 - LOWER ETIWANDA DRAINAGE 607,297 588,887 (18,410) -3.03% 127 - POLICE IMPACT FEE 232,917 274,637 41,720 17.91% 128 - ETIWANDA NO. EQUESTRIAN FACIL. 677,407 685,167 7,760 1.15% 129 - UNDERGROUND UTILITIES 10,702,349 10,731,789 29,440 0.28% 130 - LMD #1 GENERAL CITY 1,193,537 1,259,647 66,110 5.54% 131 - LMD #2 VICTORIA 3,598,133 3,196,873 (401,260) -11.15% 132 - LMD #3A HYSSOP 38,580 34,180 (4,400) -11.40% 133 - LMD #3B MEDIANS 1,828,148 1,863,778 35,630 1.95% 134 - LMD #4R TERRA VISTA 4,897,658 4,940,888 43,230 0.88% 135 - LMD #5 ANDOVER 39,175 32,115 (7,060) -18.02% 136 - LMD #6R CARYN COMMUNITY 419,982 454,182 34,200 8.14% 137 - LMD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA 1,135,275 1,035,355 (99,920) -8.80% 138 - LMD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 69,586 67,966 (1,620) -2.33% 139 - LMD #9 LOWER ETIWANDA 1,533,057 1,194,657 (338,400) -22.07% 140 - LMD #10 RANCHO ETIWANDA 1,164,874 1,143,374 (21,500) -1.85% 141 - LMD 1 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 84,817 135,297 50,480 59.52% 150 - GENERAL CITY STREET LIGHTS 70,076 70,906 830 1.18% 151 - SLD #1 ARTERIAL 281,532 27,702 (253,830) -90.16% 152 - SLD #2 RESIDENTIAL 235,795 142,065 (93,730) -39.75% 153 - SLD #3 VICTORIA 1,229,099 1,226,429 (2,670) -0.22% 154 - SLD #4 TERRA VISTA 552,727 398,857 (153,870) -27.84% 155 - SLD #5 CARYN COMMUNITY (100,601) (143,821) (43,220) 42.96% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 203 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July 1, 2017 June 30 2018 Change Change Reason for Changes >$500,000 and 10% 156 - SLD #6 INDUSTRIAL AREA 430,377 417,277 (13,100) -3.04% 157 - SLD #7 NORTH ETIWANDA (34,545) (54,325) (19,780) 57.26% 158 - SLD #8 SOUTH ETIWANDA 2,016,618 2,004,548 (12,070) -0.60% 174 - GAS TAX R&T7360 8,004,709 7,262,629 (742,080) -9.27% 176 - MEASURE I 1990-2010 486,323 89,033 (397,290) -81.69% 177 - MEASURE 12010-2040 4,833,951 4,242,341 (591,610) -12.24% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 178 - SB 140 36,529 36,529 - 0.00% 179 - ROAD MAINT & REHAB ACCT - 10,620 10,620 N/A 182 - AB 2928 TRAFFIC CONGEST RELIEF 292,870 292,790 (80) -0.03% 186 - FOOTHILL BLVD MAINTENANCE (1,433) (1,433) - 0.00% 188 - INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT 3,429,653 3,597,233 167,580 4.89% 190 - PROP 42-TRAFFIC CONGESTION MIT 206,301 208,571 2,270 1.10% 194 - PROPOSITION I STATE FUNDING 242,354 245,134 2,780 1.15% 195 - STATE ASSET SEIZURE 124,553 120,453 (4,100) -3.29% 196 - CA ASSET SEIZURE 15% 6,005 6,035 30 0.50% 197 - FEDERAL ASSET SEIZURE - (1,670) (1,670) N/A 198 - CITYWIDE INFRASTRUCTURE IMPRV 27,614,837 24,779,537 (2,835,300) -10.27% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 204 - COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLK GRNT 364,737 (389,103) (753,840) -206.68% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 209 - FEDERAL SAFETEA-LU - - 0.00% 211 - PROP 1 B - SLPP 3,049 3,049 0.00% 214 - PEDESTRIAN GRANT/ART 3 (9,883) (9,883) 0.00% 215 - ENRGY EFFICNCY/CONSRVATN GRNT (96) (96) 0.00% 218 - PUBLIC RESRCE GRNTS/HEALTHY RC (14,849) (4,979) 9,870 -66.47% 225 - CA RECYC/LITTER REDUCTION GRNT - 570 570 N/A 227 - USED OIL RECYCLING PROGRAM 3,866 4,136 270 6.98% 234 - SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOL PROGRAM (69,183) (92,433) (23,250) 33.61% 235 - PROP 84 PARK BOND ACT (341) (341) - 0.00% 250 - RECREATION SERVICES 2,232,152 1,946,672 (285,480) -12.79% 255 - VG CULTURAL CENTER 531,432 487,192 (44,240) -8.32% 258 - SENIOR OUTREACH GRANT (5,267) (5,267) - 0.00% 272 - FREEDOM COURTYARD RSRC GRANTS - 30 30 N/A 290 - LIBRARY FUND 4,641,441 4,409,561 (231,880) -5.00% 291 - CA STATE LIBRARY 29,575 11,575 (18,000) -60.86% 292 - STAFF INNOVATION FD (CA ST LB) - - - N/A 299 - LIBRARY DEVELOPMENT FUND 53,041 73,561 20,520 38.69% 301 - THE BIG READ LIBRARY GRANT 20,000 20,000 - 0.00% 302 - LIBRARY SERVICES & TECH. ACT 36,885 36,885 0.00% 310 - PUBLIC LIBRARY BOND ACT-2000 6,128 6,128 0.00% 329 - LIBRARY CAPITAL FUND 915,726 793,326 (122,400) -13.37% 354 - COPS PROGRAM GRANT -STATE 437,073 329,073 (108,000) -24.71 % 356 - JUSTICE ASSIST GRNT (JAG) ARRA 33 33 0.00% 361 - JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT(JAG) 2,111 2,111 0.00% 373 - COPS SECURE OUR SCHOOLS GRANT (54) (54) 0.00% 381 - HOMELAND SECURITY GRANT -POLICE (37) (37) 0.00% 383 - EMERGENCY MGMT PERFORMNCE GRNT (28) (28) 0.00% 396 - HOUSING SUCCESSOR AGENCY 7,718,778 3,330,888 (4,387,890) -56.85% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 838 - AD 91-2 REDEMPTION -DAY CANYON 40,408 45,228 4,820 11.93% 847 - PD 85 CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 96,391 173,881 77,490 80.39% 848 - PD 85 REDEMPTION FUND 1,342,936 1,530,806 187,870 13.99% 868 - CFD 2000-03 PARK MAINTENANCE 495,711 451,771 (43,940) -8.86% TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 145,079,138 $ 130,962,698 $ (14,116,440) -9.73% CAPITAL PROJECTS 600 - AD 82-1 6TH ST INDUSTRIAL $ 13,203 $ 13,363 $ 160 1.21 % 602 - AD 84-1 DAY CREEK/MELLO 1,122,223 1,135,073 12,850 1.15% 606 - AD 86-2 R/C DRAINAGE DISTRICT (41,128) (41,128) - 0,00% 607 - CFD 2000-01 SOUTH ETIWANDA 63 63 - 0.00% 612 - CFD 2001-01 497,298 502,998 5,700 1.15% 614 - CFD 2003-01 PROJECT FUND 175,077 175,077 - 0.00% 615 - CFD 2003-01 CULTURAL CENTER 5,242 5,242 - 0.00% 617 - CFD 2004-01 RANCHO ETIWANDA ES 48,456 48,516 60 0.12% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 204 City of Rancho Cucamonga Summary of Changes in Spendable Fund Balances Greater Than $500,000 and 10% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Estimated Estimated Spendable Spendable Fund Balance Fund Balance $ % July 1, 2017 June 30, 2018 Chance Chance Reason for Changes>$500.000 and 10% 681 - CFD 2006-02 AMADOR ON ROUTE 66 6,084 6,164 80 1.31 % TOTAL CAPITAL PROJECTS $ 1,828,366 $ 1,847,246 $ 18,880 1.03% ENTERPRISE FUNDS 700 - SPORTS COMPLEX $ 747,674 $ 749,764 $ 2,090 0.28% 702 - REGIS CONNECT 37,745 (32,895) (70,640)-187.15% 705 - MUNICIPAL UTILITY 11,712,811 13,004,501 1,291,690 11.03% Results of operations, for use in future period 706 - UTILITY PUBLIC BENEFIT FUND 770,383 475,193 (295,190) -38.32% 708 - RCMU CAPITAL REPLACEMENT FUND 4,479,198 4,530,528 51,330 1.15% 711 -FIBER OPTIC NETWORK 23,642 70,592 46,950 198.59% TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS $ 17,771,453 $ 18,797,683 $ 1,026,230 5.77% INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 712 - EQUIPNEHICLE REPLACEMENT $ 2,698,339 $ 1,876,239 $ (822,100) -30.47% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time 714 - COMP EQUIP/TECH REPLCMENT FUND 2,297,262 2,054,182 (243,080) -10.58% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS $ 4,995,601 $ 3,930,421 $ (1,065,180) -21.32% TOTAL CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA $ 272,593,968 $ 240,769,848 $ (31,824,120) -11.67% R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT SPECIAL REVENUE 281 - FIRE FUND $ 35,456,658 $ 35,456,658 $ 0.00% 282 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 85-1 3,084,384 3,084,384 0.00% 283 - COMMUNITY FACILITIES DIST 88-1 - - N/A 285 - FIRE TECHNOLOGY FEE FUND 23,452 24,612 1,160 4.95% 288 - FIRE PROTECTION CAPITAL FUND 34,775,084 26,991,384 (7,783,700) -22.38% Use of funds accumulated over a period of time TOTAL SPECIAL REVENUE $ 73,339,578 $ 65,557,038 $ (7,782,540) -10.617/. TOTAL R.C. FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT $ 73,339,578 $ 65,557,038 $ (7,782,540) -10.61% TOTAL ALL FUNDS $ 345,933,546 $ 306,326,886 $ (39,606,660) -11.45% Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 205 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 206 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 207 City Council Department Budget Summary Overview of Department As a body of elected officials, the separately elected Mayor and four -member City Council establish local laws, set policy, approve programs, adopt the annual budget, and appropriate funds. As elected representatives of the citizens, the City Council is responsible to all of the people and, as such, devotes its energies to making decisions which are in the best interest of the public welfare. The Mayor and City Council members serve staggered four-year terms. The City Council also serves as the Board of Directors for the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District (a subsidiary district of the City). The City Council meets the first and third Wednesday of the month at City Hall to discuss and vote on pertinent issues facing the City and its residents. In addition, the City Council is responsible for appointing the City Manager, City Attorney, and members of certain foundations, boards and commissions. City Council Mission Statement The Mission of the City Council of Rancho Cucamonga is to: • Make decisions, and be perceived as making decisions, for the general welfare of the community. • Always work to improve existing services and develop policies to meet the expected as well as anticipated needs of the community. • Work together cooperatively to respect all persons and their ideas in order to develop and maintain the trust of the community. • Reflect the community's desires and priorities by assuring that decisions accurately reflect the community's interests by fairly translating public feedback into public policy. • Enhance the quality of life of all Rancho Cucamonga residents through the continued pursuit of excellence and commitment to the City's core values and goals. • Set the vision for the community for the future. • Have a professional, objective, and respectful relationship with each other in order to more effectively address the challenges of the future. FY 2017/18 City Council Priorities The four primary goals established by the City Council for the upcoming fiscal year are as follows: • Public Safety: Proactively develop public safety programs and facilities to meet community needs. • Parks and Recreation Development: Proceed with planning and development of major parks and recreational projects. • Enhancing Premier Community Status: As the community matures, undertake programs and projects to enhance Rancho Cucamonga's position as the premier community in our region. • Mid and Long Range Planning: Begin efforts to develop mid -range and long-term goals and vision for the City. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 208 City Council Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Actuals 2015/16 Adopted Budget 2016/17 Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 144,090 $ 153,720 $ 151,190 15,901 26,500 23,900 (48,700) (52,060) (51,160) 111,291 128,160 123,930 Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 144,090 153,720 151,190 Operations and Maintenance 15,901 26,500 23,900 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (48,700) (52,060) (51,160) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 111,291 $ 128,160 $ 123,930 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 5.0 5.0 5.0 Total Staffing 5.0 5.0 5.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 209 City Clerk Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Clerk is an elected official charged with the responsibility of maintaining records of City Council actions, recordation of minutes for all meetings of the City Council, and verification of all Resolutions and Ordinances. In addition, the City Clerk is responsible for all documents and duties associated with municipal elections. This position works with the City Clerk Services Director who is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the office. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Maintain an accurate record of City Council proceedings and official City documents. • Conduct municipal elections in accordance with federal and state laws. • Administer the oath of office to elected officials, city commissioners/members and employees. • Ensure the preparation of minutes for all City Council, Successor Agency; Fire Protection District, and City Council subcommittees. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 210 City Clerk Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,613 $ 2,700 $ 2,700 Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (740) (760) (790) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,873 1,940 1,910 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 2,613 2,700 2,700 Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (740) (760) (790) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 1,873 $ 1,940 $ 1,910 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 211 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Treasurer is an elected official charged with the responsibility for the custody and investment of all City funds. The Treasurer is the City's official "signature" for all financial transactions made. The Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services has been appointed as Deputy City Treasurer and has the authority to assign Finance staff to handle treasury functions needing daily attention. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Maintain funds in secure and liquid investments. • Structure maturities to meet City cash flow needs throughout the year. • Present the City's investment policy to the City Council for annual approval. • Maintain CMTA Investment Policy Certification which certifies the City's investment policy complies with the current State statutes governing the investment practices of local government entities located within the State of California. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 212 City Treasurer Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost Actuals 2015/16 Adopted Budget 2016/17 Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 2,613 $ 2,700 $ 2,700 10,605 14,380 14,580 (4,580) (4,930) (5,050) 8,638 12,150 12,230 2,613 2,700 2,700 10,605 14,380 14,580 (4,580) (4,930) (5,050) $ 8,638 $ 12,150 $ 12,230 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time - - - Part Time 1.0 1.0 1.0 Total Staffing 1.0 1.0 1.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 213 City Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City Manager is appointed by the City Council to oversee the enforcement of municipal laws, direct daily operations of the City, make recommendations to the City Council, prepare and administer the municipal budget, appoint and supervise all City department heads and employees, and supervise the operation of all City departments. The City Manager's Office oversees a variety of interdepartmental activities and programs and provides direct support for the City P g P pP Y Council. One such effort is the Healthy RC initiative, which encourages a healthy and environmentally sustainable lifestyle for those who live, work, and play in Rancho Cucamonga. Healthy RC initiatives include the Safe Routes to School program, Green Business Recognition Program, CASA healthy cooking classes, electric vehicle charging station network, and the implementation of policies that encourage access to healthy food and physical activity, including farmers' markets, community gardens, and walkable neighborhoods. The Office provides management of the City's award -winning Community Information Program including publication of the Rancho Reporter newsletter, media relations, community outreach and engagement, social media platforms, special projects, and other public information efforts. Staff also responds to and follows -up on citizen inquiries and concerns regarding City programs and services, operates and is involved with original programming on the government access channel RCTV-3, and oversees live broadcasts of City Council meetings. The Community Information Program utilizes a creative mix of innovative communication tools and technology, along with traditional outreach methods, to enhance communications outreach and engage the community. The City Manager's Office also manages the Legislative Advocacy Program to ensure that Rancho Cucamonga's interests are heard at the state and federal level. These efforts are governed by our Legislative Platform, which promotes the principle of local control and protection of local revenue. The Community Improvement Division oversees enforcement of the City's municipal codes to ensure a safe and happy community. In 2016, the State of California recognized the profession by establishing training standards and a certification procedure for employees enforcing municipal codes. Evidencing the existing strong commitment to employee development in the City, two officers have already received the designation of Certified Code Enforcement Officer and all others are on track to receive certification by 2018. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Redesign of Cultural Center Courtyard (City Council Goal PR-1) • Continue Community Improvement effort to proactively respond to nuisance properties and vacant structures. • Participate in the What Works Cities Initiative to improve the City's data -based decision making. (City Council Goal ML-7) • Working with the Youth Leaders, host the City's first Healthy RC Youth Forum. • Launch the SolarRC Expansion Project Phase 2.0 to add solar installation for up to five additional City facilities. • Complete and implement a Strategic Communications Plan. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 214 City Management Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,076,181 $ 2,249,640 $ 2,418,030 Operations and Maintenance 241,477 444,180 565,080 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (437,350) (475,100) (482,510) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,880,308 2,218,720 2,500,600 Other Funds Personnel Services 1,343 34,990 - Operations and Maintenance 71,456 14,740 9,730 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 72,799 49,730 9,730 All Funds Personnel Services 2,077,524 2,284,630 2,418,030 Operations and Maintenance 312,933 458,920 574,810 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (437,350) (475,100) (482,510) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 1,953,107 $ 2,268,450 $ 2,510,330 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 18.0 17.0 18.0 Part Time 1.8 1.6 1.4 Total Staffing 19.8 18.6 19.4 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 215 City Management Performance Statistics Healthy RC • The Ash Center for Democratic Governance recognized Healthy RC as part of the 2017 Bright Ideas in Government initiative; • The first Mental Health Symposium was hosted by Healthy RC with over 100 attendees; • The City Council adopted the Healthy RC Evaluation Plan to include a number of positive downward trends; • The City was selected as one of six cities nationally to participate in the Mayors' Institute on Advancing Education and Health through a Community Schools Strategy. • The Healthy RC Sustainability Program continued efforts with installing five solar power systems totaling almost two megawatts, which is equivalent to taking 7,100 cars off the road; • The Sustainable Community Action Plan was adopted by the City Council; • The City received a Beacon Platinum Level Spotlight Award for Sustainability Best Practices from the Institute for Local Government and the League of California Cities. Legislative Advocacy • In 2016, the City tracked 25 state legislative bills. From these bills, the City supported five and opposed 11. • CMO staff provides support for the City Council's active role in the League of California Cities (LoCC). Council Member Sam Spagnolo is serving his second year as President for Inland Empire division and Mayor Pro Tern Kennedy as Vice Chair of the League's Legislative Task Force. Communications 2016 State Legislative Session 25 BiBsTracked watch, _ Oppose 35!k 44% S.Ppall 20% • Oppose - Support - Watch • The Communications division received the Award of Merit for the Most Effective Social/New Media from the California Association of Public Information Officials (CAPIO) 2017 Awards of Excellence for its social strategies campaign; • Electronic media highlights include: 602, 000 visitors on the City's website, one million more ses- sions, and an additional 2.8 million pageviews; additionally, we have added 15, 000 E-Newsletter subscribers, and 84, 000 social media followers across City Performance Management In 2016, the City Manager's Office added performance data for the Community Services and Library Services Depart- ments to the online Performance Dashboard. The City was one of 100 communities nation-wide selected to join the What Works Cities Initiative sponsored by Bloomberg Philanthropies, which is designed to elevate cities use of data and evidence to engage citizens, improve decision -making and make governments more efficient and effective. Community Improvement • Coverage has been expanded to provide services six days a week to address issues that occur more often on weekends; Community Improvement is tak- ing a pro -active approach to nui- sance properties, Two officers have received their designation of Certified Code Enforcement Officer. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 216 City Management Services to the Community Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 217 Police (Contract) Department Budget Summary Overview of Department Since incorporation, law enforcement services in the City have been provided through a contract with the San Bernardino County Sheriffs Department. The low crime rate that the City continues to enjoy is a direct result of the hard work and dedication of the men and women of the Police Department and the positive interaction and participation by the community in crime prevention activities. The Police Department has one of the largest volunteer units in the Inland Empire, which includes Line Reserves, Citizen Patrol, Equestrian Patrol and Explorers. The number of volunteer hours dedicated to the Department and the City continues to be the highest in the County. Many of these volunteers have been residents within the City for some time, which also attests to the community's involvement in working together to provide a better place to live. The terrorist attack in San Bernardino in December 2015 generated fear throughout the City and the country. The Department has responded by presenting City employees, school district staff, and our citizens with cutting edge training. The "Surviving an Active Shooter" curriculum will continue to be provided throughout this fiscal year, in partnership with the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District and our Community Services Department staff and facility. The Department will also transition this training to the next level, training staff and students at privately operated businesses and colleges. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Continue to enhance the partnership between the Police Department and community stakeholders. (City Council Goal PS-6) • Use technology as a force multiplier and continue to expand the Public Safety Video Network (PSVN) and increase ALPR's (Automated License Plate Readers). . (City Council Goal PS-2) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 218 Police (Contract) Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ - $ - $ - Operations and Maintenance 32,745,565 35,225,040 37,284,250 Capital Outlay 16,071 - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 10,088 18,010 20,200 Transfer Out 150,730 367,580 58,920 Subtotal 32,922,454 35,610,630 37,363,370 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance 776,866 1,304,080 968,970 Capital Outlay 495,960 64,520 530,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 59,482 - - Subtotal 1,332,308 1,368,600 1,498,970 All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance 33,522,431 36,529,120 38,253,220 Capital Outlay 512,031 64,520 530,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 10,088 18,010 20,200 Transfer Out 210,212 367,580 58,920 Total Cost $ 34,254,762 $ 36,979,230 $ 38,862,340 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Safety Personnel Non -Safety Personnel Total Staffing 133.0 137.0 138.0 41.0 42.0 41.0 174.0 179.0 179.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 219 Police (Contract) Performance Statistics 2016 Performance Highlights • 110, 781 Calls for Service— 1.43 % decrease • Average Response Time for Emergency Calls was 5.52 minutes in 2016 compared to 4.5 minutes in 2015 • Part I Crimes up 1.1 % • Part 2 Crimes down 1.14% PART I* PART II** CALLS FOR SERVICE REPORTS TAKEN ARRESTS TRAFFIC COLLISIONS 2014 4,368 8,139 111,133 13,769 4,390 1,418 2015 4,732 7,142 109,215 15,175 4,837 1,642 2016 4,784 5,714 110,781 15,549 4,439 1795 *Part I Crimes - Murder, Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, Burglary, etc. **Part II Crimes - Forgery, Counterfeit, Fraud, Stolen Property, Vandalism, etc. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 220 Police (Contract) Services to the Community Police (Contract) Patrol Crime Traffic Investigations Victoria Special Prevention Safety Gardens Units Gang Teams Volunteers Emergency Response 7Enforcement Felony Case Retail Theft Solution Citizen Follow-up Investigations Oriented Policing Team Active Advisory ry CCW Pilot CFS/APS Shooter Bicycle project Response Safety Crime Free Program OPTED Classes Multi -Housing Pawn Shop 3-K9's Neighborhood Dedicated Liaison School Watch DUI Resource F„fnr, pmpnt Officers Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 221 Fire District Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Fire District is a subsidiary district of the City and has its own statutory funding with the City Council serving as the Fire District Board of Directors. Our mission is to serve the community through planning, promoting and demonstrating a readiness to respond to, and reduce, threats to life and property through the delivery of emergency and non -emergency services and programs in an efficient and effective manner. Three pillars establish the foundation for the Fire District's traditional and innovative services: Community Risk Reduction, Emergency Response and Emergency Management. Leading our risk reduction efforts, the Prevention Bureau reduces risk and eliminates hazards through fire prevention, inspection, wildland fire threat reduction, and public education/community outreach. Additionally, firefighters deliver an efficient and effective emergency response through structural and wildland fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous materials response and technical rescue. The Emergency Management program reduces vulnerability to hazards, increases community disaster resiliency and provides timely economic recovery utilizing comprehensive mitigation, preparedness and response programs. The Fire District supports these direct services through progressive leadership, personnel management, professional development through high level training, advanced planning, financial administration, and logistical support which includes apparatus and facilities maintenance, communications and information technology. Our emergency response and incident mitigation capabilities maintain a cutting edge through innovative, passionate, and fiscally responsible program management, which further enhances the quality of life for those served by the District. The Fire District's goal is to deliver all of these programs and services in an effective, efficient and professional manner while maintaining financial stability. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • The All -Risk Regional Training Center will be operational and provide further training as well as educational opportunities to enhance our firefighters' readiness, while also creating opportunities for joint training with our regional partners. In addition, the District will be constructing the new Data Center, on site at the Training Center. • Begin construction on new Fire Station 172, which include a Rancho Cucamonga Police Department Substation. (City Council Goal PS 4) • Continue to expand training to help prepare the citywide workforce and community for Tactical Response and Purposeful Mass Injury Incidents. • The District is supporting the City Facilities Team in procurement of a backup generator located at the new Rancho Cucamonga Sports Center, which will act as an Emergency Evacuation Center in the event of a disaster. • Replace an aging 2003 KME Type 1 fire engine. • Maintain Community Facilities District (CFD) assessments at current rates. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 222 Fire District Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 26,685,973 $ 25,149,610 $ 26,637,390 Operations and Maintenance 5,505,499 6,333,890 6,865,280 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 149,099 805,460 405,780 Transfer Out 997,276 953,800 1,105,640 Subtotal 33,337,847 33,242,760 35,014,090 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance 971,758 1,054,580 680,840 Capital Outlay 7,062,256 23,974,630 15,043,020 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 74,322 - - Subtotal 8,108,336 25,029,210 15,723,860 All Funds Personnel Services 26,685,973 25,149,610 26,637,390 Operations and Maintenance 6,477,257 7,388,470 7,546,120 Capital Outlay 7,062,256 23,974,630 15,043,020 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 149,099 805,460 405,780 Transfer Out 1,071,598 953,800 1,105,640 Total Cost $ 41,446,183 $ 58,271,970 $ 50,737,950 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 114.0 114.0 115.0 Part Time 4.1 4.4 3.5 Total Staffing 118.1 118.4 118.5 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 223 Fire District Performance Statistics Fire District Incident Summary 2016 15,435 incidents for fire, emergency medical/ rescue, hazardous materials, and public ser- vice; 4% increase; • 333 working fires; 2,449 good intent and false alarm; • 10,916 emergency medical/rescue incidents; 3% increase; 139 hazardous materials incidents; 1,037 public service incidents including water salvages, lockouts, police matters and other non -emergencies; • 13 overpressure rupture or explosion without fire 2016 Business Inspections 93, 4% ` 373, 17% 82, 4% 681, 32% 20, 1% 310, 14 16818%. 12,1% 90. 4% lill329,15% • Places of Assembly, Restaurant, Church, Theater ■ Schools and Day Cares • Medical Facilities, 24-hour care Apartments, Hotels, Other Residential ■ Mercantile, Retail, Service Business ■ Industrial ■ Manufacturing Employee Development Highlights 2016 22,510 total training hours (including classroom); 24% decrease; • 108 multi -company training exercises; 38% increase; 2.07 average training hours per shift per employee Conducted two new recruit Firefighter Academies, an Engineer's Academy and a Captain's Academy P. Ll Community Engagement Highlights 2016 117 public education activities and station tours held in 2016; 14,604 citizen contacts made through pub- lic education activities; 903 people trained in Hands -Only CPR; 794 people trained in Emergency Prepared- ness through CERT, BERT, Amateur Ra- Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 224 Emergency Response Fire Supression Structural Wildland Front Country Fire Investigations Emergency Medical Services Technical Rescue Haz Mat Tactical Response Response Planning Fire District Services to the Community Emergency Management Ready RC Mitigation Preparedness Response Recovery Community and Business Emergency Response Training Fire District Community Community Administration Risk I I Affairs Personnel Prevention Inspections Public Management and Information Development Weed Abatement/ Volunteer Planning/Finance Brush Coordination Clearance Apparatus and Public Special Events Equipment Education Maintenance Facility Community New Outreach and Construction Engagement Facility Plan Review Maintenance Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 225 Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The City of Rancho Cucamonga has an innovative Animal Care and Services Department whose mission is Building a Community in which every Adoptable Pet Finds a Home. The Animal Services Department cares for more than 5,000 homeless pets annually and responds to more than 7,500 calls for service related to stray animals, rescues, and animal welfare. The Department oversees the following program areas: Animal Care: General animal care, adoptions, reuniting lost pets with owners and kennel and facility maintenance. Community and Information Programs: Volunteer programs, foster care, fundraising, community outreach, social media and community information/education. Field Services: Animal pickup, rescues, investigations, rabies control, animal licensing, enforcement of animal regulations, co -existing with wildlife, and community education. Veterinarian Services: Veterinary treatment for animals housed at the Center; contracts for outside veterinary services for emergency and after hour care and specialized care; and teaching hospital for Veterinary and Veterinary Assistant students. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • To help decrease the number of homeless pets, the Veterinarian Services Division will be offering no cost and low cost spay and neuter opportunities in targeted portions of the community. Additionally, Animal Services will continue the beat the heat program, which offers free spay and neuter services for unowned community cats and pet cats residing in Rancho Cucamonga. • Recipient of a Helen Putnam award, the 24-hour Kitten Nursery will continue to operate and help improve the placement rate for neonatal kittens 1 day old to 8 weeks old. The kitten nursery is staff -run and largely volunteer supported. A Pet Cadet Program for volunteers between the ages of 12 and 16 helps expand the number of volunteers and youth educational opportunities. This program is funded partially from the City General Fund and largely from fundraising efforts and donations. A capital project was approved to build additional dog play yards. The play yards will allow the Animal Center to expand its dog behavior and enrichment program, keeping the Center's dogs healthier and mentally fit while they await adoption. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 226 Animal Care and Services Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Actuals 2015/16 $ 2,437,103 487,734 Adopted Budget 2016/17 $ 2,672,320 463,660 20,000 Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 2,772,560 463,660 2,924,837 3,155,980 3,236,220 Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 2,437,103 2,672,320 2,772,560 Operations and Maintenance 487,734 463,660 463,660 Capital Outlay - 20,000 - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 2,924,837 $ 3,155,980 $ 3,236,220 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 22.0 22.0 22.0 Part Time 11.0 12.5 12.8 Total Staffing 33.0 34.5 34.8 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 227 Animal Care and Services Performance Statistics Animal Center Highlights 2016 The 24 hour neonatal Kitten Nursery completed its second season and improved the save rate of kittens 1 day old to 8 weeks old. The Kitten Nursery was the 2016 recipient of a Helen Putnam Award in the category of Enhancing Public Trust, Ethics & Community Involvement. The Rancho Cucamonga Animal Care Foundation was formed to help improve fundraising efforts and offset the cost of animal care. The Animal Center partnered with Assemblyman Marc Steinorth for a #Steinorth100 adoption event and NBC and Telemundo for the #CleartheShelter adoption event. Singer/Songwriter Keaton Simons launched a new single The Way It Goes. Proceeds benefited the Animal Center and Natural Child. Live placement rate (percent live outcomes) for dogs was 94% and cats was 85% for a combined live outcome rate of 89.5%. The number of service hours donated by volunteers (not including service groups or foster parents) was 16,597. Dog and Cat Outcomes 3,000 2,50D 2,000 1,Sw Animal Center Activities 15,000 10,000 5,000 Field Calls Animal licenses Sold ■ 2015 ■ 2016 1,OOD SOD 2015 2016 2025 2016 2015 2016 2015 2016 2015 2016 2025 2026 2015 2016 Adoption Returned to Rescue Partner TNR/SNR Transfer Euthanixed Died in Owner Care/Foster e Cats ■ Dogs Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 228 Animal Care and Services Services to the Community Animal Care and Services Administrative Services Community Programs and Information Community Veterinary I Services j Nursery Animal Care and Adoptions Animal Care Field Services Field Service Administration Outreach Officers Animal Spay Adoptionis and Neuter Volunteers Dispatcher Vouchers Animal Trap Neuter Foster Care Health and Wellness Animal Licensing Release Program Animal Care Foundation Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 229 Records Management Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Records Management Department operates under the administrative direction of the City Clerk Services Director. This Department is responsible for agenda management, legislation, and records management. The Department provides ancillary technical support regarding research requests from staff, officials, and the general public as part of its records maintenance duties, including maintenance of the Municipal and Zoning Code and Conflict of Interest Code. Records Management serves as the single point of contact to provide information to the community and general public relating to official City records. The Department maintains and updates placement of the City Council agenda packet on the City's website and prepares all agendas and minutes for the City Council, Successor Agency, Fire Protection District, and all City Council subcommittees. Additionally, the Department is responsible for assisting with proclamations, resolutions, ordinances, agreements, bid openings, contracts, records management, archiving and records destructions, and compliance with legal advertisements and public notification information. The Records Management Department coordinates and assists the City Clerk Services Director in administering municipal elections in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Implement an electronic Agenda Management System. • Implement an automated Public Records Request program to streamline recording, tracking, and responding to public records requests. • Update Records Management Manual and Retention Schedules and provide staff training. • Update City Council Candidate Handbook and plan, coordinate, and disseminate information on City Council Districts in preparation of November 2018 election. • Expand the number of document types (minutes/ordinances/resolutions) available to the public on the City's Website. • Assist in initiating additional scanning projects, including training, in various City Departments to help reduce the volume of records stored. • Update City's Conflict of Interest Code. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 230 Records Management Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 436,762 $ 482,900 $ 617,920 Operations and Maintenance 285,433 206,910 105,420 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (182,190) (199,280) (211,340) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 540,005 490,530 512,000 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 436,762 482,900 617,920 Operations and Maintenance 285,433 206,910 105,420 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (182,190) (199,280) (211,340) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 540,005 $ 490,530 $ 512,000 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 4.0 4.0 6.0 Part Time 1.3 1.3 - Total Staffing 5.3 5.3 6.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 231 Records Management Performance Statistics Cih Council Agenda Items 2016 Total = 781 �a . Admin 120 • Flame • tIR 303 . WS . DMi 80 .LMO •Lkty Cle k 60 . Rwwks 20 Oki . ErtBi^eer • ti6mry • iirp . L50 0 .11, g "I 1P 1 E� S tiE Qi 0, Q 4V 1t 1 t4. � °P 1 (.1 .Rurt6me r �P� cP c �5oa�a`' Jig F Qs¢�Q�SS Qo oFy`�' .Aal r° Records Request 100 90 60 50 ao 30 20 SO 0 January Febniary March Apnt May June MY August September Ocmber Norem December - ■ 2015 92016 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 232 Records Preservation Retention Disposition Public Records Requests Recorded Documents Maintenance of Municipal Code Records Management Services to the Community Records Management Legislation Agenda and Minute Preparation Legal Notices Bond Releases Contracts Claims/Subpoenas Bid Openings Appeals Conflict of Interest Code Board and Commission Recruitments Election Administration Legal Noticing Nomination Filing Candidate Handbook Municipal Elections Ballot Measures Receive Petitions Disclosure of Campaign Finances and Economic Interests Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 233 Community Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department Community Services provides a wide variety of programs, services and facilities to the residents of Rancho Cucamonga to enhance the quality of life for individuals of all ages. Department activities are coordinated through seven Divisions: Administration, Youth and Adult Sports, Youth and Family Programs, Special Events, Cultural Arts/ Playhouse Operations, and Seniors and Human Services. Each year, thousands of community members benefit from participating in activities conducted by the Department in programs such as: Playschool, youth activities, Teen Center programs, and recreational classes for all ages, excursions, sports programs and senior citizen services. Our parks are heavily used for organized youth and adult sports, picnics and general recreational purposes. Special events are held each year including the July 4th Spectacular, Movies in the Park, Concerts in the Park and the Founders Community Parade. At the Epicenter and Adult Sports Complex.. The Department assists dozens of community organizations in their mission with facility usage and partnership efforts. The Department is proud to offer unique opportunities for the community to experience and enjoy professional theatre, young audience productions, cultural programs and family entertainment, along with exciting guest artist performances at the Lewis Family Playhouse at the Victoria Gardens Cultural Center. Community Services oversees park development activities including the planning, design, construction and renovation of parks and facilities, and serve as advocates for open space. The Department also oversees the operation of the City's Park and Recreation Commission and the Rancho Cucamonga Community and Arts Foundation. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Implement upgraded ticketing system at the Lewis Family Playhouse which will include the ability to print tickets at home or save them to your smartphone • The Central Park Master Plan will be updated this year. (City Council Goal PR-4) • Design and environmental work for the next phase of Etiwanda Creek Park development will launch. (City Council Goal PR-2) • The GOALS soccer facility is under construction and will be completed in 2018. • Addition of a third part-time Park Ranger position to facilitate more patrol time and provide more geographical coverage of the city on a daily basis • Continued construction of new RC Sports Center (City Council Goal PR-3) • Addition of a third bus for the Silver Fox Senior Transportation Program Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 234 Community Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 3,787,561 $ 4,224,680 $ 4,391,060 Operations and Maintenance 690,112 790,340 832,740 Capital Outlay 52,582 10,000 - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - Transfer Out - - Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds 4,530,255 5,025,020 5,223,800 2,473,746 2,933,280 3,177,660 2,175,838 2,107,710 2,154,190 642,139 3,605,000 1,343,890 400,000 - - 5,691,723 8,645,990 6,675,740 Personnel Services 6,261,307 7,157,960 7,568,720 Operations and Maintenance 2,865,950 2,898,050 2,986,930 Capital Outlay 694,721 3,615,000 1,343,890 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out 400,000 - - Total Cost $ 10,221,978 $ 13,671,010 $ 11,899,540 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 45.5 45.5 46.5 Part Time 188.9 189.9 189.6 Total Staffing 234.4 235.4 236.1 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 235 Community Services Performance Statistics CSD 2016 Program & Registration Highlights* • Over 39,000 registrations processed annually; • Rancho Cucamonga residents represented 85% of total registrations; • More than 25,000 patrons enjoyed the Special Events held in the City. • Approximately 1,500 summer camp spots were filled in Summer 2016; *Registration numbers exclude the Lewis Family Play- house and Special Events, which are tracked separately. • 2016 Playhouse Highlights • The 2015/16 season subscriptions have increased 15% over the previous season; • Instagram, began with the 13/14 season at the end of which we had 105 followers. In 14/15 this number jumped to 205, However, by the end of 2016, we had 411 followers. • $1,378,556 in revenue was processed through the Box Office in the 2016, up from 1,288,383 in 2015. How people are looking at our website is shifting: in 2014 53.6% desktop users and 46.4% tablet/mobile, in 2015 its 46.7% desktop, and 53.3% mobile/tablet, in 2016 desktop users Lewis Family Playhouse Ticket Sales nrtu �arwms sao arsiow,Tim.. s.us ea1.�rvoair ws�r su..s ,xmsso,acw.we .au,s vaawurwAux . r.,b.sum<nsi.�.c,s» .s..�,oim,vm,cr-scsu Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 236 Community Services Services to the Community Recreation/ Community Services Sports Advisory Senior Advisory Youth/Teens Human Resources Seniors Sports Events Marketing Registration Operations Park Rangers Community Services Cultural Arts I I Administration Playhouse Community Clerical/ Programs I I Administration Finance Playhouse Professional Programs Park Development Fiscal Year 2017A8 Adopted Budget Page 237 Library Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Rancho Cucamonga Public Library strives to inform and enrich our community by providing access to traditional and technologically innovative resources. The Department supports and encourages education and the love of reading in a welcoming atmosphere with a knowledgeable, service -oriented staff. These efforts were recognized nationally when the Library was awarded the National Medal for Museum and Library Services, the nation's highest honor that can be bestowed upon a library or a museum. Programs and services offered at the Archibald Library and Paul A. Biane Library include: •Children's services, including weekly and special event programs, performing and cultural arts programs, Homework Center, and Reading Enrichment Center. *Adult and children's information services. •Adult and family literacy services. *Teen and tween services and programming. *Public -access computers and free computer classes. The Library also offers outreach services, featuring bookmobile service to children and delivery service to the homebound and infirmed elderly. A full service Virtual Library provides 24/7 access to eBooks, research databases, online homework tutoring, downloadable music, and local history information. New sensory story times offer programs targeted specifically to special needs patrons, and our popular passport acceptance agency continues to meet a fast-growing demand for passport services in the community. e- FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Purchase a new, state-of-the-art bookmobile. • Further development of the RC Kids Discovery Space on the 2°d floor of the Paul A. Biane Library and kick off new Phase I programming, including superhero costume design classes, robotics challenges, and a STEAM petting zoo. • Utilize Collection HQ, a new software created specifically for libraries that will help to analyze circulation statistics, trends and patterns to make data - driven decisions in the area of collection management. • Offer high-speed internet (both wired and wireless) to the public via CENIC (the Corporation for Education Network Initiatives in California.) Users will experience connectivity speeds which are 5,000 times faster than the former speeds. • Continue to examine and fine-tune lineup of story times and programs — 23 weekly children's story times, increase lineup of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics) programs, and continue to pilot new special needs programming. • Increase materials collections, in both print and online formats, with new and updated titles at both Libraries. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 238 Library Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 2,761,040 $ 3,339,290 $ 3,495,260 Operations and Maintenance 998,490 1,297,690 1,387,800 Capital Outlay - 82,030 267,000 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 9,187 11,720 13,650 Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 3,768,717 4,730,730 5,163,710 Other Funds Personnel Services 4,979 16,410 - Operations and Maintenance 52,855 49,040 94,020 Capital Outlay 1,788,600 295,000 135,350 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,846,434 360,450 229,370 All Funds Personnel Services 2,766,019 3,355,700 3,495,260 Operations and Maintenance 1,051,345 1,346,730 1,481,820 Capital Outlay 1,788,600 377,030 402,350 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service 9,187 11,720 13,650 Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 5,615,151 $ 5,091,180 $ 5,393,080 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 27.5 27.5 27.5 Part Time 36.6 36.8 36.8 Total Staffing 64.1 64.3 64.3 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 239 $200,000 $180,000 $16QW0 - $155,267 $14a,167 $140,000 $120,WO $100,000 $80,OW $6QUOO $40,OW $20,000 Passport Revenue Library Services Performance Statistics Library Services Revenue 5174,416 $164,352 Overdue Fines Collected ■ 2014-15 52015-16 $76,539 $66,983 11Media Rentals. Comparison: 2015 and 2016 1,200,000 1,014,777 1,000,()00 952,607 800,000 582,286 550,150 573,268 600,0Cq 524,804 400,000 20o,000 Library Visitors Items Checked Out Website Hits ■2014-1S 82015-16 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 240 Technology 1 I Library Services I Services Tech Centers I I Adult Literacy Website/Social) l Back 2 Basics Adult and I ( Children's Teen Services Services Programs ) ( Programs Information I I Information Services Services Collection ) Collection Library Services Services to the Community Library Services Budget and Operations Budget Staff Development Personnel Grants and Special Projects Outreach Services Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 241 Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Administrative Services Group's mission is to support the functions of the City's line departments. While line departments typically provide service primarily to the public, the Administrative Services Group's departments and divisions, while providing some direct public services, primarily provide extensive services and support to internal staff of the various City departments. The Administrative Services Group includes the Finance, Human Resources, and Innovation and Technology Departments, as well as Administration and Procurement, under the oversight of the Deputy City Manager/Administrative Services. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • Several key technology projects will modernize work practices in Administrative Services. These include implementing two new modules, Contract Management and COGNOS Reporting, in OneSolution, the City's financial system; migration of the City's e-mail and internal communications services to Microsoft cloud based platforms to improve resiliency, performance and accessibility; and ddevelopment and deployment of enhanced public services applications such as GIS based citizen reporting tools and interactive digital maps. • Finance and GIS staff will be key parts of the team managing the acquisition of the City's 15,000+ street lights from Southern California Edison. • Provide administrative support for the West -side Districts Citizens' Oversight Committee and the Planned Communities LMD Citizens' Oversight Committee. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 242 Administrative Services Department Budget Summary Funds Summary Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time Part Time Total Staffing Actuals 2015/16 $ 2,606,235 3,771,206 821,230 (1,255,340) 18,642 3,416,784 9,378,757 1,291,930 2,308,253 3,196,971 4,741 50,000 6,851,895 3,898,165 6,079,459 4,018,201 (1,255,340) 23,383 3,466,784 $ 16,230,652 6.0 2.0 Adopted Budget 2016/17 $ 1,021,720 3,412,280 (1,250,460) 23,160 4,233,540 7,440,240 882,000 1,916,500 7,974,240 69,480 50,000 Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 938,460 3,537,800 (1,266,110) 21,760 4,204,110 7,436,020 1,124,930 15,620,280 5,738,360 73,280 50,000 10,892,220 22,606,850 1,903,720 5,328,780 7,974,240 (1,250,460) 92,640 4,283,540 $ 18,332,460 6.0 2.0 2,063,390 19,158,080 5,738,360 (1,266,110) 95,040 4,254,110 $ 30,042,870 5.0 1.0 8.0 8.0 6.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 243 Administrative Services Performance Statistics Procurement Division Highlights 2017 441 Purchase Orders issued; 1.01% decrease from FY 15/16 • 87 requests processed for requests for quotes, bids, proposals, information and budget- ary quotes; 0% increase $116,404.54 revenue received from on-line surplus auction; 5.5% increase $433,542.41 was spent on green products Special Districts Highlights 2015 $27,362,087 received in Special Districts tax revenue; 1 % decrease 139,738 parcels submitted to the tax rolls for 35 special assessment districts with 100% accuracy • 70 CFD delinquency letters sent; 75% decrease Hosted Open House Events for LMD 8, 9 & 10 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 244 Administrative Services Services to the Community Administrative Services Administration I I Purchasing Oversight Procurement of Responsibility Goods and for Finance, Services DoIT, and Human Resources Bid Management Departments Disposal of City Assets (surplus) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 245 Finance Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The overall mission of the Finance Department is to provide excellent service to �0�._ . both our internal and external customers with the highest degree of reliability and C-,W m9 of AfMaw m la ExceEenos timeliness, while maintaining appropriate financial control of City resources. m F` RWo,6n, FlvwNd b E t:.iry o f RarcAm Cucm+nmg The Finance Department is responsible for managing the financial operations of the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in accordance with generally accepted accounting ihstinguislrt! `. principles, as well as applicable laws, regulations and City policies. RudgetP�. Wkm I Auw,d City W K.M G� ' C utomisi: The Department consists of five divisions to accomplish its mission:' • Accounting and Financial Reporting: Comprised of the following sections: Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Cashiering, Fixed Assets, General Ledger, and Payroll. In addition, this Division is responsible for preparing the City's Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR). • Budget Management: Responsible for coordinating the City's annual budget and monitoring each department's compliance with the annual budget. • Business Licensing: Responsible for the issuance and annual renewal of Business Licenses to all persons transacting and carrying on business within the City. This section also ensures compliance with the City's Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT) and Admissions Tax Ordinances which requires monthly reporting and remittances by the City's various hotels and businesses. • Special Districts: Responsible for placing special assessments for City parcels on the county tax rolls, tracking and paying debt service on the City's special obligations payable from the special assessments and assisting with special district formations. • Treasury Management: The Treasury Management Section works with the City Treasurer and the Deputy City Treasurer, and is responsible for daily cash management and investment of funds for the City of Rancho Cucamonga and the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District. The Section is also responsible for the daily transferring and settling of depository funds, investing excess funds, and reporting investments in accordance with all applicable State and Federal laws and the City's Investment Policy. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights In conjunction with DoIT and Human Resources, facilitate the implementation of two new modules for the City's financial system: Contract Management and COGNOS Reporting. Facilitate the transition to a new vendor to process the City's parking citations and administrative citations, as well as facilitate collection activity for past due accounts. Implementation of a digital document management system for Business Licensing to facilitate the transition to a paperless work environment to the extent practical. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 246 Finance Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,772,798 $ 2,254,820 $ 2,341,300 Operations and Maintenance 81,869 68,900 142,260 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (454,460) (574,170) (599,590) Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,400,207 1,749,550 1,883,970 Other Funds Personnel Services 331,999 410,680 391,520 Operations and Maintenance 3,539,646 3,416,300 2,822,690 Capital Outlay - 20,000 14,353,730 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - 706,160 Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 3,871,645 3,846,980 18,274,100 All Funds Personnel Services 2,104,797 2,665,500 2,732,820 Operations and Maintenance 3,621,515 3,485,200 2,964,950 Capital Outlay - 20,000 14,353,730 Cost Allocation (454,460) (574,170) (599,590) Debt Service - - 706,160 Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 5,271,852 $ 5,596,530 $ 20,158,070 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 21.0 21.0 21.0 Part Time 1.1 2.3 2.3 Total Staffing 22.1 23.3 23.3 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 247 Finance Performance Statistics Finance Highlights 2016 * $2,662,3 10 received in Business License revenue; 5.7% increase * $3,024,620 received in Transient Occupancy Tax revenue; 0.8% increase Business License Data 7AW sm 4= 3M ZAW 7W New Businesses Renewals Business closures E2016 *Data excludes vendors and contractors located outside ofRancho Cucamonga. City of Rancho Cucamonga Investment Effective Rate of Return Comparison January 2016 - December 2016 0.015 0�01 0.005 0 Jan Feb Mar Apr July Aug Oct Nov Dec MayJune Sept -City Pool Average _l3ofA Merrill Lynch U.S. Treasuries/Agencies 1-5 Yrs Special Districts Highlights 2016 0 $27,375,134 received in Special Districts tax reve- nue; 0.05% decrease 0 139,879 parcels submitted to the tax rolls for 35 special assessment districts with 100% accuracy 60 CFD delinquency letters sent; 14% decrease Hosted Open House Events for LMD 2, 4-R, 6-R, 7, 8, 9 and 10. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 248 and Financial Reporting Accounts Payable Accounts Receivable Cashiering Fixed Assets General Ledger Payroll Prepare Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAER) Finance Services to the Community Finance Budget I I Business Special Treasury Management 1 1 Licensing Districts Management Issue and Renew ""Administer 35") Daily Cash Management Coordinate City's of Business Special Districts Annual Budget Licenses in the City Investment of Generate Ensures Manage Special Excess Funds Quarterly Budget Compliance with District Updates for City City's TOT and Forintions Investment Council Admissions Tax Reporting Ordinances Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 249 Human Resources Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Human Resources Department oversees the City's human resources and risk management functions. The mission of the Human Resources Department is to recruit, develop, and retain a diverse, engaged, well -qualified and professional workforce that reflects the world -class standards of the community we serve, and to lead City Departments in positive employee relations, talent acquisition, succession planning, and employee engagement. The Human Resources Team provides a wide range of services to City staff in the following areas: • Total Compensation • Employee and Labor Relations • Organization and Employee Development • Talent Acquisition • Risk Management • Safety • Workers Compensation FY 2017/18 Human Resources Bud2et Highlii!hts • The budget reflects the addition of a Risk Analyst as part of a reorganization of the Administrative Services Group and a clarification of contract insurance responsibilities within the City, which shifted a full time position from Procurement to HR. This position will enhance our risk management, safety and workers' compensation program and provide support for Organization and Employee Development. • HR is initiating a new project that will utilize innovative sourcing and applicant tracking tools to improve the City's talent acquisition strategies. The Department continues to improve onboarding to provide an expeditious, engaging, and meaningful experience. In addition, HR is working to improve the City's current employee performance and goal setting system to make the process more forward -thinking, effective, and meaningful for employees and the organization. The Department will continue to foster and facilitate employee development, organizational development and succession planning through innovative and cooperative programs. HR will partner with DoIT and Finance to refine and enhance the employee self-service tool in the existing HRIS system to allow employees better access to benefit and pay information. The Department will use social media and participate in community events as a way to improve outreach for recruitments and the profile of the City. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 250 Human Resources Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 724,048 $ 843,910 $ 1,035,070 Operations and Maintenance 210,430 320,250 377,250 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (284,010) (336,320) (402,740) Debt Service Transfer Out - - Subtotal 650,468 827,840 1,009,580 Other Funds Personnel Services - - - Operations and Maintenance - - - Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal - - - All Funds Personnel Services 724,048 843,910 1,035,070 Operations and Maintenance 210,430 320,250 377,250 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation (284,010) (336,320) (402,740) Debt Service Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 650,468 827,840 1,009,580 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 6.0 7.0 9.0 Part Time - - 0.5 Total Staffing 6.0 7.0 9.5 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 251 Human Resources Performance Statistics Human Resources Highlights 2016 64 full-time position recruitments; 36% increase; 59 part-time position recruitments; 2% increase; 9,299 online applications screened; 25% decrease. • Full -Time new hires increased by 60% • Part -Time new hires increased by 17% • Full -Time promotions increased by 37% • Part -Time promotions decreased by 42% New Hires 180 153 160 131 140 120 100 80 60 48 40 30 26 19 29 20 1 12 0 Full -Time Part -Time Full -Time Part -Time New Hires New Hires Promotions Promotions n2016/17 *201516 Risk Management Statistics Worl(er5 Compensation Claims General UabilityNirns 20 30 20' 10 to 0 0 Anjmdl Srvcs Bldg/Code CSD Admin Srvcs Public WA Rre Dist, TraftAocidents Cit�Contfactors Potbdes Trip and Fall Trees Misc, 12015 # 2016 1 11015 12016 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 252 Human Resources Services to the Community Employee Labor Relations I I Services MOU/Negotiations Benefits Training & Organizational Development Human Resources Recruitment & Employee Risk Selection I Relations I � Management Liability Worker's Compensation Safety/Loss Control Employee Wellness Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 253 Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Department of Innovation and Technology manages the core technology platforms for the City of Rancho Cucamonga and facilitates the effective and innovative use of technology across the organization to serve our community. Our Department provides the following services to the City: • Data network design, operation and security • Enterprise application management, including cloud and server based systems • Voice -over -Internet -Protocol (VoIP) telephone system administration, management and service • Procurement and management of electronic devices including desktop, mobile, and shared platfon-ns • Data science & visualization including Business Intelligence, mobile dashboard, and Geographic Infortriation Systems platforms, including the Rancho Enterprise Geographic Information Systems (REGIS) team that develops regional GIS capabilities through business partnerships with other public agencies FY 2017/18 Bud2et Highfi2hts • Planned completion of the city-wide network improvement and VolP telephone system installation, bringing high-speed internet access and advanced telephone features to the organization. • In cooperation with the Library Services Department, planned completion of the project to install public -facing high-speed internet access to the Biane and Archibald Libraries to support Library programming and provide wireless internet access for Library patrons. • The Accela land management platform will move from development and deployment into maintenance and management, completing the system's major implementation goals and providing ongoing support for the Building & Safety, Planning, Engineering, Community Improvement, and Fire Departments. • Continued development of business intelligence and spatial reference platforms for enterprise applications to visualize data in a contextually relevant format and evaluate data across Department lines. (City Council Goal ML-8) • Maximize value and benefit of the City's new Microsoft Enterprise Agreement, including expanded tools for collaboration and creating more dynamic work environments. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 254 Innovation and Technology Department Budget Summary Adopted Actuals Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost $ 2,363,975 1,714,760 (1,642,050) $ 2,582,950 2,372,110 (1,428,700) Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 2,713,040 2,482,780 (1,471,960) 2,436,685 3,526,360 3,723,860 1,513,689 692,020 574,440 59,256 340,230 105,700 45,355 489,580 424,100 1,618,300 1,521,830 1,104,240 2,363,975 3,228,449 59,256 (1,642,050) 45,355 2,582,950 3,064,130 340,230 (1,428,700) 489,580 $ 4,054,985 $ 5,048,190 2,713,040 3,057,220 105,700 (1,471,960) 424,100 $ 4,828,100 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 22.0 23.0 23.0 Part Time - - - Total Staffing 22.0 23.0 23.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 255 Innovation and Technology Performance Statistics Information Technology Maintained by the IS Division Desktop & Notebook Computers; iPads; Central Computer Services; Printers; Enterprise Applications; Office Productivity Programs; Multi -Function Photocopiers; Wired & Wireless Networks; Help Desk Tickets Completed: 2015-1470 2016-1196 Completed Work Orders 350 327 300 250 211 198 200 163 184 170 150 141 127 108 117 113 119 90 100 58 55 51 52 5 0 36 41 42 25 31 191, 1 01 0 0 January February March April May June July August September October November December n2015 v2016 Completed Work Orders by Type 400 361 350 321 297 281 284 300 250 12 8 200 128 150 124 8684 100 53 30 30 51 38 50 21 5 17 521 4 2 3 4 5 5 0 11 11 11 1 1 11 1 n No .,-- . - M - - a - - le, 0�_ (P .11, e 11�� e- �& e llq� 44 e e '4/ / -4e 131� m2015 w2016 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 256 Innovation and Technology Services to the Conununity Innovation and Technology Geographic Customer Applications Systems Information Service I I I I Services (GIS) I I Enterprise Network Spatial Data Help Desk Application Security and Visualization Requests Management Management Business User Support User Interface L Data Center Intelligence Development Management Development Hardware Information Rancho Implementation Data Hosting Solutions Security Enterprise GIS Practices (REGIS) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 257 Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Economic and Community Development group encompasses activities including Economic Development, Building and Safety, Engineering, Planning, and Public Works Departments. The Department coordinates the activities, work products, and processes of these areas with the City Manager's Office and other City Departments. In addition, the Department coordinates implementation of the City's Economic and Community Development goals and objectives and capital projects planning programs. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights Deliver services of Building and Safety, Engineering, Planning, and Public Works under a common philosophy of innovation and excellent customer service. Support the City Manager's Office in monitoring and ensuring efficient and timely implementation of the City Council's goals and key Capital Projects. 0 Provide effective coordination and monitoring of all Economic and Community Development programs and budgets that cross -over department lines. This will include the implementation of milestones and tracking timelines for accomplishment of the Department's established annual goals and objectives. Continue to implement the Economic Development Strategic Plan to lay the foundation for the City's economic development efforts over the next 5 to 10 years. Continue to provide support to the business community through the City's Economic Development liaison and partnening with other agencies to provide business services such as workforce development, small business consultation, and education. Continue to work with DoIT staff to assist in the use of technology to provide guidance to existing and startup businesses and residents in the community. Assist City Manager's Office in the coordination and negotiations of affordable housing development for low -and -moderate income families. Coordinate, administer, and monitor Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funds that promote decent affordable housing, and create jobs through the expansion and retention of businesses. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 258 Economic and Community Development Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 304,639 $ 393,950 $ 450,350 Operations and Maintenance 138,590 343,130 360,330 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 443,229 737,080 810,680 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost 14,989 341,080 63,580 - 16,000 - 166,180 179,000 182,940 181,169 536,080 246,520 304,639 393,950 153,579 684,210 - 16,000 166,180 179,000 $ 624,398 $ 1,273,160 450,350 423,910 182,940 $ 1,057,200 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 2.0 2.0 3.0 Part Time 0.8 0.8 - Total Staffing 2.8 2.8 3.0 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 259 Economic and Community Development Performance Statistics Please see Performance Statisticsfor Economic and Community Development in each of thefollowing department sections: Building and Safety Services Engineering Services Planning Public Works Services Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 26o Economic and Community Development Services to the Community Oversee Services o f: Building and Safety Engineering Planning Public Works Economic and Community Develo-oment Assist in Implementing City Council's Goals Oversight of Key Capital Projects Foster Economic Development through Focused Programs that Promote the Quality of Life and Economic Health of the Communitv Housing Works to ensure decent affordable housing, and services are provided to families and residents of low to moderate income Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 261 Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Building and Safety Services Department, in partnership with the community: Supports the community's construction projects through plan checking, permit and inspection services to meet the requirements of building and construction codes, state mandated regulations, and municipal codes. Works with other City departments to develop regulations and conditions for construction projects through the entitlement process. Coordinates and assist other City departments in managing building and structural capital improvement projects and enforcing ADA regulations for City facilities. 0 Provide emergency responses and damage assessment during and after disaster events. Building and Safety Services enforces a series of nationally recognized standards and construction codes as well as mandates from the state regulatory agencies, in matters pertinent to building construction, grading, drainage, water quality and permit process. In addition, Building and Safety Services also enforces compliance to codes as it relates to energy, ADA laws, places of assembly, and housing requirements. Field inspections and safety assessments are perfonned by field inspectors. Plan checking is accomplished by in-house plan check staff and through the use of contract engineers, if needed, in order to meet the goal of quality service to the development community. The Department provides plan checks and inspection for compliance of California Fire Code and all fire, life, and safety inspection activities. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights • This year, the department worked closely with the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board to implement new State requirements for septic systems (LAMP). The City will continue to maintain the half -acre minimum lot size for residential properties with septic systems instead of using the State's mandate of 2.5 acres. • Additional funds were allocated to the Department for contract services for outside consultants to provide assistance in plan check and inspection for large, complex projects. • This is a year of transition for the Building and Safety Services Department. An interim Building and Safety Director was hired while the recruitment for a permanent Director is accomplished. • The Department continues to provide opportunities for training new and existing staff on technical code requirements. This training is critical to proper implementation of the new State Code changes that became effective January 1, 2017. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 262 Building and Safety Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Actuals Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 Operating Budget Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services $ 1,413,828 209,137 1,622,965 $ 1,894,980 124,320 2,019,300 Adopted Budget 2017/18 $ 1,711,580 136,800 1,848,380 Operations and Maintenance 3,750 44,150 44,360 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 3,750 44,150 44,360 All Funds Personnel Services 1,413,828 1,894,980 1,711,580 Operations and Maintenance 212,887 168,470 181,160 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Total Cost $ 1,626,71 5 S 2,063,450 $ 1,892,740 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 18.0 18.0 16.0 Part Time 0.5 0.5 0.5 Total Staffing 18.5 18.5 16.5 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 263 Building and Safety Services Performance Statistics Building and Safety Highlights 2015 BUILDING & SAFETY REVENUE $1,400,000 $1,200,000 $ $1,100,941 $1,051,173 $1,0D0,0D0 $ $1KIM $60,0DO $400,W0 $20000 $0 Permits Plan Checks 0 Over 175 electronic plans were submitted on 0 Accela in 2016, showing a 23% increase over 0 2015. 0 99% of inspection requests were responded to within a twenty-four (24) hour turn -around time. a The Building and Safety Services Department processed 557 permits for photovoltaic solar projects in 2016. a 2015 = $Z125,734 2 2016 = $2,62,114 �01 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 264 Building and Safety Services Services to the Community Building and Safety Support Building and Construction Services Fire Plan and Pen -nit Checks Services Building and Fire Inspections Damage Assessment Complaint Response Grading Plan Check and Inspections Water Quality Management Plan (WQMP) Review Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 265 Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Engineering Services Department strives to ensure that Rancho Cucamonga has the vital infrastructure in place to maintain its standing as the premiere community in the region. The Administration and Budget Section provides imperative management and fiscal support to all five Engineering Sections and is responsible for the City's Capital Improvement Project budgets. The Land Development Section is responsible for conditioning new development projects to install street improvements and collection of development impact fees, plan checking street improvement plans and the issuance of all permits within the public rights -of -way. The Transportation Management Section oversees the City's traffic and transportation systems, and investigates and provides recommendations on matters related to traffic safety. The Capital Project Management Section designs and manages the construction of City -funded projects. The Environmental Programs Section is working collaboratively for an environmentally safe, healthy and sustainable community today and for future generations. The Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) Section is dedicated to the operation and administration of the City's electrical distribution system. FY 2017/18 Buftet Hi2hliphts • Pavement rehabilitation of Foothill Boulevard from Haven Avenue to Milliken Avenue. • Haven Avenue community trail improvements along the west side from Wilson Avenue to Vivienda Street. • Construction of the Upper Cucamonga storm drain improvements. • Design, construct, and implement an Intelligent Transportation System. This will decrease maintenance, improve staff efficiency, and improve signal timing coordination. The project will install conduit, fiber optic cable, and other network devices to connect the City's traffic signals to the City's Traffic Management Center. • Design and construction of two new traffic signals, located at 6th Street & Hellman Avenue and East Avenue & Highland Avenue. • Upgrade recycling/trash receptacles at local schools and Chaffey Community College. • Implementation of Phase 11 of the Mandatory Organics Recycling Program (businesses generating 4 or more cubic yards of organics). Community outreach and education on recycling and sustainability to Elementary schools. • Construction of two small line extension projects adding additional electric and dark fiber conduits, cabling and vaults to our existing backbone system. • RCMU plans to replace almost 600 old commercial meters with new technologically advanced smart meters in order to reduce meter reading costs. • Implementation of Phase 11 of the Mandatory Organics Recycling Program (businesses generating 4 or more cubic yards of organics). Community outreach and education on recycling and sustainability to elementary schools. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 266 Engineering Services Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,594,438 $ 1,806,280 $ 1,981,000 Operations and Maintenance 356,601 461,410 440,460 Capital Outlay 400,000 - - Cost Allocation - Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal 2,351,039 2,267,690 2,421,460 Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Total Cost Staffing Summary (Budgeted) 4,027,527 4,493,530 4,682,960 20,388,761 11,179,430 10,429,460 2,976,485 30,686,110 20,660,610 608,834 - - 1,718,470 1,662,360 1,591,310 29,720,077 48,021,430 37,364,340 5,621,965 6,299,810 6,663,960 20,745,362 11,640,840 10,869,920 3,376,485 30,686,110 20,660,610 608,834 - - 1,718,470 1,662,360 1,591,310 $ 32,071,116 $ 50,289,120 $ 39,785,800 Full Time 34.0 Part Time 1.9 Total Staffing 35.9 34.5 37.0 2.4 1.9 36.9 38.9 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 267 Engineering Services Performance Statistics Core Service Categories Public Infrastructure Improvements - Land Development* Transportation Development Municipal Utility (RCMU) - Storm Water Pollution Prevention - Solid Waste Management 0 Recycling Programs - Household Hazardous Waste Management - Issuing Construction Permits Capital Improvements Highlights 72 capital improvement projects identified in FY 2016/2017 Capital Improvement Program (CIP); 17 capital improvement projects approved for construction in 2016 totaling $15 million in community investment. Environmental Programs HHW Facility Highlights 0 6,034 customers served at the HEW Collection Facility; 6% increase; 0 341,057 pounds collected (non E-waste items); 0 $23754 generated in E-waste R. P—,il, 1,,,,d by lype Land Development Highlights 1,716 permits issued for work in the Public All Right -of -Way; 20 customers assisted each day on average at the front counter. RCMU Revenue RCMU Facts and System Data 4,OOD.MO • Year established - 2001; • Date began providing power - May 2004; 3,000.MO • Service area size - 4 square miles; • Number of meters - 924; • Number of streetlights - 222; 1�00,wo • Number of transformers - 143; SWIMO • Distribution Lines - 23 (circuit miles); Q11 4 • Average annual consumption - 76,186 MWh; • Number of customers - 896 (as of Dec 2015); • $10,733,387 revenue received; 1.72% increase. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 268 Engineering Services Services to the Community Engineering Services Administration Budget Land Development & Transportation Capital Project Management I Environmental Programs Rancho Cucamonga Municipal utility Pennit Processing Proj ect Integrated Billing/ Payment Clerical/ Administration Waste Processing Administration Tract/Parcel Maps CIP Budget Storm Water Program Budget/Finance Implementation Administration Storm Drain/ Household Personnel Street Improvements Inspection Hazardous Customer Services Waste Outreach Traffic Signal Coordination Vehicle/ Pedestrian Safety Traffic Planning Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 269 Planning Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Planning Department's primary responsibilities are developing and implementing comprehensive plans that reflect the goals and policies of the City,rnsuring the long term success of the community through effective management of the City's growth. The Department conducts onducting detailed analysis of all development proposals to verify consistency with the City's Goals and Policies, and works with other City Departments to build and maintain a high quality, balanced, and sustainable community. The Planning Department has experienced a high number of visits and calls to the Public Counter over the last fiscal year. The volume of development applications submitted to the City for review has also been steady. As the amount of readily available vacant land within Rancho Cucamonga diminishes, development has shifted towards "in -fill" development. FY 2017/18 Bud2et Highlights The Planning Department is currently reviewing several applications for mixed use development including projects at major street intersections such as "Day Creek Square" at Base Line Road and Day Creek Boulevard, "Town Square - West" at Foothill Boulevard and Milliken Avenue, and "Rancho Cuvee" at Foothill Boulevard and Etiwanda Avenue. Staff is also meeting weekly with developers to discuss the design/technical details and the review process for the initial development applications for the recently approved Empire Lakes project. These projects have been enabled by the Department's efforts that are being completed in phases, to create development standards for mixed use development and establishing areas in the City suitable for mixed use and transit -oriented development (TOD). The North Eastern Sphere Annexation Specific Plan (NESASP) project will include the development of a project specific plan, General Plan Amendment, Zoning Map Amendment, Etiwanda North Specific Plan Amendment, and all related environmental documentation. Early concepts include a mix of residential product types, a central commercial "town center", and public uses and amenities arranged in a compact and walkable land use pattern. Pre - zoning is tentatively scheduled to be completed by early 2018 and annexation following through mid to late 2018. The Department will be organizing a multi -discipline group to coordinate preparation for the 2020 Census. The first activity will be the Local Update of Census Addresses (LUCA) that will take place in late 2017/early 2018. Begin pre -work needed in advance of a General Plan Update. Work will include identifying changes or updates needed within the existing General Plan. Administer the housing, Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and Home Improvement city-wide programs. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 270 Planning Department Budget Summary Adopted Adopted Actuals Budget Budget Funds Summary 2015/16 2016/17 2017/18 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 1,212,582 $ 1,318,340 $ 1,273,710 Operations and Maintenance 683,602 565,900 556,050 Capital Outlay - - - Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service - - - Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,896,184 1,884,240 1,829,760 Other Funds Personnel Services 348,400 406,600 420,540 Operations and Maintenance 569,641 313,880 328,820 Capital Outlay 217,549 8,423,290 5,670,820 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service Transfer Out - - - Subtotal 1,135,590 9,143,770 6,420,180 All Funds Personnel Services 1,560,982 1,724,940 1,694,250 Operations and Maintenance 1,253,243 879,780 884,870 Capital Outlay 217,549 8,423,290 5,670,820 Cost Allocation - - - Debt Service Transfer Out - - Total Cost $ 3,031,774 $ 11,028,010 $ 8,249,940 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time 15.0 15.0 14.0 Part Time 1.6 0.8 0.8 Total Staffing 16.6 15.8 14.8 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 271 Planning Performance Statistics New Development Highlights 2016 Mixed use development is generally de- scribed as development where residential and non-residential (office, commercial, etc.) are located in close proximity to each other. In this setting, a house could be lo- cated next door to an office. Similarly, in a building with multiple floors, there could be a restaurant on the first floor with apart- ments on the floors above it. Mixed Use standards have now been incorporated as part of the vision of the City. 160000 140000 120000 100000 80000 60000 40000 20DOO 0 Planning Department Revenue Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 02015 22016 Planning Counter Visits Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 02015 12016 11-1--l-I 1 11 1-- ------------------------------------ — — — ------------ Accepted Planning Applications Soo 463 450 ---- — -- — ----- - — ---------- — --- — - -------- 400 — - - — — -- — ---------- — — — ---- 350 300 ........... . ------------ . ....... --------- 238 250 200 150 ............. R7 100 52 36 26-- 50 OWN 0 1�10 41e; 9, 0" IN 2015 0 2016 .... ...... . ....... . .. . ...... . .. ...... . ............... ..... Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 272 Planning Services to the Community Planning Economic Development Land Use Entitlements Environmental Review (CEQA) Housing and Community Improvement Programs Public Information Development Review Historic Preservation Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 273 Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Overview of Department The Public Works Services Department's mission is to provide efficient stewardship of the City's public works infrastructure. The Department has 4 sections: Facilities: Serving 14 facilities and 8 Fire District buildings (over I million square feet); Parks andLandscape: Maintaining 30 parks (Los Amigos Park was added in April 2017), Adult Sports Park and baseball stadium, 125 street front miles of landscape, 72,000 trees, paseos and trails; StreetlFleetlStorm Drain: Care for 532 roadway miles and 4,171 catch basins and 197 vehicles, 146 On and Off road equipment, 205 signal- controlled intersections/crossings, and graffiti removal; and, AdministrationlProject Management: Manage departmental support services, contracts, safety and risk management, budget, and capital maintenance projects. FY 2017/18 Budget Highlights Minimum wage impacts continue to be the largest reason for budget increases in the Public Works budget due to the heavy dependence on contract labor-intensive services such as janitorial, security guard, and landscape maintenance services. Public Works will continue to focus on the goal to reduce overall City water consumption. Parks staff have been working steadily on identifying areas where water can be reduced or eliminated in low traffic turf areas. (City Council Goal ML-10) As part of the water saving effort, $550,000 has been set aside in LMDs 2 ($110,000) and 4R ($440,000) specifically for turf removals along with converting existing planter sections with low water use landscape plants and materials. Work will continue into FY 2017/18 to complete a city-wide tree inventory that will improve the tree trimming process and improve the efficiency of the tree crew. Public Works staff will also continue to replace or repair wom out rubberized surfacing at various parks. With the good fortune of rain returning to the Inland Empire, so too do the roof leaks and repairs needed. During the new fiscal year, the roof system will be replaced at Lions West in addition to repairs being made at Lions East, the Animal Care and Adoption Center, and the Cultural Arts Center. Other new facilities projects for this year include: the repair and maintenance of the parking deck at the Civic Center; replacement of the carpeting on the upper level rotunda area and main staircase at the Civic Center; the replacement of the moveable room divider wall in Celebration Hall at the Cultural Center. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 274 Public Works Services Department Budget Summary Actuals Funds Summary 2015/16 Operating Budget Personnel Services $ 4,288,367 Operations and Maintenance 5,068,214 Capital Outlay - Cost Allocation (804,030) Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal Other Funds Personnel Services Operations and Maintenance Capital Outlay Cost Allocation Debt Service Transfer Out Subtotal All Funds Adopted Adopted Budget Budget 2016/17 2017/18 $ 4,903,440 $ 5,261,450 6,291,310 6,446,080 (839,330) (887,730) 8,552,551 10,355,420 10,819,800 4,222,957 8,816,138 50,705 25,196 39,450 13,154,446 4,536,410 4,709,460 10,093,020 10,252,090 758,000 1,040,700 31,370 29,620 243,940 245,970 15,662,740 16,277,840 Personnel Services 8,511,324 9,439,850 9,970,910 Operations and Maintenance 13,884,352 16,384,330 16,698,170 Capital Outlay 50,705 758,000 1,040,700 Cost Allocation (804,030) (839,330) (887,730) Debt Service 25,196 31,370 29,620 Transfer Out 39,450 243,940 245,970 Total Cost $ 21,706,997 $ 26,018,160 $ 27,097,640 Staffing Summary (Budgeted) Full Time Part Time Total Staffing 127.0 127.0 128.0 32.5 34.1 34.1 159.5 161.1 162.1 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 275 Public Works Services Performance Statistics 2016 Highlights 0 1,130 requests for service through Rancho Responds 0 6 days on average to complete service requests 0 3,701 potholes repaired 0 29,545 sf. of asphalt removed/replaced (488 locations) 0 3,673 sf. of asphalt overlays (52 locations) 0 9,277 sf. of concrete sidewalk removed/replaced (76 locations) 0 463 linear ft. of concrete curb & gutter removed/ replaced (27 locations) 1,938 sf. of concrete drive approach removed/replaced (22 locations) Streets After -Hours Call Outs M 2015 4 2016 86 84 79 66 57 44 43 46 29 24 23 26 18 13 9 Debris Potholes Traffic Traffic Traffic Trees Parks/ INASCL Removal Accidents Signals Signs Irrigation Tree Trimming In -House Contractor a Z015 0 2016 02015 32016 1,670 1,556 8,951 5,95 835 641 334 145 244 512 N d- 0 14 Trees Trees Trees Trees Trees Trees Pruned Rermved Planted Pruned Removed Planted Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 276 Public Works Services Services to the Community Public Works Services Facilities Parks and Maintenance Landscape I I Maintenance City Buildings I H Urban Forestry Fire Stations I H Water Management Street Maintenance Traffic Signals and Safety Lighting Street Sweeping Parkways, Medians Graffiti Removal and Trails IH Administration Clerical/ Administration Safety/Training Capital Projects Park Facilities Storm Drain Contracts and Amenities IH Maintenance IH Park Landscape City Fleet Budget/Finance IH Maintenance I H Concrete and Asphalt Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 277 TFUS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 278 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 279 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 28o CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Category The City's Capital Improvement Program (CIP) for Fiscal Year 2017/18 will provide needed infrastructure improvements city-wide. The CIP summarizes the projects planned for the upcoming fiscal year by the following categories: Beautification — Projects include parkway landscape, median islands, plant material replacement, community trail landscape, and open space preservation. Drainage— Projects include the construction of new storm drains, storm drain lateral connections, flood control channels, catch basins, debris racks and other forms of infrastructure that protect the public right-of-way from hazards caused by flooding and severe weather events. Facilities — Projects involve the construction of new buildings or improving, adding on to, or renovating existing buildings and ancillary structures. Miscellaneous — Projects are the capital undertakings that do not qualify for classification into the other project categories. Municipal Utility — Projects are related to the maintenance, expansion, and improvement of the Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility (RCMU) distribution system. Parks — Projects that are located in, on, or adjacent to a park or community center facility, Railroad Crossings — High cost, infrequent projects that require large funding commitments, lengthy construction schedules, and inevitably cause some inconvenience to the local community during the construction period. Railroad Crossings are identified in the City's General Plan document. Streets — Projects include resurfacing of local arterial and residential streets in order to extend pavement life and improve driving conditions as well as widening and extension of streets as need dictates via new development, community needs, and the City's General Plan. Traffic — Projects are typically those that will promote safe and efficient traffic circulation per State and local design standards such as new signals, upgrades to intersections, etc. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 281 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA9 CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Summary by Category Following is the total budgeted by category for Fiscal Year 2017/18: Beautification $ 700,000 Drainage 3,950,000 Facilities 16,205,240 Miscellaneous 1,974,160 Municipal Utility 19,194,930 Parks 1,093,890 Railroad Crossings 125,000 Streets 5,927,000 Traffic 2,238,750 Total CIP $51,408=,970 Note: Funds for these projects come from a variety of sources including development impact fees, State gas taxes, grant funds, and special assessments. These funds are non -General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. The amounts budgeted will fluctuate annually. In addition to CIP project costs, future operational costs are identified in the CIP and will be included in the operational budget in future years, as appropriate. Some of the more significant capital improvement projects in each category are discussed below: The Drainage category includes construction of the Cucamonga Storm Drain Upper Phase 111. The Facilities category includes the relocation of a current fire station to include a Police Substation, the construction of a Data Center (Phase III of the training facility), drought tolerant irrigation landscaping and emergency vehicle circulation driveway improvements for the Fire District; and the Public Works Services Department's warehouse expansion. The Miscellaneous category includes green bike lanes and safety enhancements, and the Southwest Cucamonga Bike Trail Project. The Municipal Utility category includes citywide street light acquisition and the citywide street light LED retrofit. The Parks category includes the initial design of Etiwanda Creek Park Phase 11. The Railroad Crossings category includes replacing rubber panels with concrete panels at a railroad spur. The Streets category includes local street pavement rehabilitation at various locations and a street widening project on Hermosa Avenue. Within the Traffic category, there are two traffic signal installations/upgrades along with an Intelligent Transportation System Upgrade - Citywide. Details of the cost and funding source(s) for each project budgeted for Fiscal Year 2017/18 are included in the following pages. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 282 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Cate2ory / Pro*ect Descrii)tion Fundine Source Amount Beautification Haven Ave from Wilson to Vivienda - Community Trail West Side Beautification 150,000 LMD 2 Water Conservation and Landscape Renovations LMD 2 110,000 (Multi -Phased Project) LMD 4R Water Conservation and Landscape Renovations (Multi -Phased Project) LMD 4R 440,000 Beautirication Total: 700,000 Drainage Cucamonga Storm Drain Upper Phase III General Drainage 800,000 Measure 1 400,000 Citywide Infrastructure 2,700,000 McKinley St at Ramona Ave Storm Drain Repair Citywide Infrastructure 50,000 Drainage Total: 3,950,000 Facilities Archibald Library - Office Re -design Library Reserve 135,350 Central Park - Emergency Backup Power (Design Only) Fire Capital Projects 75,000 City Facilities - Roofing Replacement & Repairs Capital Reserve 250,000 Civic Center - Carpet and Reconfiguration Capital Reserve 219,000 Civic Center - Parking Deck Maintenance Capital Reserve 30,000 Civic Center - Waterproofing & Planter Box Repair Capital Reserve 50,000 Cultural Center - Celebration Hall Air -Wall Replacement Capital Reserve 389,500 Cultural Center - Courtyard Redesign Park Development 200,000 Cultural Center - Loading Bay Park Development 40,000 Energy Efficiency Facility Improvements Capital Reserve 71,390 Fire District - Jersey Station (174) Data Center (Bldg 1) Fire Capital Projects 2,500,000 Fire District - Jersey Station (174) Training Facility Fire Capital Projects 25,000 Fire District - San Bernardino Station (172) Relocation/Police Station Fire Capital Projects 9,420,000 Fire District - Water Conservation Landscaping & Emerg. Vehicle Circulation Fire Capital Projects 600,000 Driveway Improvements Public Works Services Department - Warehouse Expansion Capital Reserve 2,140,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 283 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category CateLyory / Proiect Description FundinE Source Amount Sports Complex - Removal of Soccer Field Lighting Fixtures and Poles at LMD 1 30,000 Goals Site PD 85 30,000 60,000 Facilities Total: 16,205,240 Miscellaneous 9th St along north side west of Vineyard Ave - Sidewalk Improvements Citywide Infrastructure 43,000 Safe Route To School 90,800 133,800 ADA Ramps at Various Locations (Design and Construction) Measure 1 100,000 Arrow Rte and Rochester Ave, N/E Comer - Animal Exercise Yard Improv. Park Development 80,000 Community Trail Drainage Improvements LMD 1 10,500 Green Bike Lanes & Safety Enhancements AB 2766 Air Quality Impry 725,500 Pacific Electric Trail - Block Wall East of Victoria Park Lane LMD 2 Victoria 13,200 Paseo Lighting Retrofit LMD 2 Victoria 290,000 Southwest Cucamonga Class I Bike Trail Project AB 2766 Air Quality Impry 621,160 Miscellaneous Total: 1,974,160 Municipal Utility - Electrical 6th Street from Utica Avenue to The Vine - Electric Line Extension Municipal Utility 885,000 Citywide Safety Light LED Retrofit SLD 1 389,200 Citywide Street Light Acquisition SLD 1 2,701,720 SLD 2 3,237,210 SLD 3 1,245,870 SLD 4 648,460 SLD 5 283,380 SLD 6 439,760 SLD 7 901,850 SLD 8 321,040 9,779,290 Citywide Street Light LED Retrofit SLD 1 1,164,080 SLD 2 1,394,800 SLD 3 536,800 SLD 4 279,400 SLD 5 122,100 SLD 6 189,480 SLD 7 388,580 Municipal Utility 46,200 4,121,440 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 284 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Cate2ory / Proiect Description Commercial Smart Meter Replacement Haven Avenue at 6th St - Street Light Installation Haven Ave from Foothill Blvd to Church Street - Electric Line Extension Rancho Cucamonga Fiber Optics Network Utica Ave from 4th Street to 6th Street - Electric Line Extension Parks Central Park - Phase II Design Study Central Park - Trail Head Improvements (Design with Construction TBD) Etiwanda Creek Park - Phase 11 Heritage Park - Handicap Parking Stalls and Pavement Rehabilitation Rubberized Surface Replacement Railroad Crossings Arrow Rte at Railroad Spur - New Concrete Panels Etiwanda Ave Grade Separation at Metrolink Tracks Streets 6th St from Milliken to Charles Smith - Pavement Rehabilitation Civic Center and Courthouse Pavement Rehabilitation (Construction cost share with San Bernardino County) Foothill Blvd from Grove Ave to San Bernardino Rd - Street Improvements (Design) Fundine Source Amount Municipal Utility 100,000 Municipal Utility 25,000 Municipal Utility 585,000 Fire Capital Projects 460,000 1,045,000 Fiber Optic Network 2,050,000 Municipal Utility 800,000 Municipal Utility Total: 19,194,930 Park Development Park Development Park Development Park Development Park Development PD 85 LMD 9 250,000 180,890 1,890,000 2,070,890 538,000 55,000 55,000 110,000 15,000 Parks Total: 1,093,890 Gas Tax R&T 7360 75,000 Citywide Infrastructure 50,000 Railroad Crossings Total: 125,000 Gas Tax R&T 7360 500,000 Citywide Infrastructure 402,000. 902,000 Law Enforcement Reserve 150,000 Citywide Infrastructure 50,000 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 285 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Capital Improvement Program Detail by Category Cateeory / Pro*ect Description FundinE Source Amount Foothill Blvd from Haven Ave to Milliken Ave - Pavement Rehabilitation Measure 1 79,000 Measure 1 771,000 850,000 Hermosa Ave from Arrow to Foothill - Pavement Rehabilitation Measure 1 250,000 Hermosa Ave north of Foothill Boulevard to Church St - Street Widening Beautification 350,000 Gas Tax 250,000 600,000 Highland Ave from Archibald Ave to Haven Ave - Pavement Rehabilitation Gas Tax R&T 7360 25,000 Jersey Blvd from Haven to Rochester - Pavement Rehabilitation Gas Tax R&T 7360 815,000 Fire Capital Projects 35,000 850,000 Local Street Pavement Rehabilitation at Various Locations Gas Tax R&T 7360 450,000 (Design and Construction) Road Maint & Rehab 1,000,000 Citywide Infrastructure 750,000. 2,200,000 Youngs Canyon Road from Koch Place to Cherry Ave - Street Extension AD 88-2 Etiwanda/Highlnd 50,000 (Environmental, Design and Flood Control Review) AD 88-2 Etiwanda/Highlnd 3,150,000 3,200,000 Streets Total: 5,927,000 Traffic 6th at Hellman Ave - Traffic Signal Installation Transportation 546,000 Base Line Rd at Lion St- Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (HAWK) Citywide Infrastructure 80,000 Day Creek Boulevard - Upgrade Left Turn Phases Transportation 63,750 East Ave at Highland Ave - Traffic Signal Installation Transportation 469,000 Freeway and Arterial Signal Synchronization Phase I AB 2766 Air Quality 112,810 Transportation 207,190 320,000 Intelligent Transportation System Upgrade - Citywide Transportation 650,000 Terra Vista Parkway at Spruce - Safety Lighting Installation SLD 4 110,000 Traffic Total: 2,238,750 Total Capital Improvement Projects: $ 51,408,970 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 286 RANCHO CUCAMONGA CALIFORNIA APPENDIX Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 287 TFUS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 288 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Financial Policies BUDGETING POLICY • The City will adopt an annual budget for the fiscal year beginning July I no later than June 30 of the same year. • The adopted budget will be balanced with current year operating expenditures fully funded by current year revenues and identified undesignated/unreserved fund balance. • Fund balance reserves will be used only for non -recurring expenditures such as capital projects and not for on -going operations. • The City Manager is authorized to implement programs as approved in the adopted budget. • The City Manager may transfer appropriations between divisions, projects and programs within the same department and fund in order to implement the adopted budget. • Quarterly budget reports will be presented to the City Council to provide information on the status of the City's financial condition. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT POLICY • Capital projects involve the purchase or construction of major fixed assets such as land, building or permanent improvements including additions, replacements and major alterations having a long life expectancy and costing $5,000 or more. • Capital projects are funded by a variety of sources including Special Funds, Redevelopment Agency, and Special Districts. These funds are non -General Fund revenues and typically are restricted in how they can be spent. Prior to its inclusion in the annual budget, a determination must be made that the project is an appropriate use of the funds and that there is sufficient fund balance. • The City will identify the estimated costs and potential funding sources for each capital project prior to its submittal to the City County for approval. • The City will coordinate the development of the Five -Year Capital Improvement Program (CIP) with the development of the annual Operating Budget. REVENUE POLICY Recurring revenue growth (inflation) will be used to pay for recurring expenditures. Recurring expenditure increases should not be approved which exceed recurring revenue growth. Any new or expanded programs will be required to identify new funding sources and/or offsetting reductions in expenditures. In addition: The City shall use a conservative approach in projecting revenues. One-time revenues may be used for one-time expenditures. The City shall update its user fees and charges periodically to recover costs of providing that service for which a fee is charged. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 289 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Financial Policies PURCHASING POLICY Purchasing Limits: Less than $5,000 No bid necessary, may use PCard $5,001 to $50,000 Minimum of three (3) written quotes More than $50,000 Formal bid Contract Signing Limits: $5,000 or less Lead Maintenance Worker $10,000 or less Supervisors $15,000 or less Superintendents $25,000 or less Division Heads/Battalion Chiefs $50,000 or less Department Heads $100,000 or less City Manager $ 100,001 or more City Council RESERVE POLICY Adequate reserve levels are a necessary component of the City's overall financial management strategy. It is the responsibility of the City Council to maintain a sufficient level of reserve funds to provide for the orderly provision of services to the citizens of the City of Rancho Cucamonga. The City Council has the authority to decide the circumstances under which the reserves can be used. The City Manager and the Finance Director may, from time to time, make recommendations as to the level of reserve funds necessary for prudent fiscal management. Reserve levels shall be reviewed at least annually during the budget process to ensure that they are consistent with the conditions faced by the City. Changes in Economic Circumstance The City's General Fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine month reserve, or 75% of the City General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's fund balance committed for changes in economic circumstances is established at a goal of a nine month reserve, or 75% of the Fire District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The specific uses of this commitment are 1) the declaration of a state or federal state of emergency or a local emergency as defined in Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Code Section 2.36.020; or 2) a change in economic circumstances in a given fiscal year that results in revenues to the City/Fire District being insufficient to cover expenditures for one or more fiscal years. The City Council/Fire Board may, by the affirming vote of four members, change the amount of this commitment and/or the specific uses of these monies. City Facilities' Capital Repair The City's General Fund balance committed for City facilities' capital repair is established at a minimum goal of 50% of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress (excluding infrastructure), building improvements, and improvements other than building for governmental activities. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 290 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Financial Policies Fire District Facilities Capital Repair The Fire District's fund balance committed for the Fire District facilities capital repair is hereby committed to a minimum goal of 50% of capital assets value comprised of construction in progress (excluding infrastructure), building improvements, and improvements other than building for public safety -fire activities. Working Capital The City's General Fund balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 5% of the City's General Fund operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. The Fire District's ftind balance committed for Working Capital is established at a goal of a minimum of 50% of the District's operating budget for the upcoming fiscal year. 0 Self -Insurance The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of Worker's Compensation, General Liability, and Employment Practices Liability claims is established at a minimum goal of eight times the City's and the District's total yearly SIRs for all types of insurance coverage. PASIS Worker's Compensation Tail Claims The Fire District's fund balance committed for payment of outstanding Worker's Compensation claims remaining after the District's withdrawal from PASIS is established at a goal equal to the most recent fiscal year end Claims Cost Detail Report from the District's third -party administrator plus 15%. Employee Leave Payouts The City's General Fund balance and the Fire District's fund balance committed for employee leave payouts as valued in accordance with the City's labor contracts as of the last day of the fiscal year. PERS Rate Stabilization I The City's General Fund and Fire District's fund balance committed to offset projected rate increases identified in the respective annual CalPERS actuarial valuation for two fiscal years after the year of financial reporting and identified by the City's actuarial consultant for three more years for a total of five years' projection. Vehicle and Equipment Replacement The Fire District's fund balance committed for the replacement of fire safety vehicles and equipment as determined based on the District's replacement criteria is established at a minimum goal of 50% of District vehicle and equipment replacement value. Law Enforcement The City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes, including operations, equipment, capital outlay, personnel, and booking fees. The ftinding goal for this reserve is Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 291 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Financial Policies the equivalent of 100% of the most recently approved Schedule A from the San Bernardino County Sheriff s Department. RC Sports Center Vehicle and Equipment Replacement The City's General Fund balance committed for construction of the future replacement and repair of vehicles and equipment for the new RC Sports Center. This reserve is established at a minimum goal of 105% of the cost of the vehicles and equipment for the new Center. INVESTMENT POLICY The Statement of Investment Policy shall be reviewed annually to ensure its consistency with the overall objectives of the City and its relevance to Federal, State, and local law; prudent money management; and financial and economic trends, and submitted to the City Council for approval in December. The policy applies to all funds and investment activities under the direct authority of the City. Financial assets held and invested by trustees or fiscal agents are subject to the regulations established by the State of California pertaining to investments by local agencies as well as the related bond indentures. Cash management and investment transactions are the responsibility of the City Treasurer and/or his designee. Criteria for selecting investments in order of priority are safety, liquidity and yield. The City operates its pooled cash investments under the "Prudent Person Standards." Under the provisions of the City's investment policy and in accordance with Section 53601 of the California Government Code, the City may invest in the following types of investments: • Securities of the U.S. Government, or its agencies • Municipals (Warrants, Notes and Bonds) • Certificates of Deposit (or Time Deposits) • Negotiable Certificates of Deposit • FDIC — Insured Certificates of Deposit • Banker's Acceptances • Commercial Paper • Local Agency Investment Fund (State Pool) Demand Deposits • Joint Powers Authority (JPA) Investment Pool (Short -Term) • Deposit of Funds • Repurchase Agreements (Repos) • Medium Term Corporate Notes • Supranational Securities • Investment Agreements In order to minimize the impact of market risk, it is the intent that all investments will be held to maturity. The City Treasurer shall prepare and submit a monthly investment report to the City Council within 30 days after the end of the reporting period. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 292 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Long -Term Debt The City has no single, comprehensive debt policy statement because the City has no bonded indebtedness. Therefore, State law pertaining to local government debt and past City debt transactions serve as de facto policy. Pursuant to State of California Government Code Section 43605, the City's legal bonded indebtedness shall not exceed 15% of the assessed value of all real and personal property in the City. However, this provision was enacted when assessed valuation was based upon 25% of market value. Effective with the 1981/82 fiscal year, each parcel is now assessed at 100% of market value (as of the most recent change in ownership for that parcel). Although the statutory debt limit has not been amended by the State since this change, the percentages presented in the computation below have been proportionately modified to 3.75% (25% of 15%) for the purposes of this calculation in order to be consistent with the computational effect of the debt limit at the time of the State's establishment of the limit. As noted above, as of the publication date of this report, the City had no bonded indebtedness. However, its debt limit, as illustrated in the June 30, 2016 Comprehensive Annual Report, is $851,959,538. The calculation is included below. Legal Debt Margin Calculation for Fiscal Year 2015/16: Assessed value Debt limit (3.75% of assessed value) Debt applicable to limit: General obligation bonds Ugal debt margin $ 22,718,921,000 851,959,538 $ 851,959,538 Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 293 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Accrual Basis of Revenues are recognized when both measurable and available; Accounting: expenditures are recorded when services have been substantially performed or goods have been received and the liabilities incurred. Adopted Budget: The official budget as approved by the City Council at the start of each fiscal year. Ad Valorem Tax A state or local government tax based on the value of real property as "According to its determined by the county tax assessor. value": Amended Budget: The adopted budget as amended by the City Council through the course of a fiscal year. Appropriations: A legal authorization granted by a legislative body to make expenditures and to incur obligations for specific purposes. An appropriation is usually limited in amount and to the time when it may be expended. Assessed Valuation: A municipality's property tax base stated in dollars based on real estate and/or other taxable business property for the purposes of taxation, sometimes expressed as a percent of the full market value of the taxable property within a community. Balanced Budget: A budget in which planned expenditures do not exceed planned funds available. Bond: A security whereby an issuer borrows money from an investor and agrees and promises, by written contract, to pay a fixed principal sum on a specified date (maturity date) and at a specified rate of interest. Budget: A plan of financial operation comprised of estimated expenditures for a given period (usually a single fiscal year) and the proposed means of financing the expenditures (through revenues). Capital Budget: A budget which focuses on capital projects to implement the Capital Improvement Program. Capital Expenditure: An acquisition or an improvement (as distinguished from a repair) that will have a life of more than one year and costs more than $5,000. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 294 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Capital Improvement A plan for capital improvements to be implemented each year over a Program: number of years to meet capital needs arising from the assessment of long- term needs. It sets forth the estimated cost for each project and specifies the resources required to finance the projected expenditures. Capital Improvement The budget unit to group activities and costs necessary to implement a Project: specific capital improvement and/or acquisition. A project can include the construction, acquisition, expansion, replacement, or rehabilitation of a physical facility or improvement. Projects often include planning and design, land acquisition, and project management costs related to such facilities and improvements. Capital Projects Used to account for financial resources for the acquisition or construction Funds: of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust funds. Debt Service Funds: Account for the accumulation of resources set aside to meet current and future debt service requirements (payments) on general long-term debt. Department: A major organizational group of the City with overall management responsibility for an operation or a group of related operations within a functional area. Division: An organizational subgroup of a department. Encumbrance: The commitment of appropriated funds to purchase goods, which have not yet been received, or services that have yet to be rendered. Enterprise Funds: Use to account for self-supporting operations such as the Municipal Utility. Expenditures: Decreases in net financial resources. Expenditures include current operating expenses which require the current or future use of net current assets, debt service and capital outlays. Expenses: Decreases in net total assets. Expenses represent the total cost of operations during a period regardless of the timing of related expenditures. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 295 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Tenns Fiscal Year: A 12-month period to which the annual operating budget applies and at the end of which an entity determines its financial position, the results of its operations, and adopts a budget for the coming year. The City of Rancho Cucamonga's fiscal year is from July 1 to June 30. Fixed Assets: Equipment costing $5,000 or more, including tax, with a useful life longer than one year, and not qualifying as a capital improvement project. Includes automotive equipment, office equipment, office furniture, acquisitions, landscaping improvements, etc. Full -Time Equivalent The conversion of part-time employee hour to an equivalent of a full-time (FTE): position. For example: one person working 20 hours a week for a year would be 0.5 FTE. Fund: An independent fiscal and accounting entity with a self -balancing set of accounts, recording resources, related liabilities, obligations, reserves and equities segregated for the purpose of carrying out specific activities or attaining certain objectives in accordance with special regulations, restrictions or limitations. Fund Balance: The equity (assets minus liabilities) of governmental fund and fiduciary fund types. Generally Accepted Uniform minimum standards of and guidelines for financial accounting Accounting Principles and reporting. They govern the form and content of the basic financial (GAAP): statements of an entity. GAAP encompasses the conventions, rules, and procedures necessary to define accepted accounting practices at a particular time. They include not only broad guidelines of general application, but also detailed practices and procedures. GAAP provides a standard by which to measure financial presentations. GFOA: Government Finance Officers Association Governmental The independent organization that establishes and improves standards of Accounting Standards accounting and financial reporting for U.S. state and local governments. Board (GASB) Governmental Funds: Typically are used to account for tax -supported (goverm-nental) activities. These include the General Fund, Special Revenue Funds, Capital Projects Funds, and Debt Service Funds. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 296 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Interfund Transfers: Defined as "flows of assets" (such as good or services) without equivalent flows of assets in return and without requirement for repayments. Internal Service Account for the goods or services provided by one fund and/or department Funds: to another fund and/or department on a cost reimbursement basis. Investment Grade: A rating issued by the three major bond rating agencies, Moody's, Standard & Poor's, and Fitch, rated BBB, Baa or Better. Many fiduciaries, trustees, and some mutual fund managers can only invest in securities with an investment grade rating. Modified Accrual The accrual basis of accounting where revenues are recognized when they Basis: become both "measurable" and "available" to finance expenditures of the current period. All governmental funds and agency funds are accounted for using the modified accrual basis of accounting. Object Code: The classification of expenditures in terms of what is bought and paid for grouped into categories. Overlapping Debt: The proportionate share of the general obligation bonds of local governments located wholly or in part within the limits of the reporting unit of government, that must be borne by property owners within the unit. Personnel Expenses: Compensation paid to or on behalf of City employees for salaries and wages, overtime and benefits. Proprietary Funds: Account for records of operations similar to those found in a business, such as internal service funds and enterprise funds. Revenue: Moneys that the City receives as income such as tax payments, fees from specific services, receipts form other governinents, fines, forfeitures, grants, shared revenues and interest income. Special Revenue Account for the revenue derived form specific taxes or other earmarked Funds: revenue sources (other than expendable trusts or for major capital projects) that are restricted by law or administrative action to expenditures for specified purposes. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 297 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Glossary of Budget Terms Taxes: Compulsory charges levied by a government for the purpose of financing services performed for the common benefit. This term does not include specific charges made against particular persons or property for current or permanent benefits such as special assessments. Neither does the term include charges for services rendered only to those paying such charges as, for example, user charges. User Charges: Payments made by users or customers of publicly provided services that benefit specific individuals. These services exhibit "public good" characteristics. Examples of user charges are fees paid for recreational activities, building fees, etc. Working Capital: I The cash available for day-to-day operations of an organization. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 298 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget List of Acronyms ADA Americans with Disabilities Act HHW Household Hazardous Waste AQMD Air Quality Management District HR Human Resources BERT Business Emergency Response HVAC Heating, Ventilating, and Air Training Conditioning BYB2RC Bring Your Business 2 Rancho IAQ Indoor Air Quality Cucamonga IESBDC Inland Empire Small Business C.A.N.I.N.E. Campus Awareness, Narcotic Development Center Intervention, Narcotic Education IPM Integrated Pest Management CAFR Comprehensive Annual Financial KIDS Kids Interactive Discovery Space Report LED Light -Emitting Diode CAL-11) RAN California Identification System LMD Landscape Maintenance District Remote Access Network PCI Pavement Condition Index CDBG Community Development Block PD Park District Grant PERS, Public Employees Retirement CERT Community Emergency Response System Training PSVN Public Safety Video Network CFD Community Facilities District RCLS Rancho Cucamonga Library CIP Capital Inprovement Project Services CNG Compressed Natural Gas RCMU Rancho Cucamonga Municipal CONFIRE Consolidated Fire Agencies, Joint utility Power Authority REGIS Rancho Enterprise Geographic CPI Consumer Price Index Information Systems CPR Cardiopulmonary Resusitation ROPS Recognized Obligation Payment CSD Community Services Department Schedule CVWD Cucamonga Valley Water District SANBAG San Bernardino Associated EIR Environmental Impact Review Governments ESRI Environmental Systems Research SBCERA San Bernardino County Employee Institute Retirement Association FLSA Fair Labor Standards Act SBOE California State Board of FTE Full Time Equivalent Equalization FY Fiscal Year SCE Southern California Edison GFOA Government Finance Officers SLD Street Lighting District Association TOD Transit Oriented Development GIS Geographic Information Systems TOT Transient Occupancy Tax GOTMD Greater Ontario Tourism VLF Vehicle License Fees Marketing District HdL Hinderliter de Llamas Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 299 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA.) CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description GENERALFUND 001 General Fund - The general operating fund of the City which accounts for all general tax receipts and fee revenue not allocated by law, Council policy or contractual agreement to other ftmds. General Fund expenditures include operations traditionally associated with activities which are not required to be accounted for or paid by another fund. OTHER GENERAL FUNDS 003 Reimb St/County Parking Cit - Established for the tracking of revenues and expenditures related to State and San Bernardino County surcharges on parking citations. 006 CVWD Reimbursements - Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed street repairs within the City on behalf of Cucamonga Valley Water District. 008 County of S.B. Reimbursements - Established as a clearing account for expenses and reimbursements associated with City performed storm drain facility maintenance on behalf of the San Bernardino County Flood Control District. 016 Comm Dev Technical Services - Established to account for the City's General Plan Update Fee as well as funds that have been set aside for Economic and Community Development Special Services. 017 Law Enforcement Reserve - Established to account for the funding and use of the City's General Fund balance committed for public safety purposes. 018 Traffic Safety - Established to account for vehicle code fines collected to fund the City's contracted crossing guard services. 019 Info Technology -Development - Established to account for fees collected to ftind the internal cost of providing information technology services for the Community Development Departments. 020 City Technology Fee - Established to account for fees collected to fund a future replacement of the City's land management system. 022 Mobile Home Park Program - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the City's mobile home park inspection program. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 300 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 023 SB1186 Cert Access Special Program - Established to account for the $1.00 State mandated fee imposed on any applicant for a business license, equivalent or renewal, including the payment to the State of 30% of the fee collected as well as expenditures to fund increased certified access specialist (CASp) services for the public and to facilitate compliance with construction -related accessibility requirements. 025 Capital Reserve - Established to account for key reserves of the General Fund including City infrastructure, City facilities capital repairs, and self-insurance. 073 Benefits Contingency - Established to account for the accumulation of resources for the future payment of employee leave benefits paid to employees upon separation from the City. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Special Revenue Funds account for revenues derived from specific sources which are required by law or administrative regulation to be accountedfor in a separatedfund. Funds included are: 100 Assessment Districts Admin - Established to account for revenues and expenditures associated with the management of all City assessment districts. 101 AD 93-1 Masi Commerce Center - Established to acquire the necessary infrastructure from the developer after the completion and acceptance of the approved improvements. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds pursuant to the provisions of the Improvement Act of 1915. 105 AB2766 Air Quality Improvement - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2766 which imposed an additional registration fee on motor vehicles. These revenues are to be used to reduce air pollution from motor vehicles and for related planning, monitoring, enforcement, and technical studies (Vehicle Code Section 9250.17 and Health and Safety Code Chapter 7, Part 5 of Division 26, commencing with Section 44220). 110 Beautification - Established to account for fees collected to provide proper landscaping and irrigation systems after parkway and median improvements are made. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 301 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description ill Park Land Acquisition - Established to account for the park land acquisition development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park sites. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 112 Drainage Fac/General - Established to account for fees charged developers for purposes of defraying the actual or estimated costs of constructing planned drainage facilities. 113 Community/Rec Center Develpmnt - Established to account for community and recreation center impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 114 Drainage-Etiwanda/San Sevaine - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of regional and mainline flood control projects. 115 Henderson/Wardman Drainage - The Henderson/Wardman Drainage fund is a developer impact fee supported fund for the construction of storm drain improvements in the Henderson/Wardman drainage area. 116 Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area North of Base Line Road for the construction of Master Plan Storm Drain projects. 118 Upper Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda/San Sevaine Drainage area for the construction of secondary mainline flood control projects. 119 Park Improvement - Established to account for park improvement impact fees charged to developers. This fee replaces the revenue previously collected in Fund 120. 120 Park Development - Established to account for the residential park development fees charged upon issuance of a building permit for development of future park or recreational sites. 122 South Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for Development Impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south of Foothill Blvd for the construction of the Master Plan Storm Drain. 123 Library Impact Fee - Established to account for library impact fees charged to developers. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page302 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 124 Transportation - Established to account for fees charged for the construction and expansion of City streets and highways which provide additional capacity and safety. 125 Animal Center Impact Fee - Established to account for animal center impact fees charged to developers. 126 Lower Etiwanda Drainage - Established to account for development impact fees collected in the Etiwanda area south between Foothill Blvd. and Base Line Road for the construction of master plan storm drain projects. 127 Police Impact Fee - Established to account for police impact fees charged to developers. 128 Etiwanda No. Equestrian Facility - Established to account for in lieu fees collected for the Etiwanda North Specific Plan for the future construction of an equestrian facility. 129 Underground Utilities - Established to account for fees collected from developers for future undergrounding of overhead utilities. 130 LMD #1 General City - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 131 LMD #2 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 132 LMD #3A Hyssop - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 133 LMD #311 Medians - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 134 LMD #411 Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 135 LMD #5 Tot Lot - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 303 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 136 LMD #611 Caryn Community - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 137 LMD #7 North Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 138 LMD #8 South Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 139 LMD #9 Lower Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 140 LMD #10 Rancho Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing landscape maintenance. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 141 LMD #1 Capital Replacement - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for LMD #1. 151 SLD #1 Arterial - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 152 SLD #2 Residential - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 153 SLD #3 Victoria - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 154 SLD #4 Terra Vista - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 155 SLD #5 Caryn Community - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 304 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 156 SLD #6 Industrial Area - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 157 SLD #7 North Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 158 SLD #8 South Etiwanda - Established to account for the costs associated with providing street lights. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 170 Gas Tax 2105/Propll I - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of State gasoline taxes provided the financing. 172 Gas Tax 2106-2107 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of state gasoline taxes provided the financing. 174 Gas Tax R&T7360 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds used for road construction and maintenance of the City network system. The City's share of state gasoline taxes provided the financing. 176 Measure 1 1990-2010 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 177 Measure 12010-2040 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of county/local gasoline tax funds for the construction and maintenance of eligible street projects. 182 AB 2928 Traffic Congest Relief - Established fund to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received as a result of Assembly Bill 2928. The purpose of the Traffic Congestion Program was to provide funding for transportation projects that would relieve congestion, connect transportation systems, and provide for better goods movement. 186 Foothill Blvd Maintenance - Established to account for funding provided by Cal Trans as part of their relinquishment of Foothill Boulevard to the City of Rancho Cucamonga. This limited funding source will be utilized to repair and maintain portions of Foothill Boulevard. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page305 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 188 Integrated Waste Management - Established to account for AB939 recycling fee revenues from the City's refuse haulers and can only be used for the City's Household Hazardous Waste Disposal program. Assembly Bill 939 is a law that was passed by the State of California that mandates that all cities divert a specified percentage of their solid waste from their landfills in accordance with established deadlines. 190 Prop 42-Traffic Congestion Mit - Established to account for gasoline sales tax revenue received from the State of California for transportation purposes, including city and county street and road repairs and maintenance. Proposition 42, a legislative constitutional amendment, permanently dedicated revenues from this sales tax on gasoline to transportation infrastructure needs. 194 Proposition 113 State Funding - Proposition I B (Prop I B) provides state fimding to cities and counties to fund the maintenance and improvement of local transportation facilities. The funding is allocated based on population. 195 State Asset Seizure - Established to account for the funds received from the State for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 196 CA Asset Seizure 15% - Established to account for 15% of State Asset Seizure (Fund 195) designated for the sole purpose of funding programs designed to combat drug abuse and divert gang activity pursuant to the provisions of Health & Safety Code Section 11489(b)(2)(A)(i). 197 Federal Asset Seizure - Established to account for the funds received from the Federal government for the equitable transfer of forfeited property and cash in which the City directly participates in the law enforcement efforts leading to the seizure and forfeiture of the property. 198 Citywide Infrastructure Impry - This fund was established to account for reimbursement revenue received from various local, State and Federal agencies and utilities for capital improvement projects completed in the City. The accumulated funds will be used for future capital improvement projects as authorized by the City Council. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 3o6 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 204 Community Development Blk Grant - Established to account for grants received from the Department of Housing and Urban Development. These revenues must be expended to accomplish one of the following objectives: elimination of slum or blight; or benefit to low and moderate income persons by providing loans and grants to owner -occupants and rental property owners to rehabilitate residential properties. 209 Federal SAFETEA-LU - Established to account for the Safe, Accountable, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) Federal funding for surface transportation projects. 211 Prop 113 - SLPP - Established to account for the State -Local Partnership Program utilizing Proposition 113 bond proceeds to fund eligible transportation projects. Funds are allocated through formula and competitive sub -programs. 214 Pedestrian Grant/Art 3 - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received for the construction of facilities provided for the exclusive use of pedestrians and bicycles. 218 Public Resrce Grnts/Healthy RC - The City had received and will continue to receive from various funding sources for the Healthy Cities concept, which was adopted by the Council in March 2008, as a means of integrating health concerns into a holistic approach to improving the overall quality of life in the community. 225 CA Recycle/Litter Reduction Grant - Established to account for a grant from the State Department of Conservation. This grant will fund a program that will emphasize the collection and recycling of beverage containers at large venues, public areas, residential communities or schools. 226 Used Oil Recycling Grant - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. 227 Used Oil Recycling Program - The California Integrated Waste Management allocates funding to governmental agencies on a population basis. The fund was established to administer the used oil collection programs. The fund must be used specifically for oil recycling collection and educational programs. Fiscal Year 2017A8 Adopted Budget Page 307 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 234 Safe Routes To School Program - The Safe Routes to School Program fund is a grant fund for monies provided by the State of California. The state funds are administered through Caltrans as part of the California Department of Health Services' "Safe Routes to School Program" and are available for transportation projects that increase the safety of pedestrians and bicyclists. 235 Prop 84 Park Bond Act - Prop 84 provides state funding, on a competitive basis, to local governments for the creation of new parks and recreation opportunities. The Statewide Park Program legislation requires projects to meet six eligibility requirements. The fund was established to account for the financial activities associated with the design and construction of the neighborhood park in southwest Rancho Cucamonga. 250 Recreation Services - Established to account for the wide variety of classes, special events, and activities sponsored by the Community Services Department. 255 Victoria Gardens Cultural Center - Established to account for the various activities that the Community Services Department facilitates at the Victoria Gardents Cultural Center. 258 Senior Outreach Grant - Established to account for funds passed through the San Bernardino County Department of Aging and Adult Services from the California Department of Aging to provide free recreation classes and programs for senior citizens in the City of Rancho Cucamonga. These recreation activities focused on physical, social, psychological, educational, and recreational needs of older persons. The City provided an in -kind match of $1,200 in the form of marketing, staff oversight, and supplies. 281 Fire Fund - Established to account for the revenue and disbursement of funds received by the Rancho Cucamonga Fire Protection District in the course of that agency's fire protection services. The source of revenue is primarily from property taxes. 282 Community Facilities Dist 85-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. 283 Community Facilities Dist 88-1 - Established to account for the costs associated with providing fire facilities and services. Financing is provided by special assessments levied against the benefiting property owners. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 3o8 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 285 Fire Technology Fee Fund - Established to set aside funds for technology equipment replacement. 288 Fire Protection Capital Fund - Established to account for capital maintenance and repairs as well as purchases of fixed assets for the Fire District separate from the Fire District's Fire Fund which accounts for general maintenance and repairs. 290 Library Fund - Established to account for services provided by the City of Rancho Cucamonga Library. Funding for this service is made possible through a transfer of San Bernardino County library tax revenues to the City of Rancho Cucamonga for library purposes. 291 CA State Library - This "Family Place" training grant from the California State Library provided funding for two Library staff to attend a one -week training that will enable them to develop special programs at the Biane Library and the Family Resource Center. This grant has no matching requirements. 292 Staff Innovation Fd (CA St Lb) - Established to account for the grant money awarded by California State Library. The purpose of the grant is to provide training for innovative writing skills for future grant writers. 299 Library Development Fund - Established to account for activities taking place in the newly developed second floor of the Biane Library, which is currently under construction. The second floor will serve as a dramatic programming space for the entire community, with a wide variety of programming geared toward science, art and early literacy. 301 The Big Read Library Grant - Established to account for the grant money receiving from the National Endowment for the Arts. The purpose of the grant is to emphasize a city wide media campaign through guest lectures, group discussions, film showings, and a community theater performance of a designated book. 302 Library Services & Tech. Act - Established to account for grant revenues and expenditures associated with funding provided by the federal Library Services and Technology Act, which is administered in California by the State Librarian. 329 Library Capital Fund - Established as the capital fund for the construction of the Biane Library second floor tenant improvement project. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 309 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 354 COPS Program Grant -State - Established to account for a grant awarded as the result of the approval of State Assembly Bill 3229. The grant is a one-year award with no matching fund requirements. 361 Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) - Established to account for the revenues and expenditures associated with Federal JAG grants. 370 OTS-"Drink, Drive, Lose" Grant - This grant was awarded by the State of California Office of Traffic Safety to provide supplementary funding for overtime costs incurred during sobriety checkpoints. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the number of victims killed and injured as a result of alcohol -involved crashes. 373 COPS Secure Our Schools Grant Fund — Established to account for the grant money use in partnership with public schools to improve school safety. 374 Cops Hiring Program Grant - This is a multi -year grant awarded by U.S. Department of Justice to provide partial supplementary funding to hire a new sworn officer. The grant must be used to enhance community policing activities. 380 Homeland Security Grant- Fire - This grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program is administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training cost funding for national security. There are no matching ftmds required for this grant. 381 Homeland Security Grant- Police - The grant from the State Homeland Security Grant Program administered by the San Bernardino County Office of Emergency Services. The grant is funded by the Federal Department of Homeland Security. The funds will be utilized to purchase terrorism and weapons of mass destruction (WMD's) response equipment and supplies in conjunction with an appropriate level of training costs ftmding for national security. There are no matching funds required for this grant. 383 Emergency Management Performance Grant - This grant from FEMA is used to fund a volunteer coordinator for the City's Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) program. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 310 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 396 Housing Successor Agency - Established to account for assets of the former Redevelopment Agency's Low and Moderate Income Housing Fund. The source of revenue in the fund is primarily from interest received from the notes and loans receivable. 838 AD 91-2 Redemption -Day Canyon - Established to account for assessments received under the Improvement Bond Act of 1915. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. 847 PD 85 Capital Replacement Fund - Established to account for resources designated for capital repairs and replacement for PD 85. 848 PD 85 Redemption Fund - Established to account for assessments received under the Refunding Act of 1984 for 1915 Improvement Act Bonds and Landscape/Lighting Act of 1972. Assessments received are restricted for payment of principal, interest and penalties thereon, upon presentation of proper coupons. 868 CFD 2000-03 Park Maintenance - This fund is used for the maintenance of parks and parkways located within the Community Facilities District No. 2000-03. The District is located south of Summit Avenue on the east and west sides of Wardman Bullock Road. CAPITAL PROJECTS Capital Projects Funds are used to account for financial resources for the acquision or construction of major capital facilities other than those financed by proprietary and trust fu n ds. 602 AD 84-1 Day Creek/Mello - Established to account for the receipt and disbursement of funds used in the construction and installation of public capital drainage facilities, together with appurtenant work and incidental expenses, to serve and provide drainage protection to property located within Assessment District No. 84-1 (Day Creek Drainage System). Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 311 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description 612 CFD 2001-01 - This CFD was established to fund the necessary infrastructure (streets, storm drains, sewer, water, landscaping, and traffic signals) integral to the proposed mall located at Foothill Blvd. and the 1-15 Freeway. The improvements are located south of Base Line Rd., primarily north of Foothill Blvd., primarily east of Day Creek Channel, and west of Etiwanda Ave. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 615 CFD 2003-01 Cultural Center - Established to account for the portion of the costs associated with the development of the City's Cultural Arts Center that is being funded by Community Facilities District (CFD) 2003-01. Financing for the CFD will be provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 617 CFD 2004-01 Rancho Etiwanda Es - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to the proposed public financing district. Financing was provided by the sale of bonds under the Mello -Roos Community Facilities Act of 1982. 680 CFD 2006-01 Vintner's Grove - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. 681 CFD 2006-02 Amador On Route 66 - Established to account for monies deposited by developers for initial consulting and administrative costs and expenses related to a proposed public financing district. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 312 CITY OF RANCHO CUCAMONGA, CALIFORNIA Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Description of Funds by Fund Type Fund # Fund Description ENTERPRISE FUNDS Enterprise Funds are used primarily to account for "business -like " activities that are primarilyfinanced through user charges 700 Sports Complex - Established to account for personnel and operating costs directly associated with the operation of the baseball facility, which is the home of the Rancho Cucamonga Quakes. 702 REGIS Connect - Established to account for costs associated with the development of the Rancho Cucamonga Enterprise GIS Connect Program which provides services to the City and agency partners that are in need of their expertise. 705 Municipal Utility - Established to account for the costs of labor and materials used in the operation, maintenance, construction and consumption of electric services to certain major commercial/industrial developments within the City. 706 Utility Public Benefit Fund - Established to account for 2.85% of electric retail revenues to fund qualifying energy efficiency and renewable energy programs, research and demonstration projects and services to low income electricity customers. INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Internal servicefunds are used to accountfor thefinancing of goods or services provided by one department or agency to other departments or agencies of the government and to other government units, on a cost reimbursement basis. 712 EquipNehicle Replacement - Established to account for the accumulation of user charges to various City departments and the costs associated with replacing the City's vehicles and equipment. 714 Comp Equip/Tech Replcment Fund - Established to account for the accumulation of resources and the costs associated with replacing the City's data processing equipment and maintaining current technology. Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 313 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK Fiscal Year 2017/18 Adopted Budget Page 314